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AAP

DESIGN

VOLU-TE Living Stairs

2019-2020

Micro Living

A L T E R N A T I V E A R C H I T E C T U R A L P R A C T I C E S M E F U N I V E R S I T Y G R A D U A T E P R O G R A M M E


DESING I MICRO LIVING AAP TEAM Students: Ahmet Yaymanoğlu, Aysima Akın, Damla Kaleli, Dilek Yürük, Ebru Şahinkaya, Eda Yavaş, İlayda Baydemir, Nur Gülgör, Sena Hut, Zeynep Ulusoy Studio Instructor: Oral Göktaş Program Coordinators: Kürşad Özdemir, Sevince Bayrak Program Partners: Fibrobeton, Metal Yapı 2019 - 2020 MEF University Graduate Programme


INTRODUCTION There has been a remarkable interest in small scale living, starting from the beginning of the 20th century, accelerating in the last decade. Pick one of the adjectives such as micro, tiny, small, mini and add on a word like house, cabin, home, living..you’ll get a great variety of examples that is combined under the umbrella of small scale, from a simple shed in the woods to a high-end cabin on a rooftop. This semester AAP contributes to this topic, with the design of a unit called Volu-te*. After a full semester of research on previous examples, AAP wants to raise the question of whether or not a small scale living unit can propose an active network in a metropolis. Hence, unlike most of the contemporary examples, Volu-te is not a single unit, it comes with a proposition of a network system. With the idea of this small-scale living unit network, the efficiency of being small comes together with the power of being united. But why a network of micro-living units is necessary for a big city? Over the last century, the housing industry has been mostly dominated by the demands of the nuclear family however more recent data shows that demographics of big cities are also rapidly changing. Life in a big city is composed of both ambiguous and stable times, which requires different living conditions. In a metropolis, an individual is likely to move their house several times in a life period. Volu-te is a micro-living unit network for the transition phases of individuals in big city life. Volu-te is a temporary living unit, specially designed for places like Istanbul, a city with an uncovered network of leftover voids. It is a vertical and fully prefabricated unit, which makes it easily fit in the leftover voids in the city and leave without a trace when necessary. This book presents the design research that feeds the design process of Volu-te, with alternatives, as well as the final drawings and representations of living conditions in this unit. The book also resembles how the idea of a network of micro-living can be applied in a city like Istanbul. Sevince Bayrak, Program Co-coordinator, MEF FADA

Volute*: A volute is a curved funnel that increases in area as it approaches the discharge port. The volute of a centrifugal pump is the casing that receives the fluid being pumped by the impeller, maintaining the velocity of the fluid through to the diffuser. (Source: Wikipedia)


Koza, Interior Rendering


CONTENTS 1.CONTEXT

6-21

2.BODY & SPACE

22-37

3. EXTERIOR AND URBAN CONTEXT

38-47

4. CYCLES

48-59

5. STRUCTURE

60-71

6. CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY

72-89

7. SITE STUDIES

90-97

8. ECONOMIC MODEL

98-105


1.CONTEXT

Yona Friedman’s Ville Spatiale proposal from the 1960s


“In 1950, 30 percent of the global population used to live in the cities and this ratio exceeded 50 percent in 2010, which means 3.3 billion people became urbanite. By 2030, the urban population projected to reach 60 percent. Therefore there will be more than 5 billion people living in the cities.” Nüfus ve Toplum, Doç. Dr. Aslı Didem Danıs Senyüz More than half of the global population is currently living in cities and this ratio is on the increase. As a result, rising population density creates “megacities” that consist of more than 10 billion people, and new ones are added every year. The opportunities in fields such as business or education feed the high demand to live in a city. However, megacities do not have a basic foundation to supply this demand according to the changing daily circumstances. Even though the requirement for a living unit is one of the most important basic human needs, it is challenging for an urbanite to find a suitable dwelling as a result of high ground rent values. The housing prices are not proper for average income citizens, because of an imbalance between income and outcome in these megacities and it forces people to be tenants rather than owners. In some cases, being a tenant is even can’t be afforded by people, and every city deals with this problem with different methods. “House sharing” is popular in London, which is one of the most expensive cities in the world, therefore people prefer to rent a room rather than a house. Moreover, Hong Kong is worse than London as there is a limitation on land, which results in people with an average income living in a small room but low-income people in “cage homes” where only one person can fit inside. On the other hand, some people prefer to be a tenant with the perception of “groundlessness” as a tactic to adopt for living in unsteady cities of the 21st century. Besides, people who can afford to become property owners or buy to rent, manage their ownership with a commercial concern. It creates an opportunity for new intermediary organizations to use this ownership. For example, Airbnb does not own hotels or houses, Uber does not have cars, and food delivery companies do not even have a restaurant. This is another kind of tactic to adapt an unsteady economic system with “groundlessness”.


CONTEXT

Megacities in the World

London, UK 10,3M - 11,4M

New York, US 18,5M -19,8M Los Angeles, US 12,3M -13,2M

Paris, Fran 10.8M - 11

Lagos, Nigeria 13,1M - 24,2M

Bogota, Colombia 9,7M -11,9M

K 1

Mexico City, Mexico 21M -23,8M Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 12,9M - 14,1M

Current Megacities 2015 population 2030 population

2015 population 2030 population

8

Luan 5,5M

Sao Paulo, Brazil 18,5M -19,8M Buenos Aires, Argentina 15,1M -16,9M


DESIGN

Moscow, Russia 12,1M - 12,2M

Chongqing, China 13,3M - 17,3M

Chengdu, China 7,6M - 10,1M Lahore, Pakistan 8,7 - 13M

Istanbul, Turkey 14,6M - 16,7M

Beijing, China 20,3M - 37,1M

Shangai, China 23,7M - 30,7M

Delhi, India 25,7 - 36M

nce 1,8M

Karaachi, Pakistan 16,6M - 24,8M

Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam 7,3M - 10,2M

Tokyo, Japan 38m - 37,1M

Cairo, Egypt 18,7M - 24,5M

Kinshasa, Congo 11,5M - 20M

Mumbai, India 21M - 27,8M

Manila, Philippines 12,9M - 16,7M Bangkok, Thailand 9,2- 11,5M

Jakarta, Indonesia 10,3M - 13,8M

nda, Angola M - 10,4M

Johannesburg, South Africa 9,7M - 11,9M

9


CONTEXT

Nakagin Capsule Unit by Kisho Kurokawa, Tokyo photographed by Arcspace

Capsule Inn Osaka by Kisho Kurokawa

Living Cubes and Resource Tower from Nomadic Furniture vol.1

Cage Homes, Hong Kong photographed by Bobby Yip-REUTERS

Micro Compact House, O2 Village, Munich by Richard Horden

Keret House by Jakub Szczesny, Warszawa photographed by Bartek Warzecha,Polish Modern Art Foundation

OPod Tube Housing by James Law Cybertecture, Hong Kong photographed by Xiaomei Chen

Caravans in Wiesbaden Trailer Park photographed by dpa

Excrescent Utopia by Milo Ayden De Luca

Light House by All(zone), Chicago Architecture Biennial 2015 photographed by Soopakorn Srisakul

