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2013

FJP

FUTURE JOURNALISTS PROGRAMME

YEARBOOK


Join the conversation on Twitter https://twitter.com/Highway_Africa FJP // 2013


contents 2 7 8 10 11

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Executive Summary Key pilllars Programme Structure Recruitment Participants 2012

Alumni

13 Autumn School 16 Winter School 18 Spring School

FJP 2013: Into the future

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FJP Youth Newsroom at the UNESCO World Press Freedom Day Conference

ICT INDABA Alumnus Testimonial Contacts

FJP // 2012

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Executive Summary

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On a Highway to Africa, we met. It wasn’t a dusty road, dark or dull like the world would believe. Oh no. it was a scenic path paved with opportunity for the young. Somewhere in the journalism plain was an orange baobarb. I heard inbetween the whispering uncertain voices of legacy media succumbing to the winds of change, destiny beckoned all Future Journalists to heed the call into a technological awakening; into a new media age! And through that call, we, Future Journalists were born. And since that day, our fibre optic roots have grown, spread and infiltrated the newsrooms of Africa, applying our skill to report pressing issues of our time.

F

JP was honoured to be invited as partners at the annual UNESCO World Press Freedom Day conference (WPFD), which took place in Tunis, Tunisia, 1-6 May 2012, forming the first ever Youth Newsroom reporting the WPFD conference. The rationale to include young journalist in the UNESCO’s World Press Freedom Day conference was a strategic yet simple one. This conference’s mediation has been deemed a platform only for professional media practitioners, with budding journalists never having had a change The FJP also became the to be actively involved and official newsroom reporting participate meaningfully in the inaugural ICT Indaba 2012 such important global media Conference, which took place engagements. The conference in Cape Town, 3-7 June 2012, therefore served as an inspiring at the Cape Town International gathering to bring young Future Convention Centres (CTICC). Journalists, enabling them The group of four FJPs and to meet their counterparts two coordinators produced from different walks of life. It a daily 8-spread conference also served as means to give newspaper and numerous online the students international content. The last event in the professional experience FJP calendar was the Spring in an environment where School workshop during the 16th perspectives could be shared, Highway Africa Conference, 9-11 and understanding and skill September 2012, which saw the could be uniquely enhanced. 2012 group of student being The youth participants had handed out their certificates. an opportunity to meet and I am happy to mention dialogue with leading journalists that some of the programme’s from all over the world. alumni are already making waves within the media and publishing landscape, with the 2011 FJPs acting as mentors for the current years’ group. As I prepare to leave

FJP // 2012

Highway Africa and the FJP, I am confident that the programme will continue to be a crucial platform for collaborative teaching and learning in the journalism and media industry. My part has been to ensure each intake of students were exposed to a creative programme that addressed issues of our transforming landscape and were equipped with skill and rounded knowledge on pragmatic reporting solutions suited for African information needs. The rest, lies on the student, to utilise opportunities provided to him/her. I remain grateful to our funder, the Open Society Foundation (South Africa) and all our partner institutions for the continued support and faith in the value of this ----programme. Thank you to all Highway Africans for believing. Ashe. Ngiyabonga.


In 2012, dear colleagues, the Future Journalists Programme (FJP) celebrated its sixth year since inauguration and fifth year as a fully fledged training programme! The FJP has become Highway Africa’s pride and joy, as well as that of Rhodes University School of Journalism and Media Studies (JMS). Within five years, the programme has seen 105 youngsters equipped with skill essential for new-age journalism.

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Join the conversation on Facebook

www.facebook.com/fjp.coordinator FJP // 2012

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FJP // 2012


Key pillars

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I n J u ly 20 07 Ope n Soci ety Fou n dation (OSF, www.osf.org. za ) gr ante d H ighway Africa , a progr am m e of Rhodes U n ive rsity, a fi nancial gr ant for th e pu rposes of establishi ng an d mai ntai n i ng a progr am m e that wou ld se e k to achi eve th e followi ng:

Provide a vibrant networking opportunity for journalism students at South African tertiary institutions to engage with one another, meet media profesÂŹsionals and cover key events, festival or conferences.

Provide mentors in the media field for the students.

