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Anglo-American School of Moscow

“CHARTING THE FUTURE OF AAS” Strategic Plan 2011-2016


Contents Preface....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 4 AAS Identity Statement ............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 5 AAS Mission ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5 AAS Core Values ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 6 AAS Vision.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 7 Student Outcomes..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 7 Strategies ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 8 THE LEARNING STRATEGY: .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 8 THE SYSTEMS STRATEGY. ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 9 THE COMMITMENT AND COMMUNICATIONS STRATEGY .................................................................................................................................................. 10 Strategies Implementation Plan .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 11 THE LEARNING STRATEGY ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 12 THE SYSTEMS STRATEGY ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 24 Result 1 ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 24 THE COMMITMENT AND COMMUNICATION STRATEGY .................................................................................................................................................... 35 Result 1 ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 35 Result 2 ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 38 Result 3 ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 40 Result 4 ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 42 Result 5 ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 44 Result 6 ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 46 Result 7 ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 48

2 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


Result 8 ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 50 APPENDICES............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 52 APPENDIX 1 ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 52 STRATEGIC PLAN STEERING COMMITTEE ........................................................................................................................................................................... 52 APPENDIX 2 ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 54 SOURCES OF INFORMATION ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 54

3 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


Preface This strategic plan is created as a living document to provide direction and establish clear goals for the Anglo-American School of Moscow for the period 2011-2016. Established in 1949 in the press room of the British Embassy by Maria Collins, the wife of an American diplomat, the AngloAmerican School was founded by the American, British and Canadian Embassies to serve a tiny diplomatic community. Russia’s democratic and economic transformation through the 1990’s led to enormous growth in Moscow’s international community – and AAS responded to that challenge. Today, our Moscow campus serves over 1,300 students from more than 60 countries, while the St. Petersburg branch enrolls more than 120 students from 30 countries. Combined, the annual budget exceeds US $40 million. AAS receives substantial support from the three founding embassies and maintains its essential character as a non-profit educational institution serving the expatriate diplomatic and business communities in Moscow and St. Petersburg. At the same time, the demands of the community have made clear to the School Board and Administration the need to establish an orderly process of planning for school improvement, so that AAS can build upon its considerable strengths and make a good school even better. The strategic planning process began in 2001 and continues to draw on the collective knowledge and experience of parents, students, faculty, staff and other stakeholders in the school community. The latest result of this process is embodied in the pages that follow. Overall, this strategic plan is written to ensure that the school is equipped and prepared to fulfill its essential mission of providing an outstanding education to children in the English-speaking international communities of Moscow and St. Petersburg. For the period 2011-2016, the plan establishes three strategies for constant improvement:   

Learning – to deliver a challenging curriculum and nurturing programs to assure that each child achieves academic and holistic excellence. Systems – to establish the means to align processes and systems to each other and to our vision and mission. Commitment and Communications – to establish the means necessary for the entire AAS community to embrace our vision in the realization of our mission.

Each of these strategies is further defined by associated results and the means by which we plan to achieve them. Besides denoting the action to be undertaken, the plan identifies a cost/benefit analysis and the timeline for completion. Actions, target dates and costs are not binding but are estimated based on the School’s situation in June 2011 recognizing that AAS exists in a dynamic, changing environment. At the end of each year, the strategic plan will be the standard against which the School measures its progress, adjusting and re-ordering the goals for the following year as needed.

4 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


AAS Identity Statement The Anglo-American School of Moscow is an international learning community that is enriched by the local Russian culture and strengthened by the unique experiences and synergistic engagement of its students, teachers and parents.

AAS Mission AAS empowers each student to  Respect self and others  Love learning, and  Contribute as a globally aware citizen in order to achieve individual academic and holistic excellence.

5 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


AAS Core Values Core values are the essential and enduring tenets of AAS – the small set of guiding principles that have a profound impact on how everyone at AAS thinks and acts. They are the soul of AAS – the values that guide all actions. AAS believes equally in the value of 

Making decisions based on the students’ best interests

Developing the whole child

Supporting student success through community partnerships

Delivering a challenging and inquiry-based curriculum in an engaging manner

Reviewing curriculum via a reflective and dynamic process

Respecting self and others

Providing an emotionally and physically safe environment where people want to come each day, and

Providing students with an international perspective in order to prepare them for future challenges and contributions.

6 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


AAS Vision We inspire student learning     

Through a dynamic and caring environment With innovative and effective instructional strategies In collaborative relationships Current, relevant technologies, and By using the current, relevant technologies, and the rich resources of our diverse community.

