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PROJECTS Academic//Competition//Work 2008-2013

burke park design_build landscape studio [s2013] 16 weeks // p.6-19

skating pavilion a2 studio [f2010] 8 weeks // p.48-55

folly intro to envd [s2009] 6 weeks // p.74-77

shed design competition sheddesign.com [s2009] 6 weeks // p.100-101

chinatown cultural center b2 studio [s2011] 6 weeks // p.20-29

screen walls robotic arm fab [s2012] 8 weeks // p.56-63

prayer space intro to envd [s2009] 6 weeks // p.78-81

rockport conservatory z+w architects [s2012] 6 months // p.104-107

arnold arboretum b2 studio [s2011] 6 weeks // p.30-39

3d printed bench rhino 2 [s2012] 3 weeks // p.64-66

mtn house bim [f2008] 8 weeks // p.82-87

brookstone w 42nd z+w architects [f2011] 2 months // p.108-111

passage a2 studio [f2010] 6 weeks // p.40-47

squere digfab [f2008] 10 weeks // p.68-73

long island cinema suckerpunch daily [f2011] 16 weeks //p.90-99

old farm inn z+w architects [s2012] 1 year // p.112-115


academic pg. 06-87


burke park design_build Landscape Studio 2013 Instructors: David Kahn Brian Cook

Over the course of one semester a park in Boulder Colorado was transformed. Through community meetings and a partnership between Boulder's park and rec and the University of Colorado's ENVD program, students designed and built an arboretum earth berms and an outdoor classroom. As part of the lead design team my group developed the masterplan and then designed the deck structure. WE sought to connect the currently disconnected neighborhoods and user groups that surround the park. The project was completed in may of 2013.

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To Baseline Rd.

Mohawk Dr.

Meadows Shopping Center ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Co m an ch e D r.

Ch ip

Pa

pe w

wn

a

ee

D r. M

o

w ha

k

D

D r.

r.

Thunderbird Dr.

Thunderbird Lake Ca

/////////////////////////////////////

dd o

Burke Park

Pk w

CU Design Build Site /////////////////////////

y Ca dd o Pk w

Pa

w

ne

e

Dr

.

y

Frasier Meadows

Mohawk Dr.

///////////////////////////////////

Horizons K-8 School

Mountain View United Methodist ///////////////////////////////////// Pawnee Dr.

Ponca Pl.

/////////////////////////////////////////

Sioux Dr.

View Corridors Corridors C ViewView Corridors C

C

ConnectionsC Connections Connections C

R

S

S

S

C

C

C

Alignment Alignment Alignment

R

R

C

R

S

S

S

C

C

R

R

C

above: location map adjacent: original concept diagrams opposite: deck photo


HISTORY OF BURKE PARK LANDSCAPES OF HUMAN AND NATURAL HISTORY

1959 1890 Oscar Burke 1850 Boulder begins 1877 August Burke buys 130 acres of land buys 248 acres. to be settled near Baseline Family lives in five room house on site Land prices were five dollars/acre

1996 Admiral Arleigh A. Burke dies, a ship is named after him

1997 Horizons K-8 Charter School is established

1901 Arleigh A. 1959 Burke 1960 Frasier Meadows Burke is born retirement community Elementary is built is built and dedicated to Arleigh Burke 1950’s-Frasier area begins to develop the farmland Lake added

1997 Thunderbird 2001 Drought conditions 2001 The anchor from a Park is renamed threaten water levels WWII destroyer is placed Admiral Arleigh in Arleigh Burke’s honor of Thunderbird Lake A. Burke Park Monument was supposed to be the ship’s propeller but it was too big to transport on land

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1982 Burke Elementary closes Kayak classes were taught by Parks and Rec on the lake in 60’s and 70’s

2012 Decision made to keep lake at groundwater levels


02

08

20

20

92 97

20

13

20

19

96 19

01

19

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67 19

82 19

60 19

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43

19

55

50 19

70

33 19

10 19 23 19

00

18

99

93

87 18

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01

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33

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19

85

76 84 18

18 82 18

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77

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61

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73

60 18

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64

51 18 18

59

17

18

30

00

18

58

HISTORICAL TIME LINE

1700 Comanche, Arapaho &

Cheyenne Natives move into the plains

1830 Grizzly bear are common on the plains.

1851 Ft. Laramie Treaty Gives Native Americans the Boulder Watershed

1858 Boulder is founded 1853 Burke farm land bought by Elmer frasier

1859 Gold discovered at Gold Run in Gold Hill. Boulder City established

1860 Arapaho Indians conduct the “last great antelope hunt” in the Boulder Valley. Boulder builds the first schoolhouse in Colorado

1861 Ft. Lyon Treaty moves

Native Americans to reservation

1864 Colonel Chivington, with

the 3rd Colorado Volunteer Cavalry massacres Arapaho and Cheyenne Indians at Sand Creek

1873 Railroad extended to Boulder, opening the area to speculative cattle industry supplying the east

1876 Colorado becomes 38th state

1877 August Burke buys 130 acres of land near Baseline Rd. University of Colorado is established

1882 First in, First Right Water Law

1884 1,091 bison remain In North America

1885 First Arbor Day celebrated in Colorado

1887 Boulder begins reservoir building which returned flow to the Platte River

1893 Colorado becomes

second state to allow women to vote.

