Issuu on Google+

PREMIO NOBEL FÍSICA NOBEL PRIZE PHYSICS 2008


I N F O R M AT I O N

FOR THE PUBLIC

The Nobel Prize in Physics 2008 Why is there something instead of nothing? Why are there so many different elementary particles? This year’s Nobel Laureates in Physics have presented theoretical insights that give us a deeper understanding of what happens far inside the tiniest building blocks of matter.

Unravelling the hidden symmetries of nature Nature’s laws of symmetry are at the heart of this subject: or rather, broken symmetries, both those that seem to have existed in our universe from the very beginning and those that have spontaneously lost their original symmetry somewhere along the road.

Nobel Prize® is a registered trademark of the Nobel Foundation.

In fact, we are all the children of broken symmetry. It must have occurred immediately after the Big Bang some 14 billion years ago when as much antimatter as matter was created. The meeting between the two is fatal for both; they annihilate each other and all that is left is radiation. Evidently, however, matter won against antimatter, otherwise we would not be here. But we are here, and just a tiny deviation from perfect symmetry seems to have been enough – one extra particle of matter for every ten billion particles of antimatter was enough to make our world survive. This excess of matter was the seed of our whole universe, which filled with galaxies, stars and planets – and eventually life. But what lies behind this symmetry violation in the cosmos is still a major mystery and an active field of research.

An unexplained broken symmetry at the birth of the universe. In the Big Bang, if as much matter as antimatter was created, they should have annihilated each other. But a tiny excess of one particle of matter for every ten billion antimatter particles was enough to make matter win over antimatter. This excess material filled the cosmos with galaxies, stars, planets and eventually life.

The Nobel Prize in Physics 2008  The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences  www.kva.se

1(8)


Through the looking glass For many years physics has focused on finding the natural laws that are hidden deep within the wide range of phenomena we see around us. Natural laws should be perfectly symmetrical and absolute; they should be valid throughout the whole of the universe. This approach seems true for most situations, but not always. That is why broken symmetries became the subject of physics research as much as symmetries themselves, which is not so remarkable considering our lopsided world where perfect symmetry is a rare ideal. Various types of symmetries and broken symmetries are part of our everyday life; the letter A does not change when we look at it in a mirror, while the letter Z breaks this symmetry. On the other hand, Z looks the same when you turn it upside down, but if you do the same with the letter A, the symmetry will be broken. The basic theory for elementary particles describes three different principles of symmetry: mirror symmetry, charge symmetry and time symmetry (in the language of physics, mirror symmetry is called P, from parity, C stands for charge symmetry and T for time symmetry). In mirror symmetry, all events should occur in exactly the same way whether they are Mirror symmetry. It is broken in the picture on the left and seen directly or in a mirror. There should retained in the picture on the right, where it’s impossible to not be any difference between left and right decide if your are in your own world or in the mirror-world. and nobody should be able to decide whether they are in their own world or in a looking glass world. Charge symmetry states that particles should behave exactly like their alter egos, antiparticles, which have exactly the same properties but the opposite charge. And according to time symmetry, physical events at the micro level should be equally independent whether they occur forwards or backwards in time. Symmetries do not just have an aesthetic value in physics. They simplify many awkward calculations and therefore play a decisive role for the mathematical description of the microworld. An even more important fact is that these symmetries implicate a large number of conservation laws at the particle level. For example, there is a law that energy cannot be lost in collisions between elementary particles, it must remain the same before and after the collision, which is evident in the symmetry of equations that describe particle collisions. Or there is the law of the conservation of electrical charges that is related to symmetry in electromagnetic theory.

The pattern emerges more clearly It was around the middle of the 20th century that broken symmetry first appeared in studies of the basic principles of matter. At this time physics was thoroughly involved in achieving its greatest dream – to unite all nature’s smallest building blocks and all forces in one unified theory. But to begin with, particle physics only became more and more complicated. New accelerators built after the Second World War produced a constant stream of particles that had never been

2(8)

The Nobel Prize in Physics 2008  The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences  www.kva.se


seen before. Most of them did not fit into the models physicists had at that time, that matter consisted of atoms with neutrons and protons in the nucleus and electrons round it. Deeper investigations into the innermost regions of matter revealed that protons and neutrons each concealed a trio of quarks. The particles that had already been discovered also were shown to consist of quarks.

Molecule

Atom

Atom nucleus

Proton/neutron

Quark

Into the matter. Electrons and quarks are the smallest building blocks of all matter. Elementary particles

Leptons

First family

Second family

Third family

electron neutrino

muon neutrino

tau neutrino

electron

muon

tau

up

charm

top

down

strange

bottom

Forces

Quarks

Higgs?

Messenger particles

electromagnetic force

photon

weak force

W, Z

strong force

gluons

The Standard Model today. It unifies all the fundamental building blocks of matter and three of the four fundamental forces. While all known matter is built with particles from the first family, the other particles exists but only for extremely short time periods. To complete the Model a new particle is needed – the Higgs particle – that the physics community hopes to find in the new built accelerator LHC at CERN in Geneva.

