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2013 - 2014

PROCESFOLIO

Aaron Vergult

3rd Bachelor Research Graphic Design St Lucas University College of Art & Design, Antwerp

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Contact www.aaronvergult.com www.aaronvergult.wordpress.com www.aaronvergultprogress.tumblr.com mail@aaronvergult.com

This document contains images of other artists. All rights reserved for their author. 2


2013 - 2014

PROCESFOLIO Aaron Vergult

3rd Bachelor Research Graphic Design St Lucas University College of Art & Design, Antwerp 3


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- “Happiness and the absurd are two sons of the same earth. They are inseparable.” “Thus I draw from the absurd three consequences, which are my revolt, my freedom, and my passion. By the mere activity of consciousness I transform into a rule of life what was an invitation to death—and I refuse suicide.” -Albert Camus

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INDEX

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GENERAL RESEARCH 12-27 Richard Kern Quintin Dupieux Dominic Wilcox Asger Carlsen: HESTER Contemporary Art in China

LUCID DREAMING

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An Inquiry of Lucid Dreaming Hypnagogic State The mirror Experiment Create Dream Characters

GLYPH TYPEFACE 1.0 74-91 Research Sketches 36Daysoftype

ROSEN

92-100

Concept Screenshots Datamoshing

IDENTITY

100-113

Business Cards Internship Posters Website

OTHER

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Voids Kantharos

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What first comes to mind when thinking about absurdity

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2.

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1. Portrait of Andre Breton by Man Ray 2. Urinoir as art, Marchel Duchamp 3. Myth of Sisyphus - Albert Camus

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GENERAL RESEARCH Richard Kern Quintin Dupieux Dominic Wilcox Asger Carlsen: HESTER Contemporary Art in China

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GENEREAL RESEARCH

OTHER ARTISTS INTO ABSURD

Other Artists Into Absurd Through the first stage of my research I started looking for other artists who worked around the subject absurd. I came across several artists/ art that intrigued me, differing from technique, concept or just their personal style. It took me a while to find my own way into the subject because there are a lot of ways to interpret the Absurd.

Hanging man bubblegum sculpture by Maurizio Savini

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GENEREAL RESEARCH

OTHER ARTISTS INTO ABSURD

Scott Jarvie - Clutch project / 2007-2008

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GENEREAL RESEARCH

OTHER ARTISTS INTO ABSURD

Richard Kern “Richard Kern, photographer and filmmaker remains, first and foremost, a portraitist. For more than two decades Kern has sought to unravel and illuminate the complex and often darker sides of human nature. Kern makes the psychological space between the sitter, photographer and audience his subject. With his dry, matter of fact approach, he underlines the absurdity of truth and objectivity in photography while playing with our reliance upon taxonomies around sexual representation.� -Matthew Higgs

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GENEREAL RESEARCH

OTHER ARTISTS INTO ABSURD

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GENEREAL RESEARCH

OTHER ARTISTS INTO ABSURD

Dominic Wilcox Dominic Wilcox is a British artist and designer who creates innovative objects, drawings and installations. In 2002 he graduated from Ron Arad’s renowned Design Products course at the Royal College of Art and has gone on to develop an international reputation for his diverse range of original and creative work. Through his drawings and objects he aims to place a spotlight on the banal; adding a new, surprising perspective on the everyday. Recent projects include the design of a pair of shoes with inbuilt GPS to guide the wearer home, a race against a 3D Printer at the V&A and a 10 vinyl record called Sounds of Making in East London.

