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ABBY JOY WINTER University of Maryland

Graduate Portfolio


TABLE OF CONTENTS

THE SPIRIT OF FOOD

pg 1

THE VILLAGE PARK AT OWEN BROWN

pg 5

SUSTAINABLE FARMER’S MARKET

pg 9

TENT CABINS

pg 12


THE SPIRIT OF FOOD Creating Community Through Service, Education, and Urban Agriculture

The Three Party Harmony site is located within a very spiritually diverse community surrounding by Trinity Washington University on the south side and Catholic University of America on the north side. This sparked our idea of creating a modern day cloister scheme. Our hope is that through our design we can bring the community together around the common theme of urban agriculture and food.


SPIRIT OF FOOD

Precedents | Cloister Scheme COMPREHENSIVE STUDIO ARCH600 | FALL 2016 PROFESSOR TILGHMAN GROUP MEMBER: ARICA THORNTON

St. John’s College University, Cambridge

Fountains Abbey, North Yorkshire

Site Analysis | Topography AN

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EN

AV

AN

HIG

UE

EN

AV

AN

HIG

MIC

8%

UE

EN

AV

AN

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EN

AV

HIG

HIG

MIC

MIC

MIC

14%

35%

WI

Connections

R SOLSTIC S O LSTI

E

CE

4TH STREET NE

4TH STREET NE

4TH STREET NE

Main Zone

N TE

M M ER

4TH STREET NE

SU

55%

Preserve Views

Optimal Growing

The steep topography of the site created a zone connecting 4th St. and Michigan Ave. We placed the community center and complimenting cloister on the flat part of the site. There is a clear connection between the two structures. The community center was placed to the north of the cloister, which is a slightly higher elevation, to maximize the views. Also, the shadow of the community does not cast over the south growing areas.

pg 1


Sustainability Strategies

Summer Solstice

Rainwater Collection


SPIRIT OF FOOD Section Perspective

This view shows the two main spaces of the site activated - the growing space within the cloister and the event space within the community center. This view also shows how the spaces gradually step down, which mimics the topography.

East Elevation

Photovoltaic Panels

Green Roof

Ventilation

This view shows the similar materiality on Closed Loop the cloister and the community center. Geothermal System Metal slats are used as a sun shading device on the main structure and a growing space on the cloister.

South/Front Elevation

pg 2


Green Roof Daylighting Photovoltaic Panels Rainwater Catchment for Graywater

Sustainability Strategies

Landwater Catchment for Land Irrigation

Summer Solstice Summer Solstice

Rainwater Rainwater Collection Collection

Photovoltaic Panels Photovoltaic Panels


SPIRIT OF FOOD

SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS

Green Roof Green Roof

Ventilation Ventilation

Closed Loop Closed Loop Geothermal System Geothermal System

This studio project also focused on sustainable strategies as well as structure. Our goal was to make our community center as dynamic as possible. The cisterns which collected the roof water run-off was above ground, visible to the user. Water was also collected off of the land, and reused to crop irrigation through a sprinkler system. Operable windows allow for natural ventilation through the building. The green roof and solar panels are also visible to people at high elevations. pg 3


Single Ply PVC membrane VAPOR BARRIER RIGID ROOF INSULATION METAL DECKING 4’ DEEP METAL TUBE TRUSS

W6 BEAM W6 BEAM W16 GIRDER DROP CEILING - FABRIC FLOURESCENT PENDANT LIGHT 8”X8” STEEL TUBE COLUMN GLAZING MUNTIN MULLION

2’ DUCTWORK 1’ CONCRETE SLAB CONCRETE FLOOR

DETAIL SECTION - SCALE 1”=1’

CONCRETE FOOTING

ARCH 600 + 611 Integrated Design Studio, Fall 2016 | Arica Thornton + Abby Winter | Professor Tilghman + Professor Bovill


SPIRIT OF FOOD

Aerial View

View showing community center, cloister, growing spaces, vineyard

Exterior View

View looking through the cloister looking at the front of the community center

Section Detail

This studio focused on integration of structural, HVAC and lighting design. This is a detail section of the front curtain wall.