The Shed Micro Homes, London by Studio Bark

An example from London Houseboats photographed by Tom Watkins-BBC

10


DESIGN

Micro Living “Humanity is increasingly moving into cities, but the Earth isn’t getting any bigger. That means our apartments are getting smaller and our living arrangements denser. Some people get roommates to avoid living in such small spaces. Others, because of poverty or personal obligations, have no choice but to accept their crowded circumstances. We don’t know how they do it, but somehow they make it work.” Bobby Yip/Reuters Micro living can be an obligation for urban conditions, but it also suggests getting smaller and taking up less space in the world. It is not only about putting more people in limited land. Living in a micro-unit can describe a different way of life. This living scenario is not a new invention that proposes to leave a minimum mark on the planet. The concept of “Minimal Existence” developed to access appropriate housing in Between the Wars. It can be expressed as a minimum subsistence dwelling to build quickly. With this concept, discussions have started about the minimum and acceptable standards of a dwelling to have access to fresh air and daylight. Living in minimal standards experimented in Nakagin Capsule with the perspective of metabolism in the 60s; however, there are still questions about the suitability of these fabricated capsules for living practices. According to the users’ feedback, non-replaceable finished components and materials did not allow the adaptation of the place in permanent conditions. After the 2000s, the cabin culture was popular in rural areas and people preferred to spend their weekends in tiny cabins in nature to forget the weary city life. However, the temporary tiny living practice didn’t continue in the city and people turned back their spacious houses formed by extra rooms or a big living room. On the other hand, the housing crisis in megacities questioned on how to adopt weekend houses into the cities. That discussion adds a new vision to the Minimal Existence concept with current living practices of the 21st century. Some people begin to share their homes as it is not economically affordable anymore and some people prefer minimal living units such as micro pods or houseboats. Despite the example of the Nakagin Capsule, the important point is that they usually prefer renting those places rather than the motivation of ownership.

11


CONTEXT

00.00 Entertainment Other Sleeping

Eating

Transportation

18.00

06.00

Other Eating Transportation Work / Education Eating

Work / Education

12.00 Daily Time Circle

Working %5,2

TV / Netflix %5,2

Sleeping %73,6

Shower %2,6

Others %2,6

Home Time

Eating %10,8

12


DESIGN

Daily Routines time spent at home Daily routines interact with living spaces and it represents the users’ lifestyles. As an example, while freelancers usually create their home office area by multi functioning their living areas for various actions, others who have a separate workspace only use their homes for defined purposes. Students and workers are the majority group of settlers in a city and they prefer to live in their individual space rather than the traditional family house. Even though it gets smaller in size, the single-person household means the increase in consumption of space as it provides separate common rooms such as bathrooms, kitchen, and living room that would be shared otherwise. The daily routines of this household profile are formed by sleeping, eating, traveling, working, or studying and relaxing, where they mostly spend their time outside their homes with the cycle of work-transport-eat. The remaining part of the day is approximately 9.5 hours at home for these people, and they spend 73% of this time sleeping. The picture shows that our living spaces are transforming into hotels, which do not consist of any domestic activity. In the parallel case, there is a reality as the housing crisis and high ground rent in megacities. As a result, these people occupy smaller spaces. Firstly, they change their living unit from family-shared to individual, however; they share it afterward again with other people because of economic insufficiency. This situation creates the following question: ‘’How much space do we need to live?”

13


CONTEXT

Martı, Istanbul People share their houses with this application in temporary periods and it creates an international network between hosts and tenants. Some of them rent homes that they are a tenant to and some of them using the app for weekend holidays.

Airbnb Space10 developed seven autonomous vehicles with different functions such as office, cafe, healthcare, farm, play, hotel, and shop. People book the space that is on the move and keep moving.

Space on Wheels, Global Andrés Jaque projected a place for the Rolling Society after a research period with Office for Political Innovation Design and the prototype experienced in Barcelona. They define the space as “transnational urbanism of non-familial shared homes”.

The Rolling House, Across Europe Andrés Jaque projected a place for the Rolling Society after a research period with Office for Political Innovation Design and the prototype experienced in Barcelona. They define the space as “transnational urbanism of non-familial shared homes”.

Net Room, Tokyo Manboo transformed net cafe to net rooms that allow users to do temporary activities such as sleeping, showering, etc. People rent the private rooms for just an hour or a day and the transitory net cafe refugees called “cyber-homeless” in Japan.

14


DESIGN

Transience people in transition Andres Jaque creates a new term “Rolling Society” for describing people that are rolling between cities, and a new semi-nomadic lifestyle is emerging that objects to the idea of being ​​ permanent. Besides not being able to find affordable housing in cities, there is a supply-demand imbalance caused by the existing housing market failure in responding to the changing-transforming demographic structure. Various ideas have been developed to take a position against this situation through the investments of states, initiatives of private companies, and individual efforts of citizens. This semi-nomadic lifestyle is not just about the dwelling itself, it also consists of daily life habits in outdoor places such as workspaces, transportation, and cafes. The concept of take-away is one of the reflections of transience because people in rolling society don’t even have time to stop. Urban nomads inspire everyday life by adapting their transiences into the spaces.

15


CONTEXT

Left Over Spaces in the city The organic urban texture is a result of individual improvisations of urban users according to their construction and design practices. Istanbul is one of the cities where organic urban texture is dominant and it is in constant change with new construction law every year. Besides, the urbanite transforms spaces with the legal gaps and then a new law is enacted again. There are lots of unstable factors on urban texture and they create the “leftover spaces” behind the scenes. Empty plots, derelict areas, and redundant streets usually can not engage with daily urban life in unplanned cities. Some organizations try out to rehabilitate those places and some of them experience the places with temporary interventions. In some cases, these practices can create awareness and be a catalyst for being part of active urban life unexpectedly. There is a powerful potential to think about “the leftovers of the city” in the human scale rather than “dealing with” them, and the small scale of interventions suggest the possibility of transforming the function of space. As an example, the roof of Karaköy multi-story car parking has a Golden Horn and Bosphorus view but people usually prefer initial floors for parking, and there are usually empty slots on the roof if it is not an extra busy day. Therefore, the question is “Can we consider using 2.5 meters by 5 meters parking slots for other than cars?”

1. Empty plots in the city

2. Derelict Areas

3. Private Garden

4. Roof

5. Sidewalk Extensions

6. Redundant Part of Street and Squares

7. Roadside Parking

8. Open Air Parking

9. Roof of Multi Storey Parking

16


DESIGN

1. Empty plots in the city

2. Derelict Areas

3. Private Garden

4. Roof

5. Sidewalk Extensions

6. Redundant Part of Street and Squares

7. Roadside Parking

8. Open Air Parking

9. Roof of Multi Storey Parking

17


CONTEXT

Distribution of pods in Istanbul

Application Interface

18


DESIGN

Mobile Application In a city like Istanbul, there are many voids, gaps, or undefined areas, whose potential has not discovered yet. Located in places with high potential, Vole-te scatters over the city. This network is visible on the mobile application so that the user could rent the module by using their smart-phone. It provides an alternative accommodation opportunity for the tourists who arrive in the city or anyone who wants to stay during a short period. Users need to enter the appropriate date and location information to rent the module. They log in the module securely via a code that comes to their phone. The process is quick and practical that Volu-te becomes a part of the social network in the city. As a result, in an era where time is the most important aspect of our lives, we offer an alternative to stay with Volu-te.

