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2009Media Placements ~ Abbi Public Relations, Inc.


November

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March

Fortune Small Business South Florida Business Journal Northern Nevada Business Weekly Multi-Housing News SFGate.com February

Central Valley Business Times CNNMoney.com Associated Press Yahoo Finance Inland Valley Daily Bulletin November 2008

The Washington Post


Three New Businesses Make Their Home in Lakeway Story by Cathie Parssinen Phtotos courtesy of XXX

Greystone Cabinetry Rob and Misty Estrada felt like pioneers when they packed up their children and headed to Texas from Indiana a two and a half years ago. Despite their affection for the midwest and their extensive family roots in an area not too far from Chicago, a spirit of adventure and a desire to escape the endless, frigid, snowy Indiana winters inspired them to head west. And here they are...new Texans! They are huge fans of the Texas Hill Country and have slipped seamlessly into the fabric of life in Lake Travis, assisted by their love of sports. Rob has coached both football and baseball for three seasons in LTYA leagues, and their involvement has led to many new friends and great times (and, hopefully, as Rob notes, not too many sports enemies!). The Estradas have owned Greystone Farm Custom Cabinetry 10 years and take great pride in the high quality, beautiful custom cabinetry they create. They enjoy working on both whole house, new construction custom jobs and also renovations and additions. In addition to cabinets, they specialize in custom entertainment centers, unique dining room tables, hutches and built-in beds. “We go the distance,” says Rob. “If a door or drawer needs adjusting a year later, I’m here for you.”

Balance Yoga The January opening of Balance Yoga, Lakeway’s first yoga studio, brings Nani and Bart Bacon back to Texas. Nani was born and raised in Friendswood, TX, just south of Houston, and she met Bart Bacon of Denver, CO, when they both attended Sam Houston State University at Huntsville. The couple has lived in Denver where Bart started Bacon Design, a graphic design business handling print media, web design, illustration and fine art. In 2001 Nani started her practice of yoga and quickly developed a level of expertise and certification in four styles of yoga that led Core Power Yoga in Denver to offer her a position as an instructor. Subsequently she managed two of Core Power Yoga south Denver studios and operated their retail programs as well. Nani’s following and reputation grew, and the Denver Post named her one of Denver’s foremost fitness leaders. Nani’s mother and her sister and brotherin-law, Leilani and Joe Connors live in Lakeway so the Bacons have spent a lot of time here over the years. The Bacon’s two children, Zoe (13) and Reid (9) are looking forward to being near this part of their family. Leilani Connors owns and operates Achieve Manual Physical Therapy in the Lakeway Plaza off Hwy 620, and now the two sisters will own businesses less than a mile apart! Balance Yoga will offer classes in four different disciplines, including hot yoga, hot power fusion and power yoga. Classes will be open to all experience levels, although some classes will be structured more specifically toward the advanced or beginning student. We welcome Bart, Nani, Zoe and Reid!

FAST WRAP USA OFFERS AUSTIN AFFORDABLE ASSET PROTECTION Meg and Rob Arnold are no strangers to Austin, having lived here when Meg was a Dell employee. They are excited to be back and even more excited to debut their new business, FAST WRAP USA, in Austin. FAST WRAP is the only national franchiser of shrink-wrapping services, bringing wrapping directly to the customer. The covering is fire-retardant, flameresistant and “shrinks to fit,” forming a powerful seal that protects watercraft, RVs, equipment, materials and structures from dirt, insects and animals, and the effect of weather. All materials used in this environmentally conscious business are recyclable, anti-microbial and resistant to allergens, mold and mildew. In addition, for projects precarious to the environment, such as asbestos removal, FAST WRAP prevents toxic substances from penetrating the atmosphere. The Arnolds will also offer a “Same Day Shade” component that provides clean, 100% recyclable, single-use shelters for events at a 25–30% discount compared to tent rentals. These special event tents can be customized for all needs and set up the same day, usually in a matter of hours. Welcome home, Meg and Rob!

1

Waterways | Winter 2009–2010


KENOSHA NEWS | TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2009 | C6 Reporter: John Krerowicz l (262) 656-6272 l jkrerowicz@kenoshanews.com

Local man won’t shrink from business BY JOHN KREROWICZ

KENOSHA NEWS PHOTO BY BRIAN PASSINO

Russ Bloom has started Fast Wrap, a business that specializes in on-site shrink-wrapping of boats, furniture, etc.

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AutoNation CEO sees sales lag until 2011 DETROIT (AP) — U.S. auto sales should recover a bit next year but will remain at depression levels through 2010 until housing prices and job cuts stabilize, the CEO of the nation’s largest auto dealer chain said Monday. AutoNation CEO Mike Jackson said in an interview that tight credit is holding down sales this year, but they will hit bottom in 2009 and start to increase next year, rising to around 11 million cars and trucks. Sales this year are running at an annual rate of around 10 million vehicles. Auto sales, he said, won’t return to normal levels until job losses and housing prices begin to stabilize. He predicted improvement in 2011 and 2012, and a return to more normal sales after that.

Green M&Ms really go green

More job cuts ahead for some employers THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

■Sprint Nextel Corp. is planning to cut 2,000 to 2,500 jobs, mostly before the end of the year, as it keeps losing subscribers. The wireless carrier, based in Overland Park, Kansas, said Monday it aims to cut labor costs by at least $350 million per year. ■ The Procter & Gamble Co. is centralizing some research and development operations, affecting some 700 jobs. Most of the jobs will move to P&G’s South Boston complex and centers in the Cincinnati area and Bethel, Conn., starting next year and completing by June 2012. ■ The Star Tribune in Minneapolis is cutting about 100 jobs as Minnesota’s largest newspaper further trims costs after emerging from bankruptcy protection.

DOLLAR-GOLD NEW YORK (AP) — Key currency exchange rates Monday, compared with late Friday in New York: Dollar vs: Exchange Rate Pvs Day Yen $89.99 $89.93 Euro $1.4999 $1.4835 Pound $1.6752 $1.6602 Swiss franc $1.0079 $1.0179 Canadian dollar $1.0544 $1.0768 Mexican peso $13.3060 $13.3780 Metal Price (troy oz.) Pvs Day NY Merc Gold $1100.80 $1095.10 NY HSBC Bank US $1101.50 $1096.00 NY Merc Silver $17.470 $17.365

Up to the minute NEWS, WEATHER & SPORTS

Visit our Web site: www.kenoshanews.com

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closings and layoffs often lead to the jobless moving into the home improvement business, creating more competition. However, the wrap business, Bloom said, is growing. He said he wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expecting a lot of business for his first year, saying franchises often take several months before establishing themselves. Bloom said he was a customer relations manager for a company in Kenosha County for 10 years, starting the home improvement business in 2000. He can be reached at 877378-9727 or 224-234-8921; see also www.fastwrapusa.com.

Kraftâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $16.4B Cadbury bid starts takeover tussle NEW YORK (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kraft Foods has gone hostile in its bid to buy Cadbury but didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sweeten its first bid, drawing an immediate rejection from the British candy maker in what is likely to be a lengthy takeover struggle. Taking the same offer directly to Cadbury shareholders likely means that Kraft is betting no competing bids will emerge for the maker of Dairy Milk and Creme Eggs. The early gambit also leaves the company room to take the bid higher.

Kraft made the offer, worth about $16.4 billion, just hours before a Monday deadline imposed by Britainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s takeover law that required the company to make a formal offer or back off for six months. Kraft now has 28 days to file a prospectus, which will then trigger more deadlines that could last months. Now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up to Cadburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shareholders to decide. Most likely, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll hold out for a higher offer, analysts say. Kraft put a maximum value on the deal of $17 billion.

LIVESTOCK REESEVILLE (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Milwaukee Stockyards report: Cows: no-roll cows 42-47; highyielding cutters and utility 35-40; cutters 30-35; canners and shells up to 30. Holstein steers: high choice and prime Holstein steers 1,4001,650 pounds 71-74; choice Holstein steers 65-70; select and unfinished Holstein steers up to 65. Beef cattle: prime Angus beef 1,200-1,450 pounds up to 77; choice steers and heifers 73-76; select beef steers and heifers up to 70. Bulls: premium beef bulls 1,600-2,050 pounds up to 55; common to good bulls 48-54. Replacement calves: premium bulls 90-120 pounds 45-60; common to good bulls 80-120 pounds 30-45; premium heifers up to 250; common to good heifers 100-200; boning calves up to 30. Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s estimated receipts: 500 cattle and 30 calves.

777097

HACKETTSTOWN, N.J. (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A New Jersey candy factory that produces M&Ms flipped the switch Monday on a dedicated solar array thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the largest in the nation to serve a single manufacturing complex, according to Public Service Enterprise Group Inc. The 18-acre field of solar panels in Hackettstown is capable of generating 2.2 megawatts per hour of clean energy.

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wrap to customers. Boats, barbecues, construction equipment, half-completed homes, pools, furniture and scaffolding could be covered by the wrap, they said. Bloom said he wrapped battleship radar domes 20 feet tall and wider than 22 feet while in training. His shop, with a few parttime employees, has done boats, patio furniture, outdoor fountains and collector cars, with about half the work in Kenosha County.

He also offers coverings for industrial and agricultural needs such as wrapping bales of hay or crops and a temporary roof for a building that had a fire as well as tents for weddings, graduation parties and other gatherings. A wrap for crawl spaces has an anti-bacterial agent that fights mold and mildew, he said. Bloom said the plastic wrap is put on tightly and shrunk using heat guns and special torches. Bloom owns Innovative Home Improvements in Racine. The building industry has shrunk, too, and company

Stocks are those that affect the local economy. Kenosha Area Busniess Alliance contributed to the list.

ATTORNEY JOHN A. BECKER

BOARD OF TRADE CHICAGO (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Agriculture futures advanced Monday on the Chicago Board of Trade. Meanwhile, beef futures rose and pork futures traded mixed on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. â&#x2013; Wheat for December delivery surged 22.75 cents to $5.20 a bushel;

â&#x2013; December corn jumped 19 cents to $3.86 a bushel; â&#x2013;  Oats for December delivery gained 4.5 cents to $2.585 a bushel; â&#x2013;  January soybeans added on 17 cents to $9.72 a bushel; â&#x2013;  December live cattle slipped 0.05

Recall warns baby strollers can slice off kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; fingertips WASHINGTON (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; About a million Maclaren strollers sold by Target and Babies â&#x20AC;&#x153;Râ&#x20AC;? Us were recalled Monday, after 12 reports of children having their fingertips amputated by a hinge mechanism. The recall includes all nine models of single and double umbrella Maclaren strollers, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, which announced the recall after an investigation. The amputation risk occurs when a childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finger is placed in the hinge mechanism of a stroller while it is being unfolded. When the opened stroller locks into place, it can cut off the tip of the childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finger. The recall includes the following stroller models: Volo, Triumph, Quest Sport, Quest Mod, Techno XT, TechnoXLR,

RECALLS Twin Triumph, Twin Techno and Easy Traveller. They have been sold at Babies â&#x20AC;&#x153;Râ&#x20AC;? Us, Target and other stores around the country since 1999. Prices for the strollers ranged from $100 to $360. The company is offering free hinge covers to prevent future incidents. The covers should not be removed unless the stroller is being cleaned, according to the CPSC. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our message to parents, grandparents and all caregivers is to make sure that you stop using these strollers until you get the repair kit, which zips the covers in place,â&#x20AC;? said CPSCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Patty Davis. The strollers were manufactured in China and distributed by Maclaren USA Inc of South Norwalk, Conn.

cent to 84.95 cents a pound; â&#x2013; January feeder cattle fell 0.37 cent to 95.7 cents a pound; â&#x2013;  December lean hogs inched up 0.1 cent to 55.8 cents a pound; â&#x2013;  February pork bellies lost 1.5 cents to 84.6 cents a pound.

Over 20 years experience handling personal injury claims.

776631

BRIEFS

NEW BUSINESS

jkrerowicz@kenoshanews.com A Racine resident has opened a new Fast Wrap business that covers various items in plastic, typically to protect them from the weather. The business owner, Russ Bloom, says he researched four franchises for a few years and settled on shrink wrap because it seemed an interesting thing to do. He opened his office Aug. 10, operating for now out of his home. Company officials said that shrink wrap has been used for years, usually at a site, but their franchisees bring the

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:: Baton Rouge Business Report :: Daily Report PM

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THIS AFTERNOON'S HEADLINES / WED, NOV. 11, 2009

Entergy customers to see lower bills Entergy says customer bills are down more than 34% from last November because of a drop in natural gas prices, which peaked at more than $13.50 per 1,000 cubic feet last July and fell to $3.58 per 1,000 cubic feet earlier this year. The Henry Hub price for the beginning of November was $4.28 per 1,000 cubic feet. The company also is reaping the benefits of a one-time $4.37 per-1,000-kilowatt-hour credit that is the result of a recent formula rate plan settlement with the Louisiana Public Service Commission. The result is that a customer who uses 1,000 kilowatt hours of electricity this month can expect to see a bill of $70.29, more than $35 lower than a $107.16 bill last November. “We are pleased that the reduction in the price of natural gas has led to lower electricity costs for our customers,” says Jeff Holeman, a spokesman for Entergy. “We are fortunate to be able to pass along decreases at a time when the holidays are approaching and many customers are experiencing challenges from the current economy.” DEMCO spokesman David Latona says the cooperative has less volatile rates because of a long-term contract with Louisiana Generating, which uses coal as a fuel source.—Emma James

La. ranked as 20th most-troubled state A new report that looks at what states are in significant financial peril ranked Louisiana 20th. Louisiana was tied with Oklahoma in the report released today by the Pew Center for the States. The report looked at the same factors that have pushed the California economy to the brink: plunging revenues, a widening budget gap, rising unemployment and an increase in foreclosures. California was ranked as being in the worst condition, with Arizona and Rhode Island finishing second. Wyoming was rated as the state least like California, in terms of fiscal condition. To read the full report, click here.