Plan View Interior View

View from balcony to the lower event space and then into the cloister.

pg 4


THE VILLAGE PARK Re-envisioning Owen Brown Village Center

For this project, we partnered with the UMD real estate students and members of Owen Brown to try and re-envision the current village center. The site is surrounded by Cradlerock parkway and is directly north of the man-made lake, Lake Elkhorn. Our goal was to design a three-phase center that included mixed-use (residential and retail) buildings, provide a safe community center for the residents, and to provide access to Lake Elkhorn.


THE VILLAGE PARK URBAN DESIGN STUDIO ARCH461 | SPRING 2016 PROFESSOR VANDERGOOT GROUP MEMBERS: AREN KNUDSEN CHRISTIANE MACHADO

Left: View of the retail corridor and stream that leads into Lake Elkorn from the retention pond. Right: Aerial View of the Village Park

pg 5


3 Phase Scheme Parti Diagrams

Extending to Elkhorn Lake

Current

Major Connections

Phase 1

Major Zones

Phase 2


Phase 3

THE VILLAGE PARK Our first parti Diagram centered around the idea of connecting the community center to Lake Elkhorn. Currently, the lake is not very utilized because of the major road that separates the Lake from the community center. Our second parti shows how we wanted to create connections between the major areas of the site - the library, middle school, retention pond and Lake. Ultimately, we created three zones in our scheme - The Fields, The Gardens and the Village. Just like any development project, we had to think of our design development in three phases.

pg 6


Site Diagrams The figure/ground diagrams show the buildings that we kept and the buildings that we removed and added. We were careful to keep the current senior living housing complexes as well as the Giant, which remained the anchor to the site. The site itself created a loop shape. The circulation diagram shows how we added a connector road through the site. We also paid close attention to the existing parcels when creating our design layout.

Figure/Ground - Before

Circulation - Before

Pedestrian vs. Vehicular

Figure/Ground - After

Circulation - After

Parcels


Parking Lots Transform into Parks

“Park Areas”The

Section through Cradlerock Way

THE VILLAGE PARK Another goal of the Park was to create as few impermeable spaces as possible. Each parking lot we placed on the site was designed to be used for multiple purposes. When not in heavy use, like on the weekends, the parking lots could be turned into a farmer’s market venue. The parking lots had impervious pavers. Some even had lots of tree coverage to make the lots seam more of a “park” and less like a parking lot. The diagram with the gradients of green show the different spaces in the design and how green and “park like” they are. The light green are pervious parking lots and the dark green are actual green spaces covered with grass and vegetation.

pg 7


Top Left: This is the retention pond re-envisioned. In the background is the village center loop and the Giant Food Store. Bottom Left: This view is walking from one side of the Village center loop to the other, walking towards the Giant food store entrance.


THE VILLAGE PARK Top Right:Mixed Used Building within the Village Center Loop Bottom Right: The View is looking at the stream that runs under the road and into Lake Elkhorn.

pg 8


2

pace

SUSTAINABLE FARMER’S MARKET Comprehensive and Tectonic Design

Primary beams purlins

Two-Way Beam Structural System with moment connections and cross bracing

secondary beams

Our comprehensive studio started with this individual 5 week exercise. Each week, we had to tackle a new design aspect of the design, such as structure, material, glazing, lighting, HVAC, and sustainability. The result was an indoor/outdoor farmer’s market. The purpose of this exercise was to allow us to think about the large design concept and Module 2 the tectonics at the same time. Two-Way Beam Structural System column

Primary beams

purlins

with moment connections and cross bracing

secondary beams

Precedent | Isreal Plads, Copenhagen column

Program: Farmer’s Market Floor Plate Area Total: 12,000sqft Floor Plate Area of Interior Corridor: 32ft x 75ft =2,400sqft Floor Plate Area of One Building: 75ft x 64ft = 4,800sqft x (2) = 9,600sqft Bay Area: 64ft x 25 ft = 1,600sqft Exterior Bay Area: 32ft x 25 ft = 800 sqft