1894 Boulder Creek floods the

1923 Arleigh A. Burke graduates from U.S. Naval Academy

1933 Dust Bowl.

The Civilian Conservation Corps plants 538 million trees nation-wide

1938 Major storm causes

1980 200 Non-Native wintering Bald Eagles move into Boulder County

1982 Burke Elementary closes 1992 Nesting Peregrine Falcons return to Boulder after 35 year absence

extensive flood damage in Eldorado Springs along South Boulder Creek

1996 Arleigh A. Burke dies

1943 Arleigh A. Burke enters WWII

1997 Horizons K-8 School

1950 Thunderbird lake re purposed for Agriculture

1955 Admiral Burke Becomes Chief of Naval Operations

is established

2001 Anchor from WWII is

placed in Arleigh Burke’s honor

2002 Bald eagles begin nesting along Boulder and St. Vrain creeks.

city in a "100-year flood" caused by rapidly melting snow pack combined with heavy spring rains

1958 Frasier Meadows

1899 Boulder secures 1,800

1959 Burke Elementary built

2008 Osprey begin to nest in

1960 Frasier Meadows

2009 Decision made to fill

acres of mountain backdrop from South Boulder Creek to Sunshine Canyon

1900 Oscar Burke purchases 248 acres

1901 Arleigh A. Burke is born 1910 5 Million acres of forest

burn and active suppression by U.S. Forest Service of all forest fires begins

subdivision/Thunderbird Park built

retirement community is built

1965 Thunderbird Square shopping center opened

1966 Baseline Rd is paved 1967 Boulder voters approve first Open Space purchases

Boulder County

Thunderbird lake with municipal water

2009 Decision made to keep

Thunderbird lake at groundwater levels

2013 CU ENVD program breaks ground

1


M

oh

aw

kD

riv e

1

2 4 3

eD

ne Paw

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e Driv

1 Arboretum 2 Mounds & Seat Wall 3 Biomes 4 Deck

0'

30'

60'

120'


ARBORETUM 13 10

18

3 22

2 30 29

9

16 15 18 20 21

17 11

9

14

11 23

9

19

22

24 18 4

26

5

9

24

27 26

25

27

6 24 7 8

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Sugar Maple Lanceleaf Cottonwood Autumn Purple Ash Golden Rain Swamp White Oak Ohio Buckeye Frontier Elm Hackberry Blue Spruce Norway Maple

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10

9

13

10

10

12

1

11

11

11 9

9

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

26 24

American Linden Japanese lilac Red Oak Bur Oak Pin Oak Southwestern White Pine Crabapple Catalpa English Oak Austrian Pine

28

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Academic

Scotch Pine Green Ash Silver Maple American Elm Honeylocust Weeping Willow Cottonwood London Planetree Peachleaf Willow Giant Sequoia


MOUNDS & SEAT WALL

above: location map opposite: deck photo

Top of seat

1’-3”

Grade

0’-0”

Bottom of Concrete

-2’-3”

BIOMES montane biome

foothills biome

bristlecone pine granite boulder

prarie biome

rocky mountain maple pink granite

sandstone boulders


DECK

Concrete Mow Strip Ipe Decking

10”

concrete seat wall 40”

Earthen Mound

28” 16”

AD

2%

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Earthen Mound

Ohio Buckeye

Frontier Elm

Earthen Mound

Hackberry

Concrete Pad

Academic

A

ath P le sib s ce Ac


above: exploded axon opposite above: materials diagram opposite below: layout diagram


15

100'-0" GRADE TYP.

'- 4

1/ 2

"

7'-

1/2 m "d pro atc ee bo vid h m p to t. e ow (2 s ) # trip 4's ,

0"

6" re thic ea inf k s sla . w W/ lab b ay # 4 o n c e ba g nte rs rad re @1 e, d in 2"

100'-0" GRADE TYP.

2' CONCRETE FOOTER

1/

8"

8" CONCRETE MOW STRIP

6 '-

9"

3'-

2'0"

5

EDGE OF DECK

'- 4

1/

4"

1/ 4"

20

1

3

1/

2" 5

1/ 8"

7' -

6 '-

9"

6'-

3'-

100'-4 3/4" GRADE TYP.

FOUNDATION PLAN /////////////////////////////////

6 9' -

A-52

4"

A-64

1/

A-62

1/ 4"

(2) 2X6 POSTS

(2) 2X8 HIGH (2) 2X8 SLOPED

20

'-4

DFL #2

A-63

A-52

(2) 2X8 SLOPED

6X8

A-52

(2) 2X8 SLOPED

DFL #2

A-64

9

(2) 2X8 SLOPED

2"

A-52

1/

A-53

5' -

A-41

A-61

6X8

DFL #2

A-52

A-53

7' -

2"

(2) 2X8 SLOPED

A-51

1/

A-52

2

1'-

0"

(2) 2X8 SLOPED

FRAMING PLAN

1/ 20

'-4

1"

'- 0

3/

4"

7'-

11

1/

2"

A-5

14

3

6'-

4"

A-4

1

A-3

2

9 '-

6

1/

4"

A-3

1

//////////////////////////

DECKING PLAN //////////////////////////

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above: plans opposite above: deck details opposite below: deck sections Academic


2" STAINLESS STEEL HEX-SCREW 2" STAINLESS STEEL HEX-SCREW

1 x 6 IPE HARDWOOD DECKING

1 x 6 IPE HARDWOOD DECKING 2 X 6 JOIST @ 12 O.C.