Northrop Grumman opens new facility Northrop Grumman has opened its new 20,000-square-foot facility in Slidell, combining that office and its Stennis Space Center operations in a $4 million campus. The project retained 35 jobs from the Slidell office, created 40 new high-tech jobs at an average annual salary of $47,000 plus benefits and will generate approximately 31 indirect jobs. In addition, it is expected to generate nearly $1.7 million in new state tax revenues and nearly $1.2 million in new local tax revenues from 2009 to 2018. "Expanding and retaining Louisiana’s existing companies is our top economic priority," Gov. Bobby Jindal says. "It’s also a reminder that, despite the national recession, companies have continued expanding and investing in Louisiana." The facility is capable of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), which is at the forefront of the geospatial industry and is shaping the technology available now and in the future. The Quality Jobs Program helped convince Northrop Grumman to expand in Slidell. The Slidell facility will support terrestrial elevation, watershed, flood, bare earth and surface modeling, volumetric and permeability solutions, and feature extraction data. For the rest of 10/12 Corridor Weekly, click here.

11/12/2009 11:07 AM


:: Baton Rouge Business Report :: Daily Report PM

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http://www.businessreport.com/archives/daily-report/2009/nov/11/1313/

Shrink-wrap business comes to B.R. Fast Wrap, a West Coast-based mobile business that shrink-wraps everything from foreclosed houses to boats, has opened up a Baton Rouge office. Charlie Henry has the first Louisiana franchise for Fast Wrap, which launched two years ago. The Baton Rouge operation has three employees who seal products with recyclable film. Henry says the service is ideal for protecting machinery and equipment from south Louisiana heat and humidity.

More La. residents eligible for H1N1 vaccine More Louisiana residents are eligible to receive the swine flu vaccine. State health officials announced today that people ages 25 to 64 with chronic medical conditions can now get doses of the vaccine. Pregnant women and children younger than 6 months old also remain eligible. The state Department of Health and Hospitals also added a feature to its Web site, making it easier to find facilities that have the vaccine. The Web address is FightTheFluLA.com.

Government says brown pelicans are endangered no longer After nearly 40 years of struggling for survival, the brown pelican, Louisiana's state bird, is coming off the endangered species list. The bird, now prevalent across Florida, the Gulf and Pacific coasts, and the Caribbean was declared an endangered species in 1970, after its population was devastated by the use of the pesticide DDT. The pelican's recovery is largely due to a 1972 ban on the chemical, coupled with efforts by states and conservation groups to protect its nesting sites and monitor its population. "After being hunted for its feathers, facing devastating effects from the pesticide DDT and suffering from widespread habitat loss, the pelican has made a remarkable recovery," says Tom Strickland, assistant secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks for the Interior Department. "We once again see healthy flocks of pelicans in the air over our shores." The plight of the brown pelican has tracked closely with the development and birth of the nation's environmental policy and the environmental movement. It was listed as endangered before Congress passed the Endangered Species Act in 1973. And its struggle for survival, initially due to hunting for its feathers, led to the birth of the National Wildlife Refuge System more than 100 years ago.

UNO considers dropping down in athletics The University of New Orleans says it’s looking at going from having Division I sports programs, to Division III programs as a money-saving move. While Division I student-athletes have scholarships to college, Division III schools don't give scholarships for sports. UNO says it is looking at making the shift after absorbing tough budget cuts and attempts to raise money for athletics through higher student fees and private fundraising fell short. “We had to reduce funding for athletics in the previous round of budget cuts and since then the financial picture of the university and the athletics program has not improved,” says Chancellor Tim Ryan, who notes UNO faces more budget cuts in the future. If UNO makes the switch, the school would have to send a request to the NCAA by May 15, in order to be a Division III school by the fall semester. Louisiana College in Pineville is a Division III school, and Centenary College in Shreveport plans to make the move in 2011.

Time running out for Fittest Exec competition Think you are more fit than your peers? There’s less than one week left to find out. The deadline to enter Business Report’s second Fittest Execs competition, in which Capital Region business executives compete in four categories (men 44 and under, men 45 and over, women 44 and under and women 45 and over), is Monday. The competition is open to executives (C-level, president, vice president, owner, partner, executive director or retired executives) and mid-level managers. In addition, companies with a minimum of five participants are eligible for a team competition. Fitness appraisals will take place at Bally Total Fitness Baton Rouge through Nov. 20, with the results to be announced in the Dec. 29 issue of Business Report. Click here to register or for more information.

11/12/2009 11:07 AM


Marc Hallen Joins Fast Wrap of Tampa Bay as Head of New Business De...

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http://www.madduxpress.com/people-on-the-go/2009/11/10/marc-hallen-...

« New Exhibition Opening Friday, November 13, 2009 At The Dalí Museum Manhattan Casino Allstars and Jordan Richardson Jazz Septet perform “Before & AfterPassing the Torch!” in Mahaffey Theater’s famed Bayview Room » 10 Nov 2009

Tampa Bay, Fla. –Fast Wrap of Tampa Bay, a mobile shrink wrapping company, recently announced the addition of Mr. Marc James Hallen as the companies Head of New Business Development. Mr. Hallen will work closely with Field Operations Manager George Duncan in building the Florida West Coast Fast Wrap business. Mr. Hallen spent 17 years in the telecommunications industry and was a top sales performer in a competitive Los Angeles, CA market. Hellen’s managed and trained a direct sales force and developed independent agents that consistently exceeded sales quota. He is also a sought after international speaker and trainer in the network marketing industry and has built numerous multi-national network marketing and direct sales businesses over the years. “Marc’s previous experience building businesses from start up to a successful enterprise provides us with the final piece of a strong, motivated team of business professionals,” said owner Harold Becker. “We’re proud to have him on board as key figure at Fast Wrap of Tampa Bay.” Fast Wrap owners, Bill Pierce and Harold Becker, recently acquired the Western Florida multi-area agreement for Fast Wrap The Tampa Bay location is the first of six locations that the two seasoned businessmen are planning to open on the western coast of Florida helping to address the area’s need to shrink wrap protection and services. About Fast Wrap USA Fast Wrap USA is the only national franchisor of shrink wrapping services. Fast Wrap’s fleet of vans provides mobile shrink wrapping that weatherizes and protects recreational vehicles, equipment, farm products, shipping containers, weather-damaged structures and more. The “shrink to wrap” film is recyclable, fire-retardant and comes in four colors, including a proprietary green for environmentally and visually sensitive areas. Franchisees receive extensive training and support through an innovative franchise management system. For more information, call 877-FST-WRAP or visit www.fastwrapusa.com. Popularity: 10% [?]

11/11/2009 12:11 PM


Local businessman says he can 'shrink wrap' Echelon - Inside Gaming - R...

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Local businessman says he can 'shrink wrap' Echelon Posted by Howard Stutz Wednesday, Nov. 04, 2009 at 09:59 AM

After reading Sunday’s Inside Gaming column, Garth Harris came up with an idea for what Boyd Gaming Corp. can do with the mothballed Echelon project – shrink wrap the nine-story steel and concrete structure. Harris owns the Las Vegas franchise of Fast Wrap USA, a national provider of shrink wrap materials. He said the company has shrink wraped residential, commercial and industrial projects. He said the $4.8 billion Echelon would probably take between 200,000 and 250,000 square feet of material to cover. Harris provided an image (below) of what Echelon might look like after the process.

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11/11/2009 12:38 PM


Covering the Industry’s News

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CONSTRUCTION

The Industry’s Newspaper www.constructionnews.net

(512) 295-3900  Home Ofc: P.O. Box 791290 San Antonio, TX 79279 (210) 308-5800

“I

first met David in 1988 when he was attending the University of Texas,” says John T. Baker. David Polser, Ph.D., was a Bevo handler with UT’s Silver Spurs organization, and played a role in selecting Bevo XIII, the longest-tenured mascot in UT history, who came from Baker’s Sunrise Ranch. “John and I have been friends for a number of years. He is my mentor and adviser,” Polser says. Polser turned to Baker for career guidance when he was offered a position with a large company. “I explained the merits of this offer, and John said, ‘Well, it sounds like a good deal, but let me give you something else to think about…’”

Polser says the two decided to create a company along the same lines of Baker’s former business of preparing land for construction, only with the goal to be more efficient. The two started Sunrise Vistas earlier this year. “With my previous business, which I ran for 15 years, we historically used skid steer loaders and other equipment to clear lots of large acreage tracks and right-of-ways of what I call ‘environmental parasitic invaders,’ such as cedar trees and other brush,” Baker says. After much brainstorming and researching about making the business more efficient, Baker finally came across continued on Page 21

Vol. 9

No. 11

Building a team

Blazing trails across Texas

L-R: Co-owners David Polser and John T. Baker operate Sunrise Vistas on the same ranch that Bevo XIII was born and raised.

 NOV 2009

Robert Cottrell, second from left, and Rocky Mager, far right, started their company with $5,000, years of experience and a love for the industry.

“W

e scraped together a whole $5,000, bought some tools and went to work! The rest,” Rocky Mager, co-owner, C&M Construction says, “is history!” Mager and his business partner, Robert Cottrell, co-owner, had both been involved in the industry for years, working for other companies. They decided to go out on their own after realizing that the opportunity was right in front of them. C&M, for Cottrell and Mager, was started in 2005. Gradually the business partners built their crew with men they have worked with in the past, and younger guys who were eager to learn. Office manager Jennifer Hall says,

“Rocky has always been one to help other people. If someone can’t find a job, he might hire them. People have always helped him when he needed it, so he passes it forward.” Both Cottrell and Mager agree that Hall has been instrumental in guiding the company to success. Mager says, “Robert and I work in construction – we’re not businessmen!” Cottrell adds, “That’s right. Until we brought Jennifer in, we just learned the business side as we went along. “We both were superintendents for other companies, and we learned a lot out there. To make this happen, we just continued on Page 21

Bringing beauty back to life

T

he Granite Shoals Municipal Building sits atop a granite rock and was once considered the diamond of Granite Shoals. Somewhere along the way of this striking building’s existence, however, it became vacant. When the city of Granite Shoals presented the opportunity to bid on the Granite Shoals Municipal Building Upgrade, the team at S&G Contracting Inc. pulled together to procure the job with what would be the winning bid. “This project consists of bringing aspects of an already beautiful building up to date, from new roofing, electrical, plumbing mechanical, as well as adding elevator wheelchair lifts and paved driveways,” says project manager James Johnson. “It is a little bit of everything, from as simple as paint to as complex as adding a new elevator to the existing structure with a nice granite veneer.”

L-R: S&G Contracting Inc.’s President Mike Stout and project manager James Johnson with the newly restored Granite Shoal’s Municipal Building

The S&G team, including project superintendent Homer Garza, came together to walk through the deserted building and found that their work was cut out for them. “This building was built back in the ‘80s. It has been vacant for so long, and we were finding unforeseen objects and problems daily, like with any other remodel,” Johnson says. “However, we are accustomed to finding some renovation projects in this state, and we always stay very persistent and mindful of the outcome.” Johnson says S&G founders Mike Stout, president, and Shane Gibson, vice president, are excited to be a part of this project. The building houses key players in the city’s organizational chain of command, which Johnson says was instrumental in bringing the project together. continued on Page 21


Page 24 ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––----------------–––––– Austin Construction News • Nov 2009

F

Ccino needs a home

That’s a wrap!

Ccino ready to work

L-R: After moving to Austin earlier this year, Rob and Meg Arnold have become involved in many of the activities that are unique to the area.

or the past six months Ccino (as in Cappaccino) has waited patiently for my little white truck to come up the driveway at the end of each day. As I near the house I can hear his soulful cry, so glad I am finally home. Not long ago Ccino stood wait in a similar way for a soldier, SSgt. Clay Bowen, his owner, to come home. Clay planned to visit Ccino in September and take him home with him in January, when his deployment ended. Ccino was his baby. But he is not coming home. Clay lost his life in Afghanistan in August. Ccino needs a home. I have fostered the amazing dog and his stepsister, Coco, since April. I have loved every minute of it. Just months ago, Clay asked if I would keep Coco. I would love to keep both dogs, but I feel I can only do one dog justice. Coco suits my lifestyle and is content just being outside, chasing squirrels and looking for deer. She doesn’t mind if I have to attend an event in the evening and come home late.