Provide unique training and learning that will equip the students with media production skills, through experiential learning projects and workshops in a variety of areas such as new media; writing; editing; photojournalism and television

Provide exposure for the students to media professionals and to developÂŹments in the media world.

Provide an opportunity for young people to be attached to news and information media through work observations and internships as well as the opportunity to be published in relevant media.

Goal: To create a nucleus of well trained, mentored and educated black journalism graduates who will go into the journalism profession and contribute meaningÂŹfully to profession and industry. The programme was named Future Journalists Programme (FJP) and has been growing ever since.

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Programme Structure

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FJP is a national programme with a range of partners drawn from tertiary institutions, the media industry, donor community and the not-for-profit sector. The programme operates as a vacation school around the three school vacations, which are Autumn School (March/April), Experiential Learning Winter School (June/July) and Spring School (September). FJP is constituted of two levels; namely level 1 and 2

Leve l 1: This is the entry level of the programme where each year a new group of 2nd year students from various South African journalism and media tertiary institutions participate in the programme. In 2012 there were 20 students from 11 institutions. Level one includes a year-long programme where students have training workshops and receive mentorship from media educators and practitioners; are provided with experiential learning through the attending and covering of an event and given an opportunity to be published in established media. The students work towards building a portfolio of work produced during their year with FJP. The group also attends the annual Highway Africa conference, Highway Africa’s flagship event.

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Leve l 2: This level concentrates on FJP alumni students who have completed level one and focuses on facilitating attachments or internships for the students at various media organisations. Highway Africa also creates opportunities for FJP alumni and Rhodes Students to gain work experience during the annual conference, employing around 100 students each year. FJP alumni continue to write for the FJP blog (www.zajournalist. blogspot.com) and interact with other FJP students. These level 2 students also become junior mentors to the junior level one FJP students in their respective universiÂŹties. We believe this is important not only to keep the network alive but also for the personal development of the level 2 students. The coordinator connects junior mentors to their mentees. Once these students have graduated they automatically become alumni and FJP keeps track of its alumni as they are great resources for the programme.

FJP // 2012

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Recruitment 10

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In 2012, FJP consisted of 20 participants from ten journalism/media studies/communication tertiary institutions in South Africa. We worked closely with the heads of departments and senior lecturers at the various institutions to select deserving candidates to join the programme. The selection criteria are:

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Black second year journalism / communication / media studies students;

Only students who would be able to offer their full commitment and participate in all FJP proÂŹgramme workshops and events for the year;

Students who could make a positive contribution to the programme.

Students who display potential and passion for journalism and an eagerness to learn;

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PARTICIPANTS 2012 FJP had 20 participants and the following students were admitted into FJP 2012:

NO.