Now, almost all the pieces of the puzzle have fallen into place; a Standard Model for the indivisible parts of matter comprises three families of particles (see diagram). These families resemble each other, but only the particles in the first and lightest family are sufficiently stable to build up the cosmos. The particles in the two heavier families live under very unstable conditions and disintegrate immediately into lighter kinds of particles. Everything is controlled by forces. The Standard Model, at least for the time being, includes three of nature’s four fundamental forces along with their messengers, particles that convey the interaction between the elementary particles (see diagram). The messenger of the electromagnetic force is the photon with zero mass; the weak force that accounts for radioactive disintegration and causes the sun and the stars to shine is carried by the heavy W and Z boson particles; while the strong force is carried by gluon particles, which see to it that the atom nuclei hold together. Gravity, the fourth force, which makes sure we keep our feet on the ground, has not yet been incorporated into the model and poses a colossal challenge for physicists today.

The mirror is shattered The Standard Model is a synthesis of all the insights into the innermost parts of matter that physics has gathered during the last century. It stands firmly on a theoretical base consisting

The Nobel Prize in Physics 2008  The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences  www.kva.se

3(8)


of the symmetry principles of quantum physics and the theory of relativity and has stood up to countless tests. But before the pattern was quite clear, a number of crises occurred that threatened this well-balanced construction. These crises related to the fact that physicists had assumed that the laws of symmetry applied to the Lilliputian world of elementary particles. But this, it turned out, was not entirely the case. The first surprise came in 1956 when two Chinese-American theoreticians, Tsung Dao Lee and Chen Ning Yang (awarded the Nobel Prize the following year in 1957) challenged mirror symmetry (P symmetry) in the weak force. That nature respected mirror symmetry, the symmetry concerning left and right, was considered, like other symmetry principles, to be a wellestablished fact. We need to re-evaluate old principles in the quantum world, where the elementary particles exist, claimed Lee and Yang. They proposed a series of experiments to test this mirror symmetry. And sure enough, only a few months later the decay of the atom nucleus in the radioactive element cobalt 60 revealed that it did not follow the principles of mirror symmetry. The symmetry was broken when the electrons that left the cobalt nucleus preferred one direction to another. It was as if you were standing in front of the Stockholm Central station and saw most of the people turning left out from the station.

Inherent asymmetry determines our fate It may well be that charge and mirror symmetries are broken separately, but both of them, the so called CP-symmetry, are certainly not broken at the same time. The physicist community consoled itself with the idea that this symmetry remains unbroken. The laws of nature, they believed, would not change if you stepped into a mirror world where all matter was replaced with antimatter. This also means that if you met an extraterrestrial being, there should not be any way of deciding whether the alien came from our world or from the antiworld. A welcoming hug could then have disastrous consequences. Only a puff of energy would be left when matter and antimatter annihilated each other on first contact. So it was perhaps just as well that the weak force came back into the limelight in 1964. A new violation of the symmetry laws emerged in the radioactive decay of a strange particle, called a kaon (Nobel Prize awarded to James Cronin and Val Fitch in 1980). A small fraction of the kaons did not follow the current mirror and charge symmetries; they broke the double CP-symmetry and challenged the whole structure of the theory.

A hug? Wait until the symmetry is clarified first! If the alien being is made of antimatter, a hug will result in both of you vanishing in a puff of energy.

4(8)

Thinking about meeting extraterrestrial beings, this discovery offers a salvation. It might be enough to ask an extraterrestrial before it hugs you to first look carefully at the kaon decay at home and check whether it is made of the same matter as us or antimatter.

The Nobel Prize in Physics 2008 Â? The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Â? www.kva.se


The first person to point out the decisive importance of broken symmetry for the genesis of the cosmos was the Russian physicist and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Andrei Sakharov. In 1967, he set up three conditions for creating a world like ours, empty of antimatter. Firstly, that the laws of physics distinguish between matter and antimatter, which in fact was discovered with the broken CP-symmetry ; secondly, that the cosmos originated in the heat of the Big Bang; and thirdly, that the protons in every atom nucleus disintegrate. The last condition might lead to the end of the world, since it implies that all matter can eventually disappear. But so far that has not happened; and experiments have shown that protons remain stable for 1033 years, a comfortable 10 trillion times longer than the age of the universe, which is slightly more than 1010 years. And still there is no one who knows how Sakharov’s chain of events took place in the early universe.

Solving the mystery of the broken symmetry It may well be that Sakharov’s conditions will eventually be incorporated into the Standard Model of physics. Then the surplus of matter created at the birth of the universe will be explained. That, however, requires a much greater symmetry violation than the doubly broken symmetry, that Fitch and Cronin found in their experiment. However, even a considerably smaller broken symmetry that the kaons were guilty of, needed an interpretation; otherwise the whole Standard Model would be threatened. The question of why the symmetries were broken remained a mystery until 1972, when two young researchers from the University of Kyoto, Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa, who were well acquainted with quantum physics calculations, found the solution in a 3 x 3 matrix. How does this double broken symmetry take place? Each kaon particle consists of a combination of a quark and an antiquark. The weak force makes them switch identities time and time again: the quark becomes an antiquark while the antiquark becomes a quark, thus transforming the kaon into its antikaon. In this way the kaon particle flips between itself and its antiself. But if the right conditions are met, the symmetry between matter and antimatter will be broken. Kobayashi and Maskawa’s calculation matrix contains probabilities for describing how the transformation of the quarks will take place.

Kaone g stran

n dow anti-

up

anti-up

Anti-kaon down

charm

Kaon strange

anti-strange

anti-charm

anti-down

top

anti-top

Anti -k dowaon n

antistran ge

Quantum physics is behind this bizarre transformation act. A kaon can switch between being itself and being its anti-self – from kaon to anti-kaon and back again. All quark families known today must contribute to the process where in a few cases the symmetry will be broken. The explanation of how this happens has given Kobayashi and Maskawa this year’s Nobel Prize in Physics.