Program: Farmer’s Market

Outline Specifications

Floor Plate Area Total: 12,000sqft Floor Plate Area of Interior Corridor: 32ft x 75ft =2,400sqft Floor Plate Area of One Building: 75ft x 64ft = 4,800sqft x (2) = 9,600sqft Structural: Bay Area: 64ft x 25 ft = 1,600sqft Column: beam Exterior Bay Area: 32ft x 25Steel ft = 800 sqft W14 x 120

Girder: W21 x 122 Beams: W21 x 93 Purlins: W10 x 77 Outline Specifications Truss: Chords: 15” deep Structural: Vertial Joist: 8” x 8” steel tubing Column: Steel beam W14 x 120 Diagonal Girder: W21 x 122 Joist: 4” x 4” steel tubing Skin: W21 x 93 Beams: Purlins: W10 x 77 Aluminum Mullion: 8” deep, 4” wide Truss: Aluminum Muntins: 4“ deep, 2” wide Chords: 15” deep Aluminum Casement Vertial Joist: 8” x 8” steel tubing Diagonal Laminated Joist: 4” x 4” steel tubing Glazing Skin: Roof: Aluminum Mullion: 8” deep, 4” wide Aluminum Aluminum Muntins: 4“ Sheet deep, 2”Metal wide Roofing

Moment Connection Moment Connection

Roof:

Phase 1

Covered vs. Open Space Covered vs. Circulation Open Spaces

Circulation Circulation

Column Grid Transformation Column Grid Transformation

Column Grid Transformation

Green Space Surrounding Green Space Green Spaces

Aluminum Casement Laminated Glazing

Aluminum Sheet Metal Roofing

Concept Abby WInterDrawing _ Arch 600 + 611

Fall 2016, Module 1 600 + 611 Abby WInter _ Arch Fall 2016, Module 1


FARMER’S MARKET COMPREHENSIVE STUDIO ARCH600 | FALL 2016 PROFESSOR TILGHMAN

38’ 20’

Elevation One Bay Elevation Scale 1’=1/16”

Longitudinal Section Longitudinal Section Scale 1’=1/16”

Phase 1

Module 2

Primary beams purlins

Elevation Scale 1’=1/16” A

In this phase, we had to choose one materiTwo-Way Beam Structural System al. Initially, I chose steel with moment connections and cross bracing because I liked the steel structure of Isreal Plads. Also, I felt the steel gave the structure a nice light, airy feeling for the market.

secondary beams

C

B

D

1 25’

column

2 75’

The project also called for one structure, however, I decided to create two structures that joined Program: in the Farmer’smiddle. Market I shortly realized this would cause many structural issues and needed Outline Specifications modification.

3

4 Plan Scale 1’=1/16”

30’

32’

Floor Plate Area Total: 12,000sqft Floor Plate Area of Interior Corridor: 32ft x 75ft =2,400sq Floor Plate Area of One Building: 75ft x 64ft = 4,800sqft x (2) = 9,600sqft Bay Area: 64ft x 25 ft = 1,600sqft Exterior Bay Area: 32ft x 25 ft = 800 sqft

Moment Connection Bay Section

Scale 1’=1/8”

Structural: Column: Steel beam W14 x 120 Girder: W21 x 122 Beams: W21 x 93 Purlins: W10 x 77 Truss: Chords: 15” deep Vertial Joist: 8” x 8” steel tubing Diagonal Joist: 4” x 4” steel tubing Skin: Aluminum Mullion: 8” deep, 4” wide Aluminum Muntins: 4“ deep, 2” wide Aluminum Casement Laminated Glazing Roof: Aluminum Sheet Metal Roofing

Bay Elevation Scale 1’=1/8”

pg 9

Abby WInter _ Arch 600 + 611 Fall 2016, Module 1


Module 3 - Concrete

Phase 2 In this phase, we explored two other types of construction methods. Since I explored steel in the first phase, I looked at concrete and heavy timber construction for phase 2. Although my design comprised of two structures, 32’ this phase focused only on one bay of the design. In this phase, we learned about how different materials can influence the overall design.