2 X 6 JOIST SIMPSON 90 ANGLE STEEL HANGER 2x6 JOISTS W/ SIMPSON LUS26Z HNGR (Z-MAX)

SIMPSON Z-MAX GALVANIZED HANGER 8"

SIMPSON Z-MAX GALVANIZED HANGER LUS26 HNGR (Z-MAX)

1/2" GALVANIZED STEEL BOLT

(2) 1 X 6 IPE FASCIA BOARD

4 X 8 BEAM

1 x 6 IPE HARDWOOD FASCIA

SIMPSON EPB 44 @ 4X8 24" POURED CONRETE FOOTER (3) #4 REBAR EA. WAY BOT.

1'-0"

8" CONCRETE MOW STRIP

3"

(2) #4's TOP & BOT. CONT. PROVIDE CORNER BANDS AT ALL CORNERS AND INTERSECTIONS

2 X 6 JOIST @ 12" O.C. 2" STAINLESS STEEL HEX-SCREW

1 X 6 IPE DECKING

1 x 6 IPE HARDWOOD DECKING 2X6 JOIST W/ SIMPSON LUS26ZHNGR (Z-MAX)

4 X 8 BEAM (see A-2)

2 X 6 JOIST @ 12" O.C. SIMPSON CC44 COLUMN CAP

SIMPSON Z-MAX GALVANIZED HANGER LUS26Z HNGR (Z-MAX)

4X4 POST VARIES SIMPSON 1212HL (Z-MAX) SIMPSON Z-MAX GALVANIZED HANGER LUS26 HNGR (Z-MAX)

(2) 5/8" GALVANIZED STEEL BOLT

1'-0"

SIMPSON EPB 44 @ 4X8 24" POURED CONCRETE FOOTER

3"

(3) #4 REBAR EA. WAY BOT.

2" STAINLESS STEEL HEX-SCREW

2" STAINLESS STEEL HEX-SCREW

1 x 6 IPE HARDWOOD DECKING

SIMPSON Z-MAX GALVANIZED HANGER LUS26Z HNGR (Z-MAX)

2 X 6 JOIST @ 12 O.C. SIMPSON Z-MAX GALVANIZED HANGER LUS26Z HNGR (Z-MAX)

1 x 6 IPE HARDWOOD DECKING

(2) 2 X 8 BEAM

2 X 6 JOIST @ 12 O.C.

(2) 2 X 4 BLOCKING (AS NEEDED) FASCIA 6 X 8 BEAM (see A-2)

(2) 2 X 8 SLOPED (BEYOND) 1 X 6 IPE FASCIA BOARD (BEYOND) 4 X 8 BEAM (see A-2)

(2) 5/8" GALVANIZED STEEL BOLT

(2) 5/8" GALVANIZED STEEL BOLT

1 X 6 IPE FASCIA BOARD (BEYOND)

SIMPSON EPB 44 @ 4X8 (3) #4 REBAR EA. WAY BOT.

1'-0"

SIMPSON EPB 66 @ 6X8 (3) #4 REBAR EA. WAY BOT.

3"

3"

1'-0"

24" POURED CONCRETE FOOTER

2'-0"

1'-0"

2'-8 3/4"

2 A-5

1 A-7

1 A-5

1 A-7

2 A-7

1'-0"

1'-3"

10"

2 A-4

1'-3"

1'-8 1/2"

3 A-4

1'-0"

2'-0"

3'-5 1/8"

6'-9"

6'-9"

3'-5 1/8"

CONCRETE PAD EXISTING CONCRETE PATH


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chinatown cultural center At the end of the Rose Kennedy Greenway, Chinatown sits as a cultural, financial, and tourist destination. The neighborhood is devoid of a cultural center for the residents of the area to gather, to learn, relax and present their culture to the world. The building acts as an art gallery, cafe, theatre, community computer lab and cultural nexus for the residents but also for Boston at large. Situated at the terminus of the rose Kennedy greenway parks system the site is uniquely suited to be a punctuation mark to this new pedestrian core of Boston.

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// Chinatown Cultural Center

B2 Studio 2011 Instructors: Jonathan Hananhan Ryan Pinkham

below: night rendering opposite top: attractions map opposite bottom: site views

Academic


         

[02] [01]

           

97'

x

x

x

x x

x

   

[04]

 

[03]

 

[05]

E DG RI MB ON ST CA BO OF OF TY TY CI

  CI

   

[07]

   

[06]

[09]

[08] [10] [11] [12] [13]

       

[14] [15]

   

SITE

 

[17] [16] [18]

[27] [19] [24] [20]

Project Site

[25] [26]

[21] [23] [22]


top left: pedestrian movement top right above: zoning top right below: mass transit below: chinatown growth history

1890

022 / 023

1950

// Chinatown Cultural Center

1970

1990

Academic






top: massing process adjacent: facade bottom: facade module process








          

this page: exploded axon opposite top: below: section opposite bottom: section 024 / 025

// Chinatown Cultural Center

Academic


026 / 027

// Chinatown Cultural Center

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 

 DN

 

  

  UP

          

          

   UP



 

opposite top: gallery rendering opposite bottom: lobby rendering this page: floor plans next page: theatre rendering


028 / 029

// Chinatown Cultural Center

Academic


arnold arboretum pavilion The Harvard University Arnold Arboretum is currently without an informational center in its Peter's Hill section of the arboretum. With views reaching all the way to the skyline of Boston, the elevated pavilion and accompanying steps provide a center for people to gather and enjoy the natural beauty of the arboretum. The building, steps and the landscape are intertwined to emphasize the connection to nature that is ever present when visiting the arboretum.