The Nobel Prize in Physics 2008  The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences  www.kva.se

5(8)


It turned out that the quarks and antiquarks swapped identity with each other within their own family. If this exchange of identity with double broken symmetry was to take place between matter and antimatter, a further quark family was needed in addition to the other two (see p. 3). This was a bold concept, and the Standard Model received these speculative new quarks, which appeared as predicted in later experiments. The charm quark was discovered as early as 1974, the bottom quark in 1977 and the last one, the top quark, as late as 1994.

Meson factories provide the answer It may well be that the explanation of broken CP-symmetry also provides a raison d’être for the second and third particle families. These resemble the first family in many respects, but are so short-lived that they cannot form anything lasting in our world. One possibility is that these capricious particles fulfilled their most important function at the beginning of time when their presence guaranteed the broken symmetry that made matter win against antimatter. How nature solved this problem is, as mentioned before, something we do not yet know in detail. The broken symmetry needs to be reproduced many, many times to create all the matter that gives us our star-scattered sky. Kobayashi and Maskawa’s theory also indicated that it should be possible to study a major violation of symmetry in B-meson particles, which are ten times heavier than their cousins, the kaons. However, broken symmetry occurs extremely rarely in B-mesons, so immense quantities of these particles are needed to find just a few that break the symmetry. Two gigantic constructions housing the BaBar particle detectors at the SLAC accelerator at Stanford, California and Belle at the KEK accelerator at Tsukuba in Japan produced more than one million B-mesons a day in order to follow their decay in detail. As early as 2001, both independent experiments confirmed the symmetry violation of the B-mesons, exactly as Kobayashi and Maskawa’s model had predicted almost 30 years earlier. This meant the completion of the Standard Model, which has worked well for many years. Almost all the missing pieces of the puzzle have fallen into place in accordance with the boldest of predictions. All the same, the physicists are still not content.

Symmetry lies hidden under spontaneous violations As already explained, the Standard Model comprises all of the known elementary particles and three of the four fundamental forces. But why are these forces so different? And why do the particles have such different masses? The heaviest one, the top quark, is more than three hundred thousand times heavier than the electron. Why do they have any mass at all? The weak force stands out in this respect again: its messenger particles, W and Z, are much heavier, while its ally, the photon, which conveys the electromagnetic force, lacks mass at all. Most physicists believe that another spontaneous broken symmetry, called the Higgs mechanism, destroyed the original symmetry between forces and gave the particles their masses in the very earliest stages of the universe. The road to this discovery was mapped out by Yoichiro Nambu when, in 1960, he was the first to introduce spontaneous symmetry violation into elementary particle physics. It is for this

6(8)

The Nobel Prize in Physics 2008  The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences  www.kva.se


discovery that he is now awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics. To begin with, Nambu worked on theoretical calculations of another remarkable phenomenon in physics, superconductivity, when electric currents suddenly flow without any resistance. Spontaneous symmetry violation that described superconductivity was later translated by Nambu into the world of elementary particles, and his mathematical tools now permeate all theories concerning the Standard Model. We can witness more banal spontaneous symmetry violations in everyday life. A pencil standing on its point leads a completely symmetrical existence in which all directions are equal. But this symmetry is lost when it falls over – now only one direction counts. On the other hand, its condition has become more stable, the pencil cannot fall any further, it has reached its lowest level of energy.

Spontaneous broken symmetry. The world of this pencil is completely symmetrical. All directions are exactly equal. But this symmetry is lost when the pencil falls over. Now only one direction holds. The symmetry that existed before is hidden behind the fallen pencil.

A vacuum has the lowest possible energy level in the cosmos. In fact, a vacuum in physics is precisely a state with the lowest possible energy. But it is not empty by any means. Since the arrival of quantum physics, a vacuum is defined as full of a bubbling soup of particles that pop up, only to immediately disappear again in ubiquitously present but invisible quantum fields. We are surrounded by many different quantum fields across space; the four fundamental forces of nature are also described as fields. One of them, the gravitational field, is known to us all. It is the one that keeps us down on earth and determines what is up and what is down. Nambu realised at an early date that the properties of a vacuum are of interest for studies of spontaneous broken symmetry. A vacuum, that is, the lowest state of energy, does not correspond to the most symmetrical state. As with the fallen pencil, the symmetry of the quantum field has been broken and only one of many possible field directions has been chosen. In recent decades, Nambu’s methods of treating spontaneous symmetry violation in the Standard Model have been refined; they are frequently used today to calculate the effects of the strong force.

Higgs provides mass The question of the mass of elementary particles has also been answered by spontaneous broken symmetry of the hypothetical Higgs field. It is thought that at the Big Bang the field was perfectly symmetrical and all the particles had zero mass. But the Higgs field, like the pencil standing on its point, was not stable, so when the universe cooled down, the field dropped to its lowest energy level, its own vacuum according to the quantum definition. Its symmetry disappeared and the Higgs field became a sort of syrup for elementary particles; they absorbed different amounts of the field and got different masses. Some, like the photons, were not attracted and remained without mass; but why the electrons acquired mass at all is quite a different question that no one has answered yet.

