Page 1

the dar tboar d for witches


rosalind wyatt

elaine wilson

sue stone

lynn setterington

silja puranen

naori priestley

clyde olliver

tabitha kyoko moses

jane mckeating

becky knight

shizuko kimura

natasha kerr

mary lloyd jones

doug jones

rosie james

caren garfen

laura ford

the dar tboar d for witches

Fabric and stitch have strong connotations; textile is our second skin for much of the day, and consciously or not we all have an intimate knowledge of it - how it folds, how it feels. Textile arts have traditionally been associated with women’s work, and with a lower order of making: with clothing, utility, with decoration and applied arts, with commerce and tea towels and everyday chores. It has in the past been a struggle to see fabric as a serious medium for artworks. However, artists have increasingly cut textiles loose from the limitations of domestic and decorative use, wonderful as these are, to explore the medium’s wider possibilities; crossing the divide from utility to art. The artists in The Dartboard for Witches use the medium in varying ways; sometimes consciously addressing or including its history and background, at other times focusing on the techniques and physical qualities of the medium itself. There has been a move away from a perceived need for a joint social message through textile art, as was seen some thirty years ago. The artists’ approach is broader, emphasising personal experience and enquiry; art engaged as a process rather than a means to an end. The works in the exhibition have been selected to have a focus on the human figure or its intimate objects, and with this parameter the artists have addressed both intimate and global concerns. The title of the exhibition is taken from Sylvia Plath’s ‘Witch Burning’. Textile arts’ long associations with domestic use and female creation have positioned them in a limbo territory somewhere between fine and applied art; this poem combines domestic references with the idea of life at the margins.Operating in a liminal area is something many of the artists here are comfortable with, freely using combinations of media, criss- crossing borderlands of categorization. History shows that definitions of gender differences and definitions of art are not fixed; they have shifted over years, and will do so again. The seemingly impossible is achievable; boundaries are illusory. Surely textile materials and techniques can now be free of claims from gender and utility; certainly, no one is surprised to see textile artwork alongside, say, painting in an exhibition. Yet just as we can say that feminism has surely made the case in society, so we are still in a position of 80:20 gender imbalance in parliament; change occurs but not always in a straight line. In textile arts, the rich connotations of the medium and its history persist. Several of the artists in this exhibition squarely confront this history and incorporate references to the past of textile arts in their works, or appropriate historical references for their own distinct ends. Caren Garfen’s work engages with the story of women’s handwork in the home, where feminine stitch signified a well bred and socially advantaged environment. The evidence of her time spent on embroidering or hand sewing has changed in its significance; careful stitches are transformed from a signifier of submission and routine labour to a political statement. The home and the house are potent symbols, often representing an idealised dream. Lynn Setterington uses the humble pin cushion form to create celebrations and mementos of her childhood home, including the potent image of the ‘every-house’. While these are intimate personal objects they are also conceptually clear, making direct reference to textile history. Jane McKeating creates a narrative choosing a simple rag book format - a very familiar form but not one often seen in a gallery context - creating sophisticated images celebrating her daughter’s childhood alongside a diary format in stitch of the artist’s everyday life. Becky Knight works with the quilt form, which is much loved and redolent of comfort and security; reinventing it with thoughtfully combined found and recycled materials. The results are strikingly beautiful despite the unconventional materials, and while still recognisably of the traditional quilt genre there is a serious engagement with social and personal issues. Clyde Olliver responded to the feminist history he was taught on his College course by making works which combined his lifelong love of stitching with materials he associated with his male role models: stone and slate. The works included in this exhibition show his experimental ways of working with stitch and comment on the paucity of men using textile techniques. Naori Priestley uses traditional hand skills such as knitting, embroidery and felting alongside digital technology to make narrative works rooted in a domestic but faintly sinister fairy tale reality. She draws on a rich fund of shared stories and tactile experiences to manipulate the viewer’s reaction. Natasha Kerr too tells stories in her artworks, drawing on the


past but pushing on a step further to create characters from an alternative history; building another reality around old found images. After all if history is, as Voltaire commented, just ‘accepted fiction’ - who decides what is not true? Doug Jones has constructed another parallel reality. His work reveals the ideas of the clandestine organisation the Brotherhood of Saints. Their intricately embroidered and detailed robes, inspired by the artist’s fascination with the clergy and Freemasonry, act as a public display; simultaneously clothing the figures and laying bare their intentions. The myth making of the narratives these artists have constructed is a distillation of many truths and observations. Clothing performs important social and practical roles and is central to people’s external identity - just as Jones’ Brotherhood signal their unity through their robes. Elaine Wilson’s images explore the territory of erotic concealment and social restriction; confusion arises at the connotations of the veiled yet ‘wrongly’ gendered face. Rosalind Wyatt’s works fuse old garments with stories of the wearer’s life, creating a series in which she explores her family’s illustrious past. Painstakingly reproducing fragments from letters and journals in stitch and incorporating personal mementos or locks of hair, Wyatt offers each of the altered garments as an intimate celebration of a life -an imaginatively altered recollection of the clothing, words, attitudes which shaped these past achievements; a love letter to the past. Tabitha Moses reclaims unwanted objects and undervalued hand skills. She brings together buttons, dolls, old dresses - items cherished by many in a half embarrassed way - and uses them alongside items such as old parchment or bones in conceptual works which reflect on events from cultural and social history, displayed as though in a museum. The works include the disturbing ‘Hairpurse’ in which one is drawn to the skill of construction at the same time as feeling either thrilled or repulsed by the materials. Silja Puranen, too, reclaims the old, working with digitally manipulated photographs onto found domestic textiles such as carpets. Her works fuse this decorative art with individual expression, conveying an intimate and often discomfiting narrative. In her works she engages with different issues including the pressure of global influences and the standardisation of culture in her native Finland. The combination of hand embroidery with digital imagery which she uses echoes this encounter between traditional and global culture. Laura Ford’s sculpture is a creature of an alternative reality, an ambivalent being combining signs of sweet youth with intimations of dread; many of Ford’s works combine playful qualities alongside the macabre. The artist juxtaposes materials with ease in her sculptures, mixing fabric with cast metal with found objects, making unexpected connections between the media and in the viewer’s mind. Her work is unsettling, due in part to the combinations of materials which release unexpected knowledge: the heavy plaster cloud which should float upwards; the immovable puddle; the appealing childish figure with its face obscured. Some artists in The Dartboard for Witches combine visual forms and techniques freely, others use stitch and textile techniques in a fine art form. Shizuko Kimura’s works demonstrate the subtlety and variety of expression possible using stitch. Drawn in thread directly onto fabric, this is art as process; the masterly control of the medium provides the aesthetic foundation of her intimate and tender works. Sue Stone also uses stitch to draw, creating figurative compositions which combine her strong draughtsmanship with fine technique. She uses hand and machine sewing to create domestic and personal narratives based on the life around her, focusing on the individual and eccentric detail. Stitch is central in Rosie James’ works, where the fine line of machine sewing delineates crowds of people, sometimes incorporating collage or screen printing. The sewing process is primary, with end threads left visible across the surface, and the works combine acute observation with abstract ‘painterly’ qualities. Mary Lloyd Jones is a painter who has lately returned to an earlier way of working on unstretched cloth. She handles the dyes as paints so they saturate the fabric, the colours merging and pooling; her subject matter is usually the landscape of her homeland. The works selected here show the human figure in relation to the land, seen through the prism of myth and reduced to a suitably subsidiary role. Textiles summon up not just the everday needs of warmth and shelter but also decoration and social display. Moving away from utilitarian requirements, the medium along with all of its complex connotations can be appropriated by artists such as those exhibiting here - some of whom use traditional techniques, some whose work is best labelled conceptual, others who focus on intimate personal expression. How such work is read is affected by different factors - cultural expressions are made and interpreted by a mixture of influences both historical and contemporary. But the lingering ‘outsider’ nature of textile techniques in art offers a liberation and a potential springboard to complex expression. Eve Ropek June 2010