030 / 031

// Arnold Arboretum Pavilion

B2 Studio 2011 Instructors: Jonathan Hananhan Ryan Pinkham

below: exterior rendering

Academic


Duck Pond Outlet

SO U

TH STR EET

CE NT R

E

ST RE ET

Allandale Woods

Arnold Arboretum

Bussey Brook MEadow

Recuperative Center Lawn RE ET

AY KW

HIN

GT O

N

ST

R PA

W AS

Hebrew Rehabilitation Center

BUSS

EY ST

REET

T

ST R

EE T

ST RE E

WA LT ER

NT RE

HIL

L RO

EE T

ER’S

AD

ST R

PET

WELD STREET

SO UT H

CE

E

SIT Peter’s Hill

Amtrak

e Lin ge ran TA O MB ET RE ST H UT SO HIN

GT O

N

ST

RE

ET

Pagel Playground

W AS

Rosindale an Wetlands Urb Wild Park

WALTER STREET

W

VF

He a ygr ly oun d

Pla

top: site plan above: topo plan bottom: existing site section


Cen

r Pa t h

tre

St re

et

Con

ife

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Pa

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ad

Washington Street

these pages: Olmstead’s plan for the emerald necklace of which the arboretum is a part. 032 / 033

// Arnold Arboretum Pavilion

Academic


FENWAY PARK

Wa l t

er Str eet

on Fall ld Fie

B usse y St r eet

P e t e r s H i l l Ro a d



V

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t

 Wa l t

Co

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Cen   tre St re

r Pa t h

et

  ife

on Fall ld Fie

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 

 

K

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 

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 

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est

Black w

For

S o ut h S tr ee t

 



B u s sey H ill Ro a d

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 

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B usse

P e t e r s H i l l Ro a d



ad


massing

elevated for views

steps for outdoor habitation

access to the pavilion

landscape covering the building

pedestrian access to landscape

this page: building design process opposite: building diagram

034 / 035

// Arnold Arboretum Pavilion

Academic


below: section opposite top: exploded axon

036 / 037

// Arnold Arboretum Pavilion

Academic


038 / 039

// Arnold Arboretum Pavilion

Academic


opposite top left: computer lab opposite top right: exhibition & viewing opposite bottom: night site plan above: floor plan


passage A2 Studio 2011 Instructors: Amanda Sanders Cynthia Bubb

The project is an interpretation of a city described to Kublai Kahn by Marco Polo, as recounted in the book Invisible Cities. The inhabitants of the city either hate nature and therefore stay as far away from it as possible, love nature so much they wish to leave it unharmed, or they wish to only see it as it once was. This becomes an interesting commentary on environmentalism today, Will we some day reach the point where we revere nature so much that we separate ourselves from it ? Architecturally the project is a choreographed passage through the landscape which recreates the story told by Marco Polo.

040 / 041

// Passage

below: model-plan view

Academic


marco polo describes a city to kublai kahn After a seven days’ march through woodland, the traveler directed toward Baucis cannot see the city and yet he has arrived. The slender stilts that rise from the ground at a great distance from one another and are lost above the clouds support the city. You climb them with ladders. On the ground the inhabitants rarely show themselves: having already everything they need up there, they prefer not to come down. Nothing of the city touches the earth except those long flamingo legs on which it rests and, when the days are sunny, a pierced, angular shadow that falls on the foliage. There are three hypotheses about the inhabitants of Baucis: that [they hate the earth]; that [they respect it so much they avoid all contact]; that [they love it as it was before they existed] and with spyglasses and telescopes aimed downward they never tire of examining it, leaf by leaf, stone by stone, ant by ant contemplating with fascination their own absence. From Invisible Cities - italo calvino

above: drawing of the city below: axon diagram bottom: landscape intervention

park[1]

natural and elevated from the digital landscape

tree[2] revered and studied by those who live above it but never touched

[1] [3]

digital foliage[3] a bridge between the natural and unnatural worlds

[2]

info tree[4]

scanable poles that mimic the natural trees

[4]

existing

unnatural/natural

movement


042 / 043

// Passage

Academic


below: elevation opposite: model


043 / 044

// Passage

Academic


046 / 047

// Passage

Academic


skating pavilion In figure skating there are disciplines, they are: singles (mens + womens), pairs, and ice dancing. In order to compete skaters must pass a series of tests. In ice dancing the first test and in effect most skaters initiation into ice dancing is the dutch waltz. The dance is made up of alternating lobes that form a serpentine pattern. The skating pavilion is the physical manifestation of that dance, as is the facade, which is an abstraction of the tracings made by the skaters blade across the ice.