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Soundbulbs


GENEREAL RESEARCH

OTHER ARTISTS INTO ABSURD

Finger Nose Stylus Date: 2011 Materials: Stylus, clay, elastic “I sometimes use my touchphone in the bath. I know it’s stupid. One problem I encounter is that when put my left hand in the water without thinking, it gets wet and unusable for touchscreen navigation. It is too risky to try to hold and navigate with one hand. I found that I could use my nose to scroll but I couldn’t see where my nose was touching precisely. It was at that point that I came up with this idea of a nose extension ‘finger’ that would allow navigation while my phone is firmly held by one hand.” Dominic Wilcox

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GENEREAL RESEARCH

OTHER ARTISTS INTO ABSURD

Quintin Dupieux Quintin Dupieux is mostly known as his alias Mr. Oizo, and particulary for his song Flat Beat, starring Flat Eric. Although the yellow puppet was pretty bizarre as a protagonist in the videoclip, You haven’t seen nothing yet. In 2010 Quintin Dupieux started making movies, in the first movie the main character was a tire.

Rubber (2010)

Police chase in Rubber

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GENEREAL RESEARCH

OTHER ARTISTS INTO ABSURD

Wrong (2012)

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GENEREAL RESEARCH

OTHER ARTISTS INTO ABSURD

Asger Carlsen Asger Carlsen is a contemporary Danish artist who makes images through photo manipulation. He creates Unidentifying beings who reminds us to alien-like creatures amongst us. He has been inspiring me for 4 years now. There is this one particulary project of him I like the most: HESTER

Images of the HESTER project

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GENEREAL RESEARCH

OTHER ARTISTS INTO ABSURD

The Uncanny Asger Carlsen: ‘The Uncanny (Ger. Das Unheimliche -- literally, ‘un-home-ly’, but idiomatically, ‘scary’ or ‘creepy’) is a Freudian concept of an instance where something can be familiar, yet foreign at the same time, resulting in a feeling of it being uncomfortably strange or uncomfortably familiar.’

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GENEREAL RESEARCH

OTHER ARTISTS INTO ABSURD

X This is a work I made in 2010 for a school assignment: Typography versus the human body. Later on I found the equation with the work of Asger Carlsen. It resembles the capital “X” and the original picture was from a fashion advertisement in a magazine. Three years later I still see this image as one of my best works. Though the action I did to make this was very simple, It’s the perfect presentation of the bizarre works I want to make in the near future.

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GENEREAL RESEARCH

X, Digital Collage, 2010

OTHER ARTISTS INTO ABSURD

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GENEREAL RESEARCH

OTHER ARTISTS INTO ABSURD

Contemporary Art in China Contemporary Art from China is a multimedia group exhibition of artists from China who use playful, humorous, ritualistic imagery, as if they were engaging in an absurdist, leisurely “recreation” that focuses on their interior lives and keeps the external world at an arm’s length. They also have as a common theme the “re-creation” of settings, events, and situations, as if trying to recover scenes from a cultural amnesia, in reaction to the rapidly changing political, social, cultural, economic, and environmental landscapes in China.

Liu Qinghe- Early fall 2001

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Artists in the exhibition include Chen Chieh-jen, Chen Wei, Hong Hao, Liu Qinghe, Wang Wei, Xie Xiaoze, Xu Ruotao, Xu Zhen, and Zhao Liang. Support provided by Morono Kiang Gallery, Los Angeles and Falling Leaves Foundation. Organized by UCR Sweeney Art Gallery, and curated by gallery director Tyler Stallings.


GENEREAL RESEARCH

OTHER ARTISTS INTO ABSURD

Wang Wei

Chinese Library No. 35, by Xiaoze Xie (2010) Oil on canvas

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LUCID DREAMING An Inquiry of Lucid dreaming The Hypnagogic State The Mirror Experiment Create Dream Characters

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LUCID DREAMING

AN INQUIRY OF LUCID DREAMING

The Experience of Lucid Dreaming “Conscious awareness during the dream state is an exhilarating experience. Because the world you are experiencing is one of your own creation, you can do the impossible and consciously influence the outcome of your dreams.”