Ccino just wants to be loved. He really wants to be a lap dog or your shadow. He is an 18-month-old AKC registered pit bull and weighs about 65lbs., but he is not the aggressive, dog-fighting kind of pit bull. He might lick you to death, though, or accidentally hit you with his wagging tail. He is crate-trained and neutered. He loves to fetch anything and play. The amazing thing about Ccino is his personality. He will carry on a conversation with you. I have the recordings to prove it! He is very smart, but he is also very funny. Sometimes I just sit in the den and watch him on the deck doing silly things, like putting pieces of carpet on Coco’s head to entice her to play. If you throw a stick, the two dogs retrieve it in tandem. Ccino would make a wonderful companion dog. He is the most affectionate and loyal dog I have ever known. Help me find him a new, loving owner who can appreciate him the way I do and the way Clay did. –Kathie Fox, San Antonio Editor

“W

e’ve been to several concerts, I went to Austin City Limits, we’ve been out on the lakes, and we’ve had plenty of TexMex!” Yes, Meg Arnold, co-owner, Fast Wrap Austin, says she and her husband and business partner, Rob Arnold, coowner, are very excited to be living in Austin. The couple started their business in July. Meg explains why they chose Austin as the base for their business, and for their home. “We lived in Arizona, but here in Texas, there was still construction going on, as opposed to the rest of the country. Texas is just the best place to live if you still want to work and have a business or a job.” Rob says that since he and Meg opened the doors to their containment company, they have found many uses for their large-scale shrink-wrapping franchise. Though it wasn’t a project the Ar-

nolds worked on, Meg shares her favorite Fast Wrap application. “There was a casino under construction, and because it was unsightly in its condition, the casino next door paid to have it wrapped. There were also a lot of materials in there, so the wrap served as a good security measure as well.” Meg says her and Rob’s main focus was to get their business involved in construction industry. However, she says they have wrapped many other things, such as boats, to make sure that they stay practicing, and to get things “up and running.” The Arnolds say they have embraced the Austin way of life. Meg says next on her list is getting burnt orange shrinkwrap produced and sent to Austin! Fast Wrap Austin is a woman-owned business that uses shrink-wrap to perform containment, asset protection and weatherization services for construction and residential entities. –va


Loss mitigation measures important to ensure construction site protection | ... http://www.businessinsurance.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20091101...

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Printed from BusinessInsurance.com

Posted On: Nov. 01, 2009 6:00 AM CST Dave Lenckus When a commercial construction project shuts down indefinitely before it's complete, site protection depends on how well contractors demobilize and other loss-mitigation efforts once the site has been vacated, management experts say. Before contractors leave a worksite, the facility's structural integrity should be verified, said James Conroy, a vp and chief underwriting officer for the national market construction group at Liberty Mutual Group Inc. in Boston. For example, a wall system might have to be completed to stabilize the portion that is up already or the partially completed section might have to be dismantled, Mr. Conroy said. If a large construction or renovation project is halted at a fairly advanced stage, water standpipes should be charged so firefighters have an adequate water supply to fight a blaze on the site, he said. Some work, such as pouring concrete, can't always “stop on a dime” and still leave the facility structurally sound, said Colin Daigle, the Washington-based global construction consulting practice leader for the Marsh Risk Consulting. The consultant helps contractors manage shutting down a project and working through disputes. After contractors leave a site and the owner—in many cases a lender that has foreclosed on its construction loan—looks for property insurance, site security is a major factor in finding coverage, said Ronda Whaley, a senior vp for wholesale broker Brown & Riding Insurance Services Inc. in Los Angeles Local ordinances impose many security requirements, such as fencing and lighting, Ms. Whaley said. But adding guards and video surveillance “helps make underwriters feel comfortable,” particularly when a stalled project is in a high-crime area, she noted. Plastic-wrapping a stalled project can discourage trespassers and protect buildings with unfinished walls and roofs from the weather, said George Dale, executive vp in the construction services group at Aon Risk Services Inc. in Los Angeles. The process involves affixing large plastic sheets to one another by a heating process to essentially shrink-wrap a building's sides and roof. Chris McMillan, chief operating officer and director of sales for Reno, Nev.-based Fast Wrap USA, said the 3-year-old company's fee of about $1.25 per square foot of wrap is comparable to the cost of hiring a loss-mitigation company to tarp and board up a project, but the plastic wrap provides better protection and lasts

11/11/2009 2:21 PM


Loss mitigation measures important to ensure construction site protection | ... http://www.businessinsurance.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20091101...

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longer. The building wrap concept is not new, however, said Tony Seraphin, president of Global Wrap L.L.C. of St. Augustine, Fla. Global Wrap has been wrapping buildings for nearly 29 years, he said. Any size building and a project of any value can be wrapped, according to the companies' executives. Fast Wrap has secured an 88,000-square-foot building, while Global Wrap has wrapped a project in which the owner has $1.3 billion invested, the companies' executives said.

11/11/2009 2:21 PM


A Perfect Fit | Franchises from AllBusiness.com

http://www.allbusiness.com/print/13370566-1-7w7of.html

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Baton Rouge entrepreneur Charlie Henry started thinking about the best way to protect equipment from the elements after Hurricane Katrina, but the solution eluded him until he heard about Fast Wrap USA, a shrink wrap franchisor based in Reno, Nev. After Katrina, Henry, a general contractor, was working with other contractors who had no place to store their equipment and needed a way to protect their gear. "In our environment down here, with a lot of sun and humidity, I saw a lot of applications and a great fit. ... I felt like it was an ideal fit for a business opportunity," Henry said. From time to time, Henry saw boats wrapped in protective plastic being hauled on the interstate and wondered about it, but he never knew of a company that provided the service. Now Henry owns the Fast Wrap franchise for south Louisiana and part of Mississippi. The business doesn't require much in the way of bricks and mortar because the Fast Wrap van goes wherever the customer is, Henry said. "So you don't have to stop what you're doing, schedule a date, meet us somewhere or come to our location," Henry said. "We come to you. We can wrap anything, anywhere, anytime." Even hurricane-damaged houses. Usually, Fast Wrap comes in after the house has been dried with dehumidifiers, Henry said. But the company can also attach solar-powered vents to the film, which itself resists the growth of the allergens, mold, and mildew; the vents include a fan whose motor is driven by solar power. Fast Wrap USA has 37 franchises in operation or development. The franchises run from $91,000 to $198,000, with the average cost $144,000. Robert Justis, director of LSU's International Franchise Forum and the Stephenson Entrepreneurship Institute, said the startup cost for a franchise varies from industry to industry. Hotel-motel franchises can be in the millions of dollars, he said. A McDonald's can be $1.5 million to $2 million while a Home Instead Senior Care franchise may be only $35,000. No matter the industry, Justis said a franchise's success depends on three things: a wonderful product, a tremendous market and outstanding customer service. Henry is one of the many entrepreneurs who started a business during a recession. In general, more franchises are purchased during a down economy, according to Alisa Harrison, spokeswoman for the Washington, D.C.-based International Franchise Association. This year, however, the association expects the number of franchises to drop by about 10,000 to 855,000, breaking a 20-year growth trend. "We attribute the decline to the lack of access to credit for new buyers or for existing buyers who want to expand," Harrison said. Harrison said the association's members believe interest in franchising is "way up" for 2010, but the lack of financing is slowing things down a bit. Henry has three employees, including himself, and plans to hire three more by the end of the year. He hopes eventually to offer shrink wrapping throughout south Louisiana and south Mississippi.

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11/12/2009 11:12 AM


A Perfect Fit | Franchises from AllBusiness.com

http://www.allbusiness.com/print/13370566-1-7w7of.html

So far, he has wrapped boats, RVs, machinery, trailers and even some patio furniture. The biggest job Henry has done was a hospital construction site in San Francisco. Henry and two other franchise owners and their crews spent four days applying 100,000 square feet of plastic film to several of the hospital's outpatient buildings, he said. The film protected the patients, their families and hospital employees from the wind and elements while construction was under way. The company also offers a product called "Same Day Shade" - recyclable, single-use tents that can be used for tailgating, company functions, weddings, receptions and other events, Henry said.

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11/12/2009 11:12 AM


Franchise Focus Profile

Serial Entrepreneur

First there was taxidermy, then a traveling stuffed bucking bull...

We’ve heard the “I-saw-a-needand-filled-it” story about how an entrepreneur came up with a concept, but not three concepts as diverse as taxidermy, port-a-potties and shrinkwrapping jet engines and casinos. By Nancy Weingartner

M

ike Enos wiled away his high school years in Nevada hunting and fishing, not playing the usual team sports. His senior year, he killed “a really big mule deer,” so he did what any hunter who wants bragging rights would do—he took it to a taxidermist to have the head mounted. “Every boy wants (a really big mule deer) on his wall,” Enos explained. He arrived at the address listed in the Yellow Pages only to be greeted by the taxidermist’s mother in her nightgown. She told him her son was down the hall and to walk right in. Enos did, only to find the guy asleep in his bed— at 10 a.m. “I woke him up,” he says. “It was the most unprofessional situation (I’d ever seen), and I thought, ‘Man, I could do this better.’” Enos took a yearlong taxidermy course, and opened a studio with a ceiling-to-floor glass showroom on the third-busiest intersection in town. There was a loading dock in the back where customers could easily unload their precious cargo, and a walk-in freezer to store it in. He mounted bighorn sheep, fish, ducks, even snakes, but stayed away from domestic pets. Why? Because nine out of 10 people who have their pet stuffed get rid of them within a year, he claims. “Scruffy the poodle runs up and tweaks one ear, cocks his head and has personality,” he says. “You bring Scruffy to me and I’ve never met Scruffy and I don’t know those (mannerisms).” So the result is an alien Scruffy without the unconditional love so valued by pet owners. What fails to work for dogs, however, must for birds, because parrots are the No. 1 domestic pet to get stuffed, Enos says. It didn’t take Enos long to discover that while he was making good money making dead animals look lifelike, he had a fixed income. “When I was 19 I was making $60,000,” he says. “You’re living well, that’s great, but I built up the business and was still making $60,000 seven years later.” There are only so many hours in a day and customers wanted 60

October 2009

Taxidermy was Mike Enos’ first career, a skill he developed right out of high school. But while he opened a second studio, he found customers only wanted to do business with the owner.

the owner handling their trophy kills. “I cared about the dollars, not the artistry,” he says. “I was working holidays—out of 365 days, I was working 360.”

Lake Tahoe area. When asked if he was ever embarrassed to tell people his vocation, he replied, “When you work for a port-a-potty company you don’t tell anyone, but when you own a port-a-potty business you tell everyone.” In other words, it’s more lucrative than a stuffed bull at a rodeo. His company, “Johnny on the Spot,” supplied portable restrooms for a wide range of clients, from the government to construction companies to weddings to charitable events. His biggest coup was being the restroom supplier for The Burning Man, a counter-culture arts/lifestyle event that takes place over Labor Day weekend in the Black Rock Desert and attracts 40,000-plus people.