19


CONTEXT

One Night in Volu-te “What a day! It has been extra busy and difficult as I was already tired the day before. Waking up at 6 am to travel to work for an early client meeting was torture after 4 hours of sleep. I had another site visit. Then I got a text message from Nil trying to gather everyone for a couple of drinks tonight. I couldn’t refuse it as I haven’t seen Arda for ages. He moved to Izmir after high school with his family and studied there, but I heard that he came back to Istanbul now by himself to look for a job. We met in Cihangir for dinner at Otto Cihangir and then carried on for some drinks at Mellow. It was such an enjoyable evening, but it ended up at 1 am! Thankfully Arda mentioned that he stays in a micro-living unit called Volu-te. He rented it for a few months so that he could look for a job while staying in a Maslak pod near where the offices he has interviews with. I heard about it before, but I have never had enough courage to stay in one of them. Ahh, I didn’t have enough energy to go back home, which would take a minimum of 30 minutes to go back to Suadiye, and tomorrow morning I have another early meeting. Considering the price of a taxi as well, I have decided to stay for tonight in Volu-te near Cihangir. I have searched on my phone and found one near the underground station so that I can travel easily in the morning to my office. I have paid through Apple Pay, and the code came to my phone, then I have scanned the QR code to the door to open it. It was such an easy and practical thing to do, why haven’t I done it before?! Hopefully, I slept more than 4 hours tonight. It seems such a cozy space, there is everything I would need here. I just slept at night, and set my alarm later what it would be if I was at home, had my shower and I had even had some time to have breakfast. I have realised that my home is huge for me, I could live in a smaller one, which would be a more efficient use of my money or even energy. I have even found some mint in the pot in front of the window and made tea with it. Such a fresh start to my day, and it was a nice experience.”

20


2. BODY & SPACE “The experience of architecture is related to our bodily existence and to the movement of the body in space“ Rudolf Arnheim

Embodied Spaces: On the Edge of Movement, Marianna Chrapana, Virginia Giagkou/ Egnatias 94, Thessaloniki, Greece, 2017

“Dance and architecture have much in common. Both are concerned with practices of space. For a dancer, the act of choreography as a writing of place occurs through the unfolding of spatial dimensions through gesture and embodied body movement. For the architect, space is the medium through which form emerges and habitation is constructed. For both, the first experienced space is the space of the body“ Carol Brown

Rudolf Von Laban’s Gammes Dynamosphériques, séquence de mouvement “A” et “B” From: Danse et architecture. Nouvelle de danse 42/43. Editions Contredanse


The body tends to create its own moment by disrupting the spatial order imposed on it. On the other hand space wants to activate the body in accordance with itself and manage its perception. Both components tend to violate the expected behavior and disrupt another. Neufert standardised the ergonomics of architectural elements and body expressions. Architectural design often doesn’t embrace the movement of the body and its interaction with space. Considering that, new ways of relationship between space and body movement sought. With the movement of the body in a microstructure, a different ergonomics experimented. In Volu-te, the movement of the human body during the daily routine generates a base for space creation. The volume occurs by the superposition of the combination of body movement instead of the distribution as in conventional space set up within the module. Volu-te operates different spatial elements during the configuration of space according to the human movement.


BODY & SPACE

Daily Routines horizontal distribution The human movement could be neglected in spaces that are organized with conventional ergonomics. In addition to that, the spatial configurations that separate each function as a single room can end up with maximizing the use of floor area.

Cooking

Socializing

Working

Urinating

Showering

Stocking Up

Cleaning

Resting

Daily Routines vertical distribution Rather than organizing rooms function by function with conventional ergonomics, Volu-te aims to experiment with how the actions can intersect and merge in a vertical layout.

Resting

Showering

Cleaning

Urinating

Stocking up

Cooking

Socializing

24


DESIGN

6.10 m

2.50 m Volume rather than area Total usable space 18m3

Levels rather than floors Total usable floor area 12m2

Modulor rather than Vitruvian Man

Not distribution but superposition

25


BODY & SPACE

Isometric Open Section

26


DESIGN

Fragmented Section

27


BODY & SPACE

Storage

Tank Storage

Plan 1/30 +0.50 Level

Plan 1/30 +1.50 Level

28


Storage

DESIGN

Plan 1/30 +2.50 Level

Machine Storage

Plan 1/30 +3.60 Level

29


BODY & SPACE

14 15

13

Plan 1/30 +4.30 Level

Plan 1/30 +5.00 Level

30


DESIGN

Plan 1/30 +5.50 Level

Isometric View

31


BODY & SPACE

Resting The last stop resting or sleeping level in all vertical home activities flow. The floor is an almost half dodecagon and the fabric around it has windows and polycarbonates at intervals

Urinating The stair turns into the floor at the urinating level without any partition wall, and a divider curtain can be added for privacy according to the user

Showering The showering level is reached around the urinating space

Partition mesh at the working level

Kitchen stuff hung on the beam

Socializing The circular table creates a socializing area around itself at the ground level

Stocking up Outdoor resting

Section A 1/30

32

Under the stairs are used as a storage for the functions at the ground level. Kitchen stuffs, books, shoes etc.


DESIGN

10 Sleeping The second sleeping level is an alternative platform to create extra sleeping space for more

Cleaning Cleaning level where people can washing hands or brushing teeth is at last the stair before sleeping

Stocking up There are shelves for stocking up showering and urinating stuff such as towels, shampoo, toilet paper, etc in that transition space

Mesh for safeness

Lighting

Working There is a tiny table fixed to the central column at the working level and the stairs turn into a seat

Entrance

Cooking All kitchen activities are around a circular table, cooking and eating on one side and washing up on the other side

Outdoor Flowering

Section B 1/30

33


BODY & SPACE

Cooking

Stocking Up

Chatting

Washing Hands

Watching

Eating

Organizing

Taking Shower / Urinating

Dressing

Working

Brushing teeth

Sleeping

34


DESIGN

Working Place

Cleaning Place

Resting Place

Cooking Place

35


BODY & SPACE

Cooking Place

36


DESIGN

Cleaning Place

37


3. EXTERIOR AND URBAN CONTEXT As the characteristic of a micro-structure, the interior and exterior border becomes thinner. With the fact that Volu-te is a part of the urban context, there should be a strong relationship with the exterior. The module, which is planned to be deployed to the leftover spaces in urban areas, has the potential to create an effective space both for it’s the environment and the user. In this section of the book, the limits that Volu-te can expand in the exterior are searched. In the different urban contexts, alternative materials experimented. Besides, due to the advantage of the form and the way of construction modular growth is studied.

Volu-te in Urban Context


Exterior Utilization Alternative


EXTERIOR AND URBAN CONTEXTÂ

Pots for Bird Feeding

Plants

PV Panel

Wind Tribune

Door

Window

Canopy

Roof

Storage Tube

40


DESIGN

Isometric View

41


EXTERIOR AND URBAN CONTEXT

Corrugated metal cladding is an option for façade cladding. The material has a low weight and high strength. It can be preferred due to its ease of installation and minimal maintenance during use. The material, which is easy to access on the market, is also available in different colors.