Concrete Construction

Section Scale 1’ =3/16”

Module 3 - Concrete

Module 3 - Heavy Timber 40’

32’

32’

Section Scale 1’ =3/16”

Detail 1 Scale 1’ = 1 -1/2”

50’

Heavy Timber Construction

Module 3 - Heavy Timber

40’

Plan Scale 1’ =3/16”

Detail 2 Scale 1’ = 1 - 1/2”

Section Scale 1’ =3/16”

Concrete

Type I - B - NS 11 floors / UL sqft

Pour Footings Erect cast in place column/girder

Pour concrete foundation

160’

Attach cast in place beams -with metal fasteners/epoxy

Plate Area = 10,560 sqft

32’

24’ 50’

Plan Scale 1’ =3/16”

Section Scale 1’ =3/16”

Detail 1 Scale 1’ = 1 -1/2”

40’

Detail 2 Scale 1’ = 1 - 1/2”

Abby WInter _ Arch 600 + 611


Scale 1’ =3/16”

Scale 1’ = 1 -1/2”

Scale 1’ = 1 - 1/2”

Concrete

Type I - B - NS 11 floors / UL sqft

40’

Module 3 - Heavy Timber

160’

Plate Area = 10,560 sqft

Module 3 - Concrete

Phase 2

Plan Scale 1’ =3/16”

50’ 32’

32’

Concrete Construction Pour Footings Erect cast in place column/girder

Section

Attach cast in place beams Scale 1’ =3/16” -with metal fasteners/epoxy

Pour concrete foundation

Detail 1 Scale 1’ = 1 -1/2”

ScaleDetail 1’ =3/16” Footing

Abby _ Arch 600 + 611 DetailWInter 2 2016, Module 1 Scale 1’ = Fall 1 - 1/2”

Detail 1 Add Concrete walls and windows/doors Scale 1’ = 1 -1/2”

Add roof

Section

Beam Detail

Detail 2 Scale 1’ = 1 - 1/2”

Concrete

I - B - NS Heavy Type Timber

40’

floors / UL sqft Type IV 11 - NS 5 floors / Plate 36,000sqft Area = 10,560 sqft

Module 3 - Heavy Timber

24’

Section Scale 1’ =3/16”

=3/16”

Plan Scale 1’ =3/16”

Detail40’ 1 Scale 1’ = 1 -1/2”

Detail 2 Scale 1’ = 1 - 1/2”

Pour Footings Erect cast in place column/girder

40’

Concrete Concrete

Type I - B - NS Type I - B - NS 11 floors / UL sqft 11 floors / UL sqft

Pour Footings

Add wood column pour concrete foundation

Attach cast in place beams -with metal fasteners/epoxy

Pour concrete foundation

Add metal colum and plate to wood column

Attach two glulam pieces together attach girder to column

160’

Footing Detail

Plate Area = 10,560 sqft Detail Connection Plate Area = 10,560 sqft

Cast-in-place beams and girders with steel reinforcement allow for fewer, but larger, structural members than wood construction allows. This ultimate creates a larger bay. Concrete also allows for higher construction heights, with more floors.

Detail 2 Scale 1’ = 1 - 1/2”

32’

Add Concrete walls and windows/doors

Add roof

Add beams

Add roof

160’ Section Scale 1’ =3/16”

Abby WInter _ Arch 600 + 611 Fall 2016, Module 1

Add walls and windows/doors

Detail 1 Scale 1’ = 1 -1/2”

Detail 2Abby WInter _ Arch 600 + 611 Scale 1’ = 1 - 1/2” Fall 2016, Module 1

Heavy Timber

Type IV - NS 5 floors / 36,000sqft

Plan Scale 1’ =3/16”

24’

65’

Plate Area = 10,752 sqft

Heavy Timber Construction Heavy timber and glulam construction also allow for large bay configurations. However, wood construction allows for more interesting detail connections than concrete construction.