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Title Student’s Name

Institution

Year

1

Mr

Thabo Mongoato

Walter Sisulu University

2nd

2

Ms

Nomthandazo Duze

Walter Sisulu University

2nd

3

Mr

Tiragalo Evans Kgowa

University of Limpopo

2nd

4

Ms

Matjorie Rachoene

University of Limpopo

2nd

5

Mr

Tendai Sibanda

University of Fort Hare

2nd

6

Ms

Banathi Sigaji

University of Fort Hare

2nd

7

Mr

Sphelele Ngubane

Durban University of Technology

2nd

8

Mr

Tony Manyangadze

Durban University of Technology

2nd

9

Ms

Nontobeko Oreander Mpaza

University of Zululand

2nd

10

Ms

Zandile Nomvula Pearl Msane

University of Zululand

2nd

11

Ms

Julia Payle

University of Cape Town

2nd

12

Mr

Sakhisizwe Gcina

University of Cape Town

2nd

13

Mr

Sthembiso Sithole

Tshwane University of Technology

2nd

14

Ms

Natasha Phiri

Tshwane University of Technology

2nd

15

Ms

Zithobile Zwane

University of Johannesburg

2nd

16

Ms

Binwe Adebayo

Rhodes University

2nd

17

Ms

Nompumelelo Mncube

Rhodes University

2nd

18

Ms

Asanda Sokanyile

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

1st

19

Mr

Marcel Jermaine Trout

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

1st

20

Ms

Nonjabulo Khuzwayo

University of Kwa-Zulu Natal

3rd

FJP // 2012


AUTUMN SCHOOL 8-14 April 2012

T

he theme for the workshop was Podcasting and Good old Writing. The aim was to teach FJPs how to produce good radio news reports for new media platforms which are also well packaged. Trainers for this school were Sim Kyazze and Lincoln Van Der Westhuizen, Writing and Editing lecturer and Radio Teaching Assistant at Rhodes University respectively. Students learnt and understood the concept of convergence and how to use Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) as reporting aid. They used recorders, mobile phones and podcasting technology to tell the stories and opinions of local Grahamstownians regarding democracy. The fundamentals of journalism, particularly writing, were not forgotten. Sim ensured that the students learnt about the principles of journalism including writing styles, news analysis, interviewing and profiling. The FJP blog was used as practice ground for both journalistic writing and self-expression.

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FJP YOUTH NEWSROOM AT THE UNESCO WORLD PRESS FREEDOM DAY CONFERENCE, 3-5 May 2012

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JP therefore took 22 multi-national second year students from six journalism institutions around the world to cover the 10th UNESCO World Press Freedom Day Conference (WPFD). The conference took place from 3- 5 May 2012, at the Karthago Le Palace Hotel, in Tunis, WPFD conference. The theme FJP ’s mission at the UNESCO WPFD conference was a success. The project for this conference allowed FJP to be a prime news was New Voices: Media source covering WPFD conference Freedom Helping to from a student journalist’s perspective. Transform Societies. Not only did it contribute to the The students were presence of a Future Journalists from 6 countries: South wing at the conference, but it also Africa, United States of elevated the FJP as a programme to America, Tunisia, Egypt, an international level. Each day saw Senegal and Qatar. The FJP become a custom name on the backdrop of the conference and FJP Youth Newsroom amongst world’s media who trusted convened from 1-6 and opted to use our news content. May, the first two days The other pivotal achievement serving as training days. of this project was the ability to sensitize Future Journalists to report the pressing issues of press freedom and freedom of speech. This unique opportunity also saw the coming together of various journalism institutions and organisations for the same course, marking the beginning of what is hoped to be a sustainable relationship between all parties involved. Through this venture support from the Open Society Foundation (OSF) and that of the various journalism schools around the world and UNESCO itself, FJP began its international engagement mission, which is to bring our training and experiential learning to journalism students beyond South African boarders.

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FJP // 2012


ICT INDABA 4-8 June 2012 F

unded by the Department of Communications (DOC), FJP took four programme alumni and the two FJP coordinators to the ICT Indaba 2012, which took place at the Cape Town International Convention Centre (CTICC) from 4-8 June 2012. The main goal of the Indaba was to convene ICT leaders, governments and partner organisations to come and deliberate the current stance and future of ICTs in Africa. It was also meant to pave a way forward for Africa’s operations in the digital age by finding collaborations that will leapfrog the continents development. It is at this conference where a declaration was drafted to fulfill Africa’s digital advancement mission. The FJP students formed the central newsroom of journalists who reported this conference. The coordinators played the role of editor and designer, the group producing three editions of a daily newsletter that was distributed to conference delegates. Content from this conference is accessible at www. reportingdna.org.

FJP // 2012

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Winter School: Experiential Learning at the National Arts Festival 28 June- 2 July 2012

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he 2012 FJP Winter School took place from 28 June- 2 July 2012, and was themed Experiential Learning at the National Arts Festival. A great achievement of this school was the collaboration between FJP and Upstart, a youth media project of Grocott’s Mail, the oldest independent newspaper based in Grahamstown, which is a teaching establishment now belonging to Rhodes University’s School of Journalism and Media Studies. This was the beginning of what is hopefully a long relationship between Upstart, Grocott’s and Highway Africa to upskill the next generation of Africa’s journalists from their high school years heading forward.

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FJP // 2012

U pastart Partici pants 1

Mr

Zekhaya Spondo

UpStart

2

Mr

Anathi Madinda

UpStart

3

Ms

Siyamthanda Dyantyie

UpStart

4

Ms

Ziphelele Losi

UpStart

5

Ms

Thandile Lumkwana

UpStart


An important aspect for the Winter School workshop was to build a newsroom environment where the participants were thrown in an ocean of story possibilities and have them report back to the newsroom. FJPs learnt to write for the arts. Traditionally, journalists and critics writing about for arts have always had a background in arts writing, however, this was not the case for FJPs. They had no formal advanced training in this field which entailed training staff working tirelessly at assisting the participants in acquiring, refining and having confidence in their arts writing and reporting skills.