Module with corrugated metal

Cardboard is made of postconsumer waste paper and card, which is a suitable alternative material for quick and practical solutions. Although it has limited market availability, it is suitable for façade cladding under appropriate external conditions. Cardboard tubes are suitable for establishing a relationship with modules due to their forms. Besides, it is an alternative building material in terms of sustainability.

Module with cardboard tube

44


Module with mesh and fabric

Bamboo is a structurally strong, fast-growing, and highly sustainable material. It has the potential to be an aesthetically pleasing and cost-effective alternative. In this scenario, it is an alternative faรงade cladding option for the modules when they are placed indoors or in environments that are protected from climatic conditions. Its form is also suitable for the polygonal structure of the module.

Module with bamboo

45

DESIGN

Another option is to use fabric on the faรงade. It can be applied with a metal mesh where necessary. This aesthetic effect provided on the faรงade can make the structure more permeable and flexible, and it could support the relationship between the interior and the exterior.


EXTERIOR AND URBAN CONTEXTÂ

Typologies Volu-te is designed as a singular micro-living module, but the advantage of the form and size opens a space for modular growth. In an appropriate urban context, a gathering of the modules can create new potentials in leftover spaces. The polygonal structure of the module is sufficient for horizontal and vertical growth. The blank side of the façade becomes the joinery element of the modular horizontal composition. The lightweight steel construction structure enables the vertical composition. With the structure combining vertical modules in vertical becomes more effective. Besides the vertical and horizontal modular combinations, the union of two modules experimented.

The verticality provides a horizontal composition without extra infrastructure. As when we think that if the module has horizontal planning we should place one module on top of the others and we will need a staircase structure to reach the module. In this way, in the urban situation, two and more modules can easily come together in a suitable environment.

Horizontal composition of the modules

The polygonal structure leads up to the horizontal combination but on the other hand with the lightweight structure design and spiral level usage in the module it opens a space for vertical combinations. The structure of the module with levels works as an outdoor staircase for the modules.

Vertical composition of the modules

Volu-te designed as a micro-living unit for 2 people to use. However, the modular structure enables the union of two modules for 3 to 4 person usage. The advantage of levels and spiral settlement spaces of modules can be united in two levels. In the first level, one of the cooking areas can be removed to prevent doubling the spaces. As in the level of shower and toilet, the second unit can be removed for new potentials. Union of two modules

46


DESIGN

Vertical composition in an urban left-over space

47


4. CYCLES


Climate change, irresponsible land use, and the 6th great extinction are the most important environmental problems that we are currently facing and experiencing their catastrophic consequences more each year. However, we strongly believe that current green ideology is serving to make the world less sustainable, which doesn’t necessarily mean to make it sustainable. It is only increasing the amount of time we could spend on Earth, it does not try to propose a solution. We designed Volu-te by taking into consideration the ecosystem, which includes living organisms and their surroundings as a whole either in a city or in rural areas. Both in these settings, the footprint of the living unit was our priority in terms of becoming mindful of the land that we require with minimum harm to the living organism in its surroundings. Therefore, we have decided to focus on the most effective use of the volume on the smallest floor area possible by maximising the useful area inside, which helped us to minimise the heat loss area through the fabric. Volu-te is designed to generate adequate energy with solar panels in the summer and a home size wind turbine in the winter to cover its water heating and electrical appliances, which has chosen carefully considering the real needs of a living unit. Space heating has 2 options: an electrical fan heater for the city which would require extra energy and a solid fuel heater for nature. In the urban scenario, we have imagined using the grid for necessary features such as the removal of black water; however, for the off-grid option that could be implemented in the rural areas, we have designed plug-in storage including the battery, rainwater collection tank, and black water storage.


CYCLES

2

1

10

14

8 1 260W TESUP Thin Flexible Solar Panel

8

2 500W Engelec Small Wind Turbine

13

3 Inverter 6

4 6000W Lithium Ion Battery Storage 5 A+ Mini Fridge 46L 6 Instantaneous Electric Water Heater

12

7 Iron 8 Electrical Socket 9 Electric Hob 10 LED Bulb 11 Laptop 12 Portable Compact Twin Tub Laundry Machine 13 Hair Dryer 14 Smart phone

11

10 8

9

8 6 3 5 4

Section Energy Management

50

7


RURAL

URBAN

DESIGN

1 Urban settings for heating: Dyson Purifying Fan Heater 2 Rural settings for heating: Dickinson Newport Solid Fuel Heater 3 Louvred Air Vents 4 Natural Ventilation 5 Solar Shading 6 Thermal Insulation

6 4

5

5

4

4

5

5 4 4

1 3

2

Section Comfort Management

51


CYCLES

Section Superposition of Systems

52


Calculations 800 kWh

DESIGN

800 kWh

400 kWh 400 kWh

0

Jan

Electrical 0 75 Appliances Jan Water

Electrical Heating Appliances

83

75

Internal

36 Water Heat Gain* 83 Heating

Feb 75 Feb 83

75

32

Mar 75 Mar 50

75

36

Apr 75 Apr 50

75

35

May 72 May 72

83

50

50

50

50 36

July

June 72

June 72 23

23 35

71

July 71 23

23 36

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

71

71

72

75

75

Aug 71 23

23 36

Sept 71 33

33 35

Oct 72 33

33 36

Nov 75 50

50 35

Dec 75 83

Solar Internal Gain*Gain* Heat

59 36

3269

3696

35117

36 134

35 135 36 141 36 138 35

Space Solar Heating** Gain*

677 59

69581

96529

353 117

134163

1350

Energy Space Production Heating**

120 677

120 581

140 529

135 353

163145

0 165 0

Energy Solar Production Panels

120 70

120 80

140 110

135 130

145140

165160 185 180 200 170 160 130 130 100 130 90 130

Solar Wind Panels Turbine

70 50

8040

110 30

130 5

1405

1605

141 0

138 0

185 0

180 5

36

113 36

91 35

62 36

51

113 72 91

252 62

42051

646

200 72

170 30

83

160 252 130 420 130646

130 30 100 30 90

40 80

130 80 50

Wind 50 40 30 30 30 5 5 5 5 30 40 50 Turbine *Internal heat gains are calculated based on assumptions that there are 2 people inside the living unit wearing relaxing clothes

with moderate speed of internal movement using the electrical appliances listed below. Solar gains are estimated as it is located

in an urban with average based shading which that will decrease energy need space rural areas. *Internal heatcontext gains are calculated on factor, assumptions there are 2the people inside thefor living unitheating wearinginrelaxing clothes with moderate speed of internal movement using the electrical appliances listed below. Solar gains are estimated as it is located **Space heating values represent the net energy needed to heat the living area the cooler the year in an urban context with average shading factor, which will decrease the energy needduring for space heatingmonth in ruralthroughout areas. after the removal of the effects of total internal gains, which includes internal heat gains and solar gains.