Student Outcomes By 2016 each student   

Advocates and exhibits a healthy lifestyle and respect for self and others Drives his/her own learning and turns it into ACTION Demonstrates the competencies and attitudes of a 21st Century learner.

7 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


Strategies THE LEARNING STRATEGY: We will develop our philosophical beliefs, systems and practices in order to support and empower each student to achieve individual, academic and holistic excellence. List of Results we want to achieve that emanate from the Learning Strategy 1.

All faculty and support staff understand the concept of personalized learning and their responsibility to provide personalized learning for each student’s success.

2.

Students and parents understand their respective roles and responsibilities for personalized student learning.

3.

Faculty understands and actively uses the current systems and structures in place to support individual student learning for academic and holistic excellence.

4.

A school wide system is developed which proactively supports and empowers each student to achieve individual, academic and holistic excellence.

5.

Parameters for personalized student learning have been defined and created.

6.

Personalized learning profiles, built around robust learning goals and each child’s individual needs and interests are used by students, teachers and parents.

8 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


THE SYSTEMS STRATEGY. We will develop the means to align AAS processes and systems to each other and to our mission. List of Results we want to achieve that emanate from the Systems Strategy 1.

AAS systems have been inventoried, defined and documented.

2.

An evaluation cycle has been implemented, that guarantees each system is effective in its scope and incorporates best practices.

3.

Processes have been implemented that ensure systems are sustainable and properly supported.

4.

Processes have been implemented that ensure synergistic and/or complementary systems.

5.

AAS systems are widely understood and fully utilized by relevant members of the AAS community.

9 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


THE COMMITMENT AND COMMUNICATIONS STRATEGY We will create the means necessary for the AAS community to understand and support our vision in the realization of our mission. List of Results we want to achieve that emanate from the Commitment and Communications Strategy 1.

All AAS faculty and support staff understand the Mission and Vision and what it means for student learning.

2.

Those in leadership positions support and integrate the Mission and Vision into their practices.

3.

The Mission and Vision are guiding principles in our recruitment and admissions practices.

4.

On-going processes exist to build an understanding of the Mission and Vision.

5.

All AAS students understand and support the Mission and Vision and what it means for their learning.

6.

All parents understand and support the Mission and Vision and what it means for their children’s learning.

7.

All faculty and support staff support and integrate the Mission and Vision into their practices.

8.

The AAS Community easily accesses decisions, processes and products related to its Mission and Vision.

10 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


Strategies Implementation Plan

11 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


THE LEARNING STRATEGY

We will develop our philosophical beliefs, systems and practices in order to support and empower each student to achieve individual, academic and holistic excellence. Result 1 All faculty and support staff understand the concept of personalized learning and their responsibility to provide personalized learning for each student’s success.

Steps 1) Define best practices of personalized student learning using a “Leading Team”. Be cognizant that different cultures interpret personalizing learning in different ways. The Leading Team should be created by the end of August; it should include some members of the learning action team and teacher leaders from each division. This team will contact schools who have implemented personalized learning and read literature about excellent standards based approaches to individualize student learning. Research should draw from international and founding embassy schools. (Authors we drew research from: Dufour, Stiggins, Fullan, Elmore, Reeves and Schools to reference: The Big Picture Schools: http://www.bigpicture.org/schools/). 2) Research about personalized student learning is disseminated through department and grade level teams. Using the Leading Team established in means #1, create a common protocol for disseminating information across divisions. Facilitate discussions among teaching teams (departments and grades levels) about how shared research will impact instruction and student learning. Initial information should be brought to faculty before the first break in November. At all times connect to our mission and vision.

When

Status


Benefits • Getting faculty support, everybody understands responsibility, formulating discussion and opinions • Developing expertise in personal learning • Broadening community supporting work and profile Costs  Leadership team across division is formed of approximately 10 people for 5 hours per person per month This covers presentation, research. This could take the place of an afterschool activity COST: 50 hours/month  Copying books, materials COST: $ 1000 Review Year

Comments

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Person Accountable __________________________

13 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


Result 2 Students and parents understand their respective roles and responsibilities for personalized student learning. Steps

