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AAK Magazine | No 2, 2011


AAK Magazine  |  No 2, 2011

AAK development AAK is making further progress, in terms of financial results, market shares and most important of all, in terms of customer satisfaction. Our specialisation strategy is implemented, well received by our customers and develops according to plan.   We need to keep a close eye on developments in the global economy. Given the current uncertainties combined with extremely volatile raw materials and currency markets, we must all be able to adapt quickly to new conditions. We see a continued demand for healthier solutions, which for example creates a good market for our low saturated solutions. We are also very well positioned to meet customer demands for cost reductions with products designed to help customers reduce overall product and/or production costs. Continued positive impact of the AAK acceleration program AAK company program, “AAK Acceleration”, which focuses on twelve important initiatives in the area of “Growth-Efficiency-People” is developed on the basis of our existing specialisation strategy, which remains unchanged, and now with AAK Acceleration, we are prepared to take the development of the company to the next level. Important factors will be customer benefits, customer focus, growth, efficiency, our concern for all employees and issues affecting the world around us. Strengthened positions in North America AAK has acquired the Golden Foods/Golden Brands business of Louisville, Kentucky, a leading North American processor of speciality fats and oils and a leading manufacturer of shortenings for the Bakery and Food service industries.   The acquisition is an integral part of AAK Acceleration program, which calls beyond organic growth for selective acquisitions that synergistically benefits AAK’s customers and business. It significantly strengthens our ability to supply existing and new customers with a broader bakery product portfolio. As one of the largest speciality vegetable oil markets in the world, expansion in the US is also particularly exciting.

Bakery products Health, pleasure and taste sensation are in focus when conscious consumers gets to choose. Reduced intake of saturated fat and trans fat When it comes to oils and fats the main health trend has since many years been to reduce or remove trans- and hydrogenated fats. When succeeding in reduce or eliminate these, focus has moved forward to lower the total amount of saturated fatty acids in our diet. AAK has for a long time been in the forefront of developing and lowering the total amount of trans fats as well as saturated fats in bakery applications and at the same time been able to meet the requirements of non hydrogenated products. The purpose of this work has been to create alternatives for consumer’s with health awareness. Healthier fats – good for your heart Unsaturated fat is due to its structure softer compared to saturated fat. For example traditionally butter or solid margarine has been used to acheive a smooth concistency of the dough. Today these fats are not recommended when it comes to a healthy choice. By combining the right type of solid fat with softer unsaturated fat at the right balance in the shortening. The amount of saturated fat can be decreased with maintained quality for the bakery product.

Sustainable development Today, sustainable development has become increasingly important. AAK must be able to guarantee an operation, which takes sustainability very seriously at all levels. One example of this is the commitment to the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil and the GreenPalm operation. AAK continues to hold a leading position in RSPO and to operate GreenPalm Ltd. The programs are intended to provide endconsumers with a solid guarantee that the products used have been produced using sustainable and environmentally-appropriate methods. Customers have provided AAK with excellent feedback on these efforts, and the intention is to continue with the involvement in CSR issues in order to allow AAK to continue its work on this important trend, for the benefit of all.   We are convinced that close cooperation with our customers in the development of tomorrows product lines will create continued success for our customers as well as for AAK Yours sincerely Arne Frank CEO

GLOBAL AAK Magazine published by AarhusKarlshamn Sweden AB, SE-374 82 Karlshamn, Sweden | www.aak.com Editors: Catharina Bagge, Ted Fyke, Bodil Granroth, Monika Hjorth, Lena Ingvarsson, Martin Johansson, Joakim Karlsson, Britha Kruse, Jan-Olof Lidefelt, Anneli Mattsson, Judith Murdock, Lena Nilsson, Marcus Persson, Maria Wennermark. Contact: Lena Nilsson, e-mail lena.nilsson@aak.com, phone +46 454 82 000 Production: www.johnjohns.se. Photographs: www.benfoto.se For more information, contact info.products@aak.com or visit www.aak.com