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LUCID DREAMING

AN INQUIRY OF LUCID DREAMING

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LUCID DREAMING

AN INQUIRY OF LUCID DREAMING

Figures for 窶連n Inquiry of Lucid Dreaming CONSCIOUS

E E

PRECONSCIOUS SUPER - EGO

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O UNCONSCIOUS ID

Awake

R.E.M Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 (Deep sleep) Hours

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0

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LUCID DREAMING

AN INQUIRY OF LUCID DREAMING

AWAKE STAGE I STAGE II STAGE III

STAGE IIII

REM

REALI TY Conscious, Logic, Senses, Memory, Imagination, Abstract, Thought

CONSCIOUS

LUCID DREAM S Conscious, Logic, Senses, Limited Memory, Limited Imagination

TH R E S H OLD

DREAM S Subconscious, Illogical, Limited Senses, No memory, No imagination

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LUCID DREAMING

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AN INQUIRY OF LUCID DREAMING


LUCID DREAMING

AN INQUIRY OF LUCID DREAMING

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LUCID DREAMING

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AN INQUIRY OF LUCID DREAMING


LUCID DREAMING

AN INQUIRY OF LUCID DREAMING

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LUCID DREAMING

AN INQUIRY OF LUCID DREAMING

Recurring

DREAMS

DREAMS

D R EA M S

DREAMS

S M A E R D

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LUCID DREAMING

AN INQUIRY OF LUCID DREAMING

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LUCID DREAMING

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AN INQUIRY OF LUCID DREAMING

REALITY CHECKS HANDS

LUCID DREAMING

#1 With the hands reality check, you check if your hands are normal. Look at your hand or both hands and focus on them. Count the fingers in your head or out loud. They may have the wrong number of fingers, the number may change while you try to count them, the fingers can be deformed and keep on changing when you look at them. Your hands can be the wrong colour, or have other abnormalities. A good hand reality check is pushing two fingers from your right hand into the palm of your left hand and willing them to pass straight through. In waking life, this is discreet and always yields the same resistance. In a dream, the willing fingers could pass through and you will know you are dreaming!

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D

M

LUCID DREAMING

AN INQUIRY OF LUCID DREAMING

REALITY CHECKS

LUCID DREAMING

#1

HANDS With the hands reality check, you check if your hands are normal. Look at your hand or both hands and focus on them. Count the fingers in your head or out loud. They may have the wrong number of fingers, the number may change while you try to count them, the fingers can be deformed and keep on changing when you look at them. Your hands can be the wrong colour, or have other abnormalities.

A good hand reality check is pushing two fingers from your right hand into the palm of your left hand and willing them to pass straight through. In waking life, this is discreet and always yields the same resistance. In a dream, the willing fingers could pass through and you will know you are dreaming!

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LUCID DREAMING

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AN INQUIRY OF LUCID DREAMING


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LUCID DREAMING

AN INQUIRY OF LUCID DREAMING

REALITY CHECKS

LUCID DREAMING

#2

Mirror With the mirrors reality check, you check to see if you look normal in a mirror. Mirrors may also not behave properly in dreams. This because your mind has trouble creating reflections in the mirror, especially your own reflection. Try to look at a nearby mirror: if the the image in it is oddly dark, blurry, misshapen, doesn't match the objects around you, or if there is no image at all, then it could mean that you are dreaming. Its drawbacks are that you need to be close to a mirror for it to work, and it's possible (but rare) that reflections can look correct in dreams. So, try to combine this with another reality check of your choice for best results.

However, looking at a mirror can be risky: if you're dreaming, the image might be so misshapen that it will frighten you awake.

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LUCID DREAMING

HYPNAGOGIC STATE

STUDIES ON THE HYPNAGOGIC STATE (HYPNAGOGIA) The terms hypnagogic (sleep onset) and hypnopompic (awakening) were created in the 1800s. Hypnos is Greek for sleep; while agogeus means guide. It is so named because it is most intense as you switch between phases of sleep and wakefulness. The hypnagogic state can summon an array of senses, and is by no means limited to visuals. Auditory hypnagogia range from household noises like phones ringing, to music, to voices calling your name, to the loud buzzing noise associated with the onset of an Out of Body Experience. What's more, physical hypnagogia can cause you to feel as if you are floating outside of your body. While some people consider hypnagogia to be meaningless activity of the