When

1) Guided by research and data compiled by the Leading Team in result#1, we will define our philosophy of personalized student learning appropriate at each division/grade level. 2) Begin the process of engaging students in ways in which they will monitor their own progress as they work toward learning objectives (personal learning goals). Share successes where teachers and students are working together to personalize student learning. Facilitate student understanding that effort is linked to achievement. 3) Share the philosophy behind personalized learning with stakeholders- parents, board and community. This can be accomplished via department and divisional letters, AAS website, coffees, information sessions, and conferencing with parents and students. Benefits • Students will understand their role in learning • Parents understand vision of personalized learning • Parents involved get a clear understanding • Website accesses an international community Costs • Using MAP and other teams to communicate use of data for personalize profile COST: 5 hours - with planning time • Student time (IB service hours) • Parent Coffees and Parent Evenings x 3 COST: 9 hours +US $1000 • Dispatch COST: 3 hours/month • Videos COST: 30 hours + $ 900 14 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)

Status


• Media Website COST: 20 hours/year Review Year Comments 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Person Accountable__________________________

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Result 3 Faculty understand and actively use the systems and structures in place to support individual student learning for academic and holistic excellence. Steps

When

1) Identify the student support systems and structures in place that facilitate individual student learning for academic and holistic excellence, including life skills and dispositions. 2) Explain and provide professional development assistance to the faculty about existing systems and structures in use in the Elementary School, Middle School, and High School. Align with The Systems and Structures Strategy. 3) Clarify how systems work and what services/supports are available to teachers and students. 4) Utilize student performance data to personalize learning. Look at and compile common data points, e.g. MAP (Measure of Academic Progress), WMLS (Woodcock Munoz Language Survey), F&P (Fountas Pinnell), Explore, formative and summative assessments, etc. Benefits  Utilize the tools that are already in place to support student learning  Full faculty understanding about supporting all students learning Costs  Research COST: 20 hours  Developing Professional Development (PD) program COST: 20 hours

16 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)

Status


Review Year

Comments

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Person Accountable__________________________

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Result 4 A school-wide system is developed which proactively supports and empowers each student to achieve individual academic and holistic excellence. Steps

When

1) Create a K- 12 team comprised of faculty members and administrators to develop and implement a school-wide response model (“K-12 Team”). 2) K-12 Team to: a. identify how response to intervention is currently being used among the divisions and document existing practices; b. define the elements of a tiered intervention model and provide intervention examples for each tier; c. ensure adopted interventions and strategies are based on sound research and are being implemented with fidelity; d. develop protocols for progress monitoring for effective decision making among the divisions; e. ensure the decision-making process accounts for common data points to identify student needs; f. ensure process accounts for habits of mind, affective needs of the students and other life skills. Also, ensure the process is used to enrich and extend the learning of students who are proficient. It is required that teaching teams write, and use, intervention plans that center upon the needs of students as they seek to meet or exceed the AAS standards and benchmarks; and g. develop procedures for electronic documentation of decision making about student learning. Benefit: Individual Student data will be easily accessed and used by all staff to support improved student learning Costs  Administrator, teacher-leaders, resource people will reconfigure time spent in meetings COST: 40 hours  IT staff time will be needed to support electronic student data tracking and recovery.  COST: 40 hours 18 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)

Status


Review Year

Comments

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Person Accountable__________________________

19 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


Result 5

Parameters for personalized student learning have been defined and created.

Steps

When

1) Facilitate students to use data to create individualized learning goals—through discussion and writing, help build and develop their PLPs (Personalized Learning Profiles). 2) Use information and research on personalized learning to discuss how AAS will document and individualize student progress (academic and holistic), focusing on our approved standards and benchmarks. Disseminate information for collaborative planning. E.G. MAP (Measure of Academic Progress), IB (International Baccalaureate), WMLS (Woodcock Muñoz Language Survey), Explore, internal assessments, student self-assessments, goal setting, portfolios, etc. 3) Create Quality Learning Circles (QLC), groups of leaders and teachers who are involved in, and invite outside critique of, individual student learning profiles. In these Quality Learning Circles teachers and leaders will share ideas and critically analyze-Personalized Learning Profiles (PLP) reflecting 21st century learning (www.p21.org). Benefits  School and faculty will become more finely focused on student learning  Student data will be readily available to all stakeholders  Faculty protocols for monitoring student learning will be shared across divisions Costs

 

Cross division team of 10 plan and define personalized learning and share back with divisions- four months COST: 100 hours Divisions adopt and practice QLCs for collaborating on student learning COST: 300 hours

20 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)

Status


Review Year

Comments

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Person Accountable __________________________

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Result 6 Personalized learning profiles, built around each child’s individual needs, interests, and robust learning goals, are used by students, teachers and parents. Steps

When

1) Data will be used as evidence to determine areas for learning progress for all students. 2) A personalized Learning Profile has been developed using robust learning goals and reflecting each child’s needs and interests. 3) Reporting of student progress is directly linked to the evidence found in the Personalized Learning Profile. 4) An advisory structure for organizing and managing the Personalized Learning Profiles, in partnership with the parent and student, has been established. 5) School-wide data is regularly and systematically gathered and analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of Personalized Learning Profiles. Benefits  Students are engaged in their individual learning  Students partner with teachers to document their progress  Learning progress is clear to all stakeholders Cost: On-going time for staff to analyze student data, continue training around how to best analyze student data COST:

22 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)

Status


Review Year

Comments

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Person Accountable__________________________

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THE SYSTEMS STRATEGY

We will develop the means to align AAS processes and systems to each other and to our mission. Result 1

AAS Systems have been inventoried, defined and documented.