The Nobel Prize in Physics 2008  The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences  www.kva.se

7(8)


LINKS AND FURTHER READING More information about this year’s prizes, including a scientific background article in English, is to be found at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences’ website, www.kva.se, and at http://nobelprize.org. You can also see the press conference there as web-TV. Further information about exhibitions and activities concerning the Nobel Prizes is available at www.nobelmuseum.se. Popular scientific articles Sarah Graham: “In Search of Antimatter”, Scientific American, August 2001. Helen Quinn, Michael Witherell: “The Asymmetry between Matter and Antimatter”, Scientific American, October 1998. Madhusree Mukerjee: “Profile: Yoichiro Nambu”, Scientific American, February 1995. Original scientific articles M. Kobayashi, T. Maskawa: “CP Violation in the Renormalizable Theory of Weak Interaction”. Progress of Theoretical Physics 49 (1973) p. 652-657. Y. Nambu, G. Jona-Lasinio: “A Dynamical Model of Elementary Particles based on an Analogy with Superconductivity II”, Physics Review 124 (1961) p. 246. Y. Nambu, G. Jona-Lasinio: “A Dynamical Model of Elementary Particles based on an Analogy with Superconductivity I”, Physics Review 122 (1961) p. 345. Earlier Nobel Prizes within the field The Nobel Prize in Physics 1999: http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1999/index.html The Nobel Prize in Physics 1980: http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1980/index.html The Nobel Prize in Physics 1969: http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1969/index.html The Nobel Prize in Physics 1957: http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1957/index.html

...................................................................................................................................................... THE LAUREATES Yoichiro Nambu

Makoto Kobayashi

Toshihide Maskawa

University of Chicago Department of Physics Enrico Fermi Institute 5720 South Ellis Avenue Chicago, IL 60637 USA http://physics.uchicago.edu/ research/areas/ particle_t.html#Nambu

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Ichibancho Office 1 Sumitomo-Ichibancho Bldg., 6 Ichibancho Chiyoda-ku Tokyo 102-8471 JAPAN www.kek.jp/intra-e/press/2007/ EPSprize2_e.html

Kyoto Sangyo University Department of Physics Motoyama Kamigamo Kita-ku Kyoto-City 603-8555 JAPAN www.yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp/english

US citizen. Born 1921 in Tokyo, Japan. D.Sc. 1952 at University of Tokyo, Japan. Harry Pratt Judson Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus at Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, IL, USA.

Japanese citizen. Born 1944 in Nagoya, Japan. Ph.D. 1972 at Nagoya University, Japan. Professor Emeritus at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Japan.

Japanese citizen. Born 1940. Ph.D. 1967 at Nagoya University, Japan. Professor Emeritus at Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics (YITP), Kyoto University, and Professor at Kyoto Sangyo University, Japan.

8(8)

The Nobel Prize in Physics 2008  The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences  www.kva.se

Illustrations: Typoform

Like other quantum fields, the Higgs field has its own representative, the Higgs particle. Physicists are eager to find this particle soon in the world’s most powerful particle accelerator, the brand new LHC at Cern in Geneva. It is possible that several different Higgs particles will be detected – or none at all. Physicists are prepared, a so-called supersymmetric theory is the favourite among many to extend the Standard Model. Other theories exist, some more exotic, some less so. In any case, they are likely to be symmetrical, even though the symmetry may not be evident at first. But it is there, keeping itself hidden in the seemingly messy appearance. ......................................................................................................................................................


El Premio Nobel de Física 2008 El premio Nobel de Física 2008 es compartido por tres científicos: Makoto Kobayashi (1944). Japón y Toshihide Maskawa (1940). Japón "Por el descubrimiento del origen de la ruptura de la simetría que predice la existencia de, al menos, tres familias de quarks en la naturaleza" Yoichiro Nambu (1921). USA "Por el descubrimiento del mecanismo de ruptura espontánea de la simetría en física subatómica" Por qué hay algo en vez de nada? Por qué hay tantas partículas elementales diferentes? Los laureados con el Premio Nobel de Física de este año han presentado ideas teóricas que nos suministran una comprensión más profunda de lo que sucede en el interior de los bloques más pequeños que forman la materia. Desentrañando la simetría oculta de la naturaleza La naturaleza de las leyes de simetría se encuentran en el corazón de este asunto; o más bien, la rotura de las simetrías, tanto las que parecen haber existido en nuestro universo desde el principio como aquellas que han perdido su simetría original en alguna parte del camino. De hecho, todos somos hijos de la simetría rota. Ello debió ocurrir inmediatamente después del Big Bang, hace unos 14.000 millones de años cuando fueron creadas la materia y la antimateria. El contacto de materia y antimateria es fatal para ambas, se aniquilan mutuamente y se transforman en radiación. Es evidente que la materia, al final, ganó la partida a la antimateria, de otra manera nosotros no estaríamos aquí. Pero estamos, y una pequeña desviación de la simetría perfecta parece que ha sido suficiente – un exceso de una partícula de materia por cada diez mil millones de partículas de antimateria fueron suficientes para hacer que nuestro mundo exista -. Este exceso de la materia fue la semilla de nuestro universo lleno de galaxias, estrellas y planetas y, eventualmente, de vida. Pero lo que hay detrás de esta violación de la simetría en el cosmos es aún un gran misterio y un activo campo de investigación.