Playing with game And then a giant Brahman bull came into his life. Rodeos were the rage at the time, and he mounted the bull in a bucking position. People would pay $15 to $25 to have their picture taken sitting on the bull rodeo-style. A bad rodeo could generate $2,000 in sales a night, but a good one could pull in as much as $7,500, he says. His plan was to make $12,000 a week for six weeks doing the rodeo circuit and then move on. The six-week gig proved to be lucrative, but cost him a fiancé who gave him an ultimatum—her or the rodeo tour. He What bowls over a serial entrepreneur? chose the bull, because as a friend told him over The answer: finding a solution for a common beers as he was weighing his options, “I never problem—and then franchising it, of course. thought I’d see Mike Enos let a girl tell him When Enos was still building his pot of gold what he could do.” with Johnny on the Spot, he owned an air boat He envisioned Top 10 Videos as his next he could only use a couple of months a year. get-rich idea, but after attending a conven- The expensive boat was too tall to store in his tion where he heard billionaire Blockbuster garage, and he was forced to leave it outside founder Wayne Huizenga talk about his waste where the snow invariably found its way under management business, Enos switched gears to the windblown tarp. “One day I saw a truckload of boats come discover portable restrooms. He liked what he saw when he researched the business and in through shrink-wrapped from the factory,” he 1993, started a rental company in the Reno/ says. It seemed like the perfect solution to his


While the recession may be hurting other businesses, it’s been a boon for a business that can protect half-finished projects—like hotels and houses—from the environment, until the economic climate changes. Or, as pictured above, bales of hay, a jet engine and boats.

problem, but when he called around to find at 42, Enos says Fast Wrap is the business he’s someone to do it for him, he came up empty- going to retire with. handed. Not one to give up, Enos purchased While it seems like anyone with a roll of plas$2,000 worth of industrial plastic wrap and tic wrap and an industrial hair dryer could run started practicing wrapping his boat by shrink- the business, it’s not that straightforward. “A ing the plastic with a heat gun so that the thick lot of companies seem simple from the outside,” plastic hugged the boat’s curves. Three days says Scott Jewett of iFranchise, which set up later, he had a weatherized boat. Just as his taxi- the franchise program, “but the more you dig dermy studio was a showroom for his animal into them, you see how complicated they are.” artistry, the shrink-wrapped boat was a beacon There are considerable nuances to this busifor people who needed the identical service for ness, he points out, such as, How do you wrap their boat. People stopped in his office so often a skyscraper? And how much should you charge to ask for the contact information for the com- to do it? Enos’ crew has wrapped jet engines, pany that had wrapped his boat, his secretary half-constructed casinos, boats seized by the finally asked him if he would please park the government from drug runs and foreclosed boat somewhere else. homes. Bidding such a range of jobs can also “I started doing it (wrapping) to build rela- be challenging, as well as marketing. Which is tionships with customers (of Johnny’s) and why people become franchisees, after all. In addition, Enos developed a proprietary decided what a great business,” he says. “But I was focused on Johnny, so I tucked the idea product that’s recyclable and can withstand away for 15 years.” He sold Johnny in 2006 to a humidity and mold. “I’ve consulted with hunnational firm buying up regional players. Now dreds of entrepreneurs and Mike stands out,”

Jewett says. “You feel like he can make something happen, even if it’s hard.” And even better, he adds, Enos listens to his advisors’ recommendations and even implements some of them. Jewett says his concern early on was that shrink-wrapping is a commodity item, but Enos has been able to execute it as a brand and “make it stand for something.” Enos developed the program and then proved it would work. About 25 franchises have been awarded , with about half already opened. Enos remembers telling Jewett, “This thing is a home-run. I’ll do the franchise offering first, then develop the concept.” Not exactly what iFranchise looks for, but in this case, they made an exception—Enos opened three model locations while the documents were being prepared. And the beauty of it is that everything can be shrink-wrapped—patio furniture, farm equipment, boats, any assets that need protecting. Maybe even Scruffy the dog.

October 2009

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The Home Crowd | Shrink Wrap unsold / foreclosed homes

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http://thehomecrowd.com/2009/07/29/shrink-wrap-unsold-foreclosed-homes/

Home news for the Home Crowd

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July 29, 2009 By: Home Category: Storage Fast Wrap, a Reno, Nevada company started up as a company protecting boats and recreational vehicles from the off-season winter elements by encasing them in shrink wrap. Recently, they’ve been expanding their product base and taking on franchises nationwide. Outdoor furniture receives seemingly the same weatherproofing that construction projects and equipment that sits idle for a long time. The new idea however, is wrapping unsold and/or foreclosed homes almost entirely in shrink wrap, protecting them from the elements without the care of a tenant, and possibly deterring vandalism. Any vandals that want to get past the shrink wrap would likely only need a pocketknife or scissors, but nonetheless, it’s a nice deterrent from vandals out to strip a foreclosed home of the copper wiring…or worse.

10/18/2009 4:41 PM


The Home Crowd | Shrink Wrap unsold / foreclosed homes

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http://thehomecrowd.com/2009/07/29/shrink-wrap-unsold-foreclosed-homes/

Here’s a link to FastWrap’s site, in case you’re looking to ‘hole up’ for the winter, or possibly get in on the franchise action. – Link Spotted at CNN Money – Link ShareThis Description

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One Response to “ Shrink Wrap unsold / foreclosed homes ” 1. # 1 Jacob Christensen Says: August 17th, 2009 at 10:49 am

Good post! I like to read histories about business who use the crisis to expand their horizonts.

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10/18/2009 4:41 PM


THE

Volume 39, Number 4

www.slenterprise.com

July 20-26, 2009

Midvale real estate firm to expand into five western states

THIS WEEK Minimum wage in Utah to rise this week Rate goes up to $7.25 per hour effective July 24. See page 2.

• Calendar • See page 6.

• Industry Briefs • Begin on page 7.

Focus Special

R e p ort Technology

Begins on page 12.

$1.25

Salt Lake City, Utah

Fast Wrap, based in Reno, has the ability to wrap anything from haystacks to entire buildings.

Nevada-based industrial shrink-wrap enters Utah market By Ryan Shelton The Enterprise Reno-based Fast Wrap, an industrial asset protection and mobile shrink-wrap business, opened its first franchise location in Utah on July 8. Founded in April of 2007, Fast Wrap has 18 locations across the country specializing in using environmentally-conscious materials to wrap and protect a slew objects such as recreational vehicles, boats, industrial equipment, furniture, freight, foreclosures, construction sites and unfinished buildings “The whole world needs wrapping,” said Mike Enos, cofounder and CEO. “In tough times

it’s more important than ever to protect your assets.” Utah franchise co-owner Blair Ford and his two sons, Seth and Zed, had been looking to buy into a franchise when Blair saw a Fast Wrap van from Coeur d’Alene, Idaho in Salt Lake City one day in 2008. After a short period of investigating and fundraising, the Fords were able to acquire franchise rights in early 2009. The Utah franchise has one van, with plans to expand as their business grows, and will serve the whole of Utah and the Lake Powell regions in Arizona. With

Midvale-based Equity Real Estate, a residential real estate brokerage that operates on a fixedprice business model and offers profit-sharing to all brokers, is preparing to expand into Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Nevada and Washington. The firm, founded in 2001 by Brady T. Long, has grown into the 47th largest brokerage in the nation, according to the National Association of Realtors, with a current agent count of 961. Despite the national housing slowdown, Long expects to establish multiple offices and add more than 100 agents in each of the targeted expansion states before the end of the year.

“Most of our growth has come from agent referrals,” Long said. “I set out to be the kind of broker I wished I had as an agent, and have tried to focus on that perspective as much as possible. As much as possible, I wanted the power and the money in the hands of our Realtors. I believe we’ve succeeded. We’ve created online systems and offer a quick call-back guarantee that makes the agent’s job easier. Our systems streamline the work of a broker so his or her focus can really be on the success of the Realtors and less on paperwork.” Other aspects also contribute to Equity’s growth and appeal, see EQUITY page 6

Executive Lifestyle

Executive Lifestyle

PERIODICAL Postage Paid Salt Lake City, Utah

Begins on page 17.

see WRAP page 6

Firm plans 184-unit, market-rate apartment project in Taylorsville By Barbara Rattle The Enterprise Perry Homes Inc., Murray, hopes to break ground within the next 60 days for the West Village Apartments, a 184-unit, marketrate rental community at 2099 W. 4700 S., Taylorsville. Company manager Bob Perry said once ground is broken, it likely will be a year before the first units become available. Designed by The Architects Office, a Boise firm with which Perry Homes has worked on all its other Utah projects, West Village will consist of three, three-story buildings, each containing a different number of units based on where they sit on

the 7.76-acre site, Perry said. West Village will serve those 55 and older and contain a mix of one bedroom, one bath, two bedroom, one bath and two bedroom, two bath units, he said. Rents will probably range from about $700 to $1,000. “We’ve owned the land for a long time so hopefully we’re able to keep the rent fairly reasonably even though it’s good quality, new construction,” Perry said. Each of the project’s buildings will contain a large common area focused around a fireplace and gathering area, a library/computer lab and TV/game room, he said. see PERRY page 6

The Beerhive Pub, in the works for nearly 18 months, will cater to a professional clientele.

Higher-end libations bar to open in downtown SLC By Barbara Rattle The Enterprise Nearly 18 months after beginning renovation of approximately 2,000 square feet at 128 S. Main St. in downtown Salt Lake City, a new bar called the Beerhive Pub is ready to open. Owner Del Vance is no stranger to the industry, having been in partner in both Uinta Brewing Co. and The Bayou — a microbrewery and former private club, respectively, in Salt Lake City — in the past. Beerhive Pub, which was

scheduled to engage in a soft opening last Friday, will cater to a professional clientele interested in higher-end libations, Vance said. In addition to a wide selection of American-made craft beers, the pub will have an extensive wine list and a wide selection of hard liquor, including a number of bourbons and single-malt whiskeys. “We’re trying to steer people away from fruity, mixed-up cocktails,” said Vance, author of see PUB page 2


6

WRAP from page 1

the faltering Utah housing market and construction projects often left unfinished and subject to outside elements, a majority of Fast Wrap’s Utah business is expected to come from the industrial sector. Although the Utah franchise is still in its infancy and focusing on promotion, the Fords have completed one project and have received inquires about several others, Ford said. “If you want to wrap it, and it’s legal, we’ll come out get the job done,” Ford said. “There’s a real need in Utah for our services and there isn’t anybody else who can provide the range of services that we offer.” Labor and material costs vary depending on the size of the projects and market competition, Ford said. The starting price for the wrapping materials begins at $12 per linear foot. The Fords have not yet been trained to wrap large-scale building projects, but Fast Wrap’s corporate headquarters will send out teams of experienced employees to train them as projects arise. After 100

The Enterprise hours of supervised training, the Fords will be certified to tackle building wraps on their own. Fast Wrap has a contract with Dr. Shrink Inc., the world’s leading supplier of shrink wrap. The shrink film comes in four colors, including a green made exclusively for Fast Wrap that can be deployed in forests or other environmentally sensitive areas. Fast Wrap’s material is antimicrobial and can be used to protect alfalfa, hay, straw, grain and seasonal farm equipment from the elements. Fast Wrap also provides event tents, which the Fords expect to be a big hit in Utah’s wedding market. “Most other tents take several hours and three or four workers to set up,” Ford said. “But with the lightweight tents we use, we can set up four or five tents in under five hours.” CEO Mike Enos said the lack of competition in Utah makes the Fords franchise a perfect fit. “Salt Lake was dying for our services,” Enos said. “This type of business has typically been relegated to the marine industry, but Fast Wrap will tackle projects ranging from your $30 backyard barbeque to a $400 million RitzCarlton — which we did last summer in Lake Tahoe.” Ford declined to disclose the amount he and his sons paid for franchise rights, but said it was less than $200,000. At present Ford and his two sons are the only Utah franchise employees.

EQUITY from page 1

Long said. Realtors aren’t charged additionally for errors and omissions insurance, metal signs or leads, and they are paid within 24 hours of closing a sale. Unlike other national competitors, managing brokers can open locations without paying franchise fees, and there are no salary caps. “We don’t require a lot of capital to get started as a managing broker,” said Kye Pope, president of Equity Real Estate. “Our model really works for brokers who are able to see the vision, work hard to establish a team and are able to embrace technological innovations.” Pope opened his own branch with in Equity Real Estate in 2007. Three of Equity’s senior executives have already started the selection process for hiring key personnel in Arizona, Nevada, and Colorado, and will establish offices there this summer. “We’re really pleased and excited with the progress we’re making,” Pope said. “Our national management team is in place and we are well on our way to selecting the right leaders in our targeted states.” Currently, Equity has offices in Logan, Clearfield, Midvale and St. George. A Bountiful location will be added this summer. The firm has 10 branch brokers in Utah. The firm operates on a fixed price structure. Transaction fees are $499 for Utah, $549 for other states.

July 20-26, 2009

PERRY from page 1

One of the structures will house an exercise room housing both fitness equipment and classroom exercising facilities. Another building will be home to a craft room, while another will house Perry’s management offices and a large gathering area with kitchen. One of the buildings will also sport a private dining area/ conference room, Perry said. Residents will be able to take advantage of a community garden — “our thought there is that we would have enough people who live in the community that are still interested in getting their hands

dirty” — in addition to an outside sitting garden and picnic pavilion. “Our intention at this point is to have a pretty good community program that is overseen by the management but run by the committees among the residents, where they can do lots of different types of activities, educational types of things, crafts, a gardening club,” Perry said. While the community will be geared toward older residents, it will not offer any food or nursing services. Sister company Perry Construction will act as general contractor. Perry said financing is not yet in place, but that Perry Homes can self-finance if need be.

• Calendar •

• July 21, 11:30 a.m.1 p.m.: “What Every Dietary Supplement Business Should Know About Protecting Brands and Managing Trademark Concerns,” part of an intellectual property seminar series presented by the law firm of Stoel Rives LLP. Attorneys Catherine P. Lake and G. Gigger will focus on the methodologies for effectively developing and protecting brands in the dietary supplement industry. Location is the Stoel Rives offices, 201 S. Main, Suite 1100, Salt Lake City. Free. To register visit www.stoel.com/ipseminarseries or contact Jenn Oblad at (801) 715-6662 or joblad@stoel.com. • July 30, noon-1 p.m.: “Asset

Protection — What Every Contractor Should Be Doing to Minimize risk and Reduce Taxes in a Troubled Economy,” sponsored by Associated Builders and Contractors of Utah. Presenter will be attorney Travis Bowen. Location is the ABC offices, 2130 S. 3140 W., Suite B, West Valley City. Cost is $25 for ABC/Utah Masonry Council members, $35 for nonmembers, lunch included. All non-ABC members must prepay. Register with Jodi Frank at (801) 708-7036 or jfrank@abcutah.org. • Aug. 4, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.: “Fighting the Good Fight in a Changing World: An Overview and Update of Employment Law Issues for Employers in the Construction Business in Utah,” sponsored by Associated Builders and Contractors of Utah. Presenters will be Darrel Bostwick and Joe McAllister of Bostwick & Price. Location is the ABC offices, 2130 S. 3140 W., Suite B, West Valley City. Cost is $40 for ABC/Utah Masonry Council members, $50 for nonmembers, lunch included. All non-ABC members must pre-pay. Register with Jodi Frank at (801) 708-7036 or jfrank@abcutah.org. • Aug. 20, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.: “Creating Breakthrough Performance: How Ordinary Companies Turn Challenges into Triumph,” sponsored by the Utah Technology Council. Brett Pinegar, who led the research team for the best-selling book The Breakthrough Company: How Everyday Companies Become Extraordinary Performers,” will share the keys leaders must use to unlock breakthrough performance in their organizations. Location is the Show Barn at Thanksgiving Point, 3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, Lehi. Cost is $40 for members of UTC, MWCN, UVEF and WBI, $60 for nonmembers. Register at http://utahtech.org.