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For more information – info.products@aak.com


with improved nutritional profile Low in saturated fat AAK focus on being in the fore front, working actively with developing healthier alternatives all in line with the health trends. In bakery applications where the functionality of solid fat is of great importance, Akobake LS (LS = Low in saturate) gives the functionality of a solid shortening without loss in structure and at the same time an opportunity to add as low as 25 % saturated fat to the product. Akobake LS is suitable for dough used for cookies and biscuits, as well as for other bakery applications. Akobake LS gives a good result in baked products and with a long shelf life.   If extended shelf life is required, Akobake LS HO based on High Oleic rapeseed oil is recommended. By using this oil instead of normal rapeseed oil, the oxidation stability will increased in the final product. Fillings with an opportunity Traditional fat based fillings contain 50 % saturated fat or more. For a healthier option AAK presents ­Akocrem LS. This gives an opportunity to reduce the amount of saturated fat in fillings within a range of 45 % and down to 30 %. Akocrem LS is formulated to provide the filling with a firm structure, good crystallization, melting and storage properties. Tailored to your needs The range with Akobake LS and Akocrem LS are formulated to provide the right structure with maintained functionality, good quality and with a healthier profile.   The aim is to provide exactly what the customer needs. If this can not be achieved with the standard ranges, AAK’s technical team can help either by tailoring products to precise requirements or give advice on applications. AAK Bakery product range Saturated fat (%)

Hydrogenated fat

Trans fat level (%)

Standard bakery margarine

50

No

0

Akomarba 25 (Cake Margarine)

30

No

0

Standard Shortening

50

No

0

Akobake 29 (Shortening)

29

No

0

Akobake LS range (Shortening)

25-45

No

0

Akocrem LS range (Shortening)

29-45

No

0

39

No

0

Products

Akobisc S (Shortening)

For more information – info.products@aak.com

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AAK Magazine  |  No 2, 2011

Coat your confectionery products AAK launches Cebes LS – the nonhydrogenated lauric coating fat with reduced content of saturated fatty acids (SAFA).   AAK have developed a coating fat that brings a healthier profile to chocolate coatings. With Cebes LS, confectionery manufacturers can produce a coating with higher content of the healthier unsaturated fatty acids without having to compromise on other parameters.

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Health is top of mind for many consumers today – also when they choose indulgence products with chocolate flavored coatings. What they want is to be able to enjoy chocolate products without worrying about the fat content. Consumers know that having the right kind of fat in the diet is essential for a long and healthy life.   Cebes LS is a great opportunity for the manufacturers to take a step in the right direction by bringing lauric chocolate coatings with a reduced content of SAFA gaining a higher content of the healthier, unsaturated fatty acids to the market.   The nutritional trend towards cleaner labelling and lower SAFA content For decades, hydrogenated palm kernel fractions have been used by the confectionery industry as a non-temper, low cost alternative to cocoa butter. Very fast setting time, contributing to high process output, and good gloss retention have established Cocoa Butter Substitutes (CBS) as an excellent alternative to cocoa butter in a wide range of applications. However, the hydrogenated components resulted in a saturated fatty acids content of 94 g SAFA/100 g fat.   In 2007 AAK introduced Cebes NH 85 to meet demands from confectionery manufacturers for non-hydrogenated CBS solutions to avoid labelling of “hydrogenation”.

For more information – info.products@aak.com

  The Cebes NH 85 product has a SAFA content of 85 g SAFA/100 g fat.   Today, the nutritional trend in the confectionery industry focuses on a reduced content of SAFA in confectionery fats. This phenomenon raises new types of technological challenges, as confectionery manufacturers demand the same product functionalities alongside the request for a reduction in SAFA content for the confectionery fat. The product Cebes LS 75 is the most recent addition to the Cebes product range in response to the nutritional focus towards non-hydrogenated confectionery fats with a reduced content of saturated fatty acids (SAFA). The relative SAFA reduction is 14 % compared to Cebes NH 85 and compared to a fully hydrogenated CBS the reduction is 22 %. For a chocolate manufacturer setting time in the cooling tunnel and gloss retention are two of the most important parameters for a CBS. Therefore, Cebes LS 75 provides similar setting time and gloss retention as Cebes NH 85. Unique in the market Cebes LS 75 is AAK’s response to a non-hydrogenated CBS solution satisfying the consumer trend towards healthier, clean label products with reduced content of SAFA. Cebes LS 75 is highly suited for coating applications where setting time and nutritional awareness are top of mind for the


with a healthier profile

AAK is very proud to announce that Cebes LS 75 is nominated for the prestigious Food Ingredients Excellence Awards 2011 for CONFECTIONERY INNOVATION OF THE YEAR at this years’ FIE in Paris.