048 / 049

// Skating Pavilion

A2 Studio 2011 Instructors: Amanda Sanders Cynthia Bubb

below: rendering opposite top: diagram opposite bottom: dutch waltz diagram

Academic


Quickstep Vienese Waltz Argentine Tango Westminster Waltz

n llia le Ki b s Do lue tz B al tW gh

so Pa

Gold

li ar St

e Pr G

Invented: George Muller, Boston Skating Club, Boston, MA First Performed: 1948, Broadmoor Ice Palace, Colorado Springs, CO Type of Dance: Waltz Pattern Type: Serpentine -half rink Position skated in: Kilian Tempo: 3/4 time, 138 bpm Music:

In

d ol

Rocker Foxtrot American Waltz Tango

DUTCH WALTZ

o ad el g on ep C a st ha mb n n C a tz es Fi ha r S a al lu z C ilve mb ht B alt r W S hu ig n W rge R idn ria bu lka a M ust ns Po altz ntic A ave ee W ma R ank en Ro al Y old o n io G ng at n Ta r te

COMPULSORY DANCE TEST STRUCTURE

Silver

Dutch Waltz Canasta Tango Rhythm Blues

Preliminary

0

3

6

9

12

15

18

21

24

27

30

33

36

39

42

45

48

Seconds

Pr e

ze on Br

Si lve r

e Pr

14 ea Fo Ste n xt p W ro al t tz Eu ro p

Hickory Hoedown Ten Fox Willow Waltz

a go Ch an ce a a T an Ch iest g D F win S

Bronze

2

Step list: LFO[2], RFI[1], LFO[3] RFOSW[6] LFOSW[6] RFO[2], LFI[1], RFO[3] LFO[3] RFI[3] LFO[2], RFI[1], LFO[3] RFOSW[6] LFO[3] RFI[3]

3

T

AR ST 1 5

1

2

3

2 AR ST

3

T

1 5

4

2

4 3

7 4

5

7

6

6

5

6

9

8

10

9

77

10

8

8 9

9

10 12

11

13

14

15

10

11

14

13

12

15 12

17

19

16 15

18

19

pe

14

re

19

17

Dutch Waltz 13

18

18

14

at

17

17

pe

12

15

re

16

16

11

13

at


site

site

[01]

sitesite

sitesite

050 / 051

// Skating Pavilion

[02]

[03]

[04]

[05]

[06]

Academic


[01] The site [02] Pedestrian/vehicular Traffic [03] Extrude Volume [04] Lift Corners for entrance [05] Open roof for sunlight [06] Facade reflects activity within


      

052 / 053

      

// Skating Pavilion

left: floor plan below: interior rendering opposite: exploded axon opposite below: elevation

Academic


roof

facade

skater’s markets viewing platform ice surface

24’- 0”

12’- 0”

roof

first floor


054 / 055

// Skating Pavilion

Academic


screen walls Focused on the relationship between the unit and the group, and its effect on the perception of continuity, the screen wall serves as a reconfigurable, space dividing filter. As the nature of its porosity changes with each new composition, so does the manner in which it filters light, views, touch, and sound. Depending on the type of configuration, it may behave more like a column (vertically oriented) or a fence (horizontally oriented). The module's transportable and formal attributes enable it to be moved, positioned and oriented according to potentially varied surrounding conditions.

056 / 057

// Screen Walls

Robotic Arm Fabrication 2011 Instructors: Matthew Trimble, RabLab Critics: Skylar Tibbets, SJET Carl Solander, Reverse Architecture

below: kuka robot opposite: precedent study

Academic


PRECEDENT Much like an architect the artist Sol LeWitt allowed his art to be produced by someone else, only giving simple directions that would act as the rules or parameters that would generate the work. LeWItt’s work emphasized the idea behind the work as paramount to the execution. He designed architecturally scaled wall drawings with deceptively simple geometric patterns executed at immense scales. Each

wall drawing begins as a set of instructions or simple diagram to be followed in executing the work.

Wall Drawing #56 A square is divided horizontally and vertically into four equal parts, each with lines in four directions superimposed progressively.

Wall Drawing #289 (fourth wall) Twenty-four lines from the center, twelve lines from the midpoint of each of the sides, twelve lines from each corner. (The length of the lines and their placement are determined by the drafter.)

below right: digital sol lewitt drawing below left: grasshopper definition

Wall Drawing #797 The first drafter has a black marker and makes an irregular horizontal line near the top of the wall. Then the second drafter tries to copy it (without touching it) using a red marker. The third drafter does the same, using a yellow marker. The fourth drafter does the same using a blue marker. Then the second drafter followed by the third and fourth copies the last line drawn until the bottom of the wall is reached.


FORM A screen wall comprised of sixteen modules. The geometric properties of each module are products of the following conditions: [1] every 4”x6” connector platform distributed around the perimeter must remain uncut, [2] all surfaces must be ruled (through every point on the surface there is a straight line that lies on the surface) or doubly ruled (through every point on the surface there are two distinct lines that lie on the surface), [3] only single sweep passes between any two connector nodes are permitted. Material & Machining Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) is lightweight, inexpensive, recyclable, holds its shape well, and is easy to machine. The material is meant to be read both as literal, and as an abstraction, or placeholder, for what could be a variety of materials. For cutting the material, RadLab’s Kuka KR15-2 robotic arm with a hot-wire attachment was used. The robots dimensional constraints and motion limits were taken into account at the onset of the project.