Seattle Real Estate News: Is shrink wrap the next big thing in (vacant) hou...

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Seattle Real Estate News

http://blog.seattlepi.nwsource.com/realestatenews/archives/173202.asp

Is shrink wrap the next big thing in (vacant) housing?

Courtesy Fast Wrap

A Reno, Nev., company is promoting the idea of shrink-wrapping vacant homes in South Florida, according to a story on The Real Deal Miami. Fast Wrap promotes shrink-wrapping as protection and weatherization for such things as boats, motor homes, furniture and shipping containers. The process could protect unfinished South Florida construction projects from molding wood and rusting metal in the subtropical climate, according to the story, which said Fast Wrap recently opened a branch in Dania Beach, "conveniently close to a slew of foreclosed homes." "It has the same shape of a house -- we have heat inhibitors, UV inhibitors -- it looks like a plastic house," Fast Wrap's Mike Enos said in the story. "Once it's wrapped, not only do we keep the neighborhood out of it, we keep any undesirables out of it as well -- an uninhabited residence attracts a lot of nuisances." Enos told The Real Deal that his company has wrapped three homes in the past several months and is working with a group in Pennsylvania to begin wrapping 240 homes in the Northeast. As for the appearance issue, Enos asserted a wrapped house would look better than a deteriorating, abandoned one, and most of those wrapped would be incomplete homes in construction developments. Hat tip to the Wall Street Journal's Developments blog. Posted by Aubrey Cohen at July 8, 2009 9:16 a.m.

路 Return to Is shrink wrap the next big thing in (vacant) housing?

11/12/2009 1:31 PM


Latest Trend to Protect Unfinished Homes: Shrink Wrap

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July 7, 2009 0 Comments by Will Smith You may have had your luggage shrink wrapped at the airport to protect it from getting beat up en route to your destination. Well, in the newest wrinkle to the nation’s housing crisis, developers are applying the same concept to real estate. The Real Deal reports that wrapping company Fast Wrap is seeing a growing business in wrapping stalled, under-construction houses and condo projects. Doing so protects the property from the elements, thieves and vandals, critters, and other undesirables.

Plastic wrap protecting the side of an unfinished condo project “What happens when plywood or any building material is exposed to the elements, and not finished, either has paint on it or a rock finish or stucco finish, it is subject to deterioration,” Fast Wrap’s Chris McMillan told The Real Deal. “Any deterioration we can prevent allows construction to start as close as possible to where it ended, versus where it would have to be reinstalled.” The company foresees most of its home-wrapping business coming from unfinished new homes rather than abandoned, foreclosed, or otherwise distressed properties. Because such properties are fully constructed and finished, they are (usually) in good enough shape to withstand the elements. Wrapping large assets is not so novel. The company typically wraps anything from

11/12/2009 1:33 PM


Latest Trend to Protect Unfinished Homes: Shrink Wrap

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lawn furniture to vehicles and heavy equipment to bales of hay and straw. But unfinished homes is new. The company has only wrapped three homes recently, but there is clearly a trend taking shape: Fast Wrap is working on a 240-home wrapping deal in the Northeast. Follow UrbanTurf on both!

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Neighborhood Marketplace Profiles New Condo Real Estate Profiles Agents Lists & Online Rankings Resources & What $$ Blogs Buys News & Trends Duels Highlight of Most Popular the Week How DC 1. Still Priced Out of DC’s Stacks Up Tonier Neighborhoods, Open Buyers Head East Houses 2. The Best New Listings in the DC Area: The Capitol Hill Edition 3. “If I Had $1 Million” Listing: Four-Bedroom 19th-Century Row Home in Logan Circle 4. DC Gov to Sell Vacant Properties the Old-Fashioned Way

11/12/2009 1:33 PM


Genius: Company Will Shrinkwrap Vacant Condos

Joe Weisenthal | Jul. 7, 2009, 7:18 AM |

http://www.businessinsider.com/genius-company-will-shrinkwrap-vacant...

4,684 |

18

Tags: Real Estate, Housing Crisis, Housing

And you thought that the "repo man" business was the ultimate way to play the bust. Please. Reno, NV-based company Fast Wrap USA is the king of shrinkwrapping large items like boats and sheds and gigantic piles of lumber. And now they're ready to do it with vacant condos, according to The Real Deal Miami (via Jonathan Miller). It's perfect. These condos will have value one day, when people can get a mortgage again and want to buy a place -- if you think we've seen the last Florida real estate bubble, think again. But in the meantime, they're empty and it's not worth the upkeep. However it would be a real tragedy if, in a few years, we had to rebuild all this stuff. Enter shrinkwrap! If it can preserve food from going brown, presumably it can suspend the ravages of time on buildings as well. Just imagine how screwed we'd be today if all the excess fiber-optic fiber built up during the first internet boom had somehow deteriorated, and we needed to rebuild it all. Fortunately it doesn't go bad, though buildings can degrade much quicker. This solves that. We're totally sold. We might even send away for franchise information.

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11/12/2009 1:41 PM


What to Do With Unfinished Homes? Shrink-Wrap - Developments - WSJ

http://blogs.wsj.com/developments/2009/07/06/what-to-do-with-unfinish...

JULY 6, 2009, 11:22 AM ET

What to Do With Unfinished Homes? Shrink-Wrap What’s a developer or bank to do with unfinished homes? A few months ago, we wrote about a Texas bank that had demolished 16 homes in the California desert. Now, a Reno, Nev.-based operation is proposing a novel solution: shrink-wrap them. Fast Wrap is pitching its plastic wrap solution to minimize exposure to the elements, including humidity, that can rot wood and rust metal in unfinished and empty homes and condo developments, as South Florida’s Real Deal reports. Fast Wrap

Fast Wrap covers the unfinished structure in a thin sheet of plastic, A shrink-wrapped boat. sealing off buildings from exposure to the corroding effects of weather or to keep out unwelcome critters or squatters. “It looks like a plastic house,” franchise operator Mike Enos tells the Real Deal. “When we put them in neighborhoods, everybody wants to keep them, not only their kids out of neighboring residences, but anybody else that might come in to steal or salvage, like for copper.” The shrink-wrapping is used primarily for uncompleted homes, since existing homes don’t face the same risks. So far, the company — which also wraps boats and outdoor equipment such as recreational vehicles, construction equipment — says it’s wrapped up three homes and is working with a Pennsylvania group to begin covering up 240 homes in the Northeast.

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What to Do With Unfinished Homes? Shrink-Wrap Author: John Travis • Monday, July 06th, 2009

Fast Wrap A shrink-wrapped boat. What’s a developer or bank to do with unfinished homes? A few months ago, we wrote about a Texas bank that had demolished 16 homes in the California desert. Now, a Reno, Nev.-based operation is proposing a novel solution: shrink-wrap them. Fast Wrap is pitching its plastic wrap solution to minimize exposure to the elements, including humidity, that can rot wood and rust metal in unfinished and empty homes and condo developments, as South Florida’s Real Deal reports. Fast Wrap covers the unfinished structure in a thin sheet of plastic, sealing off buildings from exposure to the corroding effects of weather or to keep out unwelcome critters or squatters. “It looks like a plastic house,” franchise operator Mike Enos tells the Real Deal. “When we put them in neighborhoods, everybody wants to keep them, not only their kids out of neighboring residences, but anybody else that might come in to steal or salvage, like for copper.” The shrink-wrapping is used primarily for uncompleted homes, since existing homes don’t face the same risks. So far, the company — which also wraps boats and outdoor equipment such as recreational vehicles, construction equipment — says it’s wrapped up three homes and is working with a Pennsylvania group to begin covering up 240 homes in the Northeast.

7/7/2009 10:34 PM


Foreclosures could put houses in plastic | The Real Deal | New York Real...

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FORECLOSURES COULD PUT HOUSES IN PLASTIC July 02, 2009 10:00AM

By Alexander Britell

Foreclosures, dried-up financing and simple bad timing means countless South Florida construction projects now sit unfinished and all but abandoned. In the subtropical climate, the wood develops mold and degrades and the metal rusts. Mike Enos figures he can wrap up this problem, no matter the size of the mess. Fast Wrap, a franchise operation based in Reno,

A wrapped condominium

Nev., describes its work as asset protection. Think shrink-wrapping on a massive scale. Now trying to get a foothold in South Florida, Fast Wrap claims to physically protect everything from furniture to cars to boats -and even houses and industrial buildings. It has 11 franchises, and recently opened one in Dania Beach, conveniently close to a slew of foreclosed homes in the tri-county area. The last ones, in particular are proving to be a boon to Fast Wrap. The company applies a film (available in white and several other colors) that takes the shape of the property to which it's applied. The company increasingly finds itself wrapping incomplete homes and larger developments to protect the properties from the elements and keep out the unwanted. It hasn't wrapped a Florida house yet, but Enos says the day will come. "It has the same shape of a house -- we have heat inhibitors, UV inhibitors -- it looks like a plastic house," Enos says. "When we put them in neighborhoods, everybody wants to keep them, not only their kids out of neighboring residences, but anybody else that might come in to steal or salvage, like for copper. Once it's wrapped, not only do we keep the neighborhood out of it, we keep any undesirables out of it as well -- an uninhabited residence attracts a lot of nuisances." While a plastic house might seem threatening to communities concerned with already-tanking property values, Enos is quick to point out that a wrapped house will look better than a deteriorating, abandoned house, and that most of the properties he wraps are not foreclosed homes, but incomplete homes in construction developments.

7/7/2009 11:25 PM


Foreclosures could put houses in plastic | The Real Deal | New York Real...

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'On an existing home that has been foreclosed upon, the chances of damage are very slight," Enos says. "Chances are we're not going to wrap that kind of residence. There's no damage to be protected, no damage that's going to occur, versus a partially constructed home, or a home that's damaged." Even if the worst has happened and a bank or owner is faced with abandoned property, there's no reason to invite damage. "What happens when plywood or any building material is exposed to the elements, and not finished, either has paint on it or a rock finish or stucco finish, it is subject to deterioration," says Chris McMillan, director of sales. "Any deterioration we can prevent allows construction to start as close as possible to where it ended, versus where it would have to be reinstalled. "The wrapping protects the asset, so the holder of the construction note receives the highest dollar either in auction or, if it's sold to a third party, that party receives an asset that does not have to be moved upon -they can get another loan and start on a much more orderly basis." Enos says the company has wrapped three homes in the past several months, and is working with a group in Pennsylvania to begin wrapping 240 homes in the Northeast.

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7/7/2009 11:25 PM


Firm's home-wrap system offers one way to seal the deal on a foreclosure ...

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Firm's home-wrap system offers one way to seal the deal on a foreclosure 12:00 AM CDT on Friday, June 5, 2009

STEVE BROWN

If you watch enough late-night cable TV, eventually they'll get around to advertisements for those gizmos to shrink-wrap sweaters and vegetables and such. At 3 in the morning it somehow seems like a worthwhile endeavor to bag up a bushel of carrots or put a stack of woolens into a package the size of a phone book. Talk about a compulsive organizer's dream. Even the cats wouldn't be safe if I had one of those gadgets â&#x20AC;&#x201C; especially when they are shedding. Now a Nevada company is taking things a step further â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with a cunning plan to shrink-wrap the entire house. Before you get worked up at the thought of dry-cleaning bags and suffocation, let me explain that these are vacant houses. Reno-based Fast Wrap Inc., which bills itself as "the leader in shrink wrap protection," wants to seal up empty, foreclosed houses in its high-tech plastic sheeting. No. Really. "These homes, most often owned by the bank, are left to rot in the sun, rain, wind and snow, which results in banks losing over 40 percent of the home value before they've even fully taken possession," said company spokeswoman Abbi Whitaker. "Fast Wrap believes they've come up with a solution by wrapping these foreclosed homes with shrink wrap and protecting them from both the harsh weather elements and squatters.' But what about raccoons? Won't they chew through anything? No mention of that in marketing materials Fast Wrap is sending out to sell franchises for its new home wrap system. Instead of big Ziploc bags or Saran Wrap, the company plans to cover distressed houses in 40-foot-wide rolls of "flame retardant, anti-corrosion and antimicrobial ... highly recyclable, virgin resin polyethylene." It even promises the material will be "green." But most of the photographs on the company Web site show big white plastic coverings on everything from playground equipment to a high-rise luxury hotel.