Una inexplicada ruptura de la simetría en el nacimiento del universo. En el Big Bang fueron creadas tanto la materia como la antimateria, ambas deberían haberse aniquilado. Pero un pequeño exceso de una partícula de materia por cada diez mil millones de partículas de antimateria fue suficiente para que la materia ganara la partida a la antimateria. Este exceso terminó llenando el cosmos con galaxias, estrellas, planetas y, eventualmente, vida.

1


Mirando a través del espejo Durante muchos años la física se ha centrado en la búsqueda de las leyes que rigen los fenómenos que vemos a nuestro alrededor. Las leyes naturales deberían ser perfectamente simétricas y absolutas; deberían ser válidas para todo el universo. Esto parece cierto para la mayoría de las situaciones, pero no siempre. Por esto la rotura de la simetría se ha convertido en objeto de investigación en física, tanto o más que el estudio de la propia simetría, lo cual es no es tan raro si tenemos en cuenta que en nuestro imperfecto mundo la simetría perfecta es algo ideal. Varios tipos de simetrías y roturas de simetrías forman parte de nuestra vida diaria; la letra A no cambia cuando se refleja en un espejo, mientras que la letra Z no conserva la simetría frente a una reflexión. Sin embargo, la Z permanece inalterada cuando la giras 1800 sin sacarla del papel, mientras que la A no conserva su simetría ante el mismo giro. La teoría de partículas elementales considera tres formas básicas de simetría: simetría especular, simetría de carga y simetría temporal (en el lenguaje de la física la simetría especular es denominada P, de paridad; la simetría de carga, C y la simetría temporal como T) En la simetría especular todos los sucesos ocurren exactamente igual si son observados directamente o reflejados en un espejo. Ello implica que no existe ninguna diferencia entre izquierda y derecha y nadie sería capaz de distinguir su propio mundo de otro reflejado en un espejo. La simetría de carga predice que las partículas cargadas se comportarán exactamente igual que sus antipartículas, las cuales tiene exactamente las mismas propiedades pero carga opuesta. Y de acuerdo con la simetría temporal, las cosas sucederían exactamente igual con independencia de que el tiempo transcurra hacia delante o hacia atrás. Las simetrías no juegan un papel puramente estético en física. Simplifican cálculos complicados y juegan un papel decisivo en la descripción matemática del micromundo. Un hecho importante es que estas simetrías implican la existencia de un gran número de leyes de conservación a nivel de partículas. Por ejemplo, la energía se debe conservar en la colisión entre partículas elementales, debe haber la misma antes que después de la colisión, lo cual es evidente en la simetría de las ecuaciones que describen la colisión de las partículas. También existe una ley de conservación de la carga relacionada con la simetría de la teoría electromagnética. El mejor modelo Fue hacia la mitad del s. XX cuando la ruptura de la simetría aparece en los estudios de los principios básicos de la materia. Entonces la física estaba volcada en conseguir su gran sueño: unificar todos los bloques básicos que forman la materia y todas las fuerzas en una teoría única. Pero la física de partículas se volvió más y más complicada. Nuevos aceleradores se construyeron después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial produciéndose un flujo constante de partículas nunca observadas. La mayoría de ellas no cabía en los modelos que los físicos tenían en aquel tiempo: la materia estaba formada de átomos formados por protones y neutrones situados en el núcleo y electrones girando alrededor de él. Investigaciones más profundas revelaron que los protones y los neutrones ocultaban tríos de quarks. Las nuevas partículas descubiertas también mostraron que estaban formadas de quarks. Actualmente todas las piezas del puzzle han sido colocadas en su sitio: El Modelo Estandar para las partículas elementales de la materia predice tres familias de partículas (ver diagrama en la página siguiente). Estas familias se parecen bastante, pero solamente las partículas de la primera familia (las más ligeras) son los suficientemente estables para construir el cosmos. Las partículas de las otras familias (más pesadas) sólo son muy inestables y se desintegran rápidamente generando energía y otras partículas. Todo en la naturaleza está controlado por fuerzas. El Modelo Estandar, al menos por el momento, incluye tres de las cuatro fuerzas fundamentales de la naturaleza, además de las partículas que

2


transmiten la interacción entre las partículas elementales (ver diagrama). El mensajero o transmisor de la fuerza electromagnética es el fotón, que tiene masa nula; la fuerza débil, responsable de la desintegración radiactiva, gracias a la cual el Sol y las estrellas brillan, es transportada por los pesados bosones W y Z; mientras que la fuerza fuerte es transportada por los gluones, los cuales mantienen unidos los núcleos atómicos. La gravedad, la cuarta fuerza, la cual hace que podamos tener nuestros pies pegados al suelo, aún no ha sido incorporada al modelo y constituye un colosal desafío para los físicos actuales.

El Modelo Estandar hoy. Este modelo unifica todas las partículas elementales de la materia y tres fuerzas de las cuatro fuerzas fundamentales. Toda la materia conocida está formada con partículas de la primera de las familias, las otras partículas existen pero sólo por periodos de tiempo extremadamente cortos. Para completar el modelo se requiere una nueva partícula (la partícula de Higgs) que los físicos esperar encontrar con el nuevo acelerador LHC, del CERN (Ginebra).