Steps

When

1) Define what constitutes a “System�. 2) Develop a template including the elements which constitute a system, possible categories of systems, determine specific information to collect. For example : http://www.montgomeryschoolsmd.org/info/baldrige/about/categories/. 3) Establish method, time and process for conducting inventory. 4) Conduct inventory. 5) Analyze inventory results. 6) Identify systems that may fall outside of the systems mentioned in the inventory. 7) Establish process for periodic review/update of the inventory. 8) Integrate new systems into a system relationship diagram, justifying or removing redundancies, before implementing new systems. 9) Publish (document) inventory.

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Status


Benefits  Clear, searchable database of systems in place and descriptions of their scope and function  More effective use of time because people will know who to go to for what  Reduced frustration as greater transparency of procedures is established  Reduction of redundancies  A working map of the systems in place which can constantly be revised Costs: • Create team of stakeholders (8-10 members) to agree on: a) a school-wide definition of systems (1 hour); b) determine process for conducting inventory and criteria to be used (3 hours); c) conduct inventory (5 hours); d) analyze results and identify redundancies (3 hours); e) generate diagram of systems within AAS justifying or removing redundancies (5 hours); f) establish process of review (1 hour); and g) generate a document with systems inventory (2 hours) COST: 200 hours • Purchase/set-up/design of a database to keep the systems inventory. Could take training of existing staff or extra support (20 hours for creation and input) • Training for stakeholders on how to access and use database (1 hour for staff, 1 hour for parents/community, 1 hour for students (within advisory/class time) • Communications staff to publish access to database online (1 hour) Review Year

Comments

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

25 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


Person Accountable __________________________

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Result 2 An evaluation cycle has been implemented, that guarantees that each system is effective in its scope and incorporates best practices. Step

When

Status

Evaluation cycle is established that: a. establishes criteria for evaluating systems; b. surveys stakeholders regarding use and functioning of systems; c. projects needs for new systems; and d. evaluates new systems and establishes criteria for implementing them. Benefits  All steps are internally staffed by people who know the systems and school best. The meetings will be held after school hours  A consistent and ongoing evaluation cycle is adopted school wide which reduces confusion and creates efficiency  The evaluation process will reveal areas of strength, redundancy or where improvement is needed, which will lead to continuous improvement  When internal staff are used to create the evaluation criteria and system, there will be more acceptance and use of the process Costs  Study team of 4-6 members to include staff, board and parent community to review existing system evaluation tools. 3 hours of research time for each member and two one hour meetings COST: 30 hours  Study team will adopt, modify or create an AAS Systems Evaluation System and criteria for existing and potential new systems. One meeting COST: 6 hours  Time for the system managers for each major system to coordinate with the Communications department to develop survey questions regarding the use and functioning of each major system including suggestions for future needs. One hour for each system manager, and communications to finalize the survey COST: 10 hours/major system  Time for study team to collate the survey results, 4-6 people for 3 hours each 27 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


COST: 18 hours  Survey results shared with stakeholders by the Communications department COST: 10 hours Review Year

Comments

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Person Accountable __________________________

28 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


Result 3 Processes have been implemented to ensure systems are sustainable and properly supported. Steps

When

1) Identify a Systems Manager for each major system. 2) Conduct a resource analysis (including training) for each major system which also includes physical/psychological costs. 3) Systems Manager for each major system participates in the evaluation process developed in result #2. 4) Establish/implement a protocol for storing/deleting information about major systems. 5) If during the evaluation stage, a system is determined to be not supported or sustainable, consideration will be given to the purpose/necessity of the system before it is deleted/changed. Benefits • Transparency • Efficiency • Time gained (elimination of duplication/redundancy) • Focused resources • A sense of ownership and buy-in for systems • Increased morale • Better service delivery for ‘customers’ (students, parents, employees, board) • Accurate and increased ability for reporting • Greater accountability and improved decision-making

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Status


Costs  Time, preparation and training for resource analysis COST: 8 hours x approximately 50 people (400 hours)  Appoint/hire consultant responsible for resource analysis and development / implementation / training for new protocol COST: $10,000  Training for System Managers COST: 50 hours  Staff time for participation in evaluation and reporting process: (2 hours/System Manager)100 hours x 50 people COST: 5,000 hours Review Year

Comments

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Person Accountable __________________________

30 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


Result 4 systems.