6/8/2009 3:03 PM


Firm's home-wrap system offers one way to seal the deal on a foreclosure ...

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The company's bread-and-butter business is to provide wrappings for shipping containers, vehicles and agricultural products. "The whole world needs wrapping," Fast Wrap founder Mike Enos says in his sales pitch. "And in tough times, it's more important than ever to protect your assets." If only I had shrink-wrapped my 401(k).

6/8/2009 3:03 PM


That's a wrap - NYP Home: Real Estate

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That's a wrap Lest you worry that no good has come out of the recent real estate collapse, we present you with the work of Fast Wrap USA -- a Reno-based company specializing in shrink-wrapping foreclosed properties to protect them from damage and decay. We've no idea how well this system actually works, but the general notion of abandoned buildings wrapped up like so many leftover turkey sandwiches is kind of delightful in a Christomeets-Repo Man sort of way.

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6/8/2009 4:36 PM


That's a wrap - NYP Home: Real Estate

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Spotlight

THE BUSINESS PRESS Inland Southern California’s Business Newspaper

May 18, 2009

VOL. 15 NO. 20

Tech Week highlights IE prowess

PAGE Filipino shops with Loma 7 tussle Linda landlord

BY LOUIS AMESTOY AND JULIANE NGAN CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

The List MinorityOwned Businesses

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Businesses

PAGE 6 San Bernardino Businesses

On the Web Biz Minute: Give us a minute and we will give you the latest news, visit www.thebizpress.com Opinions Wanted: The Business Press welcomes Letters to the Editor and Guest Columns. If you would like to write a guest column, please contact editor Nels Jensen at njensen@thebizpress.com

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Attendees check out TimberSIL Distribution California’s reputedly fire-resistant building lumber at Big Bear Lake’s 11th annual Building and Safety Open House.

Trends stress fire resistance BY ROBERT ROGERS CONTRIBUTING WRITER

The Big Bear Valley demands a lot from builders and businesses in related industries. Life here trudges on with a rustic charm haunted by the persistent threat of catastrophic fire. Rugged terrain and alpine habitat stress even the sturdiest materials. And these hearty moun-

tain folk love their nature, too, so no short shrift for the environment. “New building codes and same old area — it’s a challenge,” said Travis Hodges, a building inspector for the city of Big Bear Lake. Within this unique milieu about 20 regional entities — from public agencies to entrepreneurial startups — PLEASE SEE GREEN, PAGE 12

When it comes to entrepreneurial spirit, there’s probably no place more alive than Inland Southern California. Harnessing that energy was one of the key goals of the Inland Empire Tech Week, which opened May 11 at the Riverside Convention Center. With some of the biggest players in technology present, organizers were looking to position the region as a leading player. The first day featured an array of speakers and a tech expo. Other events throughout the week linked technology

Related video, www.thebizpress.com ............................................ innovation and entrepreneurs with the venture-capital process. It was a big week with lots of big ideas. “Oh, the Inland Empire is changing dramatically,” said John Tillquist, the dean of Riverside Community College’s business, PLEASE SEE TECH WEEK, PAGE 8

Mobile shrink wrap company finds clients big, small BY JULIANE NGAN CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Southern California Aviation has made a name for itself in the aircraft industry, maintaining and transporting hundreds of large airplanes and parts throughout the world. Its goal is to keep the items in the same condition they were in when the customer left them in its care, but it hasn’t been easy for the Victorville-based company to find the most affordable and safe way to store and transport

Related video, www.thebizpress.com ................................................

PHOTO BY JULIANE NGAN

Mac Apodaca of Fast Wrap covers an airplane engine at Southern California Aviation. The engine will be shipped to its client overseas.

the high-value equipment while protecting it from the elements. “Even though you may look at an engine and think this engine is solid, it’s made out of stainless steel, they’re actually very fragile,” said Lee Williams, a technical and safety manager at Southern California Aviation. “A lot of situations can happen in the engine if it’s not covered. It can ingest screws; somebody can leave something in the engine.” The company was using a $25,000 wrap to ship aircraft engines weighing up to 16,000 pounds overseas. It soon proved to be too expensive for the company. Once the PLEASE SEE FAST WRAP, PAGE 11

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11

M A N U FA C T U R I N G

Fast Wrap ..........................................

Company plans for synthetic-fuel plant in Rialto

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

engine was transported, the reusable wrap would rarely be returned. On May 7, SCA was preparing five engines to be shipped overseas and trying out the services of a new Inland Empire company. Fast Wrap, a mobile shrink wrapping franchise, utilizes a strong plastic wrap that weatherizes and protects residential, commercial and industrial assets. Within two hours, it was able to wrap the engine in the durable plastic. Fast Wrap has already completed a variety of projects throughout San Bernardino, Riverside, Los Angeles and Orange counties, shrink wrapping everything from buildings and boats to recreational vehicles. Wrapping the plane engine marked an important first. “This is the first one we’ve done,” said Serge Bonaldo, co-owner of the franchise. “We were thinking we were just doing the end of the propeller but it ended up when we got here, we were going to wrap the whole thing. I think it went real well.” Bonaldo and Fran Natale purchased the franchise two months ago. Reno-based Fast Wrap was doing surprisingly well despite the economic downturn. It experienced an estimated 40 percent increase in business in the past year, Bonaldo said. The plastic also blocks out about 95 percent of ultraviolet rays and comes with a one-year warranty. Fast Wrap has recently gone green, as the plastic it uses is 100 percent recyclable and goes into producing such items as animal toys and freeway barricades. Each shrink wrap cover comes with a kit where it can be mailed to the appropriate recycling facility after it’s used. Starting a franchise in the Inland Empire was a good decision, Bonaldo said; there aren’t any companies here that do what they do. And as people look to cut expenses, they’re storing their boats and RVs away for longer periods. The company can wrap an average boat in 45 minutes. It’s a new concept in the Inland Empire that Bonaldo said will become increasingly popular in the future. The company currently has five employees and one van. “We’re hoping real soon that we will be adding another van, getting some more employees and just keep on growing. We want to disperse different offices throughout the different counties and serve everyone who needs us,” Bonaldo said.

BY LOU HIRSH THE PRESS-ENTERPRISE

Los Angeles-headquartered Rentech Inc. plans to build a plant in Rialto that will turn green waste such as yard clippings into clean-burning synthetic fuels. Company officials said the construction of the Rialto facility is expected to create approximately 250 jobs. The plant is in the design phase and would create 55 permanent jobs when it is fully operating in 2012. The Rialto Renewable Energy Center is designed to produce approximately 600 barrels per day of renewable synthetic fuels

and to export approximately 35 megawatts of renewable electric power that will be sold to utilities — an amount officials said can provide electricity for 30,000 homes. Rentech President and CEO D. Hunt Ramsbottom said the Rialto plant will produce a “next generation” biofuel that does not compete with the food industry for materials. For instance, the use of corn and soy to make ethanol has driven up the cost of those materials in both the fuel and food marketplaces. “This plant will be able to transform low-value waste streams into high-value

green power and pure synthetic fuels that can be used in today’s engines and distribution infrastructure,” Ramsbottom said in a statement. Officials said Rentech initiatives fit well with recently announced Obama administration programs offering funding and other incentives for developing renewableenergy alternatives. Donn Montag, Rialto city planning manager, said what Rentech is planning would likely complement energy-related proposals submitted by EnerTech for a site on the city’s south side.

We scour the web so you don’t have to We know you’re busy and don’t have time to check out a bunch of web sites every day to get news about Inland Southern California businesses. So we do it for you. Just come to www.thebizpress.com and check out the Latest Inland Business Headlines. We update it throughout each business day with stories from media companies around the region, data from agencies and organizations and news from companies themselves. With our Latest Inland Business Headlines, you can find everything all in one place.

PHOTO BY JULIANE NGAN

Mac Apodaca and Serge Bonaldo install plastic shrink wrap on an airplane engine.


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Booming, not busting Local businesses thriving despite downturn By DANIELLE NADLER VIEW STAFF WRITER

Now may not be the best time to be in car sales, to work as an interior designer or to own a big-name casino chain. But there are a few niches among the rising rates of home foreclosures, depression and unemployment rates that have become lucrative despite of the lethargic economy, or perhaps because of it. Pay day loan storefronts, low-cost department stores and home rescue establishments are a few of those in the right business at the right time. Garth Harris is just as lucky. Like most owners of new businesses, Harris expected a slow year when he opened Fast Wrap at 3839 Spring Mountain Road four months ago. He never guessed he would have to bring on more employees so soon to keep up with all the work. The company wraps boats, RVs, half-completed homes and buildings and most anything else that needs to be protected. When a construction site comes to a halt, a growing epidemic in the valley, Fast Wrap is hired to shrink wrap materials and the building frame until the project starts up again. "It's a liability issue, and the neighbors don't want to see a half-completed house or building sit there for a year," Harris said. "I didn't expect business to go this well, but because of the economy, people suddenly had to change how they protect things." The number of people seeking mental or emotional guidance through the shaky economic times also has escalated. Marriage and family therapist Kimberly Boschee said she and the other therapists and psychiatrists at The Center for Emotional Health have been slammed in the past six months. "My phone has not stopped ringing," she said. Boschee's cases in the past year seem to follow the ebb-and-flow economy. First, she saw a surge of real estate agents, then construction workers, and, most recently, professionals such as engineers and business managers. Overall, the health clinic has seen a rise in depression, anxiety disorders and stressed relationships. "All of these things affect your mood and relationships," Boschee said. "What we've noticed is, even if money is tight, people are willing to come because we work with them on losing their job or a foreclosure."

5/3/2009 10:05 PM


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The therapists and psychiatrists at The Center for Emotional Health, located at 6284 S. Rainbow Blvd., teach people how to feel empowered in their lives despite what is going on in the rest of the world. "They realize, I can remain hopeful despite how hard this is, and I'm learning some really good skills," said Boschee, who has lowered her prices to accommodate clients. "Their stories are heartbreaking. We just want the best for them." Most would think discretionary spending is a lost luxury, but the owners at Studio 21 Tattoo Gallery beg to differ. The number of people asking for ink has continually climbed at the shop, located at 6020 W. Flamingo Road, since it opened in 2003. "I'm kind of surprised," Studio 21 co-owner Becki Spencer said. "I personally think that because of so much negative news, people are saying, 'You know, I'm just going to spend a little money on myself.' " Customers seem to choose their tattoo designs a little more carefully these days, she added. She sees more requests for tattoos with positive messages, like peace signs. Spencer expects business to continue to climb. "I'm cautious to say that," she said. "But I'm feeling good about it." Still haven't found a profitable niche? Maybe cheap eats is the ticket. Fast-food chains, including McDonald's, have benefited as the economic downturn has sent customers to lower-priced fare. Reuters.com reported that McDonald's sales in February were up 1.4 percent over 2008 February sales. Burgers, anyone? Contact Southeast and Southwest View reporter Danielle Nadler at dnadler@viewnews.com or 224-5524.

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5/3/2009 10:05 PM


Managing REO - Making Foreclosed Property Profitable

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â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Wrappingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Up REO

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By Lew Sichelman

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Here's an offbeat idea for REO specialists who need to protect their assets: Rather than pay a caretaker a monthly fee to watch over vacated houses and protect them from the elements, not to mention vandals and varmints, shrink wrap them instead.