Todo en la naturaleza está controlado por fuerzas. El Modelo Estandar, al menos por el momento, incluye tres de las cuatro fuerzas fundamentales de la naturaleza, además de las partículas que transmiten la interacción entre las partículas elementales (ver diagrama). El mensajero o transmisor de la fuerza electromagnética es el fotón, que tiene masa nula; la fuerza débil, responsables de la desintegración radiactiva, gracias a la cual el Sol y las estrellas tengan brillan, es transportada por los pesados bosones W y Z; mientras que la fuerza fuerte es transportada por los gluones, los cuales mantienen unidos los núcleos atómicos. La gravedad, la cuarta fuerza, la cual hace que podamos tener nuestros pies pegados al suelo, aún no ha sido incorporada al modelo y constituye un colosal desafío para los físicos actuales.

3


El espejo se rompe El Modelo Estandar es una síntesis de todas las ideas que la física de partículas ha generado durante el siglo pasado. Se asienta sobre la base teórica de los principios de simetría de la física cuántica y la teoría de la relatividad y ha resistido a innumerables pruebas. No obstante, varias crisis tuvieron lugar poniendo en peligro este bien construido edificio. Estas crisis tuvieron lugar porque los físicos asumían que las leyes de la simetría eran aplicables al micromundo de las partículas elementales. Pero esto no era totalmente cierto. La primera sorpresa surgió en 1956 cuando dos físicos teóricos chino-americanos, Tsung Dao Lee y Chen Ning Yang (galardonados con el Premio Nobel al año siguiente, en 1967) comprobaron que la simetría especular (simetría P) era violada por la fuerza débil. Que la naturaleza respetaba la simetría especular, la simetría entre izquierda y derecha, estaba, al igual que los otros principios de la simetría, firmemente establecido. Necesitamos volver a evaluar los viejos principios en el mundo cuántico, el de las partículas elementales, afirmaron Lee y Yang. Propusieron una serie de experimentos para comprobar la simetría especular. Sólo unos pocos meses más tarde se comprobó que la desintegración de los átomos de cobalto-60 violaba la simetría especular. La simetría se rompía ya que los electrones emitidos por el cobalto-60 preferían una dirección a la otra. Era como si alguien se sitúa frente a la estación central de Estocolmo y observa que la mayoría de la gente gira a la izquierda al salir de la estación. Una inherente asimetría determina nuestro destino Podía suceder que la simetría especular (P) y la simetría de carga (C), fueran violadas por separado, pero ambas a la vez, la llamada simetría CP, no se rompería. Los físicos se consolaron con esta idea. Las leyes de la naturaleza, creían, no se violarían si uno se sitúa en un mundo especular en el que la materia fuera reemplazada por antimateria. Esto significa que si usted se encuentra con un extraterrestre no habría manera de distinguir si el alien proviene de nuestro mundo o de un antimundo. Un abrazo de bienvenida podría tener consecuencias desastrosas. Cuando la materia y la antimateria entran en contacto, ambas se aniquilan produciendo energía. Justamente esto fue lo que atrajo la atención sobre la fuerza débil en 1964. Una nueva violación de las leyes de la simetría tenía lugar en la desintegración de una extraña partícula llamada kaon (Premio Nobel concedido a James Cronin y Val Fitch en 1980). Una pequeña fracción de los kaones no seguían las leyes de la simetría especular y de carga; se rompía la simetría CP y se desafiaba la estructura misma de la teoría.

¿Un abrazo? Antes espere a que la simetría esté clara. Si el alien está hecho de antimateria un abrazo convertiría a ambos en un estallido de energía.

Pensando en un hipotético encuentro con extraterrestres ello podría ser una tabla de salvación. Sería suficiente preguntar al extraterrestre cómo se desintegra un kaón en su mundo, para así comprobar si estaba hecho de materia o antimateria, antes de darle un abrazo de bienvenida.

La primera persona que apuntó la decisiva importancia de la rotura de la simetría para la génesis del cosmos fue el físico ruso y Nobel de la Paz Andrei Sakharov. En 1967 estableció tres condiciones para la creación de un mundo como el nuestro, vacío de antimateria. En primer lugar, las leyes de la física deben distinguir entre materia y antimateria, lo cual es confirmado con la violación de la simetría CP; en segundo lugar que el cosmos se originó en el calor del Big Bang; y tercero que los protones de los núcleos se desintegren. La última condición daría lugar al fin del mundo ya que implica que toda la materia puede desaparecer. Pero hasta ahora eso no ha ocurrido y los experimentos demuestran que los protones permanecen estables durante 1033 años, un tiempo 10 trillones de veces superior a la

4


edad del universo, calculada en poco más de 1010 años. Aún no hay nadie que comprenda como la cadena de eventos prevista por Sakharov podría tener lugar en el universo temprano. Resolviendo el misterio de la simetría rota Es muy posible que las condiciones de Sakharov puedan ser eventualmente incorporadas al Modelo Estandar de la física. Entonces el excedente de materia creada en el momento del nacimiento del universo sería explicado. Esto, sin embargo, requeriría una violación de la simetría mucho mayor que la rotura de la doble simetría que Fitch and Cronin encontraron con su experimento. De todas maneras la violación de la simetría encontrada en la desintegración del kaón, necesita de una interpretación; de otro modo el Modelo Estandar podría verse amenazado. La cuestión de por qué se rompe la simetría seguía siendo un misterio hasta 1972, cuando dos jóvenes investigadores de la Universidad de Kyoto, Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa, bien familiarizados con los cálculos de la física cuántica, encontraron la solución en forma de matriz 3x3. ¿Cómo tiene lugar esta doble ruptura de la simetría? Cada kaón consiste en una combinación de quark y antiquark. La fuerza débil hace que ambos intercambien sus identidades continuamente: el quark se transforma en antiquark, mientras que el antiquark se transforma en quark, esto transforma un kaón en un antikaón. De esta manera el kaón “oscila” entre una partícula y una antipartícula. Pero si las condiciones son las adecuadas la simetría entre materia y antimateria se puede romper. La matriz obtenida por Kobayashi y Maskawa permite describir como se produce la transformación de los quarks.