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Spring School:

A

fter a very exciting Winter School workshop, the participants attended the Spring School as well as the annual Highway Africa Conference which was the last event on the FJP calendar. It is always important that the students, who have now had their taste of new media and blogging, receive more intensive training in using ICT tools for journalism and networking. The students participated in a mentorship workshop where they were partnered with student journalists from the Open Source newspaper and wrote articles for the conference newspaper. This made the participants feel more involved as well as helped them get engaged with the conference themes. They attended plenary sessions, training workshops, book launches and evening gala networking events, making contacts with industry colleagues.

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FJP // 2012

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Alumni Mina Maboja (FJP 2011) participated in the programme as the 2012 Mentor. Mina is a Rhodes University 2011 alumni of the programme, whose passion for writing, editing and creative writing saw her do a wonderful job with the 2012 group. Mina assisted as subeditor for the newsroom as well as the go-to person between the students and the trainers.

Mina assisted Sim Kyazze, FJP Trainer, in ensuring that each FJP got the most out of the course.

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FJP // 2012


FJP 2013: Into the future: FJP 2013 promises to be an equally exciting year! With the growing need of Development Journalists, the 2013 edition of the Future Journalists Programme will be a year for ‘Development Journalism Training’. The workshops will be lead by experienced journalists as well as journalism trainers. Students will be taught how to think about reporting bread and butter issues in a compelling manner that commands civil action and enshrines accountability to authority.

FJP // 2012

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ALUMNUS TESTIMONIAL

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ate last year, I received a call from the FJP Coordinator (Ms Nqobile Buthelezi-Sibisi) informing me that the South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) was looking for interns and that I should apply. Without wasting any time, I quickly went through my emails and started applying. Fast forward Reminiscing now; my dream to be a journalist to this year, I am happy started in 2006 .I woke up in the early hours one to say I have just been morning and decided that I would go to the offered a solid contract offices of The Star Newspaper in Sauer Street to be a SABC Digital to look for a job as a reporter. Driven by passion News Producer and that and enthusiasm, I was determined that they will is the most exciting thing give me a job. How can I forget the harsh tone that ever happened to from the security officer in the reception of the me. When my contract newspaper, telling me that I should go to the as an intern was nearing library and do my research about journalism. its end, my bosses called Needless to say, I visited the library and did my me in and told me that research. Two weeks later, I went straight to the they couldn’t let me go SABC offices and told the receptionist my story. I because of my hard wanted to be a journalist. I inquired whether the work. If it wasn’t for public broadcaster was looking journalists. FJP and my hard work, Six years after all the hustle, I decided to enrol I would be where I am for Journalism at Tshwane University of Technology today. FJP is really a (TUT) and that was the link to me reaching my meaningful connection dream. to the media industry. In 2012, I was selected as the TUT participants Eita daar! and ambassadors into the Future Journalist Programme (FJP) at the Rhodes University School of Journalism and Media Studies (JMS). I had a great experience as a budding journalist-in-training. I learned a lot about podcasting, writing and without a shadow of a doubt my interviewing skills have improved. Thank you FJP, JMS and Rhodes Univesity.

Contacts

Sithembiso Sithole (FJ P 2012)

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Ms Karabo Tledima

Ms Siphokazi Maneli

FJP Coordinator

FJP Assistant Coordinator

k.tledima@ru.ac.za

s.maneli@ru.ac.za

Written by:

Ms Nqobile Sibisi

mr sim kyazze

Former FJP Coordinator

FJP Trainer

nsibisi@africanmediainititative.org

s.kyazze@ru.ac.za

FJP // 2012

Designed by Alex Bernatzky & Nicola Poulos


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FJP // 2013

FJP // 2013


Future Journalists Programme Yearbook  

This is the Future Journalists Programme Year Book that I art directed and laid out with layout assistance from Nicola Poulos. All Photograp...

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