chocolate manufacturer. Cebes LS 75 offers the following benefits: Can be used in a wide range of coating applications Improvement of the nutritional profile by reduction of the saturated fatty acid content of the compound Fast setting time in the cooling tunnel Good gloss retention No tempering and easy to use Based on non-hydrogenated raw materials and can be labelled as “vegetable fat” Break-through in the industry Cebes LS 75 has similar processing and functional properties to Cebes NH 85.   Figures 1 and 2 compare selected sensoric and physical features of Cebes NH 85 and­­ Cebes LS 75.   Using new technology, AAK’s NPD experts have made it possible to reduce SAFA to less than 75 g SAFA/100 g fat in the lauric compound fat because of a unique combination of fat and oil components in Cebes LS 75.

Figure 1: The sensory profiles for coatings of CEBES LS 75 and CEBES NH 85 Tallow

Figure 2: Physical properties for CEBES NH 85 and CEBES LS 75 100

Dry

Normalised index

95

Tough

90 Brittle

85 80

Thick

75 Hard

70 65 60 SAFA

Early meltstart Sticky

Gloss retention

CEBES NH 85

Setting time

Contraction CEBES LS 75

Melt rapidity Cooling

Totally melted CEBES LS 75 CEBES NH 85

For more information – info.products@aak.com

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AAK Magazine  |  No 2, 2011

Akonino – nutritional blends for inf The reference for infant formula is breast milk. In the cases where the mother for any reason can not breast feed her baby, infant formula is a good alternative. An important aim for infant formula is there­fore to mimic the fat composition of human breast milk. To achieve this, a number of different oils needs to be blended. AAK has a long experience in supplying tailor made blends to infant formula producers under the Akonino brand name. A tailor made blend for an infant formula usually comprise up to five components of defined proportions, in order to come as close as possible to the fatty acid composition in breast milk.   Different oils contribute with different fatty acids providing the total composition to be in line with the specification. AAK can provide a wide range of oils to fulfill any requirement on composition. Saturated fat from palm and laurics Palm oil provides palmitic acid, which is the predominant saturated fatty acid. To reach the level of 20-25 % found in breast milk, 40-50 % palm oil or palm olein is needed. To get even closer to breast milk, palm oil should be replaced by a so called structured vegetable oil, containing beta-palmitate, see page 7.   In addition, coconut or palmkernel oil is needed to provide the shorter-chain fatty acids C8:0, C10:0, C12:0 (lauric) and C14:0 (myristic). Essential fatty acids Furthermore, the formula needs to contain sufficient essential fatty acids. 10-20 % rapeseed or soyabean oil delivers the target level of 1-2 % of linolenic acid (18:3) and part of the linoleic (18:2).   In most cases at least one more liquid oil is needed to provide the desired levels of linoleic acid. Antioxidants Different antioxidants, such as mixed tocopherols, α-tocopherol, ascorbyl palmitate and lecithin can also be added on request. Akonino range Even though most Akonino products are tailor made in cooperation with the customer, some examples of standard products are described in Table 1.   Akonino NS is a typical example of a blend for a standard infant formula, with a composition very close to that of breast milk. In this blend the linolenic acid is supplied by rapeseed oil. Akonino NR is a similar blend where the linolenic acid comes from soyabean oil instead.   Akonino SC is a blend comprising MCT oils, which are used in special formulas for preterm infants. MCT oils are based on short chain fatty acids (C8:0, C10:0) and as such are appreciated as an efficient source of energy.

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Improved quality Oils used in smaller quantities may also result in longer storage time before consumed. This will have a negative impact on product quality since longer storage leads to more oxidative breakdown of the oil. When supplying oil blends AAK effectively take over the raw material supply and stock management for our customers and supply freshly produced oil blends at a rate that matches their rate of consumption.   Better quality, simpler planning and less working capital make blends a more attractive option than single oils.