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brain - a way of clearing out unwanted junk - others believe it has more value. Just like lucid dreams, hypnagogia can be consciously guided and interpreted as it happens, forging a basic two-way communication with the unconscious mind. Therefore, on one level hypnagogia is a way of leading us into the dreamstate. Scientists have linked the hypnagogic state with REM sleep, pre-sleep alpha waves, REM sleep and relaxed wakefulness. There is a theory that regular meditation can enable you to develop a skill to freeze the hypnagogic process at later and later stages. And from personal experience, hypnagogia can be extremely helpful in deepening the meditative state required for wakeinduced lucidity.


LUCID DREAMING

HYPNAGOGIC STATE

Early stage : Bright colors and slow movement, also known effect when looking into the sun with your eyes closed.

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LUCID DREAMING

HYPNAGOGIC STATE

the most common strategy for inducing WILDs is to fall asleep while focussing on the hypnagogic imagery that accompanies sleep onset. Initially, you are likely to see relatively simple images, flashes of light, geometric patterns, and the like. Gradually more complicated forms appear: faces, people, and finally entire scenes. The following account of what the Russian philosopher P. D. Ouspensky called “halfdream states� provides a vivid example of what hypnagogic imagery can be like.

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Various studies on hypnagogia


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LUCID DREAMING

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HYPNAGOGIC STATE

Various studies on hypnagogia


LUCID DREAMING

HYPNAGOGIC STATE

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LUCID DREAMING

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HYPNAGOGIC STATE

Various studies on hypnagogia


LUCID DREAMING

HYPNAGOGIC STATE

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LUCID DREAMING

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HYPNAGOGIC STATE

Various studies on hypnagogia


LUCID DREAMING

HYPNAGOGIC STATE

HYPNAGOGIC EXERCISE Although it is most commonly associated with sleep, you can observe some mild hypnagogia right now, even though you are mentally alert and awake. Close your eyes and cup your palms over your eye sockets (without actually touching your eyeballs). Focus on the middle distance. What do you see? At first there may be an afterimage from the glare of the computer screen, but then you should see some faint visuals in the darkness like holographic wallpaper lining your eyelids. They will typically appear as static, geometric patterns which intensify a little when you direct your focus towards them. 53


LUCID DREAMING

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HYPNAGOGIC STATE

Various studies on hypnagogia


LUCID DREAMING

HYPNAGOGIC STATE

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LUCID DREAMING

THE MIRROR EXPERIMENT

THE MIRROR EXPERIMENT EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF DREAM CONTROL The wide range of opinions on the topic of dream control, and the reports we received of people’s attempts to control dreams, piqued our curiosity about why it is sometimes it possible to achieve a desired outcome, and sometimes it is not. Because dreams are entirely illusory, it should be possible to experience anything imaginable. Thus, perhaps failures arise from not imagining strongly enough, or not believing a certain experience is possible. On the other hand, perhaps there are physiological limitations on the ability to control dream imagery. Our theoretical approach to dreams is based on the idea that the perceptual experiences in dreams arise out of activity in the same brain areas that produce perceptual experience in waking. This is why people have difficulty distinguishing dreaming from waking experience, and have to employ special techniques to recognize when they are dreaming. Physiological constraints on dream perception might occur if a certain brain area

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is not in a state conducive to the desired experience. For example, it might be hard to make a dark dream light, because the visual cortex is not active enough. This is one of the topics of research we would very much like to see explored: the relationship between dream perception and brain activity. The NightLight study was designed to assess how successful people would be at accomplishing certain well-defined tasks in lucid dreams. These tasks represented a variety of types of influence, ranging from things that are easy to accomplish in waking (turning on a light, looking in a mirror), to impossible in waking (passing through a mirror). In addition, some tasks we thought might be impeded by brain state were included (the changing of light level). The purpose of asking people to both will a light on and off and switch it was to see what effect belief might have on the outcome. It is easier to believe a light will turn on when a switch is flipped than that will alone will turn on a light.