rosalind wyatt

elaine wilson

sue stone

lynn setterington

silja puranen

naori priestley

clyde olliver

tabitha kyoko moses

jane mckeating

becky knight

shizuko kimura

natasha kerr

mary lloyd jones

doug jones

rosie james

caren garfen

laura ford

the dar tboar d for witches

Mae gan ffabrig a phwythau gysylltiadau cryf; tecstil yw ein hail groen am y rhan fwyaf o’r diwrnod, felly yn ymwybodol neu beidio, ‘rydym i gyd yn gyfarwydd iawn ag ef - sut mae’n plygu, sut mae’n teimlo. Cysylltwyd y celfyddydau tecstiliau yn draddodiadol gyda gwaith menywod, a gyda graddfa is o wneuthur: gyda dillad, defnyddioldeb, gydag addurno a’r celfyddydau cymhwysol, gyda masnach a llieiniau sychu a thasgiau bob dydd. Yn y gorffennol bu’n anodd i weld tecstiliau fel cyfrwng addas ar gyfer gwaith celf. Fodd bynnag yn raddol mae tecstiliau wedi cael eu rhyddhau gan artistiaid rhag gyfyngderau eu defnydd domestig ac addurniadol, er na ddylid diystyru’r rhain, er mwyn archwilio posibiliadau ehangach y deunydd; yn croesi’r llinell rhwng defnyddioldeb a chelf. Yma mae’r artistiaid yn defnyddio’r cyfrwng mewn nifer o wahanol ffyrdd; weithiau’n cyfeirio at neu’n cynnwys yn ymwybodol ei hanes a’i gefndir, tro arall yn ffocysu ar dechnegau a nodweddion corfforol y cyfrwng ei hun. Detholwyd y darnau i gael ffocws ar y ffigwr dynol a’i wrthrychau personol ac o fewn y paramedr hwn mae’r artistiaid yn ymdrin â materion personol a byd-eang. Symudwyd i ffwrdd oddi wrth yr angen am neges gymdeithasol ar y cyd trwy gelf decstiliau a welwyd tua deng mlynedd ar hugain yn ôl; mae agwedd yr artistiaid yn ehangach, yn pwysleisio profiad ac ymholiad personol. Celf fel proses yn hytrach na modd i gyflawni rhywbeth. Cymerwyd teitl yr arddangosfa o waith Sylvia Plath sef Witch Burning. Mae cysylltiadau traddodiadol tecstiliau gyda defnydd domestig a gwneuthuriad gan fenywod wedi eu gosod mewn maes rhywle rhwng y celfyddydau cain a’r celfyddydau cymhwysol; mae’r darn hwn o farddoniaeth yn cyfuno cyfeiriadau domestig gyda’r syniad o fywyd ar yr ymylon. Mae’r syniad o weithredu ar yr ymyl yn rhywbeth y mae llawer o’r artistiaid yma yn gyfforddus ag ef, gan ddefnyddio cyfuniadau o gyfryngau, yn cris-groesi gororau categoreiddio. Mae hanes yn dangos nad yw diffiniadau gwahanol genedl a diffiniadau celf yn sefydlog; maent wedi symud ar hyd y blynyddoedd, a byddant yn symud eto. Gellir cyflawni’r hyn a ymddengys yn amhosibl; nid yw’r ffiniau’n real. Yn sicr gall deunyddiau a thechnegau tecstil fod yn rhydd bellach rhag hawliau cenedl a defnyddioldeb; yn bendant nid yw’n syndod i weld gwaith celf tecstil ochr yn ochr â phaentio er enghraifft mewn arddangosfa. Ac eto jyst fel y gallwn ddweud bod ffeministiaeth yn sicr wedi gwneud ei marc ar gymdeithas, eto ‘rydym dal mewn sefyllfa lle y gwelir anghytbwysedd o 80:20 rhwng dynion a merched yn y senedd; mae newid yn digwydd ond dim bob tro mewn llinell syth. Yn y celfyddydau tecstiliau, mae cysylltiadau cyfoethog y cwfrwng a’i hanes yn parhau. Mae nifer o’r artistiaid yn yr arddangosfa hon yn wynebu’r hanes hwn ac yn cynnwys cyfeiriadau at hanes y celfyddydau tecstiliau yn eu gwaith, neu gyfeiriadau hanesyddol priodol ar gyfer eu pwrpas penodol eu hunain. Mae gwaith Caren Garfen yn ymwneud â hanes gwaith llaw menywod yn y cartref, lle ‘roedd gwaith pwytho cain yn cynrychioli amgylchedd moesgar a statws mewn cymdeithas. Mae’r dystiolaeth o’r amser a dreulwyd ar frodwaith neu bwytho â’r llaw wedi newid yn ei harwyddocâd; trawsffurfir pwythi gofalus o fod yn arwydd o ymostwng a llafur bob dydd i fod yn ddatganiad gwleidyddol. Mae’r cartref a’r ty yn symbolau cryf, yn aml yn cynrychioli breuddwyd ddelfrydoledig. Mae Lynn Setterington yn defnyddio ffurf y glustog binnau ddiymhongar i greu dathliadau a chofarwyddion o gartref ei phlentyndod, gan gynnwys y ddelwedd gref o ‘bob-ty’. Tra bod y rhain yn eitemau dirgel, personol maent hefyd yn glir yn gysyniol, gan gyfeirio’n uniongyrchol at hanes tecstiliau. Mae Jane McKeating yn creu naratif trwy ddewis fformat llyfr carpiau syml - ffurf sy’n gyfarwydd iawn ond nid un a welir yn aml mewn oriel. Mae Becky Knight yn gweithio gyda ffurf y cwilt, sy’n gysylltiedig â chysur a diogelwch; mae hi’n ei ail-ddyfeisio’n feddylgar trwy ddefnyddio deunyddiau sydd wedi eu hail-gylchu. Mae’r canlyniadau yn wirioneddol hyfryd er gwaetha’r deunyddiau anghonfensiynol, ac er y gellir adnabod y genre cwilt traddodiadol yn ei gwaith, ceir pwyslais ar faterion cymdeithasol a phersonol. Bu Clyde Olliver yn ymateb i’r hanes ffeminist a ddysgodd ar ei gwrs Coleg trwy greu gwaith sy’n cyfuno ei hoffter o bwytho gyda deunyddiau sy’n gysylltiedig â’i fodelau rôl gwrywaidd: carreg a llechen. Mae’r gwaith a gynhwysir yn yr arddangosfa hon yn dangos ei ffyrdd arbrofol o weithio gyda phwytho ac yn cyfeirio at y prinder ddynion sy’n defnyddio technegau tecstil. Mae Naori Priestley yn defnyddio sgiliau llaw traddodiadol megis gweu, brodwaith a gwaith ffelt ochr yn ochr â thechnoleg ddigidol i greu darnau naratif sydd â’u gwreiddiau mewn rhyw realiti tylwyth teg domestig sy’n tueddu at y sinistr. Mae hi’n tynnu ar gronfa gyfoethog o straeon a phrofiadau a ranwyd er mwyn dylanwadu