**Space heating values represent the net energy needed to heat the living area during the cooler month throughout the year after the removal of the effects of total internal gains, which includes internal heat gains and solar gains.

Equipments 30mins/

day 30mins/ day

24hrs/

20mins/

day 20mins/ day

4hrs/

10mins/

10mins/day day

7hrs/

24hrs/ day day

4hrs/day day

7hrs/month month

6hrs/ 6hrs/ day day

8hrs/ 8hrs/ dayday

2hrs/ 2hrs/ month month

*Each image represents 5 kWh/month *Each image represents 5 kWh/month

53


CYCLES

Built-in Storage on grid use

Gray Water Filter Black Water Storage Black Water Exit Dual Flush Clean Water Storage

Section 1/30 - Water Management

54


DESIGN

Section 1/30 - Water Management

55


CYCLES

Plug-in Storage off grid use Volu-te has the flexibility to adapt either in the urban context or the rural. Inside the living pod, there are water storage areas separated in different small tanks to reserve the required amount of water in urban areas. However, it is possible to use these areas for extra storage in the rural context as it is possible to manage the cycle of water in an off-grid system with external implements. Unlike in the city, an adequate cylinder tank has proposed to be attached to the pod externally. This tank consists of two sections, that one is for the clean water storage and the other one is for the black water without the need for grid connection. Besides, with the help of the roof slope, rainwater could be easily oriented through the tank to collect it for future usage. Afterward, the rainwater could meet the clean water need in the pod with the help of a filtering device inside the water tank. At the bottom of the tank, there is an area separated for the inverter and the battery storage.

Plan 1/30 - Infrastructure plug-in

56


DESIGN

Section 1/30 - Infrastructure Plug-in

57


CYCLES

Food Management There are three platforms to grow vegetables that include annual and perennial edible plants. These platforms are vertical garden, raised bed, and herb spiral. The vertical garden consists of small pots surrounding the faรงade where suitable, and raised bed is located on the floor with the herb spiral. Herb spiral has similarities with Volu-te in terms of being an efficient way of vertical garden design by locating plants that need dry microclimate at the top level and moist microclimate at the bottom.

Vertical Garden (A)

Herb Spiral (C_A)

Raised Bed (B_A)

Plan 1/30 - Food Management

58


DESIGN

14

5

3.53 1

4

1

2

2

14

1

1

17

6

14

5

3

4

5

6

18

5

1

1

14

3

6

4

1

1

2

5

4

3.07 6

3

2.57 1

17

17

2.07 3

1.57 1

14

+1.07

+0.60 6

0.00 Section 1/30 - Food Management

59


5. STRUCTURE


‘’As we approach the new millennium we face the need for less consumption and to achieve fast build, light, and demountable architecture.’’ (Horden, R., 1996, Light Architecture) The design process of a micro-unit is not just about shrinking the space. It aims to get smaller in terms of searching the optimal in all aspects and reflecting this approach from the design phase to the construction stage. In this context, the design and building technology of the structural system has been refined. The dimensions and weights of the structural elements and the tools to be used in the construction of the unit have been minimised. Volu-te is a 6.10 meters high dodecagon prism with the longest diagonal of 2.5 meters. The structural system is based on lightweight steel construction and it is formed by 16 different structural elements made of 3 mm steel that are repetitive throughout the unit. While designing these elements, dimensions, and weight have been the key factors to let an individual lift them by hand. In this way, it would be possible to complete the installation with a simple scaffold and minimise the use of cranes. Besides, the connection types of structural elements are standardised, and the entire structural system can be built in a short time with a simple bolt and nut connection. With the help of the design guide, which includes the dimensions of the structural elements, the connection details, and the construction steps in detail, the structure can be installed simply with minimum tools and methods.


STRUCTURE

Plan & Section 1/40

62


DESIGN

Isometric View Total Structure Weight 985 kg

63


STRUCTURE

Structural Elements There are 16 different structural elements made of 3 mm thick steel. The entire structural system is set up with the repetition of these elements. There is a distinguishable code for each element. In the diagrams below, you can find the information about the dimensions and weight of each element, their location in the system, and how many of them are used.

1a // 1 piece: 3.3 kg // 24 Pieces: 79.2 kg

64

1b // 1 piece: 1.3 kg // 24 Pieces: 33.6 kg


DESIGN

1c // 1 piece: 7.1 kg // 48 Pieces: 340.8 kg

2a // 1 piece: 15.7 kg // 2 Pieces: 31.4 kg

2b // 1 piece: 18.3 kg

3a // 1 piece: 0.15 kg // 46 Pieces: 7.0 kg

65


STRUCTURE

3b // 1 piece: 3.0 kg // 30 Pieces: 90.0 kg

3c // 1 piece: 1.95 kg // 39 Pieces: 76.0 kg

4a // 1 piece: 1.9 kg // 84 Pieces: 159.6 kg

5a // 1 piece: 0.75 kg // 12 Pieces: 9.0 kg

66


DESIGN

5b // 1 piece: 0.1 kg // 10 Pieces: 1.0 kg

5c // 1 piece (1820 mm): 5.40 kg 1 piece (2365 mm): 7.00 kg 1 piece (2535 mm): 7.50 kg

6a // 1 piece: 8.55 kg // 12 Pieces: 102.6 kg

6b // 1 piece: 4.00 kg

//

5 Pieces: 32.30 kg

67


STRUCTURE

Structure Building Manual

Step 1 2a x 1 // 6a x 12 // 6b x 1

Step 2 3a x 12 // 3b x 12

Step 3 1a x 12 // 1c x 12

Step 7 1b x 12 // 3c x 4 // 4a x 12

Step 8 2b x 1 // 3b x 2 // 3c x 3

Step 9

Step 13 2a x 1 // 3b x 9 // 3c x 8

Step 14 3b x 6

Step 15 5a x 12

68


DESIGN

Step 4 4a x 36

Step 5 3c x 12

Step 6 3c x 4

Step 10 1c x 12 // 3b x 5 // 3c x 8

Step 11 1c x 12

Step 12 4a x 12

Step 16 4a x 24 // 5a x 12 // 5b x 10

Step 17 5c x 2 // 5d x 2 // 5e x 1

Step 18

69


STRUCTURE

Structural Details

1. Steel Column Ø 135 mm 2. L Profile Column 80 x 50 mm 3. L Profile 80 x 50 mm 4. L Profile 80 x 50 mm 5. Metal Plaque 50 x 3 mm 6. Connector 7. L Profile 80 x 50 mm 8. L Profile 30 x 30 x 450 mm 9. L Beam Connector 27.5 x 50 mm 10. Trapeze Plate 5mm

Detail - 1 Roof

7 5 3

6 4

2 1

Detail - 2 Column - Beam Connection 1. L Profile Column 3 x 80 x 50 mm 2. Beam 3 x 80 x 1150 mm 70 3. Beam 3 x 80 x 560 mm 4. L Profile 30 x 30 x 450 mm 5. L Beam Connector 2 x 27,5 x 50mm 6. Steel Column Ø 135mm

1. L Profile Column 3 x 80 x 50 mm 2. Beam 3 x 80 x 1150 mm 3. Beam 3 x 80 x 560 mm 4. L Profile 30 x 30 x 450 mm 5. L Beam Connector 2 x 27,5 x 50mm 6. Steel Column Ø 135mm 7. Beam 3 x 80 x 560 mm