Processes have been implemented to ensure synergistic and/or complementary

Steps

When

1) Continually determine and diagram the relationships between systems using the systems inventory from Result #1. 2) Where systems serve an identical or similar purpose, justify or remove the redundant systems. 3) Review interaction of remaining systems and ensure that they are complimentary and/or synergistic. 4) Where necessary, positions or people responsible for maintaining communication between systems are documented on the system relationship diagram and job descriptions are set out as appropriate. Benefits  Reduce overall number of systems thereby increasing efficiency  Increase community understanding of purpose and systems  Increase efficiency of staff resulting in job satisfaction  Increase functionality of systems  Promote sustainability by documenting the relationship between systems and ensuring accountability  Increase communication across systems  Increase synergy and complimentary functioning of systems Costs  20 sub days in order to: a. time; Admin team as directed by the director will determine synergistic and complimentary systems (costs associated with this to be determined based on the members of the team); b. admin team to set up meetings with systems managers of potentially synergistic systems; and c. retraining for changed systems and / or new functionality of systems COST: 160 hours 31 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)

Status


Review Year

Comments

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Person Accountable __________________________

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Result 5

AAS Systems are widely understood and fully utilized by the relevant stakeholders.

Steps

When

1) Having identified in result 1 who needs to know about which systems, produce and publish this information so that information is easily accessible to all relevant stakeholders. List should be by system use, by staff role/division in the school, and by topic. 2) New hires and internal transfers should be introduced to this list during job orientation. All other stakeholders in need of training will be identified, and appropriate training will be provided. 3) Data will be collected on system use on an ongoing basis to ensure people are using the systems that are most efficient and helpful to them. Benefits  Efficiency of time and system use  Better understanding of systems will lead to more effective and fuller use of systems  Transparency of systems leads to greater synergy Costs  Time to maintain publishing of systems information COST: 4 hours/year  Time during orientation of new employees and transfers COST: 1 hour/orientation group  Time for training of stakeholders COST: 1-5 hours/session depending on position and exposure to systems  Time to train the trainers COST: 1 hour/person  Occasional external experts employed COST: e.g. Rubicon trainer $1000 per day

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Status


Review Year

Comments

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Person Accountable __________________________

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THE COMMITMENT AND COMMUNICATION STRATEGY

We will create the means necessary for the AAS community to understand and support our vision in the realization of our mission. Result 1 All faculty and support staff understand the concept of personalized learning and their responsibility to provide personalized learning for each student’s success. Steps

When

1) Mission and Vision will be printed and visible in all classrooms and offices of the school. 2)

Explain benefits and rationale of Mission and Vision to faculty during orientation and on-going throughout the year.

3) Illustrate the Mission and Vision using visual tools such as multimedia and video that underline practices that support the Mission and Vision already existing in the school (e.g. IB mission video). 4) Use thinking routines/concept mapping (project zero) to explore components of Mission and Vision with faculty in order to build understanding. 5) Translate the Mission and Vision into Russian for accessibility to all staff. 6) Make language of the Mission and Vision comprehensible to all. Consider vocabulary when creating visual communication tools. 7) Use the Mission and Vision to frame meetings. It should become an integrated part of meetings. 8) Give practical and visual examples in classroom or teaching approaches. 9) Facilitate discussion groups in order to give faculty and staff time to raise concerns as understanding of the Mission and Vision is being built. 35 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)