ar ymateb y gwyliwr. Mae Natasha Kerr hefyd yn adrodd straeon yn ei gwaith celf, yn tynnu ar y gorffennol ond yn gyrru ymlaen cam ymhellach i greu cymeriadau oddi wrth hanes amgen; yn adeiladu realiti arall o gwmpas hen ddelweddau sefydlog. Wedi’r cyfan os yw hanes, fel y sylwodd Voltaire, yn ‘ffuglen a dderbynnir’ - pwy sydd i ddweud beth sy’n wir neu beidio? Mae Doug Jones hefyd wedi creu hanes amgen. Mae ei waith yn datgelu syniadau’r mudiad dirgel sef Brawdoliaeth y Saint. Mae eu gwisgoedd o frodwaith manwl a chywrain, a ysbrydolir gan ddiddordeb yr artist yn y glerigaeth a’r Saeryddiaeth Rydd, yn gweithredu fel arddangosfa gyhoeddus; ar yr un pryd yn gwisgo’r ffigyrau tra’n dinoethi eu bwriadau. Mae’r creu mythau a welir yng ngwaith Kerr a Jones yn ddistylliant o wahanol wirioneddau a sylwadau. Mae dillad yn perfformio rolau cymdeithasol ac ymarferol pwysig ac maent yn allweddol o safbwynt hunaniaeth allanol y person - er enghraifft mae Brawdoliaeth Jones yn dangos eu hundod trwy eu gwisgoedd. Mae delweddau Elaine Wilson yn archwilio’r syniad o guddiad erotig a chyfyngiad cymdeithasol; creuir dryswch yn sgil goblygiadau’r wyneb cuddiedig sydd o’r genedl anghywir. Mae’r gwaith o eiddo Rosalind Wyatt a ddangosir yma yn cyfuno hen ddillad gyda straeon am fywydau’r sawl oedd yn eu gwisgo, yn creu cyfres sy’n archwilio gorffennol disglair ei theulu trwy briodas. Gan ail-gynhyrchu’n fanwl darnau bach allan o lythyrau a dyddiaduron mewn gwaith pwytho ac yn cynnwys eitemau personol neu gudyn o wallt, mae Wyatt yn cynnig pob un dilledyn fel dathliad personol o fywyd - casgliad wedi’i addasu’n greadigol, o’r dillad, geiriau, agweddau a ddylanwadodd ar y cyflawniadau a fu; llythyr serch i’r gorffennol. Mae Tabitha Moses yn ail-hawlio eitemau nad oes eu heisiau a sgiliau llaw nad ydynt yn cael eu gwerthfawrogi. Mae’n hel at ei gilydd botymau, doliau, hen ffrogiau - eitemau oedd yn annwyl gan rywun rywdro mewn ffordd hanner embaras - ac yn eu defnyddio ochr yn ochr ag eitemau megis hen femrwn neu esgyrn mewn gweithiau cysyniadol sy’n myfyrio ar ddigwyddiadau mewn hanes diwylliannol a chymdeithasol, wedi eu harddangos fel pe baent mewn amgueddfa. Mae’r darnau a arddangosir yma yn cynnwys yr Hairpurse anghysurus lle mae un yn edmygu sgil yr adeiladwaith tra ar yr un pryd yn teimlo unai cyffro neu ffieidddod tuag at y deunyddiau. Mae Silja Puranen hefyd yn ail-hawlio’r hen; mae hi’n gosod ffotograffau a addasir yn ddigidol ar decstiliau domestig cyfarwydd megis carpedi. Mae ei gwaith yn uno’r gelf addurniadol hon gyda mynegiant unigol, yn cyflwyno naratif personol ac weithiau’n chwithig sy’n cyfeirio at natur dwyllodrus yr hyn a welir. Mae cerfluniaeth Laura Ford yn cynrychioli realiti amgen, rhyw enaid amwys sy’n cyfuno arwyddion o ieuenctid melys gydag awgrymiadau o arswyd; mae llawer o weithiau Ford yn cyflwyno elfennau chwareus ochr yn ochr â’r macâbr. Mae’r artist yn cyfosod deunyddiau’n ddi-ymdrech yn ei cherfluniau, yn cymysgu ffabrig gyda metelau cast a deunyddiau eraill, gan wneud cysylltiadau annisgwyl rhwng y gwahanol gyfryngau ym meddwl y gwyliwr. Mae ei gwaith yn anghysurus, oherwydd yn rhannol y cyfuniadau o ddeunyddiau sy’n rhyddhau gwybodaeth annisgwyl: y cwmwl plastr trwm a ddylai codi i fyny; y pwll na ellid ei symud; y ffigwr deniadol plentynnaidd gyda’i wyneb wedi’i orchuddio. Mae rhai o’r artistiaid yn cyfuno ffurfiau a thechnegau gweledol yn rhydd, mae rhai eraill yn defnyddio technegau pwytho a thecstil ar ffurf celf gain. Mae darnau Shizuko Kimura yn dangos y cynildeb a’r amrywiaeth o fynegiant sy’n bosibl trwy ddefnyddio pwytho. Gan osod edau’n uniongyrchol ar y ffabrig, dyma gelf fel proses; mae rheolaeth feistrolgar y cyfrwng yn darparu’r sail aesthetig ar gyfer ei gwaith cynnil a thyner. Mae Sue Stone hefyd yn defnyddio pwythau i arlunio, gan greu cyfansoddiadau ffiguraidd sy’n cyfuno ei lluniadu cryf gyda thechneg gain. Mae hi’n defnyddio pwytho gyda’r llaw a pheiriant i greu naratif domestig a phersonol yn seiliedig ar y bywyd o’i chwmpas, yn ffocysu ar y manylder unigol ac ecsentrig. Mae pwytho’n ganolog yng ngwaith Rosie James, lle mae llinell gain y pwytho gyda pheiriant yn portreadu torfeydd o bobl, weithiau’n cynnwys collage neu argraffu sgrîn. Mae’r proses pwytho yn ganolog, gyda phennau’r edau’n weledig ar yr wyneb, ac mae’r gwaith yn cyfuno sylwadau manwl gyda nodweddion ‘paentiadol’ haniaethol. Mae Mary Lloyd Jones yn baentwraig sydd wedi dychwelyd yn ddiweddar at ddull cynharach o weithio ar frethyn anestynedig. Mae’n trin y lliwiau fel paent fel eu bod yn suddo i fewn i’r ffabrig, yn uno â’i gilydd; gwrthrych ei gwaith fel rheol yw tirwedd ei mamwlad. Mae’r darnau a gynhwysir yn yr arddangosfa hon yn dangos y ffigwr dynol mewn cysylliad â’r tir, yn cael ei weld trwy brism chwedl ac yn cael ei leihau i rôl ategol priodol. Mae tecstiliau’n galw i’r cof nid yn unig cynhesrwydd a chysgod ond hefyd addurniad ac arddangos cymdeithasol. Yn symud i ffwrdd oddi wrth ofynion ymarferol, mae’r cyfrwng, ynghyd â’i oblygiadau cymhleth, yn addas i gael ei ddefnyddio gan artistiaid megis y sawl sy’n arddangos yma - rhai’n defnyddio technegau traddodiadol, rhai’n creu gwaith cysyniadol ac eraill yn ffocysu ar fynegiant personol. Effeithir ar sut mae gwaith o’r math yn cael ei dderbyn gan wahanol ffactorau - mae mynegiant diwylliannol yn cael ei wneud a’i ddehongli gan gymysgedd o ddylanwadau hanesyddol a chyfoes. Ond mae natur anghyffredin technegau tecstil mewn celf yn cynnig rhyddhad, a modd i fynegi teimladau cymhleth. Eve Ropek Mehefin 2010