Raw materials for Akonino Coconut oil Palmkernel oil Palm and palm oil fractions Sunflower oil High oleic sunflower oil Soyabean oil Rapeseed oil Corn oil High oleic rapeseed oil MCT oils

There are several advantages with using tailor made blends compared to buying single oils and blend in-house. Four tanks or one The logistical advantage of handling only one oil-blend instead of purchasing individual oils is significant. The supply and demand as well as quality can be optimized. This ensure the oil is consumed in as short time as possible. Buying single oil requires at least one storage tank for each oil. The rate of consumption of the various oils will differ since they are used in different percentages in the blend. The challenge of balancing supply and demand is consequently greater when buying individual oils. Full truckloads Freight costs are an important factor in the total cost, and when buying a tailor made blend, full truckloads will keep these costs as low as possible. Transporting the oils separately may, however, induce difficulties to utilize full truckloads. The different oils may have different turnover rates. A slower turnover leads to higher working capital being tied up in raw material storage since more tanks are needed, and it is likely that in average more oil will be stored in the tanks.

Guaranteed specification After agreeing on a specification for the complete blend, AAK will take the responsibility to ensure that the specification is met for each delivery. This saves the extra work for the producer, who has to optimize the composition depending on variations in the raw materials. When buying a tailor made Akonino blend, this optimization is handled by AAK. Better addition of antioxidants In order to enhance the shelf life of an Akonino, antioxidants can be added. The antioxidants are efficiently added into the final stage of production. Addition of antioxidant in this stage results in a better shelf life of the oil, as the oxidation has not started yet.

Tailor made Akonino blends

Better quality Guaranteed specification Better addition of antioxidants Simplified planning Improved logistics Less working capital

Table 1: Fatty acid composition of some typical Akonino products Fatty acid profile (%) C8:0

Breast milk

Akonino NS

Akonino NR

Akonino SC

0.6

0.5

2.2

30

C10:0

1

0.5

1.8

20

C12:0

6.2

6

14.7

4.5

C14:0

7.8

2.5

5.9

1.5

C16:0

25

23

22.5

4.2

C18:0

8.7

3

3.7

1.4

C18:1

35.0

42

29.5

14.5

C18:2

11.0

19

15.6

19.5

C18:3

1.2

2

1.5

2.8

For more information – info.products@aak.com


Beta-palmitate increasing in infant formulas In recent years more and more premium brand infant formula, which are profiled as comfort formulas or easily digested formulas can be found in the market. These formulas are not coping only the fatty acid composition in the fat of breast milk but also the structure of the fat. The unique fat molecule used is called betapalmitate. The fat in breast milk as well as in the infant formula is the main energy source and contributes with 50 % of the calories the infants are fed. In most standard infant formula the fatty acid composition of breast milk is closely copied, but the structure of the fat’s triglycerides differ. It is now getting more and more common that the infant formulas contain beta-palmitate which also copies the structure of the breast milk fat triglyceride. Beta-palmitate The uniqueness of beta-palmitate is that the predominant saturated fatty acid in breast milk, palmitate, is mainly found in the mid position of the fat triglyceride and the outer position is occupied by unsaturated fatty acids such as oleic acid, which also is found in high levels in breast milk. In a traditional infant formula, it is the reverse, palmitic acid is found in the outer positions. Several studies have shown while digested the palmitic acid becomes a free fatty acid which easily connects to calcium and forms indigestible calcium soaps which may lead to constipation. Beta-palmitate gives the infant formula the following benefits; Less constipation Better energy uptake Better calcium uptake Fats for infant formula containing beta-palmitate is sold by Advanced Lipids, a joint venture between AAK and Enzymotec, under the name InFat. Found in the market The trend today is that more and more brands have a product in the premium segment containing beta-palmitate. This fat molecule is listed in the ingredient list in more ways than beta-palmitate, for example structured vegetable fat or beta vegetable oil, but it is still the same ingredient. In the Mintel data base you can find several brands which have products in this segment and the most active brands are Heinz, Milupa and Biostime as can be seen in figure 1.