La física cuántica está detrás de esta fantástica transformación Un kaón puede “oscilar” entre un kaón y un antikaón. Todas las familias de quarks conocidas hoy podrían contribuir a un proceso en el cual se rompe la simetría en unos pocos casos. La explicación de lo que sucede ha sido dada por Kobayashi y Maskawa, Premios Nobel de Física de este año. Resulta que los quarks y antiquarks intercambian sus identidades dentro de su familia. Si este intercambio de identidad, en el que se produce la ruptura de la doble simetría, tuviera lugar entre materia y antimateria, habría que añadir una nueva familia a las otras dos (ver ilustración del Modelo Estandar). Esto fue una proposición audaz que fue confirmada por experimentos posteriores. El quark encanto fue descubierto ya en 1974, el quark bottom en 1977 y el último, el quark top, más recientemente, en 1994. Las factorías de mesones dan la respuesta Era muy posible que la explicación de la ruptura de la simetría CP también diera una razón de por qué existían la segunda y tercera familia de partículas. Estas son semejantes a las de la primera en muchos aspectos, pero tienen una vida tan corta que no pueden formar nada duradero en nuestro mundo. Una posibilidad es que esas caprichosas partículas cumplieran una importante función al principio del tiempo cuando su presencia garantizó la ruptura de la simetría que hizo que la materia ganara a la antimateria. Cómo la naturaleza ha resuelto este problema, como ha sido dicho antes,

5


es algo que aún no conocemos con detalle. La creación de toda la materia contenida en las estrellas que pueblan nuestro cielo requiere que la simetría sea rota muchas, muchas veces. La teoría de Kobayashi y Maskawa también indica que podría ser posible estudiar una importante violación de simetría en mesones-B, las cuales son diez veces más pesadas que sus primos los kaones. Sin embargo, esta rotura de la simetría ocurre muy raramente en mesones-B. Una inmensa cantidad de partículas son necesarias para encontrar unos pocos casos en los que se verifique la ruptura de la simetría. Dos enormes máquinas, el detector de partículas BaBar del SLAC en Stanford (California) y el Belle del KEK en Tsukuba (Japón), produjeron más de un millón de mesones-B diarios con el fin de estudiar su desintegración con detalle. Ya en 2001 ambos experimentos confirmaron, independientemente, la violación de la simetría de los mesones-B, exactamente como el modelo de Kobayasshi y Maskawa había predicho 30 años antes. Esto significó la confirmación del Modelo Estandar que ha funcionado bien durante muchos años. Casi todas las piezas que faltaban en el puzzle han sido halladas confirmando las predicciones más audaces. Sin embargo, los físicos aún no están contentos. La simetría oculta bajo las violaciones espontáneas Como ya se ha explicado, el Modelo Estándar integra todas las partículas elementales conocidas y tres de las cuatro fuerzas fundamentales. Pero, ¿por qué son estas fuerzas tan diferentes? ¿Y por qué las partículas tienen masas tan diferentes? La más pesada, el quark top, es más de tres mil cien veces más pesado que el electrón. ¿Por qué tienen todas masa?. La fuerza débil destaca en este aspecto una vez más: sus portadores, las partículas Z y W, son muy pesadas, mientras que el fotón, que transmite la fuerza electromagnética, carece de masa. La mayoría de los físicos piensa que el llamado mecanismo de Higgs es el responsable de que la simetría original entre fuerzas fuera destruido, dando a que las partículas adquirieran su masa en las primeras etapas del universo El camino hacia ese descubrimiento fue trazado por Yoichiro Nambu quien, en 1960, fue el primero en introducir la violación espontánea de la simetría en la física de las partículas elementales. Es por este descubrimiento por el que se le concede el Premio Nobel de Física. En un principio Nambu trabajó en cálculos teóricos de otro importante fenómeno en física, la superconductividad, que aparece cuando las corrientes eléctricas, de repente, fluyen sin ningún tipo de resistencia. La violación espontánea de la simetría que aparece en la superconductividad fue después trasladada por Nambu al mundo de las partículas elementales y las nuevas herramientas matemáticas impregnaron todas las teorías del Modelo Estandar. Tenemos algunos ejemplos banales de violación espontánea de la simetría en la vida diaria. Un lápiz en equilibrio sobre su punta lleva una existencia totalmente simétrica en la cual todas las direcciones son equivalentes. Pero esta simetría se pierde cuando cae -ahora sólo una dirección cuenta - . Por otro lado su condición es ahora más estable, el lápiz no puede volver a caer, ha llegado a su nivel más bajo de energía.

Ruptura espontánea de la simetría El mundo del lápiz es totalmente simétrico. Todas las direcciones son exactamente iguales. Pero la simetría se pierde cuando el lápiz cae. Ahora sólo una dirección cuenta. La simetría existente antes se oculta tras el lápiz caído.