Laura Ford Local Weather 2 is characteristic of the conflict throughout Ford’s oeuvre, where playfulness is cut through with undertones of the macabre. Clad in a cape and Wellington boots, the little girl stands in a puddle, in the midst of an innocent childhood game. With her head in the clouds - both figuratively and physically - she hovers dreamily in her own thoughts; full of lofty aspirations and free from the pressure of knowledge and responsibility that plagues the adult mind. Yet in a more menacing fashion, the little girl is also physically absent from us; her face and thought process masked by the plaster which weighs heavy on her little shoulders.

Mae Local Weather 2 yn nodweddiadol o’r gwrthdaro sy’n bresennol yn gyson yng ngwaith Ford, lle ceir y macâbr yn torri ar draws elfennau chwareus. Wedi’i gwisgo mewn clogyn ac esgidiau ^ glaw, mae’r ferch fach yn sefyll mewn pwll o ddwr, ar ganol rhyw gêm ddiniwed blentyndod. Gyda’i phen yn y cymylau - yn ffigurol ac yn gorfforol mae’n hofran yn freuddwydiol yn ei meddyliau ei hun; yn llawn uchelgais ac heb bwysau’r wybodaeth a’r cyfrifoldeb sy’n poeni meddwl yr oedolyn. Ond mewn modd mwy bygythiol, mae’r ferch fach hefyd yn absennol oddi wrthym yn gorfforol; ei hwyneb a’i phroses meddwl yn cael eu masgio gan y plastr sy’n pwyso’n drwm ar ei hysgwyddau bach.

Local Weather 2 2009; courtesy Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London. Herculite plaster, fibreglass, steel, rubber, fabric


Caren Garfen Caren Garfen’s interest lies in issues affecting women’s lives; hand drawn images are screenprinted onto fabric and hand stitched imagery is added. Stand Up & Be Counted, It’s A Cover Up and How Cosy show kitchen textiles incorporating pictures and text researched from advertising. The tea cosy for example refers to a recent survey on fathers who find it stressful to cope with household chores. Amongst the cleaning products depicted is a lipstick, representing the woman who uses the products on a daily basis. On the reverse is a hand stitched quote from the survey and the ‘unseen’ woman doing the cleaning has been silkscreen printed onto the art piece; she cleans away the hand stitched flowers.