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http://managingreo.com/feature/?story_id=66

Fast Wrap USA, a Reno, Nev.-based company specializing in shrink-wrapping everything from boats to buildings, hasn't done any foreclosed houses yet. But it has wrapped half-built houses, churches and small office buildings. So it's inevitable that it will. After all, as founder and CEO Mike Enos says, "We're in the asset protection business." And shrink wrap, he adds, can extend the life of what it surrounds "by two or three times." Mr. Enos, who is something of a serial entrepreneur, got into the business innocently enough when he tried to get a company which wrapped new boats to wrap his air boat, which was too big to fit into his garage. When his request was rejected, he contacted the maker of the wrap itself. He bought the materials and used the maker's heat gun to wrap the boat himself. From there, a business was born. His wrapped boat sat next to a freeway like a billboard. And his secretary took so many calls about it that she asked him to move it. Everybody, it seems, wanted him to wrap something, perhaps a backhoe or patio furniture or their own boat. He did, and he's been wrapping stuff ever since. Mr. Enos, whose previous endeavors were in taxidermy and portable toilets, started Fast Wrap USA at the end of 2007. Today, its fleet of vans is wrapping things in 12 markets, including several where the number of foreclosures are outpacing some servicers' ability to manage them, places like Las Vegas, Sacramento, Calif., and Dania Beach, Fla. The goal is eventually to have 500 franchises nationwide. Fast Wrap started out wrapping mainly dry-docked boats, but now roughly half its clients are recessionwracked businesses. Rather than store 11 pickup trucks

5/3/2009 9:50 PM


Managing REO - Making Foreclosed Property Profitable

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http://managingreo.com/feature/?story_id=66

that were sitting idle after a wave of layoffs, for example, one company parked them side-by-side outdoors and hired Mr. Enos to ensconce them in plastic. Among other items, the company has wrapped a church in Virginia City, Nev., that was still under construction when the funding ran out. "The only other option they had was to let it sit exposed to the elements," Mr. Enos said. It also has covered an FAA airport tower in Reno, a 300-foot walkway at the Sacramento airport, a partially built strip mall that had lost its financing, and the North Star Ritz Carlton in Lake Tahoe for temperature control — warm in the winter, cool in the summer — while it is under construction. The only single-family house wrapped by the company was a 2,000-square-foot structure in San Francisco that was in the framing stage when the builder ran out of money. "Pigeons were getting in," Mr. Enos said, "and so were people after the copper piping." So he wrapped the place up tight to protect it from vermin, the elements and thieves. "I put in a zipper door so it could be accessed for showing," he said. "And we devised a large ‘No Trespassing’ decal for the sides." The wrap comes in widths of from 10 to 40 feet, and is welded together and shrunk tight by a gun that generates 340,000 BTUs of heat. The covering is fire retardant and flame resistant. The cost is roughly $1 per square foot. While the material can be cut by a knife if someone wants to get through bad enough, it is extremely strong, he said. "You cannot just run and jump through it." Other Feature Story items. © Monday, 04-May-2009 00:49:53 EDT Managing REO and SourceMedia, Inc. SourceMedia is an Investcorp company. All rights reserved. For technical support e-mail webmaster@managingreo.com. Privacy Policy 11.140.129.87

5/3/2009 9:50 PM


Company Shrink Wraps Materials at Halted Construction Sites

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Company Shrink Wraps Materials at Halted Construction Sites

Published: March 02, 2009 By Anuradha Kher, Online News Editor Reno, Nev.--In the current economic climate, when almost every company is going through challenges, Fast Wrap USA plans to grow and even increase its sales by nearly 40 percent. Fast Wrap specializes in shrinkwrapping everything from construction material and furniture to lumber and boats. With an increasing number of construction projects—be it multifamily, hotels or office—being halted or stopped due to lack of financing or inability to put tenants in the buildings, Fast Wrap is expecting good business throughout the downturn. “When construction came to a halt, leaving projects uncompleted, the need arose to protect the lumber, the half-built buildings and the machinery,” Mike Enos, co-founder and CEO of Fast Wrap, tells MHN. Enos co-founded Shrink Wrap in 2007 with Ken Cassas, the chief financial officer. He adds, “The only other option is to let everything be exposed to the elements and deteriorate. Fast Wrap can help extend the life of assets by two or three times.” The cost of shrink-wrapping everything at a 200-unit apartment construction site is about $200,000 at the rate of about $1 to $1.50 per square foot. The company wraps everything so that it is fire retardant, flame resistant and shrinks to fit with the application of heat that forms a powerful, protective seal. The company currently does work in Las Vegas, Reno, Nev.; San Francisco, Sacramento and Rancho Cucamonga, Calif.; Denver, Dania Beach, Fla. and Coeur d’Alene, Idaho and expects to have 16 to 20 franchisees within the next 12 months. “The goal is to eventually expand to 500 franchises nationwide,” says Enos. He adds, “The whole world needs wrapping. And in tough times, it’s more important than ever to protect your assets.”

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5/3/2009 10:09 PM


Shrink wrap plastic now covers more than boats

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http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/03/01/BURQ164...

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Shrink wrap plastic now covers more than boats Sandra Chereb, Associated Press Sunday, March 1, 2009

(03-01) 04:00 PDT Reno -Armed with mega heat guns, a small group gathered on a chilly morning taking aim not at the cold but at thick plastic sheeting draped over a small mountain of construction pipe. Guns blazing, they practiced their technique - long, sweeping strokes - and quickly learned the consequences of less than fluid motions. "Uh-oh," said one woman as the sheeting melted into a small hole. There would be more holes this day, but that didn't puncture the enthusiasm of the new business owners, recruits of Fast Wrap, an upstart Reno company that has franchises in six other states - Nevada, California, Washington, Idaho, Florida and Colorado. Though shrink wrap has been around for decades and used mostly to cover boats, Fast Wrap co-founder Mike Enos said use of the plastic protectant product is growing beyond marinas to disaster zones, construction sites and backyards. A shrinking economy has created unexpected demand for wrapping some products and heated up interest in acquiring franchises by people looking for jobs or supplemental income, he said. Ed, Charlene and Carrie Lane of Sacramento are hoping to complement their custom homebuilding business. Ed Lane said business has been slow and his work lately has been remodeling jobs. With Fast Wrap, buildings can be sectioned off, isolating construction areas and minimizing dust and debris. "The possibilities are endless," said Enos, whose business began to take shape 15 years ago when he wanted to cover his own boat, which he uses about two months out of the year. The rest of the time it's in storage. "Doing the tarp, the Bungee cords, just wasn't working." A California boat manufacturer told him it provided shrink wrapping service only for boats it made, and when he couldn't find anyone else, he called Dr. Shrink, a Michigan outfit that sells shrink wrapping materials.

5/3/2009 9:57 PM


Shrink wrap plastic now covers more than boats

2 of 3

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/03/01/BURQ164...

For $1,000, Enos bought his own supplies, wrapped his boat and parked it outside another Reno business he had at the time. Before long, others were asking where they could get it done, too - not only for boats, but recreational vehicles, outdoor kitchens, anything that needs protection from northern Nevada's harsh elements. That was in the early 1990s. He and Fast Wrap co-founder Ken Cassas, who spent 20 years in excavating and construction, opened the flagship Fast Wrap in Reno in 2007. In 2008, the company had about $600,000 in sales. Beyond the other six states, its goal is to have 30 locations by year's end and 500 nationally within five years. On this day, Cassas demonstrated technique to new franchise owners at a local plant, where acres of PVC pipe were piled in a back lot - a sign of the economic times. "It's like painting a car, only anyone can do it," Cassas said. That's debatable, said Tony Seraphin, owner of Global Wrap based in St. Augustine, Fla. He has been in the shrink wrapping business for nearly three decades and has traveled the world wrapping huge buildings and bridges for construction work and disaster relief efforts. After Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast, Global Wrap enclosed more than 400 buildings to protect whatever remained until repairs could begin. "We get there right after the wind dies down," Seraphin said. "It's a very difficult business. When you're talking about a giant bridge or steel structures ... it takes a lot of know-how." Fast Wrap owners see the mobile, on-demand service as filling a local need and expanding shrink wrap uses. Garth Harris, who owns a Line-X spray-on coating franchise in Las Vegas and has several casino accounts, sees Fast Wrap as an extension of the services he already provides, applying protective coatings to outdoor furnishings, among other things. At the Reno plant where PVC pipe is manufactured, the wrapping will extend the life of its product. "If you leave the pipe exposed, it will be sunburned," said Cantex plant manager Andy Zimmer. "It makes the product unsellable. "It's not feasible to build a facility to store it inside," Zimmer said. "That's the reason we're using shrink wrap. Wrapping the pipe extends our storage time." The huge sheets of polyethylene, manufactured by Dr. Shrink, are fire retardant and offer protection from the sun's ultraviolet rays. When heat is applied with 240,000 BTU heat guns the sheeting shrinks about 25 percent, forming a tight coating. "The tighter you get it, the better," Cassas instructs.

5/3/2009 9:57 PM


Shrink wrap plastic now covers more than boats

3 of 3

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/03/01/BURQ164...

A few weeks earlier, he supervised as Fast Wrap workers sealed the top floors of an air traffic control tower being built at Reno-Tahoe International Airport. Wrapping the outside scaffolding formed a protective cocoon, allowing the contractor to pump in heat to warm steel beams before applying required fireproofing. Under building codes, the steel must be at least 48 degrees for 48 hours before the coating is applied. It also created a safety barrier for construction workers in the otherwise open air hundreds of feet above the ground. The same concept is used to make temporary buildings, equipped with zippered doors and windows that are marketed as "same day shade," for special events. The sheeting comes in rolls as large as 40 feet wide and 149 feet long. For simple wrap jobs, the company charges about $10 a linear foot. To wrap a 40-foot recreational vehicle, complete with ventilation and zippered access, costs about $400 - cheaper than monthly indoor storage rental fees. Mark Hamill, a Fast Wrap franchise owner in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, said his outfit was contracted by a private tire manufacture. "Last year they bought hundreds of large truck tires," he said. But as the economy soured, the tires remain unused and were taking up valuable shop space. "We're shrink wrapping lots of tires," he said. Enos said Fast Wrap's franchise sales have been enhanced by the down economy. "They're creating their own work because they have no stability in their jobs." Robert McKay, a retired marine engineer from Dania Beach, Fla., is going into business with his sons, Kevin and Raymone. "We can't wait to get going," he said. "I hope to grow this business and put some people to work." Mike Stenberg, president of Dr. Shrink, said the Fast Wrap franchise is introducing the versatility of the product to the masses. His company supplies materials to outlets in 70 countries, with sales totaling about $15 million annually, he said. "Even though shrink wrap has been around 25 to 30 years, there's people who have never seen it," he said. "We haven't come close to tapping into its potential." http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/03/01/BURQ1640AN.DTL This article appeared on page D - 1 of the San Francisco Chronicle Š 2009 Hearst Communications Inc. | Privacy Policy | Feedback | RSS Feeds | FAQ | Site Index | Contact

5/3/2009 9:57 PM


http://www.centralvalleybusinesstimes.com/templates/print.cfm?ID=11262

AUDIO: For these entrepreneurs, success is shrinking WEST SACRAMENTO February 27, 2009 12:01am • They’ll shrink-wrap just about anything, any size • ‘It really made sense that this was a business that could work’ For serial entrepreneur Carrie Lane and her son Ed, a veteran small businessman, success comes in shrinking -- or more precisely, shrink-wrapping things. They’re the co-owners of Lane ShrinkWrap LLC, which does business as Fast Wrap of Sacramento, a company that covers everything from boats to stacks of hay in thick plastic shrink wrap to protect it from the elements and vandals. A friend, Fast Wrap Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer Mike Enos, clued in Ms. Lane to the franchise opportunity. “As he was telling me about his business, a little light came on and I thought, wow, this really sounds interesting,” she says. Fast Wrap’s crew travels to the customer, carrying all the materials and tools in a single van. “We can wrap an entire house with this product,” says Ed Lane, who has set aside his custom cabinet business to become more involved with the new company. “You see the boats and you see a few other things that are wrapped in shrink wrap material, but to wrap an entire building was very surprising.” Shrink-wrapping a whole building, however, would mean calling in extra hands and expertise from the national company, Ms. Lane says. (Carrie Lane and Ed Lane talk about their company and the shrink wrapping technique in today’s CVBT Audio Interview. Please left-click on the link below to listen now or right-click to download the MP3 audio file to your computer or mobile media device for later listening.) Mother and son say their company is off to a good start in part because of the recession. “It really doesn’t make a lot of sense until you start looking into it,” says Mr. Lane. “You have homeowners that maybe have run out of money or a construction company maybe in the middle of a project and so instead of just having your investment setting out in the weather and being damaged, we can completely encapsulate it.” Customers range from boat owners battening down their vessels for the winter to painters who had to refurbish a large tank that had been painted with lead paint. A Fast Wrap enclosure was used to contain the toxic paint dust, Mr. Lane explains. Another component to the company, “Same Day Shade,” offers an alternative to renting canopies and tents for special events, fundraisers or parties. Ms. Lane, who has owned other small businesses over the years, says she expects her new company to grow because of the recession and continue to grow when better times return. “People need to keep what they have and because things are bad, they don’t want to lose what they’ve already spent so much money buying,” says Ms. Lane. “So I could see that it was something that could be done in good times and in bad times. It really made sense that this was a business that could work.” Copyright Central Valley Business Times © 2009 Central Valley Business Times is an online unit of BizGnus, Inc. All rights reserved. No content may be reused without written permission.