For more information – info.products@aak.com

A SM

t

ate

idva Kru

&G Cow

s AE

il

il Plu Blem

Plus

Milu

fort

nfor

Con

il Co

ilac Mod

pa A ptam

t

pa Milu Milu

pa A

ptam

Q time Bios

zN

urtu

re

Figure 1: Launched brands containing beta-palmitate

Hein

fant formula

(Source Mintel)

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AAK Magazine  |  No 2, 2011

Healthier fats for ice-cream The health trend that reached its peak in the mid 80’th has returned and consumers are increasingly seeking out healthier versions of their favourite food, ice-cream. At the same time the production of low-fat and non-fat ice-cream has decreased. The demand is that ice-cream should contain healthier raw materials than in traditional ice-cream but with the same taste experience. To meet this trend AAK has developed the Akomix LS range of products. They are free from hydrogenated fats and trans fatty acids and they are low in saturated fats. AAK has a wide range of ice-cream fats which are the result of over 30 years’ experience with vegetable fats for ice-cream production. The company previously had its own production facility, where new fats could be easily tested in full-scale production, and this has contributed to the vast expertise within this area.   From a physical point of view, ice-cream is a very complicated product. Selecting the right ingredients is of utmost importance. The fat plays an important role in helping to achieve the desired eating qualities.   Replacing milk fat by vegetable fats not only reduces costs, it also makes the texture of the ice-cream easier to adjust to specific demands. Vegetable fats have the important advantage over milk fat that they make it possible to balance the content of saturated and polyunsaturated fats in the composition and to reduce the cholesterol level with maintained functionality. Benefits Akomix is customized for ice-cream production, and provides end products with tailor-made properties, such as hardness, melt off and creaminess. At the same time, Akomix ensures a better fat composition in the end product and reduces costs compared to using milk fat or coconut oil. Reduce saturated fat At present, ice-cream production is based on milk fat or a vegetable alternative, such as coconut oil or Akomix (ice-cream product range). Ordinary milk fat contains fairly high levels of saturated fat, around 65 %, and coconut has an even higher level of saturated fat, over 92 %. Normally, a reduced level of saturated fat means that hardness and the fat’s ability to form a good structure is more difficult. In the Akomix range, by selecting the right fat components, it has been possible to maintain the excellent functionality. In the product development phase it has been relatively easy to reduce the level of saturated fat down to 40 % and still retain the desired properties of the icecream. The step down

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to 30 %, the level of Akomix LS 30 was far more challenging and required the knowledge of advanced fat technology. Unique function Due to the reduced amount of saturated fats the new products are slightly softer than standard fats, but this is compensated by them forming the structure of the ice-cream in a totally new way. The unique formation of the crystal network in Akomix LS produces an ice-cream that maintains its shape as well as those using fats that are significantly more saturated. Melt tests (figure 1) show the products properties to be in line with coconut oil, which contains three times as much saturated fat. All products with vegetable fats show better results than ice-creams made with milk fat. Figure 1: Melt test 30

Volume (ml)

25 20 15 10 5 0 30

40

50

60

80

120

135

150

Period (minutes)

Coconut oil Akomix LS 40

Akomix TS

Butter oil

Akomix LS 30

  Akomix LS has optimal melting properties that highlight the flavour and creaminess, and provide an excellent taste experience. AAK have carried out sensory tests with a trained panel of the fats comparing ice-cream made with coconut oil or Akomix LS 30 (with 92 % and 30 % saturated fat, respectively) see figure 2. Figure 2: Sensory evaluation of ice-cream Icy Chewy

Hard

Porous

Rapid melt-down

Creamy

Fresh/ice cream-like Complete melt-down Coconut oil

Akomix LS 30

For more information – info.products@aak.com


The only differences that are significant are that the Akomix LS30 is a little softer, less icy and less porous (same density, though). This shows that choosing the right crystallisation behaviour can produce good form stability; good heat shook stability and excellent sensory properties, if the system is design in the right way.   The differences in the amount of saturated fat are shown in figure 3. Akomix has significantly lower levels of saturated fat and considerably higher proportions of mono- and polyunsaturated fat. Akomix LS range provides the end product with an excellent structure and consistency. From a sensory point of view, AAK has created a fat which improves the creaminess of ice-cream and provides an excellent taste experience. Figure 3: Fatty acid composition. 100 90 80

Coconut oil

Akomix TS

Dairy fat

Akomix LS 30

70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 SAFA

MUFA

PUFA

Trans

Akomix LS 30 is unique because it has; Low levels of saturated fat – only 30 %. No trans fats. Excellent structural properties. Creates creamy ice-cream with a great taste experience. Excellent storage stability.