DESIGN

4

6

5 3

2 1

1. L Profile Column 3 x 80 x 50 mm 2. Bolt 3. Nut 4. Slat 3 x 20 x 2960 mm 5. Beam 3 x 80 x 1150 mm 6. L Profile 30 x 30 x 450 mm

Detail - 3 Facade Column Connection

1. L Profile Column 3 x 80 x 50 mm 2. Bolt 3. Nut 4. Slat 3 x 20 x 2960 mm 5. Beam 3 x 80 x 1150 mm 6. L Profile 30 x 30 x 450 mm

1. Foundation 2. L Profile 80 x 50 mm 3. L Beam 80 x 50 mm 4. L Profile Column 80 x 50 mm 5. L Beam Connector 27.5 x 50 mm 6. Beam 3 x 80 x 1150 mm 7. L Profile 30 x 30 x 450 mm 8. Steel Column Ø 135 mm Detail - 4 Foundation

71


6. CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY

1400 cm

1850 cm

Section Open Layout of Construction Elements


In this section, the current construction formats are examined and the technology of the module to be produced is discussed in detail. The boundaries of the material and methods of its production are investigated. All of the components that bring Volu-te together are produced in the factory and all of these components are repetitive elements. Besides its potential to be a mass product, it has a very low-technology and flexibility. This helps Volu-te to be easily produced, easily assembled and reproduced by individuals who are not qualified. Besides being easy, these productions come out with simple tools and very quickly. Unlike traditional production methodologies, off-site, on-site and transportation stages, where alternative production techniques are presented, are the three main topics to be examined in this section. The process from the production phase that started in the factory to the completion of a module in the project area are evaluated over different possibilities. The technical and economic properties of each element that installed the module are investigated. By considering the installation phase, the transportation options of the module are produced and the dimensions required for storage were determined. In addition, detailed drawings and diagrams that describe the layers of the materials, analyse the connections and show the auxiliary tools are produced.


Trapeze Plate 5mm Metal Plaque 3x50mm Water Isolation 2mm Plywood 18mm Thermal Insulation (Rockwool) 40mm Vapor Barrier 2mm Plywood 18mm L Profile 80x50x50mm

Sleeping Area

Plywood 12mm Vapor Barrier/Water Proofing 2mm Thermal Insulation (Rockwool) 50mm Concrete Wall Panel 15mm

Plywood 4m L Profile 2mm I profile 80x3mm

Plywood 12mm L Profile 80x50mm Silicone 5mm Solid Polycarbonate 3mm Silicone 5mm Profile 2x30mm

Cellular Polycarbonate 50mm

Toilet

Bath Plywood 4mm I profile 80x3mm

Working Area

Plywood 12mm Vapor Barrier/Water Proofing 2mm Thermal Insulation (Rockwool) 50mm Concrete Wall Panel 15mm Kitchen Plywood 4m I profile 80x3mm

Solid Polycarbonate 3mm

Resting

Plywood 18 mm Thermal Insulation (Rockwool) 40 mm Water Isolation 2 mm Plywood 18 mm L Beam 80x50 mm

Thermal Insulation (Eps) 50mm Concrete Wall Panel 15mm Section 1/25


Plywood 12mm L Profile 80x50mm Silicone 5mm Solid Polycarbonate 3mm Silicone 5mm Profile 2x70x30mm

Resting Area

Plywood 12mm L Profile 80x50mm Sheet Metal 2mm Thermal Insulation (Rockwool) 50mm Sheet Metal 2mm Kitchen

Plywood 12mm L Profile 80x50mm Vapor Barrier/Water Proofing 2mm Wood Batten 50x20mm Galvanized Steel Frame 30x20mm Galvanized Connector 2x10mm Concrete Wall Panel 15mm Plan 1/25 Level +1.85

Toilet

Plywood 12mm L Profile 80x50mm Silicone 5mm Solid Polycarbonate 3mm Silicone 5mm I Profile 2x70x30mm

Plywood 12mm L Profile 80x50mm Vapor Barrier/Water Proofing 2mm Wood Batten 50x20mm Galvanized Steel Frame 30x20mm Galvanized Connector 2x10mm Concrete Wall Panel 15mm

Bath

Plywood 12mm L profile 50x80mm Silicone 5mm L profile 2x50x30mm Cellular Polycarbonate 50mm I Profile 2x50mm Plan 1/25 Level +4.65


CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY

Structure and Exploded Horizontal Panels

76


DESIGN

Structure and Exploded Vertical Panels

77


CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY

Plywood (horizontal) 18 mm thick plywood, preferred as floor covering, is obtained by cutting 2500 to 1250 mm boards with the help of CNC. The 18mm plywood also serves as a linking object between the beams and provides structural rigidity. A total of 10 sheets of plywood is sufficient for 3 different types of modules used as flooring, meaning that the total cost is approximately $450.

18mm plywood coverings Weight: 720kg/m³ Price per Plate: 45$ Type 1 1

2 3 8

4

7 12

6

50

mm

00

5

25

mm

18mm plywood coverings Weight: 720kg/m³ Price per Plate: 45$

1

2

23 12

50

78

mm

Type 3

1

Type 2

24

18mm plywood coverings Weight: 720kg/m³ Price per Plate: 45$

22 21

20 19

4

10 9

15 16

2 3

12 11

13 14

3

8

9

6 4

7

17 18

10

5

2

50

m 0m

5

7 6

12

50

mm

8 mm

00

25


Plywood (vertical)

DESIGN

12mm thick plywood, which is lighter and thinner than the floor covering, was preferred as a vertical surface coating to minimize structural loads. Vertical surface coating, which will be used in 2 different types as 600 to 600 and 600 to 1200, is obtained by CNC cutting of plywood sheets sold as 1250 to 2500 mm. The necessary coating material is obtained by cutting 11 sheets, so the total cost is approximately $374.

Type 2 600x1200mm

Type 1 600x600mm

Type 1

Type 2

12mm plywood coverings Weight: 600kg/mÂł Price per Plate: 34$

60

m

0m

0m

60

12mm plywood coverings Weight: 600kg/mÂł Price per Plate: 34$ m

60

0m

m

m 00

1

12

m

1

2 2 3 5 7 12

50

mm

4

3

6 8

25

00

mm

4

12

50

mm

mm

00

25

79


CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY

Thermal Insulation Rock wool with a density of 150 kg per cubic meter will be used as thermal insulation material both on vertical surfaces between the wall panels and between the roof and floor covering. In addition to being an ecological and environmentally friendly product, it also has high fire resistance, therefore, despite being heavy, it has been the primary reason for its preference. It is sold in 600 to 1200 mm sheets. It has the opportunity to be cut and used in the desired dimensions.

600x1200mm Rockwool (50mm) Weight: 150kg/mÂł Price per 4 Plate: 20$

600x1200mm Rockwool (40mm) Weight: 150kg/mÂł Price per 6 Plate: 25$

Water Insulation It is aimed to use multi-functional waterproofing material named Dupont Tyvek HomeWrap between the outer layer on the ground and the thermal insulation and under the trapezoidal plate on the roof. The material, sold in rolls of 1-meter width and 50 meters length, has the opportunity to be easily cut and used in the desired size.