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5/3/2009 10:08 PM


A booming biz: Shrinkwrapping mothballed construction - Feb. 24, 2009

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Booming biz: Shrinkwrapping stalled construction A Reno entrepreneur seals big deals. By Phaedra Hise February 24, 2009: 5:43 AM ET (Fortune Small Business) -- Mike Enos didn't foresee the recession when he launched Fast Wrap, a Reno company that seals buildings and other very large objects in protective plastic. But after the markets crashed last fall, he was pleasantly surprised to find that the downturn was working wonders for his sales. The company started out wrapping dry-docked boats for winter, with modest plans to expand into covering patio furniture and RVs. Now nearly half of Enos's customers are recession-hit businesses trying to save money by putting projects on hold or enclosing them so construction can continue through the winter. His 14 employees have wrapped an unfinished control tower at Reno/Tahoe International Airport and the under-construction Ritz-Carlton hotel in Lake Tahoe. Enos charges roughly $1 per square foot, which, he says, is cheap compared with the monthly interest companies must pay on construction loans, even if a project sits idle. Contractor Mark Barbieri turned to Fast Wrap when a building project had to be mothballed because the prospective tenants had backed out. Enos covered the 25,000-square-foot structure in Lathrop, Calif. so it could sit empty for four months without damage. "The building had no windows or doors," Barbieri says. "We had installed electrical panels and some air conditioning ductwork, and that would have been exposed. But when we came back, it was just the way we had left it." Another client needed to store 11 pickup trucks after a wave of layoffs. Rather than paying to store the vehicles inside, the company parked them outdoors and had Fast Wrap enclose them in plastic. Enos projects more than $700,000 in revenue for 2009, double what the company took in last year. "We didn't see this part of the market," he crows. "And there's still so much opportunity out there."

5/3/2009 9:59 PM


Reno company wrapped up in its plastic product - Yahoo! Finance

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http://finance.yahoo.com/news/Reno-company-wrapped-up-in-apf-14222...

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Reno company wrapped up in its plastic product Upstart Reno company banks on shriveling economy to expand shrink wrap market Sandra Chereb, Associated Press Writer On Monday February 2, 2009, 9:20 am EST

RENO, Nev. (AP) -- Armed with mega heat guns, a small group gathered on a chilly morning taking aim not at the cold but thick plastic sheeting draped over a small mountain of construction pipe. Guns blazing, they practiced their technique -- long, sweeping strokes -- and quickly learned the consequences of less than fluid motions. "Uh, oh," said one woman as the sheeting melted into a small hole. There would be more holes this day, but that didn't puncture the enthusiasm of the new business owners, recruits of Fast Wrap, an upstart Reno company offering franchises. Though shrink wrap has been around for decades and used mostly to cover boats, Fast Wrap co-founder Mike Enos said use of the plastic protectant product is growing beyond marinas to disaster zones, construction sites and basic backyard uses. A shrinking economy has created unexpected demand for wrapping some products and heated up interest in acquiring franchises by people looking for jobs or supplemental income, he said. Ed, Charlene and Carrie Lane of Sacramento, Calif., are hoping to complement their custom homebuilding business. Ed Lane said business has been slow, and his work lately has been remodeling jobs. With Fast Wrap, he said, buildings can be sectioned off, isolating construction areas and minimizing dust and debris. "The possibilities are endless," said Enos, whose business began to take shape 15 years ago when he wanted to cover his own boat, which he uses about two months out of the year. The rest of the time it's in storage. "Doing the tarp, the Bungee cords, just wasn't working." A California boat manufacturer told him it provided shrink wrapping service only for boats it made, and when he couldn't find anyone else, he called Dr. Shrink, a Michigan outfit that sells shrink wrapping materials. For $1,000, Enos bought his own supplies, wrapped his boat and parked it outside another Reno business he had at the time. Before long, others were asking where they could get it done, too -- not only for boats, but recreational vehicles, outdoor kitchens, anything that needs protection from northern Nevada's harsh elements. That was in the early 1990s. He and Fast Wrap co-founder Ken Cassas, who spent 20 years in excavating and construction, opened the flagship Fast Wrap in Reno in 2007. In 2008, the company had about $600,000 in sales, he said. Since then it has since extended the franchise to eight locations, with three more in the works, in six states -- Nevada, California, Washington, Idaho, Florida and Colorado. Another will open soon in Missouri, Enos said. Their goal is to have 30 locations by year's end and 500 nationally within five years. The first 20 new franchise owners can buy into the company at a reduced rate of $50,000 to $60,000, depending on location, Enos said. The buy-in includes a week's worth of training at the Reno location, plus a day of onsite training, sales leads and all supplies needed to get started -- heat guns, ladders, and rolls of shrink wrap. On this day, Cassas demonstrated technique to new franchise owners at a local plant, where acres of PVC pipe were piled in a back lot -- a sign of the economic times. "It's like painting a car, only anyone can do it," Cassas said. That's debatable, said Tony Seraphin, owner of Global Wrap based in St. Augustine, Fla., with offices in Philadelphia and Monterey, Calif. Seraphin has been in the shrink wrapping business for nearly three decades and has traveled the world wrapping huge buildings and bridges for construction work and disaster relief efforts. After Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast, Global Wrap enclosed more than 400 buildings to protect whatever remained until repairs could begin, he said. "We get there right after the wind dies down," he said. "It's a very difficult business," he said. "When you're talking about a giant bridge or steel structures ... it takes a lot of know-how.

5/3/2009 10:07 PM


Reno company wrapped up in its plastic product - Yahoo! Finance

2 of 2

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/Reno-company-wrapped-up-in-apf-14222...

"We have a lot of people who have jumped on our bandwagon," Seraphin said. "We're the only ones that really do this on a national level. Seraphin said he didn't consider the Nevada upstart competition. Fast Wrap owners see the mobile, on-demand service as filling a local need and expanding shrink wrap uses. Garth Harris, who owns a Line-X spray-on coating franchise in Las Vegas and has several casino accounts, sees Fast Wrap as an extension of the services he already provides, applying protective coatings to outdoor furnishings, among other things. At the Reno plant where PVC pipe is manufactured, the wrapping will extend the life of its product. "If you leave the pipe exposed, it will be sunburned," said Cantex plant manager Andy Zimmer. "It makes the product unsellable. "It's not feasible to build a facility to store it inside," Zimmer said. "That's the reason we're using shrink wrap. Wrapping the pipe extends our storage time." The huge sheets of polyethylene, manufactured by Dr. Shrink, are fire retardant and offer protection from the sun's ultraviolet rays. When heat is applied with 240,000 BTU heat guns the sheeting shrinks about 25 percent, forming a tight coating. "The tighter you get it, the better," Cassas instructs. A few weeks earlier, he supervised as Fast Wrap workers sealed the top floors of an air traffic control tower being built at Reno-Tahoe International Airport. Wrapping the outside scaffolding formed a protective cocoon, allowing the contractor to pump in heat to warm steel beams before applying required fireproofing. Under building codes, the steel must be at least 48 degrees for 48 hours before the coating is applied. It also created a safety barrier for construction workers in the otherwise open air hundreds of feet above the ground. The same concept is used to make temporary buildings, equipped with zippered doors and windows that are marketed as "same day shade," for special events. The sheeting comes in rolls as large as 40-feet wide and 149-feet long. For simple wrap jobs, the company charges about $10 a linear foot. To wrap a 40-foot recreational vehicle, complete with ventilation and zippered access, costs about $400 -- cheaper than monthly indoor storage rental fees. Mark Hamill, a Fast Wrap franchise owner in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, said his outfit was contracted by a private tire manufacture. "Last year they bought hundreds of large truck tires," he said. But as the economy soured, the tires remain unused and were taking up valuable shop space. "We're shrink wrapping lots of tires," he said. Enos said Fast Wrap's franchise sales have been enhanced by the down economy. "They're creating their own work because they have no stability in their jobs." Robert McKay, a retired marine engineer from Dania Beach, Fla., is going into business with his sons, Kevin and Raymone. "We can't wait to get going," he said. "I hope to grow this business and put some people to work." Serge Bonaldo, a civil engineer from Southern California, and his business partner, Fran Natale, are hoping to augment their architectural business and protect its 12-person staff by opening a Fast Wrap franchise. "We want to try to save them," Bonaldo said of his workers. "We think this is going to take off." Mike Stenberg, president of Dr. Shrink, said the Fast Wrap franchise is introducing the versatility of the product to the masses. His company supplies materials to outlets in 70 countries, with sales totaling about $15 million annually, he said. "Even though shrink wrap has been around 25 to 30 years, there's people who have never seen it," he said. "We haven't come close to tapping into its potential."

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5/3/2009 10:07 PM


'It's a Wrap' Is a New Beginning for Serial Entrepreneur - Small Business

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http://voices.washingtonpost.com/small-business/2008/11/its_a_wrap_is_...

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5/3/2009 10:02 PM


'It's a Wrap' Is a New Beginning for Serial Entrepreneur - Small Business

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http://voices.washingtonpost.com/small-business/2008/11/its_a_wrap_is_...

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'It's a Wrap' Is a New Beginning for Serial Entrepreneur Some might consider owning a boat too big to fit in your garage a good problem to have.

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Because when you're a taxidermist/marlin fisherman/portable potty millionaire, it just might give you an idea. Mike Enos is a working man's Christo. But unlike Christo, Enos doesn't wrap in the name of art; he wraps because there's a demand. His franchise business Fast Wrap, a commercial and residential shrink wrapper, has taken off in a weak economy where half-finished construction projects riddle the nation's landscape, slowly deteriorating until work can begin again. Enos, 42, is already a veteran of several different careers. He went to taxidermy school after graduating from high school and built one of the most successful businesses in his field in Reno and Winnemucca, Nev. He grew up there, where the sky is big and the hunting is good. His business flourished. At 19 years old, he was bringing in over $100,000 a year. But like most entrepreneurs, Enos was always on the lookout for the next big thing. While at a convention on the video industry -- a new area of interest -Enos heard Blockbuster founder Wayne Huizenga speak about how prior to launching Blockbuster he was in the waste disposal business for 18 years. Enos immediately began investigating that industry and saw there was a huge demand for portable toilets. Although it was a capital-intensive business, there was a high return on the dollar. He opened Johnny on the Spot in 1993 in Reno. The business was a success. In 1994, Enos, an avid duck hunter, bought an air boat, which was too big to fit in his garage. He kept it outside behind his office near the freeway, covering it with tarps. Traveling on the freeway one day, he saw brand new boats shrink wrapped to protect them from the elements. He called the firm to see if they would wrap his boat. They wouldn't so he turned to the maker of the materials -- the wittily named Dr. Shrink. They sent him the goods, heat gun included. Enos wrapped the boat himself and there the boat sat. A couple of times a week someone came into his office asking where he got it wrapped. His secretary finally asked him if he could move the boat, she became so busy fielding inquiries. "Everybody wanted me to wrap their Bobcat or their backhoe or even their patio furniture," said Enos. He sold his toilet venture in 2006 to a large firm that was buying up similar, smaller firms across the country. "I did quite well" in that deal, he said. Well enough to go buy a yacht, go to Mexico and do some marlin fishing with his dad. He proudly remembers the day -- Oct. 28, 2007 -- he caught a 509 lb. black marlin. But the interest in his shrink wrapped boat stuck in the back of his mind. "When I was toying around doing something after I sort of retired, I was going to open a salt water fish studio specializing in bill fish, when I realized it just wasn't going to produce the returns I needed," said Enos. He went back to Reno and opened Fast Wrap -- a West Coast-based mobile shrink wrapping franchise offering on-site wrapping of everything from buildings and bridges to generators and piping. He

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'It's a Wrap' Is a New Beginning for Serial Entrepreneur - Small Business

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started his business at an opportune time -- the construction industry was beginning to crumble in Nevada. When the bottom fell out of the housing market, developers were left with half-finished buildings and construction sites full of depreciating equipment. Enos spent about 18 months developing a franchise program and hired IFranchise Group to help him franchise the name and structure the company. He expects to have 16 to 20 franchisees within the next 12 months. Shrink wrap has been around since 1978 and big names like 3M make the product, but it's distributed through many suppliers. He got his franchise certification from the Federal Trade Commission in February 2007 and his first state registration in April 2008. Franchises are now open in Spokane, Wash.; Coeur d'Alene, Idaho; Denver, Colo.; and Reno and Las Vegas, Nev. "We're in the asset protection business," said Enos, explaining the firm's success in the economic downturn. Fast Wrap's sales have grown 40 percent over the last seven months, according to Enos. He got a call recently from a church in Lake Tahoe that was halfway built when its funding dried up. "The only option they have right now is to let it sit exposed to the elements where all the wood and fancy engraving will deteriorate or to wrap it. We're seeing a lot of that -- it's great for us and bad for them." Fast Wrap, which has 14 employees and was financed by Enos, has built a client list that extends beyond the construction industry. The company wraps plasma cutters for a small business that ships all over the world. Farmers, who were buying old billboards to protect their horse hay bales, are now wrapping the bales to protect them from rain and snow. Enos has also wrapped large truck tires that were no longer needed when the construction industry weakened. Their owner was tired of leasing storage space for them in a warehouse. Now they're wrapped and kept outside. Enos has also been talking to the American Red Cross and insurance firms about services his company can offer when disaster strikes. He believes that even though times are tough, small firms can prevail. "A successful entrepreneur is a risk taker," said Enos. "If you believe in your concept or your business enough and failure is not an option...money is out there. If you have a good concept and a track record of being a hard working guy who makes things happen, money will find you." By Sharon McLoone | November 18, 2008; 12:18 PM ET Profiles in Entrepreneurship Previous: The New Face of Entrepreneurship | Next: Board of Trade Honors Three D.C.-Area Firms

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2009 Fast Wrap Media Placements  

2009 Fast Wrap Media Placements ~ Abbi Public Relations

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