Saturated fat (%)

Hydro­ genated fat

Trans fat level (%)

Akomix TS

60

No

0

Akomix LS 40

40

No

0

Akomix LS 30

30

No

0

Milk fat

69

No

3

Coconut

92

No

0

For more information – info.products@aak.com

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AAK Magazine  |  No 2, 2011

What to replace saturated fat with Reducing the amount of saturated fat is one of the most important trends in the oils & fat industry at the moment. Dietary recommendations states that less than 10 % of the daily energy should come from saturated fat. During the last years evidence has become more and more clear that replacement of saturated fat should be with unsaturated fat rather than carbohydrates. This put high demands on the performance of the fat blends – achieve the same properties with less solid fat! The differences between saturated fatty acids (SAFA) and unsaturated fatty acids is that the former only contains single bonds (no double bonds) in the hydrocarbon chain, see figure 1. This difference greatly affects both the physicochemical (crystallization) and biochemical (nutritional) properties. The reason behind these differences is that the single bonds are rotationally flexible and mobile in contrast to the double bonds. Unsaturated fatty acids are rigid at the position of the double bond (s). Triglycerides containing SAFA therefore pack much more efficiently compared to triglycerides containing unsaturated fatty acids resulting in different melting points of the crystals. For example the beta prime (an orthorhombic crystal structure that most fats can form) melting point for a triglyceride composed of three saturated C18 chains (SSS) is around 64 °C. Exchanging one of the SAFA to a oleic, SSO decreases the melting point to 42 °C (SOO has 19 °C and OOO -5 °C). This clearly demonstrates that the unsaturated fatty acids have much more difficulties packing in an efficient way due to their rotational rigidity, thus greatly affecting the physicochemical properties. The presence of double bonds also greatly influences the biochemical response in the human body after consumption of oils and fats. Heart health During the last 60 years SAFA have been linked to heart disease via its effect on blood cholesterol levels. Early observational studies like The Seven Countries Study showed a positive correlation between coronary heart disease and SAFA intake (1). A multitude of studies have demonstrated the effects of dietary fatty acids on the blood cholesterol levels and it is well recognized that SAFA increase the LDL-cholesterol (also known as the bad cholesterol) whereas unsaturated fatty acids decrease it. Various aspects of blood cholesterol levels are considered as surrogate markers of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, in recent years the movement towards evidence based medicine puts higher demands also on the nutritional science

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Figure 1: Fatty acid structure

Stearic acid, C18:0

Oleic acid, C18:1

to use clinical endpoints i.e. study directly how dietary changes alter disease incidence. Carbohydrates or unsaturated fat to replace with? During the last years more and more research highlight the importance of what the SAFA is replaced with. A specific negative effect of saturated fat is very difficult to demonstrate, partly due to the fact that a macronutrient simply has to be replaced by another in the diet. Several studies show that replacing SAFA with carbohydrates does not seem to give a CVD risk reduction (2, 3). On the other hand, in the recent Cochrane review of intervention studies by Hooper et al. it was found that replacing saturated fats with unsaturated decreases the number of cardiovascular events (2). When looking

Types of nutritional studies There are two general types of nutritional (or medical) studies, observational and interventional. In observational studies the regular diet and the disease incidence of the study subjects are measured -observed- and then statistical correlations can be searched for. This is normally considered as a hypothesisgenerating methodology and cannot prove causality. In intervention studies, an active treatment – the intervention – is applied. In nutritional science this could be either dietary advice or supply of modified food products. The disease incidence or a biomarker is then measured and levels in the intervention group are compared to those of a control group. The possibility to demonstrate causality is higher in intervention studies than in observational studies but large intervention studies of long duration are prohibitively expensive to conduct.