Status


10) Give teachers PD around the idea of “individualized learning” so that they might better understand the Mission and Vision. Benefits  Being trained in leading change will lead to better buy in, less time wasting on vision and action of “how,” more focus, better equipped to deal with negativity of change. This is a time saving benefit of “doing it right the first time” and giving the leaders a professional edge in presenting and promoting the strategy  An employee dedicated to this strategy will give greater relevance and focus to the strategy, tie in the big picture to small, moving parts, take off the burden from admin and teacher leaders concentrating on curriculum  Videos will give not only better understanding to the Mission and Vision but also promote emotional connections  Translating the Mission and Vision will give a sense of inclusion and promote better understanding  Widely publicizing the Mission and Vision will make the Mission and Vision relevant and signify the importance of the words/idea and the strategy Costs  An organizational change consultant will be hired to train admin, teacher leaders and community leaders to order to better facilitate meetings, discussion groups, questions from the community, reorganization of meetings and documents, media/publications noted in this plan of action COST: included in the next bullet  A two day training (by consultant above) in leading change/Mission and Vision will be given at the start of the year to 14 admin and xx teacher leaders and xx community leaders (PTO) COST: $ 10,000  An employee will be dedicated part-time to this Communication Strategy in order to facilitate change, plan strategy integration in school and community meetings, plan year’s meetings/publications/videos, integrate Mission and Vision in all aspects of community COST: $ 6000  Videos will be produced to train, educate school community about Mission and Vision COST: $ 2000 COST: 100 hours  Mission and Vision will be translated in Russian (by in house staff) COST: 5 hours 36 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


 Mission and Vision posters will be designed/printed and hung in all classrooms/offices COST: $ 1000 COST: 20 hours  Teacher Professional Development (PD) time around individualized learning will require up to 1 day total, but should be reflected in action plan result 1 under the “Learning” strategy Review Year

Comments

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Person Accountable __________________________

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Result 2 practices.

Those in leadership positions support and integrate the Mission and Vision into their

Steps

When

1) The Board incorporates the Mission and Vision in setting policy and decision-making. 2) Divisional goals which are used to guide the individual professional growth goals are developed based on the principles of the Mission and Vision. 3) Administrators use the principles of the Mission and Vision in the evaluation processes. 4) Administrators and/or teacher leaders facilitate discussion groups in order to give faculty and staff time to raise concerns as understanding of the Mission and Vision as it is being built. 5) Teacher leaders and administrators provide on-going education for “why� we embrace this Mission and Vision. 6) Agendas are formed with the principles of the Mission and Vision by guiding the priorities set by leaders. 7) Administrators utilize multiple modes for communication in order to reach a range of target audiences (some prefer mail, some open discussions, some videos, etc.) and to appeal to the emotions of staff in order to promote change as the Mission and Vision are implemented. 8) Leaders communicate the Mission and Vision in consistent behavior, words and deeds. 9) Administrators and leaders spend time developing what the Mission and Vision look like in their own practices, review the Mission and Vision before school starts each year during retreats, orientation, and mentoring sessions. 10) Administration find and share clear examples of what the Mission and Vision look like in practice. 11) Leadership will carefully select the language used to communicate support for the Mission and 38 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)

Status


Vision in order to frame positive impressions that lead to lasting change. 12) Administration will plan school-wide professional development to support the implementation of the Mission and Vision. 13) The Mission and Vision will be used as a filter when deciding on professional development opportunities within the school. Benefits  By incorporating Mission and Vision into all aspects of school, it will become entrenched into thinking and will become institutionalized  We will be able to draw upon examples of our own our students and work to highlight and model the personal connection of the Mission and Vision and how it is positively influencing the school. This will build greater support Costs  

Admin and teacher leader time spent on re-evaluating evaluation processes, meeting planning, and PD planning, agendas, PD along with Strategy Coordinator COST: 2 hours per week per person PD planned around Mission and Vision (at approx two full faculty meetings) COST: $ 1500

Review Year

Comments

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Person Accountable __________________________

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Result 3 practices.

The Mission and Vision are guiding principles in our recruitment and admissions

Steps

When

Status

1) An applicant’s profile will be measured against the Mission and Vision and will be used in making recruitment decisions. 2) Admissions staff will communicate the Mission and Vision to all visitors and applicants. 3) Admissions will have the Mission and Vision visible to all visitors/applicants. 4) Recruitment documentation will illustrate the key areas of the Mission and Vision, and interviewers will ensure that they explain the key components of the Mission and Vision during the interview process. 5) Hiring interview questions are specially designed to ensure that new candidates understand the Mission and Vision and will fit into the desired profile. 6) Produce a simple small booklet of the key points of the Mission and Vision with simple explanations. Translate it into multiple languages for use during admissions process. Benefits  Formal training from a consultant will bring right practice into daily work and help bring a clear message to potential community members  Incorporating Mission and Vision into the admissions process will help ensure new community members ‘fit” into the school and support the Mission and Vision  Publications in multiple languages will bring better understanding and buy-in from the community

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Costs  Consultant in End Result 1 gives training to Admissions Staff regarding how best to communicate Mission and Vision to visitors and applicants COST: $ in Result 3 COST: 20 hours  Specific publication for admissions designed and printed in languages (English, Russian, Korean) COST: $ 3000 COST: 20 hours work in house Russian translation  Translation of booklet COST: $ 500 Review Year

Comments

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Person Accountable __________________________

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Result 4

On-going processes exist to build an understanding of the Mission and Vision.