It’s a Cover Up’, ‘How cosy’ 2008 ; silkscreen printed and hand stitched

Mae Caren Garfen yn ymddiddori mewn materion sy’n effeithio ar fywydau menywod; argreffir delweddau sydd wedi eu harlunio â’r llaw ar ffabrig ac ychwanegir ffurfiau sydd wedi eu pwytho â’r llaw. Mae Stand up & Be Counted yn dangos tecstiliau cegin yn cynnwys lluniau a thestun a archwilwyd ym maes hysbysebu. Mae’r gorchudd wy er enghraifft yn cyfeirio at arolwg yn 2008 ar dadau sy’n ei ffeindio’n anodd i ymdopi â thasgau ^ Ymysg yr eitemau glanhau a bortreadir yn y t y. gwelir lipstic, yn cynrychioli’r ddynes sy’n defnyddio’r eitemau bob dydd. Ar y cefn gwelir dyfyniad o’r arolwg wedi’i bwytho â llaw ac mae’r ddynes ‘anweledig’ sy’n gwneud y glanhau wedi’i hargraffu ar y darn celf; mae hi’n clirio o’r neilltu y blodau sydd wedi eu pwytho.


Rosie James “My work involves using the sewing machine as a tool for drawing. I am particularly interested in drawing crowds and looking at the individual within the crowd; I use transparent cloth to stitch on so that I can layer the figures and put them back in a crowd. I am interested in the contrast between marks made with a screen and those made with stitch and so like to put the two together. I am just developing the idea of making the figures move and hope to take this further into layering and creating a moving crowd.”

Olympia Tourists 2008 machine stitched & screen printed

“Rwy’n defnyddio’r peiriant gwnio fel offeryn ar gyfer arlunio. ‘Rwy’n ymddiddori yn arbennig mewn arlunio torfeydd ac mewn edrych ar yr unigolyn o fewn y dorf. ‘Rwy’n defnyddio brethyn tryloyw i bwytho arno fel y gallaf osod y ffigyrau mewn haenau a’u rhoi yn ôl yn y dorf. ‘Rwy’n ymddiddori yn y cyferbyniad rhwng marciau a wneir gyda sgrîn a’r rhai a wneir gyda phwythau ac felly ‘rwy’n hoffi rhoi’r ddau at ei gilydd. Ar hyn o bryd ‘rwy’n datblygu’r syniad o wneud i’r ffigyrau symud a gobeithiaf gymryd hyn ymhellach i mewn i haenu a chreu torf symudol.”


Doug Jones

Inservi Deo et Laetare (Serve God and be Cheerful)

As a former chorister of Lichfield Cathedral, Jones grew up amidst Anglican clergy resplendent in elaborate garments painstakingly stitched by some of the best tailors in the land. A child from a long family line of Freemasons, he was fascinated by the secret aprons his father kept in a box in the study. Titled after Jones’ old school motto, this work introduces the remarkable lives and philosophies of ‘The Brotherhood of Saints’ (BHS), established in 1573 by Zadok Nathan Solomon Jones. Jones playfully reveals the Brotherhood’s intensely secret Bosch-like practices, exhibited through their intricately embroidered robes, mitres, stoles and banners.

Fel cyn-aelod o gôr Eglwys Gadeiriol Lichfield magwyd Jones ymysg y glerigaeth Anglicanaidd, yn ysblennydd yn eu gwisgoedd hyfryd a bwythwyd gan rai o deilwriaid gorau’r wlad.Fel plentyn o dras hir o Seiri Rhyddion, ‘roedd wedi’i gyfareddu gan y ffedogau dirgel a gadwyd gan ei dad mewn blwch yn y stydi. Yn cymryd ei deitl oddi wrth hen arwyddair ysgol Jones, mae’r darn hwn yn cyflwyno bywydau ac athroniaethau rhyfeddol Brawdoliaeth y Saint (BHS), a sefydlwyd ym 1573 gan Zadok Nathan Solomon Jones. Yn hynod gyfrinachgar, gyda rheolau ac athroniaethau cymhleth, mae Jones yn datgelu mewn modd chwareus ymarferion tebyg i ‘Bosch’ y Brawdoliaeth, a arddangosir trwy frodwaith cywrain eu gwisgoedd, meitrau, stolau a baneri.

Inservi Deo et Laetare (Serve God and be Cheerful) 2009 courtesy Ceri Hand Gallery


Mary Lloyd Jones “Living in rural Wales the landscape is the natural theme of my work. To avoid clichés associated with this tradition I experimented with dyes on cotton, a technique to which I have recently returned. Llyn y Fan focuses on the legend of the lady of the lake in the remote Carmarthenshire hills and her associations with herbal medicine. The Figure in the Landscape refers to prehistoric marks: history lies beneath our feet. I include echoes of prehistory to link people & animals to the experience of landscape and to focus on a timescale which lies beyond immediate experience. Underlying the portrayal of the configurations left by man’s activity over the millennia is my engagement with the damage people have inflicted. Today, climate change is the overriding concern.”

“Gan fy mod yn byw yn y Gymru wledig, y dirwedd yw thema naturiol fy ngwaith. Er mwyn osgoi’r ystrydebau sy’n gysylltiedig â’r traddodiad hwn arbrofais gyda lliwiau ar gotwm, techneg y bum yn dychwelyd ati yn ddiweddar. Mae Llyn y Fan yn ffocysu ar chwedl morwyn y llyn ym mryniau anghysbell Sir Gaerfyrddin a’i chysylltiadau â moddion llysieuol. Mae The Figure in the Landscape yn cyfeirio at farciau cyn-hanesyddol: mae hanes yn gorwedd o dan ein traed. ‘Rwy’n cynnwys adseiniau o gyn-hanes er mwyn cysylltu pobl ac anifeiliaid â’r profiad o dirwedd ac i ffocysu ar raddfa amser sy’n gorwedd y tu hwnt i’n profiad presennol. ‘Rwy’n ceisio portreadu’r olion a adawyd gan ymyrraeth dyn ar y dirwedd dros y blynyddoedd. Heddiw, mae’r newid yn yr hinsawdd yn achos pryder mawr.”