Dupont HomeWrap Water Insulation Roll size: 1x50m Price per Roll: 70$

80


Vapour Barrier

DESIGN

Dupont’s multi-functional product has a vapour-proof structure as well as a waterproofing feature. Therefore, the material used as waterproofing can also be used as a vapour barrier. The vapour barrier to be used on the façade is between the interior plywood layer and the thermal insulation.

Dupont HomeWrap Water Insulation Roll size: 1x50m Price per Roll: 70$

Structure Almost all of the structural elements, except the L profiles that provide connections between slabs and beams are 2mm, of this module composed by the 3mm galvanized steel sheet. The production of all the structural elements has the same principle. The structural elements will be the boundaries for modules after the cutting of the galvanized steel sheet with CNC and then bending the necessary ones.

3 1

4

6 5

Galvanized Steel Sheet Plate Size: 3 x 625 x 2500mm Weight per size: 36.8kg Price per Plate: 130$

2

3mm Galvanized

2mm Galvanized

Plate Size: 2 x 500 x 500mm Weight per plate: 3.93kg Price per Plate: 20$

81


CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY

Fiber Cement Panels Fiberglass concrete panels produced by Fibrobeton in various sizes and desired texture and colour will be used as faรงade panels. Two different sized modules as 600 to 600 and 600 to 1200 mm panels will create the exterior faรงade. To decrease the vertical loads of the structure, panels with 15 mm thickness will be used.

Fibrobeton Concrete Panel Size: 600x600mm Thickness: 15mm

Fibrobeton Concrete Panel Size: 600x600mm Thickness: 15mm

Cellular Polycarbonate Panels In addition to the Fibrobeton panel, cellular polycarbonate can be used as an alternative faรงade panel for better illumination of the interior with its translucent structure. A 50 mm thick polycarbonate surface also provides some thermal insulation, although it is limited.

2mm Gaskets Polycarbonate Plate 50x 600 x 1200mm 2mm Gaskets 30x50mm L Profile

50mm Polycarbonate Size: 2100 x 6000mm Price per Plate: 390$

82


Glazing

DESIGN

Instead of using a ready-made joinery detail in Volu-te, it is aimed to create one with the basic structural elements that compose the structure. The transparent polycarbonate sheet placed between a frame consisting of an L profile and a frame consisting of the slat will form the joinery. Waterproofing will be provided by adhering silicone between metal profiles and transparent surface. By joining the L column on the outer wall with the help of a hinge, the joinery will be turned into a pivot window.

5mm Gaskets L frame 5mm Gaskets Polycarbonate Glazing 3 x 600 x 1200mm 5mm Gaskets Slat

Section A 1/30

3mm Solid Polycarbonate Size: 2100 x 6000mm Price per Plate: 46$

Trapezoidal Metal Sheet Trapezoidal metal will be used as a second layer at the rooftop level. This will provide ventilation of the roof due to the space left between the trapezoidal roof and its primary layer. It will also help ensure the drainage of the water. The gap it creates will provide an advantage in terms of thermal insulation. The 2.5-meters diameter trapezoidal surface will consist of 3 parts.

1 2 3

X X 3x=2500 mm

X

Trapezoidal Sheet Size: 860 x 3000mm Price per Plate: 70$

83


CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY

Construction Manual Installation The facade installation begins after the structural installation is finished. The installation starts from the ground level and continues to the top level. Facade elements are wood batten, vapor barrier/waterproofing, plywood, concrete wall panel, window, and door. In the first stage, the wooden battens are anchored to the columns. The vapor barrier/waterproofing is attached between the columns and wooden battens. Secondly, plywood is installed. Thirdly, concrete panels are assembled as the outer layer. Windows and the door are also installed at this stage. One or two mobile scaffolding, hand drill, and wrench are used as auxiliary tools for installation.

Step 1 Structure

Step 2 Wood Batten Vapor Barrier / Waterproofing

Step 3 Plywood

Step 7 Concrete Wall Panel

Step 8 Windows and Doors

Step 9 Wood Batten Vapor Barrier / Waterproofing

84


DESIGN

Step 4 Concrete Wall Panel

Step 5 Wood Batten Vapor Barrier / Waterproofing

Step 6 Plywood

Step 10 Plywood

Step 11 Concrete Wall Panel

Step 12 Windows

85


CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY

Storage A prefabricated factory produced pod consists of many elements. These elements should be small and light for storage and transportation. If the open layout of the construction elements (structure, floor, roof, façade, windows, door, and others) of a pod is placed in a plane, it scans an area of 259 m². But if these elements are placed on top of each other, they can easily fit into a small volume. Volu-te has 28.2 m³ volume when it is completed on-site. However, it has a volume of approximately 8 m³, when it is packaged for transportation and storage.

1400 cm

1850 cm

Open Layout of Construction Elements

200

cm

m

0c

45

180 cm

Flat-pack Storage for One Pod

86


Transportation A pod or pods are transported to the project area in three different ways. The first one is a flat-pack. A trailer truck can carry five packaged pods simultaneously. The pods are installed in the project area. Secondly, the box system factory manufactured pod is delivered by a flat-bed truck. It is put in place with the help of a crane. The third method is to transport the box system to the pod by adding apparatus such as wheels. In the project area, the pod is rotated with its own weight and simple levers.

DESIGN

45

m

6,00 m

3,00 m

2,

Flat-Pack: Five modules can be transported

45

m

8,00 m

3,00 m

2,

Box System with Truck: One module can be transported

45

m

6,00 m

3,00 m

2,

Wheeled: Transport as truck chassis

87


CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY

System Details

Trapeze Plate 5mm Metal Plaque 3x50mm Water Isolation 2mm Plywood 18mm Thermal Insulation (Rockwool) 40mm Vapor Barrier 2mm Plywood 18mm L Profile 80x50x50mm

Plywood 12mm Vapor Barrier/Water Proofing 2mm Thermal Insulation (Rockwool) 50mm Concrete Wall Panel 15mm Plywood Panel 600x600mm

Plywood 12mm L Profile 80x50mm Silicone 5mm Solid Polycarbonate 3mm Silicone 5mm Profile 2x30mm

Detail - 1 Roof

Plywood 4mm

Plywood Panel 600x1200mm

Thermal Insulation (Eps) 50mm Concrete Wall Panel 15mm

Plywood 18 mm Thermal Insulation (Rockwool) 40 mm Water Isolation 2 mm Plywood 18 mm L Beam 80x50 mm

Detail - 2 Foundation

88

Detail - 3 System Section


DESIGN

Plywood 12mm L Profile 80x50mm Silicone 5mm Sheet Metal 2mm Thermal Insulation (Rockwool) 50mm Sheet Metal 2mm

Detail - 6 Door Plan

Plywood 12mm L Profile 80x50mm Vapor Barrier/Water Proofing 2mm Wood Batten 50x20mm Galvanized Steel Frame 30x20mm Galvanized Connector 2x10mm Concrete Wall Panel 15mm

Detail - 4 Window

Detail - 7 Facade Plan

2 Plywood

1’ Vapor Barrier/Water Proofing 1 Wood Batten

3 Concrete Wall Panel Galvanized Steel Frame Thermal Insulation

Detail - 5 Cellular Polycarbonate

Detail - 8 Facade Layers

89


7. SITE STUDIES


Volu-te designed and produced using prefabricated production methods. It enables the assembly and disassembly of the system without leaving any trace behind while allowing it to be located anywhere. At this point, the notion of transience and property becomes fluid. With a minimised dodecagon floor area with the longest diagonal of 2.5 meters, Volu-te can be located in various unexpected areas in addition to urban voids. For example, these areas could be a parking lot or a rooftop that is not used and have no spatial value. Volu-te easily can be adapted to different urban scenarios both as a singular unit and modular units that come together while creating new configurations.