Steps

When

Status

1) Ceremonies, events and technology, will all feed back to the Mission and Vision. 2) Communication methods will vary to accommodate different styles of learning, linguistic, and cultural backgrounds.  Visual displays that change over time – is one example. 3) Current traditions will be re-evaluated to show how they relate and support the new Mission and Vision.  If they do not support, or are counter-productive to, the new Mission and Vision they should not be continued. 4) Activities (including new activities as introduced) around school should be highlighted as in line with a fulfilling Mission and Vision. Benefits  Incorporating the Mission and Vision into ceremonies, etc will add to understanding, keep the Mission and Vision in the forefront, celebrate successes of Mission and Vision  Using different types of communication methods to communicate Mission and Vision will bring better understanding, allow fresh perspectives, bring emotional connections Costs  Publication/media communication will be an ongoing process each year including expenses in labor, printing, translation, design, and production COST: $ 10,000 (based on 1,000 hours)

42 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


Review Year

Comments

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Person Accountabl e __________________________

43 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


Result 5 All AAS students understand and support the Mission and Vision and what it means for their learning. Steps

When

1) Make it part of AAS orientation/handbook introduction activities at the beginning of year. 2) Freely discuss and explain the “why’s,” expectations and benefits to students of the Mission and Vision (could be done through advisory and grade level activities, for example). 3) Student groups (inter- and intra-divisional) can do activities, games, spirit events around the Mission and Vision. 4) Emphasize “holistic” through the Mission and Vision’s involvement in committees, Green, STUCO, etc. 5) Integrate into report card system. 6) Create (interactive) assemblies to emphasize and reinforce Mission and Vision. 7) Service learning programs and aspects of the curriculum employ Mission and Vision throughout. Benefit: Incorporating the Mission and Vision into important documents and reporting brings more understanding to the community, signifies the importance of the Mission and Vision and institutionalizes it. Costs  The orientation/handbook rewording/ redesign will incur an additional cost of hours COST: 20 hours  The report card redesign will incur an additional cost of hours in training teachers how to integrate into reporting COST 4 hours per teacher  Report card redesign will cost addition hours in template design COST: 10 hours  Integrating into report card will require parent explanation by admin and teachers COST: 10 hours 44 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)

Status


 Activities, assemblies, programs coordinated by Mission and Vision Coordinator, cost already noted in #1 Review Year

Comments

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Person Accountable __________________________

45 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


Result 6 All parents understand and support the Mission and Vision and what it means for their children’s learning. Steps

When

1) Describe the type of adult this new Mission and Vision hopes to produce, paint the mental picture. 2)

Show how this gives students advantages in life/work/higher education, leading to parent commitment.

3) Create a product (video) that makes an emotional connection and shows the mission and vision in action, using our students, in our school. 4) Within (above) presentations, break the Mission and Vision down into key sections. 5) Demonstrate that school is not just exam-based results but develop extra-curricular activities; awareness of world events; charity work etc. 6) Use the liaisons for different communities in the school to reach the various community members through a dynamic approach communicating the relevance and importance of the message. Consider cultural and linguistic differences in this process, also consider the role and access of the PTO. 7) Consider how teachers communicate about the Mission and Vision with parents, including reporting systems. Benefits  By highlighting how the Mission and Vision benefits students, it allows for buy-in and better understanding and support from the parent community  Improved communication and relationships between different communities

46 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)

Status


Costs  Production of multimedia especially geared to parents COST: $ 600 COST: 30 hours COST: $ 300 subtitled in Russian/Korean • Time/preparation meeting with community stakeholders (PTO, for example) en route to parent community COST: 4 hours Review Year

Comments

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Person Accountable __________________________

47 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


Result 7 practices.