40’

pg 10

Abby WInter _ Arch 600 + 611

ace beams l fasteners/epoxy

=3/16”

Detail 1 Scale 1’ = 1 -1/2”

160’

65’

Plate Area = 10,752 sqft

50’

=3/16”

FARMER’S MARKET

Add roof

Section Scale 1’ =3/16”

Attach cast in place beams -with metal fasteners/epoxy

Add Concrete walls and windows/doors Fall 2016, Module 1 Abby WInter _ Arch 600 + 611 Detail 1 Detail 1 Detail 2 Detail 2 Add Concrete walls and windows/doors Fall 2016, Module 1 Scale 1’ = 1 -1/2” Scale 1’ = 1 -1/2” Scale 1’ = 1 - 1/2”Scale 1’ = 1 - 1/2”

Add roof

Pour Footings

Add wood column pour concrete foundation

Add metal colum and plate to wood column

Attach two glulam pieces together attach girder to column

Add beams

Add roof

Add walls and windows/doors


Phase 3

Roof 26’

In this phase, we had to choose one of the materials based on our phase 1 and 2 explorations. I chose heavy 15’ detailing because I wanted to span a large distance and felt that timber and glulam construction, with steel wood was a more appealing choice for this farmer’s market. In phase 3 we also had to incorporate lighting, HVAC systems, and sustainable systems into our designs. 2

28’

Section Scale 1’ = 1/8”

40’

3

4

Structure and HVAC

Air Handler Room

14 in x 48 in Supply Air Duct 12 in x 30 in Return Air Duct

24’

Steel Connection

Lights and Ceiling 4ft LED suspended fixtures 4 inch LED haning downlights

120’

Window Mullion Detail Columns and Air Handler Room 16 in square glu-lam columns 192 sqft air handler room

Chiller and Boiler Room

Ceiling Plan

Electric Room

Plan Scale 1’ = 1/8”

Detail Wall Section

Abby Winter _ Arch 600 + 611 Fall 2016, Module 5

Base Connection


FARMER’S MARKET

Full Section Scale 1/8” = 1’

Sustainable Strategies Roof 26’ 15’

Ventilation

40’ 1

A

2

Air Handler Room

28’

Section Scale 1’ = 1/8”

40’

3

4

Structure and HVAC

Air Handler Room

14 in x 48 in Supply Air Duct 12 in x 30 in Return Air Duct

24’

B

Lights and Ceiling

C

Water Shedding

4ft LED suspended fixtures 4 inch LED haning downlights

120’

D

Columns and Air Handler Room E

F

Solar Shading

16 in square glu-lam columns 192 sqft air handler room

Chiller and Boiler Room

Electric Room

Chiller and Boiler Room

Electric Room

Bay Plan Scale 1/2” = 1’ 24‘ X 40’

Plan Scale 1’ = 1/8”

Abby Winter _ Arch 600 + 611 Fall 2016, Module 5

In phase 1, my design was made of two structures joined in the middle. Since this was not structurally sound, I decided to make two structures that mirrored each other. The 10inch gap in between the structures gave the gesture of wanting to touch. This gap was just wide enough to water the line of trees in between the structures, without impeding on any pedestrians. Abby WInter _ Arch 600 + 611 Fall 2016, Module 4

pg 11


TENT CABINS Redesigning Camp for the Girl Scouts of the 21st Century

The goal of this project was to reimagine the Girl Scout Experience for the Girl Scouts of Central Maryland. We had to redesign the overall master plan of the site, as well as a cabin and a lodge. This cabin design was based off of the historic structures currently on the site.