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at what unsaturated fats are the best, replacing SAFA with PUFA consistently gives risk reduction for coronary heart disease in both intervention and observational studies (3,4). Calculated from the cholesterol effects one would expect risk reduction also replacing SAFA with MUFA but there are no randomized clinical trials evaluating disease risk and the change of SAFA to MUFA. The evidence from observational studies is difficult to interpret. Although no effect was reported by Jakobsen et al. (3), the risk of residual confounding factors is evident. Some examples being the association between MUFA intake and intake of animal fat and also TFA which to a large extent is classified as MUFA, especially in older studies. Mente et al. (5) found strong evidence for a protective effect of MUFA when evaluating observational studies of high methodological quality.   So far the evidence to discriminate between different SAFA on their effects on CVD is too scarce. Also when it comes to other diseases no clear effect of SAFA has yet been proven. Dietary guidelines Most dietary guidelines and recommendations, like those from FAO/WHO (6), stress that the SAFA intake should be limited to a maximum of 10 % of the daily energy. The dietary reference values from the European Food Safety Authority, EFSA goes even further and states that “saturated fatty acids intake should be as low as is possible within the context of a nutritionally adequate diet” (7). The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 (8) state as one of their key recommendations that one should: Consume less than 10 percent of calories from saturated fatty acids by replacing them with monounsaturated and poly­ unsaturated fatty acids.


Replace with unsaturated fat! Taken all together it is evident that the focus for food reformulation should not be the reduction of saturated fat in itself but replacement of saturated fatty acids with unsaturated fatty acids. Although the evidence is stronger for the replacement of SAFA with PUFA, there is also reason to believe that replacement of SAFA with MUFA is highly beneficial (9). Furthermore the practical implication of shelf life related drawbacks in food products with high levels of PUFA limits the extent in which SAFA can be replaced with PUFA. Most dietary recommendations have an upper limit on the advice on how much PUFA should be consumed. In

practice, both PUFA and MUFA will be significantly increased when using AAK´s low SAFA solutions, see table 1. Table 1. Fatty acid profile, (%) SAFA

MUFA

PUFA

TFA

Coconut

92

7

2

0

Milk fat

69

25

2

3

Akomix LS 30

30

51

19

0

Standard shortening

50

40

10

0

Akobake LS 30

29

52

19

0

Technical challenges Besides the shelf life issues the technical challenge is to reach the desired textural properties in low SAFA blends. In general, increasing the amount of unsaturated fatty acids and decreasing the SAFA in a fat blend give lower amounts of solid fat, thus lowering the solid fat content (SFC) curve. Although low in SAFA, the texture and melting properties should be maintained and this clearly necessitate new designed fat blends. A deep fat and application knowledge is required in order to develop these new low SAFA products. Different product groups require different solutions. For example a low SAFA bakery shortening sold in boxes and a low SAFA ice-cream fat call for different functionalities. A low SAFA bakery shortening should crystallize after baking in such a way that a network locking the liquid part of the fat is formed in order to avoid oiling out. Furthermore it must crystallize fast and build enough structure in order to enable efficient handling such as packing the boxes on top of each other. For an ice-cream fat it is very important that the fat in the oil droplets in the ice-cream mix crystallize in such a way that the droplets agglomerate well during freezing locking the ice crystals in the finished ice-cream. This is needed in order to give a form stable icecream during extrusion and also a storage and heat stable ice-cream.   AAK are conducting numerous physical chemistry studies on pure fat system to learn how different compositions affect the physical properties such as crystallization kinetics, texture, melting and storage stability. The importance of these fundamental properties is then linked to what the fat does in the finished products by doing applications work. This gives us the understanding of key physical properties that should be optimized in order to develop a top quality low SAFA product. Our trained sensory panels are also involved in our product development giving valuable feedback and validating that the low SAFA products compares well to the original.

References 1. Keys et al.The diet and 15-year death rate in the seven countries study. American Journal of Epidemiology 1986;124:903–15. 2. Hooper et al. Reduced or modified dietary fat for preventing cardiovascular disease. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2011 Jul 6;(7):CD002137. 3. Jakobsen et al. Major types of dietary fat and risk of coronary heart disease: a pooled analysis of 11 cohort studies. Am J Clin Nutr 2009;89:1425–32. 4. Mozaffarian et al. Effects on coronary heart disease of increasing polyunsaturated fat in place of saturated fat: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. PLoS Med 2010;7:e1000252. 5. Mente et al. A systematic review of the evidence supporting a causal link between dietary factors and coronary heart disease. Arch Intern Med. 2009;169(7):659-69. 6. FAO. Fats and fatty acids in human nutrition: Report of an expert consultation. FAO food and nutrition paper 91. 2010 7. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition, and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for fats, including saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, trans fatty acids, and cholesterol. EFSA Journal 2010; 8(3):1461. 8. U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010. 7th Edition. 9. Gillingham et al. Dietary monounsaturated fatty acids are protective against metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease risk factors. Lipids. 2011 Mar;46(3):209-28.