All faculty and support staff support and integrate the Mission and Vision into their

Steps

When

Status

1) Make evidence of support for Mission and Vision part of staff evaluation criteria and assessment. 2) Investigate and share concrete examples of what Mission and Vision looks like in practice in order to implement in AAS. 3) Administration makes clear to teachers, and teachers make clear to students what the Mission and Vision look like in action in the classroom. 4) Provide ongoing support and PD (Professional Development) for staff in implementing Mission and Vision. Benefits • Ensures consistency across divisions, integration of Mission and Vision in practice • Everyone benefits from admin bringing best evidence, examples, and seeing what Mission and Vision is in practice • Discussion around Mission and Vision provides ongoing opportunity to build positive relationships within staff, and between staff and students • External PD lends authority, inspiration, validation to our Mission and Vision practices Costs  Time to adapt evaluation tools to incorporate Mission and Vision COST: 75 hours (15 hr admin team of 5)  Redesign of evaluation document COST: 3 hours  Research time for leadership (to find examples and create presentation as needed) COST: 20 hours  Time in meetings and classes to discuss COST: 2 hours per month 48 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


 Time managing resistance to implementation COST: ongoing  Cost of external consultant mid-term (Professional Development) COST: $ 10,000 Review Year

Comments

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Person Accountable __________________________

49 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


Result 8 The AAS Community is easily accessing decisions, processes and products related to its Mission and Vision. Steps

When

Status

1) Make information readily available and easily accessed by the community through the school website. The school website will be used as a main hub of information storage. It will be clearly organized and easily searchable in order to find information quickly and easily. 2) Create opportunities for people to access information through different types of media (social networks, brochures, hard copy newsletter, speaking forums, flat screens at school). 3) Present information in a variety of ways, most appropriate to the message and audience, with special acknowledgement (care) given to the different communication styles/languages of our community. 4) Communication department stays informed about developments to Mission and Vision and make all processes transparent to the community. Benefits  Increased accessibility and transparency means increased support  Effective and sustained communication builds commitment from a broader section of the community  Supports improved integration of new families and staff to AAS philosophy and community Costs  Design of new website and transfer of information to the site COST: 100 hours  Hard copies and display of Mission and Vision related material designed and included in current publications as well as distributed separately and available in hard copy on campus COST: $1000  Weekly time dedicated to updating information related to Mission and Vision for community access COST: 3 hours per week 50 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


Review Year

Comments

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Person Accountable __________________________

51 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


APPENDICES APPENDIX 1 STRATEGIC PLAN STEERING COMMITTEE SP Facilitator Board of Directors

Dr. Teresa ARPIN Dick (Richard) SKLAR Lynette POULTON Kim WILKIE

Transformation Systems, Ltd Board Member Board Member PTO President

Administration

Drew Alexander Jon ZURFLUH Dr. Peggy SMITH Ian FORSTER Ron Gleason Harry HOULIS Carolina GIANETTO Robert DOYLE Rita EhRman Dr. Cindy EMMANS Erica Holt-Fursova Judith CURTIS

AAS Director AAS Director Designate Curriculum Director Deputy Director for Finance and Operations St. Petersburg Campus Principal Assistant Principal, Middle School Assistant Principal, Elementary School Assistant Principal, High School Communications & Development Director Information, Communication & Technology Director Human Resources Manager Middle School Principal

Faculty

Patrick KANE Christine APPLEBY John BISHOP Jamie MARKS Chelsea WOODS Nelly HUMPHREY Pasha KIRILLOV

ESOL Coordinator Science teacher, Middle School Librarian, Elementary School Humanities teacher, Middle School Humanities teacher, Middle School Grade 2 teacher Science teacher, AAS St P


Parents

Dianna GOODWIN Jennifer GALLENKAMP Farina MELWANI

Students

Hanna HALLBERG Renata KAMAKURA Alexander Krotow Julia HOLODOVA Zhenya IVANOVA Olga KONONOVA

Non-Teaching Staff

Learning Strategy Christine Appleby (L) Patrick Kane (L) Peggy Smith (L) Dean Cameron Irena Sheina Jennifer Hughes Mary Corliss Rob Doyle Snezana Micic

Grade 12 student Grade 9 student Grade 12 student Admin Assistant Executive Secretary to the School Director Teaching Assistant

Systems Strategy Carolina Giannetto (L) Chelsea Woods Deb Marth Dick Sklar Drew Alexander Erica Fursova John Bishop Judith Curtis Patrick MacPherson Rich McLeod Stacy Granmayeh Susan Forster

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Commitment / Communication Strategy Ian Forster (L) Rita Ehrman (L) Bogdan Mihai Hilary Milne Mary Rizos Robin Smith


APPENDIX 2 SOURCES OF INFORMATION      

AAS Charter, Board By –Laws, Policy Manual AAS Strategic Plan 07/11 2009-2010 AAS Annual Report Parent, Faculty and Student Surveys 2010-2011 AAS Organizational Chart Meetings of Steering Committee and Strategy Action Teams (February – May 2011)

54 AAS Strategic Plan 11/16 (adopted on June 15, 2011)


Strategic Plan 2011-2016