Natasha Kerr Natasha Kerr builds up her images through hand painting, silk screen printing, appliqué and hand stitching, all worked on a linen ground. Her distinctive and highly evocative style developed after the casual gift from her mother of some old family photographs. Assimilating these into her artworks, and later also working with other families’ images and memories, the works appear as haunting repositories for precious memories and histories, echoing the quilt form in the piecing and combinations of techniques. The works included in this exhibition are from a new series called the ‘Ancestors’, in which Kerr takes found photographs as her starting point and creates fictional histories for the anonymous protagonists. Mae Natasha Kerr yn datblygu ei delweddau trwy baentio â’r llaw, printio ar sgrîn sidan, applique a phwytho â’r llaw, y cyfan wedi eu gweithio ar gefndir o liain. Datblygodd ei harddull hynod nodweddiadol a theimladwy ar ôl i’w mam roi anrheg iddi, ar hap, sef nifer o hen ffotograffau teuluol. Gan gynnwys y rhain yn ei gwaith celf, a gan weithio wedyn gyda delweddau ac atgofion teuluol eraill, mae’r darnau’n ymddangos fel mannau i gadw atgofion ac hanesion gwerthfawr, yn adseinio ffurf y cwilt wrth gyfuno gwahanol dechnegau â’i gilydd. Daw’r darnau a gynhwysir yn yr arddangosfa hon o gorff newydd o waith dan y teitl Ancestors, lle mae Kerr yn cymryd ffotograffau anhysbys fel man cychwyn ac yn creu hanesion ffuglennol ar gyfer ei chymeriadau di-enw.

Jonnie Banks 2008


Shizuko Kimura “All my life drawings are made and completed in front of the life model or object. Working under strict time pressure creates a tension between the need to handle the needle and thread and respond dynamically to the subject. The finished work demonstrates the subtlety of the sewn mark and the variety of line, weight and emphasis that can be achieved. It is possible to see the evidence both of a Japanese aesthetic in my work and the influence of Western Fine Artists.” “The work (has) an uncanny quality, quiet yet somehow amazing; the result lies somewhere between the Renaissance and Alexander Calder.” (Ghost on the Aisle)

Untitled 2007 Cotton muslin, silk, cotton, synthetic thread

“Mae fy holl fywluniadau yn cael eu creu a’u cwblhau o flaen y model neu’r gwrthrych. Mae gweithio o dan bwysau amser yn creu tensiwn rhwng yr angen i ddefnyddio’r nodwydd a’r edau ac i ymateb mewn modd deinamig i’r gwrthrych. Mae’r gwaith gorffenedig yn dangos cynildeb y pwytho a’r amrywiaeth o linell, pwysau a phwyslais y gellir ei chyflawni. Yn fy ngwaith gellir gweld tystiolaeth yr esthetydd Siapaneaidd yn ogystal â dylanwad artistiaid cain Gorllewinol.” “The work (has) an uncanny quality, quiet yet somehow amazing; the result lies somewhere between the Renaissance and Alexander Calder.” (Ghost on the Aisle)


Becky Knight “I use traditional quiltmaking techniques to give found and recycled materials new form. My quilts always include a figure in some way: emphasising that they are for real people, touching on universal issues like homelessness or depression. I want people to imagine lying underneath my quilts. The material properties express particular emotions while the scale and authenticity make them both accessible and disconcerting. I am particularly interested in ideas of comfort and suppression - does hiding under the blankets provide security or does it stifle? Using recycled materials is important in different ways. It carries on the quiltmaking tradition of using what is to hand; it is automatically inclusive people are familiar with these materials; the materials have a history and carry layers of memories.”

Intitled quilt 2010 (detail)

“‘Rwy’n defnyddio technegau gwneuthur cwiltiau traddodiadol i roi ffurfiau newydd i ddeunyddiau sydd wedi eu hailgylchu. Mae fy nghwiltiau bob amser yn cynnwys ffigwr ar ryw ffurf: yn pwysleiso eu bod ar gyfer pobl real, ac yn cyfeirio at broblemau byd-eang megis pobl ddigartref neu iselder. ‘Rwyf am i bobl ddychmygu gorwedd o dan un o’m cwiltiau. Mae natur y deunyddiau yn mynegi emosiynau penodol tra bod y maint a’r dilysrwydd yn gwneud y cwiltiau’n gyfarwydd ac eto’n annisgwyl. ‘Rwy’n ymddiddori’n benodol mewn syniadau o gyfforddusrwydd ac ataliad - a yw cuddio o dan y blancedi’n sicrhau diogelwch neu a yw’n mygu? Mae defnyddio deunyddiau sydd wedi eu hailgylchu yn bwysig mewn ffyrdd gwahanol. Mae’n parhau gyda’r traddodiad o ddefnyddio beth sydd wrth law; mae’n naturiol gynhwysol - mae pobl yn gyfarwydd â’r deunyddiau hyn; mae ganddynt hanes ac maent yn cario haenau o atgofion.”


Jane McKeating

While I was gone - A counting book

“Reflecting on the upcoming 18th birthday of one of my daughters, I looked back over drawings I had done of her. They told a story of growth that I wanted to document sequentially, like a child’s counting book; to celebrate the safe arrival at adulthood through the stormy teenage years and to acknowledge the independent life of children. I juxtapose images of my daily train journey to work with stitched drawings illustrating the passage of time; hinting at the mother-daughter relationship. Call me when you’re free explores the way a relationship changes when children become independent, contrasting past and present perhaps reflecting the way a parent will always see a child. These are working ideas for new stories.”

While I was gone - A counting book

“Yn myfyrio ar 18fed benblwydd un o’m merched, edrychais yn ôl dros ddarluniau yr oeddwn wedi gwneud ohoni. ‘Roeddynt yn adrodd stori am dyfiant ac ‘roeddwn yn awyddus i’w chofnodi’n olynol, fel llyfr cyfrif plentyn; i ddathlu goroesi blynyddoedd stormus yr arddegau a chyrraedd oedolaeth ac i gydnabod bywyd annibynnol plant. ‘Rwy’n cyfosod delweddau o’m taith ddyddiol i waith ar y tren gyda darluniau wedi eu pwytho yn cynrychioli amser yn mynd heibio; yn lledawgrymu’r berthynas rhwng mam a merch. Mae Call me when you’re free yn archwilio’r ffordd y mae perthynas yn newid pan mae plant yn dod yn annibynnol, yn cyferbynu’r gorffennol a’r presennol - efallai’n adlewyrchu’r ffordd y bydd y rhiant yn gweld y plentyn bob amser. Mae’r rhain yn syniadau gweithredol ar gyfer straeon newydd.”