16

816 =281 Trillion Each of the sixteen modules can be rotated in four directions, flipped, and rotated four more times, allowing for eight orientations.

final block cut 7 cut 6 cut 5 cut 4

line of reflection cut 3 cut 2 cut 1 2x2x6 eps foam block cut sequence 058 / 059

// Screen Walls

Academic


In an effort to show the potential for compositional variation, three distinct screen walls were configured, each expressing a particular global condition.

Gradient

Directional

Fragmentation

above: robotic arm cutting an EPS foam block Quick Response (QR) codes were used for cataloging to distinguish the location of a particular module within the three predetermined configurations.


060 / 061

// Screen Walls

Academic


062 / 063

// Screen Walls

Academic


3d printed bench A plane rotates from the horizontal to an inclined position, upon reaching its new inclination the plane reaches out to hold itself up. Twisting and stretching it finally reaches solid ground. The bulges and twists created serve to create a dialog with the surrounding ground that the plane used to inhabit. The bench was designed to be a form that could not be easily fabricated by traditional methods but rather took advantage of additive fabrication (3d printing).

064 / 065

// 3d Printed Bench

Rhino 3 Instructors: Matthew Trimble

below: final 3d print model

Academic


top: process diagram middle: grasshopper definition bottom: rendering


1'-6"

3'-6"

1'-1"

2'-4"

8'-0"

3'-0"

066 / 067

// 3d Printed Bench

1'-3 1/2"

Academic


top: 3d print front bottom: 3d print back opposite: technical drawings


squere Digital Fabrication Instructors: Chris K. Palmer

This lamp was designed using Rhino 4.0 and was an exploration in geometry and pattern making. The form was created by merging a cube and a sphere together. The form is made up of 18 completely unique intersecting rings. Chris K. Palmer's Rhinoscript "overunder" was used to generate the individual pieces that make up the rings. Each ring was then reconnected using a puzzle piece connector. The connector is a two part system that locks each face, corner, and side section of the Squere together. No glue, fasteners, or adhesives of any kind were used. The lamp is held to together with only its unique geometry and the puzzle piece-slot connection.

068 / 069

// Squere

below: photo

Academic


above: form creation process adjacent: squere form


070 / 071

// Squere

Academic


above: intersection detail photo adjacent left: exploded axon diagram adjacent right: laser cut sheets next page: photo


072 / 073

// Squere

Academic


folly Designed as an installation for the main stairwell of the Environmental Design Building on the campus of the University of Colorado at Boulder, this architectural folly was part of an exercise in choreography. Students studied the effects the built environment has on the actions of its inhabitants. The assignment was to design an uninhabitable structure that would influence the way someone would move through a space using a phenomenal element. This installation uses the properties of light passing through the structure to influence the movement patterns of students through the stairwell.

074 / 075

// Folly

Intro to Environmental Design Instructors: Meredith Banasiak

below: rendering

Academic


top: rendering middle: concept diagrams bottom: plan view


above: exploded axon opposite above: stairwell section opposite below: stairwell rendering 076 / 077

// Folly

Academic


2 1 B-1


prayer space The building is a reinvention of the traditional Islamic mosque. It promotes a religion of transparency, not secrecy, with the building itself becoming a tool for understanding. The wrapping screen is a physical representation of prayer as it reaches up towards heaven. The facade of the project encloses the spaces and allows for the transmission of light to the interior. The moire effect caused by the crossing lines of the facade screen creates geometries found in Islamic art.

078 / 079

// Prayer Space

Intro to Environmental Design Instructors: Meredith Banasiak

below: rendering

Academic


Roof 38’-0” +

+38’-0” Roof

Floor 3 22’-0” +

+22’-0” Floor 3

Floor 2 12’-0” +

+12’-0” Floor 2

Floor 1 0’-0” +

+0’-0” Floor 1

above: elevations below: floorplans

1st floor - cleansing

2

2nd floor - prayer space

5

3

1

3rd floor - call to prayer

UP

UP

UP

4

1 cleansing pool 2 entrance 3 prayer space 4 circulation 5 call to prayer


080 / 081

// Prayer Space

Academic


above: section axon opposite: model


mountain house Building Information Modeling Instructors: Marcel de Lange

This two bedroom, one and a half bath home was designed as a vacation home for a family and their two young children. Emphasis on prefabrication and building information modeling were paramount to the design of this home. The size of the program was limited to a thousand square feet. The large use of glass is a response to the limited square footage in an attempt to make the space feel more open and larger than its true dimensions. Wood slat screens provide shading and privacy while the wrap around deck provides access to Colorado's magnificent views.