SITE STUDIES

MEF University Left Over Space

Site Plan 1/100

Section 1/100

92


DESIGN

Render

93


SITE STUDIES

Roof of Karakรถy Multi-Story Car Parking

Site Plan 1/100

Section 1/100

94


DESIGN

95


SITE STUDIES

Volu-te in a Parking Lot

96


DESIGN

Volu-te on the roof

97


8. ECONOMIC MODEL


In this section, the operation of the module on different economic models is examined and different sales offers are emphasized. It is important to offer varied options to investors according to demands and conditions so the continuity and sustainability of the module are associated with a realistic base. Investors who will provide financing for the operation of the module can be an individual or a company. In this regard, various agreements can be made with private companies or municipalities. In addition, the modules that are planned to be located in the city can cooperate with other cafes, restaurants, bars. Individual sales, wholesale, and creating networks are the three main proposals to investors.

䔀挀漀渀漀洀椀挀 䴀漀搀攀氀猀

䤀渀搀椀瘀椀搀甀愀氀 匀愀氀攀 1. Individual Sale Individual investors can buy the module and use it according to their demand. The fact that the module is portable and easy to install, it increases options for its location such as the garden of their house, beach, camping.

圀栀漀氀攀猀愀氀攀 2. Wholesale Hotels that want to increase their bed capacities, investors who want to offer temporary accommodation at the airports, hospitals that want to protect the health of their employees can buy the module wholesale.

䌀爀攀愀琀椀渀最 一攀琀眀漀爀欀 3. Creating Network Modules in the city can be rented with a mobile application by entering the appropriate location and date. In this way, it is aimed to create a network in the city.


ECONOMIC MODEL

1. Individual Sale

Volu-te located in the camping area

100


2. Wholesale

DESIGN

Festivals

Using for short term accommodation at festival areas.

Tourism

Using to increase bed capacity in hotels.

Airport

Using for short term accommodation by passengers and employees at airport.

101


ECONOMIC MODEL

3. Creating Network Another proposal for the operation of the module is based on the creation of a network in the city. With developed communication and mobile technologies, the module is planned to be rented by an application. Modules placed at suitable points in the city by the investors can be rented practically with an application. Tenants can pay online after choosing the appropriate modules on the dates they want. Security is also provided by tenants accessing the module with the code received on their mobile phones. People who have individual modules can also rent their modules using that application if they wish to include their modules in this system.

102


DESIGN

Application Users can download the mobile application from the store to rent a place or to rent their place. Welcome page shows on-boarding to describe the main purpose of the service and useful features about the application.

Home Page Users enter the home page after login. On this page, they can search using the section at the bottom on the map. There are date and location entry buttons in the lower section.

Module Detail Page Details are shown on this page. It includes photos of module, detailed address information, host information, and comments about the module. They can examine the price and availability of it.

Sign-up Users who will be included to the system for the first time enter their phone numbers and namesurname information.

Enter Code By entering the code on the phone, they verify their identity.

Searching Page Users who enter the appropriate date and their location can see the houses and daily prices in that region on the map. Available modules at that time will appear in color.

Short Information Page Users can reach short information about the module by touching them. For detailed information, they can continue with the button shown.

Payment Page Users entering personal information and payment information rents the module.

Code Page The users can enter the module by using the code that comes their accounts after payment. This code changes every time they rent it.

103


ECONOMIC MODEL

User Profile

one nighters adults in transition medical professionals turist student

This graphic shows that which periods of the year user-profiles stay intensely in Istanbul.

104


Approximately 350,000 people go out at one night in Istanbul. In the late hours, instead of returning to their homes, they prefer to stay in the hotel, hostel, Airbnb, staying with friends or relatives at night. One nighters intensity is balanced throughout the year.

DESIGN

Today, there are approximately 2,000,000 unemployed people in Istanbul. Popular locations for workplaces are concentrated around Levent, Maslak, Kağıthane, Beşiktaş-Şişli, Kozyatağı, Ataşehir, and Altunizade. Those who live far from the city center or come to look for jobs from outside the city prefer to stay in these areas. However, prices are typically higher in these areas compared to less popular places, as an example of the minimum value of a 1 bedroom flat rent in Beşiktaş starts from 1.400 TL per month.

In Istanbul, a high percentage of students stay in dormitories at certain times of the year. In general, these periods are between September-January and February-June. Many dormitories remain vacant during the summer. However, they only have a capacity of 601,000 students. Therefore, apart from staying in these dormitories, students are constrained to look for other options such as house-share, single living, and living with family or relatives.

13,000,000 tourists come to visit Istanbul annually. They prefer to stay in hotels, hostels, and Airbnb which are close to tourist attractions. In general, tourist density increases in the summer and February holidays.

Medical professionals work at various times of the day, which is different from standard working hours in other occupational groups. For this reason, they prefer to stay in locations close to the hospitals instead of wasting time on the road. They also prefer to live separately from their families to reduce disease risk.

105


DESIGN I MICRO LIVING AAP (Alternative Architectural Practices) Instructor Oral Göktaş Design Team: Ahmet Yaymanoğlu, Aysima Akın, Damla Kaleli, Dilek Yürük, Ebru Şahinkaya, Eda Yavaş, İlayda Baydemir, Nur Gülgör, Sena Hut, Zeynep Ulusoy Editors Damla Kaleli, Ebru Şahinkaya Book Design Aysima Akın This catalogue is part of an educational, non-profit project. The students have attempted to acknowledge all sources of images used and apologize for any errors or omissions. Please e-mail aap@mef.edu.tr for any concerns related to copyrights. MEF University Huzur, Maslak Ayazağa Cd. No:4, 34396 Sarıyer/İstanbul aap@mef.edu.tr aap.mef.edu.tr 2020 MEF University


AAP

2019 - 2020 MICRO LIVING DESIGN GUIDE ALTERNATIVE ARCHITECTURAL PRACTICES I MEF UNIVERSITY GRADUATE PROGRAMME

Profile for AAP_mef university

VOLU-TE* Living Stairs  

AAP Design on book micro-living. Alternative Architectural Practices MEF University Graduate Programme aap.mef.edu.tr

VOLU-TE* Living Stairs  

AAP Design on book micro-living. Alternative Architectural Practices MEF University Graduate Programme aap.mef.edu.tr

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