6


El vacío tiene el nivel de energía más bajo posible en el cosmos. En efecto, un vacío en física es precisamente un estado con la menor energía posible. Sin embargo, no está totalmente vacío. Desde la llegada de la física cuántica, un vacío está lleno de una burbujeante sopa de partículas que aparecen e inmediatamente desaparecen en invisibles y ubicuos campos cuánticos. Estamos rodeados por campos cuánticos que se extienden por el espacio; las cuatro fuerzas fundamentales de la naturaleza también son descritas como campos. Uno de ellos, el gravitacional, es conocido por todos nosotros. Es el que nos mantiene pegados a la tierra y determina lo que es arriba y lo que es abajo. Nambu indicó que las propiedades del vacío pueden ser de gran interés para el estudio de la rotura espontánea de la simetría. Un vacío, que es el estado más bajo de energía, no se corresponde con el estado de mayor simetría. Tan pronto como el lápiz se cae, la simetría del campo cuántico queda rota y sólo una de las muchas direcciones posibles es elegida. En las últimas décadas los métodos de Nambus para tratar la violación de la simetría espontánea en el Modelo Estandar han sido refinados y actualmente son frecuentemente usados para calcular los efectos de la fuerza fuerte. Higgs da la masa La cuestión de la masa de las partículas elementales ha sido también contestada por la rotura de la simetría del hipotético campo de Higgs. Se piensa que en el Big Bang el campo era perfectamente simétrico y las partículas tenían una masa nula. Pero el campo de Higgs, al igual que el lápiz en equilibrio sobre su punta, no era estable, así que cuando el universo se enfrió el campo cayó al nivel de energía más bajo, su propio vacío, de acuerdo con la definición cuántica. Su simetría desaparece y el campo de Higgs se transforma en una especie de jarabe de partículas elementales; éstas interaccionaron de diferentes formas con el campo quedando con masas distintas. Algunos, como los fotones, permanecieron sin masa; pero por qué los electrones adquirieron masa es una cuestión que nadie puede responder actualmente. Como otros campos cuánticos el campo de Higgs tiene su propio representante, la partícula de Higgs. Los físicos están ansiosos por encontrar pronto esta partícula en el más poderoso acelerador de partículas, el nuevo LHC en el CERN en Ginebra. Es posible que sean detectadas varias partículas de Higgs, o ninguna. Los físicos están preparados, la llamada teoría supersimétrica es la favorita entre varias para extender el Modelo Esatandar. Otras teorías existen, algunas muy exóticas, otras menos. En todo caso, todas ellas serán simétricas, aun cuando la simetría puede que no sea evidente al principio. Pero estará allí, oculta en el aspecto aparentemente desordenado.

LINKS AND FURTHER READING More information about this year’s prizes, including a scientifi c background article in English, is to be found at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences’ website, www.kva.se, and at http://nobelprize.org. You can also see the press conference there as web-TV. Further information about exhibitions and activities concerning the Nobel Prizes is available at www.nobelmuseum.se. Popular scientifi c articles Sarah Graham: “In Search of Antimatter”, Scientifi c American, August 2001. Helen Quinn, Michael Witherell: “The Asymmetry between Matter and Antimatter”, Scientific American, October 1998. Madhusree Mukerjee: “Profi le: Yoichiro Nambu”, Scientifi c American, February 1995. Original scientifi c articles M. Kobayashi, T. Maskawa: “CP Violation in the Renormalizable Theory of Weak Interaction”. Progress of Theoretical Physics 49 (1973) p. 652-657. Y. Nambu, G. Jona-Lasinio: “A Dynamical Model of Elementary Particles based on an Analogy with Superconductivity II”, Physics Review 124 (1961) p. 246. Y. Nambu, G. Jona-Lasinio: “A Dynamical Model of Elementary Particles based on an Analogy with Superconductivity I”, Physics Review 122 (1961) p. 345.

7


Earlier Nobel Prizes within the fi eld The Nobel Prize in Physics 1999: http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1999/index.html The Nobel Prize in Physics 1980: http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1980/index.html The Nobel Prize in Physics 1969: http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1969/index.html The Nobel Prize in Physics 1957: http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1957/index.html

................................................................................................................................................ ..... THE LAUREATES Yoichiro Nambu University of Chicago Department of Physics Enrico Fermi Institute 5720 South Ellis Avenue Chicago, IL 60637 USA http://physics.uchicago.edu/ research/areas/ particle_t.html#Nambu US citizen. Born 1921 in Tokyo, Japan. D.Sc. 1952 at University of Tokyo, Japan. Harry Pratt Judson Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus at Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, IL, USA.

Makoto Kobayashi Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Ichibancho Offi ce 1 Sumitomo-Ichibancho Bldg., 6 Ichibancho Chiyoda-ku Tokyo 102-8471 JAPAN www.kek.jp/intra-e/press/2007/ EPSprize2_e.html Japanese citizen. Born 1944 in Nagoya, Japan. Ph.D. 1972 at Nagoya University, Japan. Professor Emeritus at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Japan.

Toshihide Maskawa Kyoto Sangyo University Department of Physics Motoyama Kamigamo Kita-ku Kyoto-City 603-8555 JAPAN www.yukawa.kyotou.ac.jp/english Japanese citizen. Born 1940. Ph.D. 1967 at Nagoya University, Japan. Professor Emeritus at Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics (YITP), Kyoto University, and Professor at Kyoto Sangyo University, Japan

8


Premio Nobel Física 2008