082 / 083

// Mountain House

below: rendering

Academic


Stairs Living Room Bedroom Kitchen Master Bath Master Bedroom Parking

above: section perspective below: floorplan

DW

2 1

5

F

3 4

4

6

7

4

W/D

8

9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Living Room Kitchen Bathroom Closet Stairs Bedroom Master Bathroom Master Bedroom Deck


above: site plan below: rendering opposite: exploded axon

084 / 085

// Mountain House

Academic


086 / 087

// Mountain House

Academic


COMPETITION pg. 90-101


Long Island Cinema What does the future of cinema look like? How does the digital social revolution affect the movie going experience? With the home theatre becoming so prevalent and the quality of the at home movie watching experience beginning to rival that of the cinema how does the cinema attract people to theaters that have been traditionally crowded, noisy, irritating, tacky and completely devoid of any natural environment. We propose to accomplish this future by combining the best of the current cinema and the home theatre. Individual pods that are mini home theaters are housed in glassed in natural atriums. Outdoor theaters have views of the skyline of New York City. The future of cinema is a modern, inviting, intimate and social experience.

090 / 091

// Long Island Cinema

Competition


SuckerpunchDaily Competition 2011 TOP 23 FINISH


top: city context bottom: good/bad

[01]

[02]

[03]

             

[06]

[05]

[04]

[08]

[07]

[09]

 

[10]

   

Typical New York Apartment home theatre experience quiet no interuptions from strangers

Future Cinema

small screen

home theatre experience

isolation

quiet

not the newest films

no interruptions from strangers

Typical Movie Theatre

movie sound experience

movie sound experience

big screen

noisy

sense of connection

sitting next to people you don’t know

newest releases

big screen sense of connection newest releases

092 / 093

// Long Island Cinema

Competition


top: pod diagram bottom: pod theatre next page: theatre atrium


094 / 095

// Long Island Cinema

Competition


top: north elevation bottom: south elevation below: section opposite: site plan

096 / 097

// Long Island Cinema

Competition


46th AVE.

46th AVE.

46th RD.

46th RD. VERNON BLVD.

5th STREET 5th STREET

CENTRE BLVD.

EAST RIVER

47th AVE.

47th AVE.

47th RD.

47th RD.

48th AVE.

48th AVE.


098 / 099

// Long Island Cinema

Competition


shed design competition Shed Design 2009

Glass, steel, wood and concrete combine to create an architects backyard studio. The studio space was designed for an online competition that asked for participants to imagine a space for people to use that would allow them to work from home in their own secluded office. Large expanses of glass blur the boundaries of inside and outside. Wood slats provide privacy from the main house. The structure becomes wrapped in nature and a part of the garden it inhabits by using a green roof .

100 / 101

// Shed Design Competition

below: rendering opposite above: rendering opposite below: section

Competition


PROFESSIONAL WORK pg. 104-115


rockport conservatory This conservatory is the replacement of an earlier conservatory, the new design focused on maximizing the amount glass and subsequent ocean views. I was responsible for onsite measurements, and all CAD drawings.

104 / 105

// Rockport Conservatory

Connaughton Residence Conservatory Zelloe + Weaver Architects , LLC 2012

below: finished project

Professional Work


below: elevations


above: structural steel details below: framing/steel layout plan

106 / 107

// Rockport Conservatory

Professional Work


above: details below: finished project


brookstone This brookstone across from macy's in New York City was a two phase project. The first phase consisted of a pop-up store and redesign of the front facade. The second phase was a complete redesign of the store interior. I was responsible for initial concept renderings, client meetings, construction drawing sets for both phases, as well as construction administration during the tight 3 month timeline for both phases. I was part of implementing many brookstone projects across the country during my time at Z+W Architects.

108 / 109

// Brookstone

Brookstone 134 w.42nd street NYC Zelloe + Weaver Architects, LLC 2011

below: finished project

Professional Work


above: facade elevation


below: demo, finish, fixture, rcp plans

110 / 111

// Brookstone

Professional Work


above: rendering


old farm inn rockport The old farm inn Rockport is the renovation of an existing inn to a cognitive learning and rehabilitation center, The building will become a long term living residence for people with traumatic brain injuries. Multiple additions to the existing structures as well as a remodel of the existing interior will create assisted living and self sufficient living units. All the units will be ADA compliant. The project is due to start construction in the summer of 2013.

112 / 113

// Old Farm Inn Rockport

Zelloe+Weaver Architects, LLC 2011-2012

below: rendering opposite: site plan

Professional Work


FH

600' + -

N/F DECOURCY LOT 2-B 23,000 SF

TT GO

EW AY

EXISTING SHED TO BE REMOVED

EX AM TS TR E

EXISTING PARKING LOT TO BE REDUCED

16'

TE R

M ITT EN

PROPOSED TRASH STORAGE SHED

PROPOSED EVERGREEN SHRUBS

IN

16'

Planter & Flagpole 4'

75'

N/F 291 GRANITE LLC. LOT 12-F 23,300 SF

NEW TREE MAPLE or SIMILAR Primary Snow Storage

Wall Faced Double

IV DR IST IN

G

8'

UE AVEN

RIGHT OF WAY

EXISTING TREE TO REMAIN (TYPICAL)

1

(Secondary Snow Storage)

2 MURPHY HOUSE

100' WETLAND BUFFER ZONE

PROPOSED PARKING

3

10'

4 6

5

PROPOSED ADDITION

FH 300' + -

PROPOSED GROUND COVER

MANHOLE COVER

7

PRESERVE TREE

8

9

10

11

12

20'

REMOVE SIGN 75'

PAVED DRIVEWAY

Wood Fence

N/F OLD FARM INN, INC. LOT 12-E 1.88 AC

LIGHT

20'-0" SETBACK

STR EET ITE GR AN

NORWOOD HOUSE

Bit. Con c.