PRECEDENTS

TENT CABINS

Lamb Lodge

Starlet

Tee-Pee/Tent

GRADUATE STUDIO ARCH400 | FALL 2015 PROFESSOR SIMON

- skylight on top - geometric shape - exposed structure

- A Frame - Overhanging Roof - Exposed Interior Structure

- Tee Pee Shape - Blinds similar to opening a tent

PRECEDENTS

Lamb Lodge is the most famous structure on the site, built by RTKL in the 1950s. It is currently on the National Register TENT of Historic Places. StarCadet let lodge, although not Cabin recognized as a historic structure, it is still Camp a large iconic building for Total: the site and its visitors. This design aimed to take elements from the -TEE PEE SHAPE current structures as -BLINDS SIMILAR TO OPENING A TENT well as other camping structures to envision a new cabin design. The exposed structure, A frame and tee pee like shape were the main characteristics used. Summer

-SKYLIGHT ON TOP -GEOMETRIC SHAPE -EXPOSED STRUCTURE LAMB LODGE

STARLET

-A FRAME -OVERHANGING ROOF -BALCONY -EXPOSED INTERIOR STRUCTURE

Winter

TENT CAMPING

pg 12


Tent Cabin | Elevations

Sun Angles

The front and back facades are completely glazed to give the cabin a welcoming and open feel. The first floor has windows above each girl and troop leader’s bed so they can can have a view to the outside. There are sky lights towards the top, like in lamb lodge, to allow natural sunlight into the cabin. The slanted overhang, similar in appearance to the overhang

FRONT ELEVATION

BACK ELEVATION

SIDE ELEVATION

SIDE ELEVATION

Summer

Winter


Tent Cabin | Sections

TENT CABINS

The cabin has a main entrance level with a front porch and an ADA ramp that leads to the entrance. There are interior stairs that lead to a second level where girls can hang out and see GRADUATE STUDIO their friends down below. This level also extends to the outside to create a second floor balco- ARCH400 | FALL 2015 ny in the front of the cabin. Below shows what the cabin would look from the inside when the PROFESSOR SIMON

CROSS SECTION 2

CROSS SECTION 1

CURTAINS CLOSED

CROSS SECTION 2 CURTAINS OPENED

CURTAINS OPENED

CROSS SECTION 2 CURTAINS CLOSED

CROSS SECTION 1 CURTAINS CLOSED

pg 13


Tent Cabin | Floor Plans and Aerial These floor plans show the interior stair placement as well as the arrangement of beds. Each cabin can accommodate 20 girls in 10 bunk bends and 2 troop leaders in 2 single beds. Each bunk bed gets a corresponding dresser and window for a more personalized feel. The bunks are situated between structural studs which help to define the girls’ individual space. TRANSVERSE SECTION

CROSS SECTION 2

CROSS SECTION 1

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

AERIAL VIEW

Aerial View


Total: 5 Buildings, 40 Girls, 8 Troup Leaders

PRECEDENTS

TENT CABINS

Cadettes - Ambassadors (Grade 6 - 1 Cabin: 10 Girls, 2 Troup Leaders Campsite: 4 Cabins, 1 Pavilion Total: 5 Buildings, 40 Girls, 8 Troup Lea

Tent Cabin | Campsite Location and Perspectives

TENT CABINS

Summer

-A FRAME -OVERHANGING ROOF -BALCONY -EXPOSED INTERIOR STRUCTURE

PERSPECTIVE

-TEE PEE SHAPE

-BLINDS SIMILAR TO The current campsite consists of four cabins, central campfireWinter and a pavilion to cook and eat. They are OPENING A TENT shown on the map used dashed lines. The campsite lies between the main access road and the ravine TENT CAMPING and there is a center path that runs between the cabins. The cabins are positioned so that they receive the morning sun and the summer cross breezes from the south east. -SKYLIGHT ON TOP -GEOMETRIC SHAPE -EXPOSED STRUCTURE

LAMB LODGE

STARLET

-TEE PEE SHAPE -BLINDS SIMILAR TO OPENING A TENT

E

Summer

W

-A FRAME -OVERHANGING ROOF -BALCONY -EXPOSED INTERIOR STRUCTURE

Winter

S

TENT CAMPING

E W

S

Model

CABINS AT MERRIMEN

Section Perspective

INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE

SITE PLAN

Site Plan SITE PLAN

pg 14



Graduate Portfolio 2017