LUCID DREAMING

The instructions asked the participants to try each task in waking prior to attempting the tasks in lucid dreams, so that they would have the procedure well-rehearsed. Then, they were to try each task at least once in a lucid dream. They did not need to complete all the tasks in one dream, but could use as many lucid dreams as they needed. So that they would not forget details, the participants were asked to awakening immediately after the experimental lucid dreams and make complete reports of their experiences.

THE MIRROR EXPERIMENT

RESULTS Twenty-seven people submitted reports of their attempts to carry out the assigned tasks, fourteen women and thirteen men. Altogether they provided 65 lucid dream reports, an average of 1.4 per person. The maximum number of reports from one individual was four.

TABLE 1. Results of attempts to control dream content

(From NIGHTLIGHT 5(2), Summer 1993, Copyright, The Lucidity Institute.) 57


LUCID DREAMING

THE MIRROR EXPERIMENT

February 2, 2014

“I noticed something weird in my dream so I performed a reality check. I thought about looking at my reflection in a mirror, and rapidly a mirror appeared right in front of me. My reflection starts wobbling around slowly and I realized quickly this was a dream.

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LUCID DREAMING

THE MIRROR EXPERIMENT

At first I felt fear because it looked so real, but short after I was aroused by the extremely vivid images my reflection was making. I saw my face transforming from one grimace to the other, melting back down

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LUCID DREAMING

THE MIRROR EXPERIMENT

to become another series of facial expressions I’ve never done before in real life. After some of these peculiar transitions, the reflection multiplied and became a tunnel of faces and faded into abstraction which caused to made me lose lucidity.�

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LUCID DREAMING

THE MIRROR EXPERIMENT

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LUCID DREAMING

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THE MIRROR EXPERIMENT


LUCID DREAMING

THE MIRROR EXPERIMENT

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LUCID DREAMING

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THE MIRROR EXPERIMENT


LUCID DREAMING

THE MIRROR EXPERIMENT

Various mirror studies

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LUCID DREAMING

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THE MIRROR EXPERIMENT


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LUCID DREAMING

DREAM CHARACTERS

HOW TO CREATE DREAM CHARACTERS

Paint a Picture Remember the kid's cartoon Penny Crayon? This one's quite surreal but, then again, so is the nature of the subconscious dreaming mind! Get creative and paint a picture (your hand in the air works fine) of the person you want to meet, however crudely. It's not the motion of your finger-brush but the image you create in your mind that will pop into life!

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LUCID DREAMING

DREAM CHARACTERS

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GLYPH TYPEFACE 1.0 Research Index 36daysoftype Final Result

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GLYPH TYPEFACE 1.0

RESEARCH

Hebrew

RESEARCH The Glyph Typeface 1.0 is based on reading signs across the world (UNICODE). It has its roots in Hebrew, Greek, Russian, Japanese, Mathematical, ... (etc.) signs. All the signs are combined into one universal readable font (ENG). Each sign is based on form from different cultures over the world, so it could be used as a Universal typeface. The combination of the different cultures and pronounciations makes the font unreadable when written in it’s original language, but when it’s written in English it makes sense.

Ҽ Ӝ Ԓ Ҩ Д Ћ ◊ Ф

Russian

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GLYPH TYPEFACE 1.0

Greek

RESEARCH

Cyrillic

23, Miley Cyrus / Juicy J videoclip

Japanese — Chinese

Mathematical

...

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GLYPH TYPEFACE 1.0

RESEARCH

Katakana Alphabet ( Japanese )

Early Cyrillic Alphabet

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GLYPH TYPEFACE 1.0

RESEARCH

Research on form (Lucida Grande Regular, Glyph Illustrator)

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SKETCHES

GLYPH TYPEFACE

The hardest thing to do was to synthesise the different cultures and reading signs all together in the typeface. I decided to make a doube capital font because the base cabinets are not always interesting enough to put them together. With double capitals the font has more oppertunities to be used as titles (magazines, books, quotes) and the like.