Tabitha Kyoko Moses “My practice is an exploration of objects, cloth and clothing as containers and transmitters of human experience. Fabric and stitch are central to my practice - by using the language of textiles I am able to discover rich connections and communicate latent emotions. I am interested in the transformation of discarded or overlooked subjects and materials into objects that speak with beauty and eloquence of human relationships. Contradictions excite me - seduction & revulsion, authenticity & artifice, precious & worthless, comforting & disturbing. The viewer may be seduced by exquisite workmanship only to be repelled when they see the piece is worked in human hair. Thus the abject is transformed and rendered compelling.”

Hairpurse 2004; metal clasp, human hair, fabric

“Yn f’ymarfer ‘rwy’n archwilio eitemau, brethyn a dillad fel pethau sy’n cynnwys ac yn trosglwyddo’r profiad dynol. Mae ffabrig a phwytho yn ganolog i’m hymarfer - trwy ddefnyddio iaith tecstiliau gallaf ddarganfod cysylltiadau cyfoethog a chyfleu emosiynau cuddiedig. ‘Rwy’n ymddiddori mewn trawsffurfio pethau a deunyddiau sydd wedi eu taflu o’r neilltu neu wedi eu hanwybyddu i fewn i eitemau sy’n siarad gyda phrydferthwch ac huodledd am berthnasau dynol. ‘Rwy’n hoffi’r syniad o gyferbyniad - atyniad a ffieidd-dra, dilysrwydd a dyfais, y gwerthfawr a’r diwerth, cysur ac aflonyddwch. Gall y gwyliwr gael ei ddenu gan grefftwaith cywrain, dim ond i deimlo’n anghysurus pan mae’n sylweddoli bod y darn wedi’i ffurfio allan o wallt dynol. Felly mae’r eitem yn cael ei thrawsffurfio i mewn i rywbeth cymhellgar.”


Clyde Olliver “Aggregate II (Figure) is a mosaic of embroidered slate pieces forming a fragmented figure; ‘Aggregate I’ (Shadow) is an experimental large-scale embroidery that shows a man’s shadow cast across the gallery floor. Although it is regarded as women’s medium, British men have a long history of embroidering - particularly in the armed services. This tends to be written out of textile discourse so the presence of this male ‘shadow’ might remind us of the (virtual) absence of men in contemporary textiles; while the inclusion of rusty ironmongery in the work might suggest ‘Iron John’ - the mythical figure in Robert Bly’s book on contemporary masculinities.” “Mae Aggregate II (Figure) yn frithwaith o ddarnau brodiog ar lechen sy’n ffurfio ffigwr tameidiog; Mae Aggregate I (Shadow) yn frodwaith arbrofol ar raddfa fawr sy’n dangos cysgod dyn wedi’i daflu ar draws llawr yr oriel. Er bod brodwaith yn cael ei ystyried i fod yn gyfrwng i fenywod, mae gan ddynion Prydeinig hanes hir o frodio - yn arbennig yn y lluoedd arfog. Ni chynhwysir y ffaith hon ar y cyfan mewn trafodaethau ar decstiliau felly efallai bydd presenoldeb y cysgod gwrywaidd hwn yn ein hatgoffa am absenoldeb dynion (bron) ym maes tecstiliau cyfoes; tra bod cynnwys gwaith haearn rhydlyd yn y darn efallai yn ein hatgoffa am ‘Iron John’ - y ffigwr chwedlonol yn llyfr Robert Bly ar wrywdod cyfoes.”

Aggregate II (figure); embroidered slate pieces mounted on paper


Naori Priestley Naori’s work is illustrative and strongly autobiographical. Her work employs humour to convey the darker, more sinister side of everyday life. Working with textiles, she employs domestic craft skills, such as hand-knitting, crochet, embroidery, appliqué and hand-felt. Her work has a narrative element, inspired by folk tales and nursery rhymes where reality, daydreams and nightmares merge into one surreal world. The appearance of charm and naivety belies the subversive concepts that influence her pieces.

Gerda’s Red Shoes 2007; wool, glass eye

Mae gwaith Naori yn esboniadol ac yn hunangofiannol iawn. Mae ei gwaith yn defnyddio hiwmor i gyfleu’r ochr dywyllach, mwy sinistr o fywyd bob dydd. Gan weithio gyda thecstiliau, mae hi’n defnyddio sgiliau crefft domestig megis gweu, gwaith crosio, brodwaith, appliqué a gwaith ffelt. Mae gan ei gwaith elfen o naratif, wedi’i hysbrydoli gan straeon gwerin ac hwiangerddi, lle mae realiti, breuddwydion ac hunllefau yn toddi i mewn i un byd swreal. Mae’r ymddangosiad o hyfrydwch a diniweidrwydd yn gwrth-ddweud y cysyniadau tanseiliol sy’n dynlanwadu ar ei darnau.


Silja Puranen Silja Puranen operates within the borderlands of textile and visual art. She won the prestigious Nordic Award in Textiles in October 2009 for her distinctive way of perceiving human vulnerability and inadequacy; the jury commented: “Through her power of observation in daily life situations, Silja Puranen asks crucial and unanswerable questions in her works. She processes her carefully chosen textile materials in combinations of old and new expressions and techniques which gives a distinctive ‘Puranenish’ intimacy and unquestionable might to her artistic voice. Her artistry is affiliated with a human warmth that reaches out to us as we ponder over Life and Death - why and where to?”

Mae Silja Puranen yn gweithio o fewn y ffiniau rhwng tecstiliau a chelf weledol. Enillodd y Wobr Nordic fawr ei bri mewn Tecstiliau ym mis Hydref 2009 am ei dull nodweddiadol o bortreadu gwendidau a diffygion dyn; dywedodd y beirniaid: “Trwy sylwi’n fanwl ar sefyllfaoedd bob dydd mae Silja Puranen yn gofyn yn ei gwaith cwestiynau hanfodol nad ellir eu hateb. Mae’n prosesu ei deunyddiau tecstil, a ddewisir yn ofalus, mewn cyfuniadau o fynegiant a thechneg hen a newydd sy’n rhoi rhyw gynildeb a phwer unigryw i’w llais artistig. Mae gan ei gwaith gynhesrwydd dynol sy’n ymestyn allan i ni wrth i ni fyfyrio ar Fywyd a marwolaeth - paham ac i le?”