Berm

Stone Post

RIGHT OF WAY

Double Faced Wall

PROPOSED ADDITION

SETBACK LIMITS

15'-0" SETBACK

N/F DELPADRE LOT 12-D 46,400 SF

N/F BALZARINI LOT 12-B 27,900 SF

350' + FH


SIDEWALK RAMP TO ACCOMMODATE PRESERVATION OF EXISTING TREE STORAGE SHED - TO BE REMOVED

24'-2" 3'-5"

22

3'-5"

6'-2"

6'-0"

5'-1"

3'-4"

PORCH 5'-6"

101 5'-6"

110 ENTRY 6'6 X 13'

EXISTING TREE

2

UNIT 4 11' X 16'6

3

21

115

4

LINEN

DINING AREA

114

18' X 18'

109 BATH 3 7' X 9'6

EXISTING KITCHEN 17' X 22'

103 13

CLOSET 14'-10"

EXISTING DECK TO REMAIN

4'-10"

8'-11"

1

11'-0"

11' X 19'6

BATH 1 7'6 X 11'

31'-3"

LAUNDRY/STORAGE

1'-8"

116

CLOSET

SLOPED

6

5

14

6'-4"

4'-9"

102

2'-11"

2'-7"

4'-10"

DOWN

12

UNIT 3 11' X 16'6

15 3'-6"

1

113

8'-0"

3

2

5

4

6

7

11

BATH 2

2'-4"

7' X 10'6' SLOPED

17

108

16

8

COMMON 9

13' X 12'

3'-3"

1'-11"

6'-7"

19

105 ENTRY 6' X 7'

18

10

20

17'-2"

3'-6"

3'-6"

112

3'-2"

2'-0"

UNIT 1

111

10'-7"

12' X 12'

UNIT 2

107

SITTING ROOM 106 LIVING ROOM

10' X 14'4

20' X 10'6

14' X 17'6

6'-10"

11'-5"

5'-11"

24'-2"

51'-11"

04.03 07.04 04.03

TREE TO REMAIN

07.04

07.11 01.10 12

07.04

3

07.05 BOTTOM OF EAVE 06.13 06.13

07.11 06.13 06.12

08.04

8'-1"

06.13 07.11

07.11

08.04

08.04

08.04

FLOOR

07.11

5'-1"

03.04

04.01

EXISTING FOUNDATION 03.01

NEW FOUNDATION

03.02

BOTTOM OF FROST WALL

PROPOSED ADDITION

TREE TO REMAIN

04.03 04.03

07.04 07.04 07.04

07.11 01.09

04.03

3

07.04

07.04

12

07.05 07.05

06.13

07.11

07.11

06.13 06.13 06.13 07.11

06.13

05.04 06.14

06.12 06.02

01.01

07.11 08.04

08.04

03.06

03.01

114 / 115

// Old Farm Inn Rockport

03.02

04.01

top: Norwood House floor plan bottom: elevations Professional Work


EXISTING STAIR TO REMAIN

EXISTING STAIR TO REMAIN

21'-0" 4'-1"

5'-5"

EXISTING STRUCTURE 9'-1"

2'-5"

16

6'-5"

6

15

F

102 KITCHEN 14'8 X 8'

10'-6"

BEDROOM 10'6 X 19'6

5

4

14'-9 1/2"

103

107 BATH 6' X 7'

BEDROOM/LIVING 10'6 X 20'

7 2'-0"

14

LINEN

8

103 BATH 7' X 6'

108

16'-2"

29'-9"

KITCHEN 7' X 13'

SITTING AREA 16' X 12'

CLOSET

5'-9"

CLOSET

F

103

UNIT 8 101

105 BATH 7'6 X 7'6

106 BATH 7'6 X 7'6 9

13

104 KITCHEN 14'8 X 8'

12'-3"

2'-6" 1'-0"

103 LIVING ROOM

UNIT 7

2'-0"

109 LAUNDRY

6'-2"

W

6' X 7'

2

4'-0"

8'-0"

103

6'-5"

10'6 X 19'6'

11

4'-9"

10'-9"

5'-9"

F

6'-8"

DR

3'-8"

7'-6"

14'-9 1/2"

12

LINEN

10

7'-9"

BEDROOM/LIVING 10'6 X 20'

3

1

UNIT 6 SECOND FLOOR APARTMENT

EXISTING STAIR TO REMAIN

EXISTING STAIR TO REMAIN

PROPOSED ADDITION

EXISTING STRUCTURE

07.04

07.04

06.13 07.04

06.13

6

12 06.12

06.12 06.13

08.04

08.04

06.13

03.06 03.01

03.02

ADDITION

EXISTING

07.04

RIDGE LINE TO BE HELD 2" FROM SILL

4'-5"

2"

RIDGE

07.04

BOTTOM OF EAVE

06.13

06.12 8'-0"

06.13

06.13 08.04 06.13 FLOOR

5'-2"

03.06 03.02 BOTTOM OF FROST WALL

03.01

top: Murphy House floor plans bottom: elevations


Aaron Anderson Selected Works Portfolio 2013  
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