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UPPERCASE REGULAR

GLYPH TYPEFACE 1.0


GLYPH TYPEFACE 1.0

SKETCHES

1st Semester, Temporary Result 79


GLYPH TYPEFACE 1.0

SKETCHES

Little yus is a letter of the Cyrillic script, representing two Common Slavonic nasal vowels in the early Cyrillic and Glagolitic alphabets.

The voiced velar fricative is a type of consonantal sound, used in various spoken languages. It is not found in English today, but did exist in Old English

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Mathematical “3�


GLYPH TYPEFACE 1.0

SKETCHES

The voiceless alveolar lateral fricative is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages

hebrew letter shin with sin dot

The letter Gha has been used in the Latin orthographies of various, mostly Turkic languages, such as Azeri or the Jaalif orthography for Tatar

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GLYPH TYPEFACE 1.0

Tzadi The eighteenth letter of the Hebrew alphabet is called Tzadi. In modern Hebrew most speakers refer to it as Tzadik, but in the ancient form, it is pronounced Tzadi. The letter makes the sound that you hear at the beginning of that word: “ts-,” a ‘t’ and an ‘s.

=Y

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SKETCHES


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CONCEPT

GLYPH TYPEFACE 1.0

SKETCHES

The Glyph Typeface 1.0 is based on reading signs across the world. I started my research in online UNICODE dictionairies to find the right signs I wanted for my typeface. The concept is that every culture and every country has his an own personal way to communicate in their own personal language. Even in amount of time their language will also adapt / change in a way. My idea was to create an uppercase typeface that loans reading signs from every culture, country, and even time. It is in a saying a language of the world. The signs were stolen from Ancient Hebrew, Greek, Russian, Japanese (Katakana), Danish, Norwegian, Mathematical, Latin reading signs, Cyrillic, Turkic, German and so on. After making this typeface, I also noticed that I used Hebrew and German in the same font and they seem to get along now in my opinion. The Glyph Typeface is based on the English language, and the reading signs in the font are taken out of it’s original context to become a letter in the English Alphabet. You are only able to use this font when you can speak English. This means when you type for example “C”, a Fu (Kana) in katakana will appear (c) =is one of the Japanese kana, each of which represents one mora. This results that all the signs are taken out of it’s original context to become a reading sign in Glyph Typeface (ENG). It’s based on form because it looks a “C”. Typing with weird signs oñ ØnĻiИҼ ÑetШorҞs ŜtдŔtëd as a hҶp for youth in 2007. Nowadays a lot of designers / (net) artists also started integrating this into their work. I really enjoyed contributing to this style and will use the glyph typeface in my future work.

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GLYPH TYPEFACE 1.0

SKETCHES

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GLYPH TYPEFACE 1.0 REGULAR UPPERCASE STROKE

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GLYPH TYPEFACE 1.0

SKETCHES

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GLYPH TYPEFACE 1.0

SKETCHES

aBcDe FgHijk LMnop qRstu vwxyZ 72 pt.

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gLypH typeFace 1.0

c L e p t a

aBcDe FgHijk LMnop qRstu vwxyZ 72 pt.

CONCEPT The Glyph Typeface 1.0 is based on reading signs across the world (UNICODE). It has its roots in Hebrew, Greek, Russian, Japanese, Danish, Norwegian, Mathematical, ... (etc.) signs. All the signs are combined into one universal readable font (ENG). Each sign is based on form from different cultures over the world, so it could be used as a Universal typeface. The combination of the different cultures and pronounciations makes the font unreadable when it’s read in it’s original language, But makes more sense when it’s read in English.

60 pt. Bold

a

B

c

D

e

F

Little yus is a letter of the Cyrillic script, representing two Common Slavonic nasal vowels in the early Cyrillic and Glagolitic alphabets.

In the German alphabet, ß is a consonant letter that evolved as a ligature of “long s and z” (ſz) and “long s over round s” (ſs).