Siamese twins 2009 Fabric paint, transfer photograph, soft pastel and stitching on found textile


Lynn Setterington “This new body of work is a poignant exploration of loss and identity. It stemmed from the selling of my childhood home and the dispersal of all its contents, a strange and unsettling experience even though it had not been my “home” for many years. Initial ideas began with an examination of the house as depicted in American quilts, a metaphor used by the early European settlers as a way of establishing identity and putting down roots. However in my case the reverse was true. The objects act as a memento-mori to my childhood and former home.”

Mourning quilt (detail)

“Mae’r gwaith newydd hwn yn archwiliad teimladwy o golled ac hunaniaeth. Datblygodd y prosiect yn sgil gwerthu cartref fy mhlentyndod ^ profiad estron ac a gwasgaru holl gynnwys y t y, anghysurus er nad oedd wedi bod yn “gartref” i mi ers blynyddoedd lawer. Dechreuodd y syniadau cyntaf gydag archwiliad o’r t y^ fel y portreadwyd cartrefi mewn cwiltiau Americanaidd, metaffor a ddefnyddiwyd gan yr ymsefydlwyr Ewropeaidd cynnar fel ffordd o sefydlu hunaniaeth a rhoi gwreiddiau i lawr. Fodd bynnag yn f’achos i, mae’r gwrthwyneb yn wir. Mae’r eitemau yn gweithredu fel mementomori o’m plentyndod a’m hen gartref.”


Sue Stone Born in Grimsby, Lincolnshire, Sue Stone studied Fashion at St Martin’s School of Art and Embroidery at Goldsmiths College in the 1970s. Her inspiration is drawn from subjects both past and present, all with some connection to her own life and environment. Using hand and machine stitch as a means of mark making, Sue’s work is mainly figurative, usually narrative and sometimes has a surreal sense of humour. Her work is underpinned by a great belief in drawing - as a thought process, as a means of solving problems, and as a means of expression in its own right.

Woman with Fish 2008; hand and machine stitched textile

Ganed Sue Stone yn Grimsby, swydd Lincoln ac astudiodd Ffasiwn yn Ysgol Gelf a Brodwaith San Martin yng Ngholeg Goldsmith yn y 1970au. Tynnir ei hysbrydoliaeth oddi wrth wrthrychau o’r gorffennol a’r presennol, y cyfan gyda rhyw gysylltiad â’i bywyd a’i hamgylchedd ei hun. Gan ddefnyddio pwytho gyda’r llaw a’r peiriant fel modd o wneud marciau, mae gwaith Sue yn ffiguraidd yn bennaf, gyda naratif fel rheol ac weithiau gyda rhyw hiwmor swreal. Seilir ei gwaith ar ei chred mewn arlunio - fel proses meddwl, fel modd datrys problemau ac fel cyfrwng mynegiant .


Elaine Wilson ‘By Proxy’ photographs “The veil has many connotations in society. It simultaneously conceals and defines while embodying traditional precepts of femininity. Often it determines how we are perceived and importantly how we see ourselves. It is commonly associated with virginity, servility, modesty, purity, demureness. It poses questions around gender roles and relationships, power and autonomy. In the two photographic works ‘By Proxy’ I chose to highlight these associations by depicting a male figure in a full length veil.” Ffotograffau ‘By Proxy’ “Mae gan y fêl lawer o gysylltiadau mewn cymdeithas. Mae hi ar yr un pryd yn cuddio ac yn diffinio tra’n ymgorffori syniadau traddodiadol am fenywod. Yn aml mae’n diffinio sut y mae eraill yn ein gweld ac yn bwysicach, sut yr ydym yn gweld ein hunain. Fe’i cysylltir yn aml gyda gwyryfdod, gwaseidd-dra, diymhongarwch, purdeb, swildod. Mae’n codi cwestiynau am rolau a pherthnasau, pwer ac annibyniaeth. Yn y ddau ddarn ffotograffig ‘By Proxy’ dewisais uchelbwyntio’r perthnasau hyn trwy gyflwyno ffigwr gwrywaidd mewn fêl lawn hyd.”


Rosalind Wyatt The Stitch Lives of Others brings together calligraphy, textile and collage - and real life. This work tells the story of Rosalind Wyatt’s husband’s distinguished family, inspired by a treasure trove of letters, drawings and journals passed down through three generations. Hand written text is meticulously replicated in stitch work on garments original to each generation, using period thread, interspersed with paper artifacts and personal effects, even locks of hair. Stitch becomes the common theme, tracing the words, thoughts and feelings of the players/cast/ protagonists. The handwritten letters become the humane evidence of character and play, the stitch resonating with the sentiment.

The Stitch Lives of Others (part) 2009; hand stitched antique garment

Mae The Stitch Lives of Others yn hel at ei gilydd calligraffi, tecstil a collage - a bywyd real. Mae’r darn hwn yn adrodd stori ddisglair teulu gwr Rosalind Wyatt, wedi’i hysbrydoli gan drysor cudd o lythyrau, darluniau a dyddiaduron a drosglwyddwyd i lawr ar hyd tair cenhedlaeth. Mae testun mewn llaw ysgrifen yn cael ei ailgynhyrchu’n drylwyr mewn gwaith pwytho ar ddillad sy’n perthyn i bob cenhedlaeth, gan ddefnyddio edau o’r cyfnod, ynghyd ag arteffactau papur ac eitemau personol, hyd yn oed cudynnau o wallt. Pwytho yw’r thema gyffredin, yn olreinio geiriau, meddyliau a theimladau’r chwaraewyr/cast/prif gymeriadau. Daw’r llythyrau mewn llaw ysgrifen yn dystiolaeth o’r cymeriad a’r ddrama, y pwyth yn atseinio gyda’r teimlad.


canolfan y celfyddydau aberystwyth arts centre ISBN 978-0-9550874-2-4

www.aberystwythartscentre.co.uk

Design Stephen Paul Dale Design spdale@live.com

Dartboard for Witches  

Exhibition at Aberystwyth Arts Centre between 23 July - 18 September.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you