Fu (kana) in katakana, is one of the Japanese kana, each of which represents one mora.

Đ (lowercase: đ, Latin alphabet), known as crossed D or dyet, formed from base character D/d overlaid with a crossbar.

Ezh has its small letter used in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), representing the voiced postalveolar fricative consonant.

O (kana). In Japanese writing, the kana (hiragana) and (katakana) occupy the fifth place.

H

i

j

k

L

The g-stroke character is a letter of the Latin Skolt Sami alphabet, denoting the partially voiced palatal spirant.

Ħ (minuscule: ħ) is a letter of the Latin alphabet, derived from H with the addition of a bar. It is used in Maltese.

The voiceless alveolar lateral fricative is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages.

A (kana) in katakana, is one of the Japanese kana, each of which represents one mora.

Ka with vertical stroke is a letter of the Cyrillic script. Its form is derived from the Cyrillic letter Ka by the addition of a stroke

The pound sign (£) is the symbol for the pound sterling—the currency of the United Kingdom (UK).

M

n

O

p

q

R

Pi; Greek: [pi], uppercase Π, lowercase π) is the sixteenth letter of the Greek alphabet, representing [p].

is a mathematical constant, the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter, equal to 3.14159.

Ø or (minuscule: ø) is a vowel and a letter used in the Danish, Norwegian, Faroese and Southern Sami languages.

The symbol is a letter of the Latin alphabet, used to represent a glottal stop in several phonetic transcription schemes.

The letter Gha has been used in the Latin orthographies of various, mostly Turkic languages.

In the epiglottal trill, the larynx is raised & the pharynx constricted, so that the epiglottis vibrates

s

t

u

v

w

X

Koppa or Qoppa, as a modern numeral sign: Greek Koppa is a letter that was used in early forms of

T with a stroke sign is the 25th letter in the Northern Sámi alphabet, where it represents the

ų lower case (upper case Ų) The letter u with an ogonek.

The voiced velar fricative is a type of consonantal sound, used in various spoken languages.

Shin (also spelled Šin (šīn) or Sheen) literally means “teeth”, “press”, and “sharp”

Zhe (Ж ж; italics: Ж ж) is a letter of the Cyrillic script.

g

y

Z

The eighteenth letter of the Hebrew alphabet is called Tzadi. In modern Hebrew most speakers refer to it as Tzadik.

Z with a stroke is a letter of the Latin alphabet, derived from Z with the addition of a stroke.

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GLYPH TYPEFACE 1.0

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36DAYSOFTYPE


GLYPH TYPEFACE 1.0

36DAYSOFTYPE

Contribution to #36daysoftype

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ROSEN: MESSAGE IN DREAMS Concept Screenshots Datamoshing

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ROSEN: TYPE IN DREAMS

CONCEPT

Concept Visualizing The Dream World In dreams there is always a lot of hidden symbolic going on where we don’t understand the underlying meaning of. In this project I aim my focus to visualize the world of dreaming, by using peculiar settings and mixing them with datamoshing. This mix creates a visual absurd world which intrigued me. I had the film sequences before I knew the datamoshing technique and I really needed to add something to it. Then a friend told me about a song, CardioCleptomanie from PASDEDEUX (be). The videoclip was made using this technique and the effects really caught my attention. I finally found the correct absurd technique for my shortfilm.

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Original Images


ROSEN: TYPE IN DREAMS

CONCEPT

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ROSEN: TYPE IN DREAMS

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SCREENSHOTS


ROSEN: TYPE IN DREAMS

SCREENSHOTS

Audio To add the right tones to this Peculiar two minute movie, I found the solution at one of my favorite film producers, David Lynch. Lynch is known for his Tv -series Twin Peaks, a strange world not to different from ours. In the series there is place called ‘The Black Lodge’ that represents the dream world. Whenever a character finds himself in the condition of dreaming, he and his dream characters start talking backwards. This effect of reversing a recorded audioconversation reinforces the ludicrous ambience I’m trying to create. I made the audiorecordings on several occasions with friends, just talking, and there is a repititive ‘Rosen’ backwards.

Filmstills

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ROSEN: TYPE IN DREAMS

DATAMOSHING

Datamoshing When motion prediction is used, as in MPEG-1, MPEG2 or MPEG-4, compression artifacts tend to remain on several generations of decompressed frames, and move with the optic flow of the image, leading to a peculiar effect, part way between a painting effect and "grime" that moves with objects in the scene.

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Data errors in the compressed bit-stream, possibly due to transmission errors, can lead to errors similar to large quantization errors, or can disrupt the parsing of the data stream entirely for a short time, leading to "break-up" of the picture. Where gross errors have occurred in the bitstream, decoders continue to apply updates to the damaged picture for a short interval, creating a "ghost image" effect, until receiving the next independently compressed frame. In MPEG picture coding, these are known as "I-frames", with the 'I' standing for "intra". Until the next I-frame arrives, the decoder can perform error concealment.

Filmstills


ROSEN: TYPE IN DREAMS

DATAMOSHING

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IDENTITY Business Cards Internship Posters Website

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IDENTITY

INTRO

Intro Making business cards and defining your own identity is one of the hardest things to do as a graphic designer/ artist. How do you define yourself on one small piece of paper? The first sketches I made was with images of my own work. Mostly the designs were to occupied and distracting. After that I started working with typography. My first result became a black card with a black marble frame and my initials. I’m a fan of a simple black and white card if it’s well coordinated. The first logo I created was a cross of my initials ( A - V ) in a wroter letter in stroke. I’m not a big fan of a logo for an artist / Designer so I’m still in search for the correct graphic language. The back of the cards is plain and simple ordered, and well organized.

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IDENTITY

V

AARON VERGULT

A V

V

Graphic Design Art Direction

Graphic Designer - Art Director

+32 498 722 577 mail@aaronvergult.com www.aaronvergult.com

Aaron Vergult +32 498 722 577 mail@aaronvergult.com www.aaronvergult.com

V

AV Graphic Design Art Direction

AARON VERGULT +32 498 722 577 mail@aaronvergult.com www.aaronvergult.com

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ult nverg

w.aaro

INTRO

Aaron Vergult

V☛

AARON VERGULT Graphic Design Art Direction (-:

RR

+32 498 722 577 mail@aaronvergult.com www.aaronvergult.com

www.

mail@

aaron v

gult er

+32 498 722 577

Graph ic D Art Dir esign ection

AARON

E ! k G aU

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&

A 103

.com


IDENTITY

Sketches

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SKETCHES


IDENTITY

SKETCHES

AA

A A

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IDENTITY

FINAL RESULT

Final Result

AA

AARON

V E R G U LT

Graphic Design | Art Direction +32 498 722 577 mail@aaronvergult.com www.aaronvergult.com

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IDENTITY

FINAL RESULT

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Internship Posters 108


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IDENTITY

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CURRICULUM VITAE


Curriculum Vitae 111


IDENTITY

WEBSITE

Website

Info 112


Penumbra

Photo

113


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OTHER Voids Kantharos

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OTHER

VOIDS

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VOIDS


OTHER

VOIDS

Contribution to VOIDS, 2014

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OTHER

KANTHAROS

KANTHAROS Kantharos is a visual tumblr blog I am currently curating with a focus on promoting new young interesting artists who are involved in any form of art. I started this project in 2013 as a personal research, but nowadays it’s just a way of giving props to the people that deserve it.

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Logo


OTHER

www.ka

KANTHAROS

nth ar o mb tu s.

‘Refilled daily’

lr.com

The kantharos of Dionysus was never supposed to be empty.

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AA

Contact www.aaronvergult.com www.aaronvergult.wordpress.com www.aaronvergultprogress.tumblr.com mail@aaronvergult.com

This document contains images of other artists. All rights reserved for their author.

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Procesfolio: An Inquiry of Lucid Dreaming