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11


AAK Magazine  |  No 2, 2011

Denmark first with tax on saturated fats There has been a lot of attention in the global media when Denmark introduced tax on saturated fats Oct 1, 2011. In UK the prime minister is now considering actions in the line with Denmark’s legislation, to try to solve the problems with obesity. Also in US the news regarding the tax got a lot of attention in the media. AAK has been active in the discussion that took place prior to the introduction of the tax. Danish Product

Dairy technological society invited AAK to give a presentation on the topic. AAK talked about the process and the influences in practise and continued with the possibilities of using vegetable fats in the Dairy industry. Today there are available alternatives or complements to milk fat in all application areas and there is also a possibility to tailor-make solutions to meet the customers demand on the end product. AAK has developed a product range for both the Dairy industry as well as for the Bakery industry to get as low amount of saturated fat as possible. In the table below,

are some examples of recommended products for different applications, the amount of saturated fats and the effect of the Danish tax in comparison with products commonly used today. There are possibilities to develop healthier products and these can be made in cooperation with AAK. By this the customers will meet the trend of healthier products and at the same time keep the tax and saturated fats on the lowest level possible.   AAK has during many years worked to improved the healthy profile on the fats and offer today a complete portfolio of healthy alternative.

Saturated fat

Tax DKK

Trans fat (%)

Hydrogenated fat

Rapeseed oil

7%

1.12 DKK

0

No

Application

Akomix LS 30

30 %

4.80 DKK

0

No

Ice-cream

Akomix LS 40

40 %

6.40 DKK

0

No

Ice-cream

Akoroma LT

36 %

5.76 DKK

0

No

Cheese

Akocheese U

25 %

4.00 DKK

0

No

Ripened cheese

Akoblend ECE

47 %

7.52 DKK

0

No

Butter blends

Akotop NH100

84 %

13.44 DKK

0

No

Toppings

Akobake LS 30

30 %

4.80 DKK

0

No

Dough

Akocrem LS 38

38 %

6.08 DKK

0

No

Bakery fillings

Milk fat

69 %

11.04 DKK

3

No

Coconut oil

92 %

14.72 DKK

0

No

Ice-cream

Hydrogenated palmkernel oil

95 %

15.20 DKK

3

Yes

Toppings

Margarine / Shortening

50 %

8.00 DKK

0

No

Bakery

References

Facts: The tax on saturated fats starts from October 1, 2011 and is 16 DKK + 25 % VAT / kg saturated fat. Products produced in Denmark and imported products will have the tax. Milk and products with a fat content less that 3.5 % is excluded. Currency: EUR-DKK 7.44, USD-DKK 5.35. Source: NASDAQ OMX/Nordic, Oct 26, 2011

12

For more information –10 info.products@aak.com


Fullolife animal healthcare range AAK has launched a new range of nutritional oil based supplements for dogs, horses and smallholder farms. The new range, which comprises Fullolife Pure Cod Liver Oil, High Strength Joint Care, Calmer and Skin & Coat, is designed to promote the best of health whilst providing a nutritionally formulated blend containing essential nutrients and vitamins.   Oils have been carefully selected for their health giving benefits – borage oil for its Omega 3 & 6 content, for the positive contribution they can make to joint, brain, skin and coat health.   The new products are available in a variety of formats from a 200 ml bottle for dog owners, to a 20 kg drum which is suited to the requirements of larger stables, farms and the agricultural sector.   “The global retail value of the pet healthcare market grew by 31 % between 2006 and 2011 to US$3.8bn whilst sales of pet dietary supplements increased by 23 % to US$1.1bn”, said Helen Flower, AAK.   “According to Euromonitor, the trend towards a greater focus on health, wellness and obesity is as strong in the pet and animal feed sector, as it is in food for human consumption. It therefore represents a fantastic opportunity for us to use our proven expertise in a new market sector.”   The new products are being launched this autumn and the feedback, so far, has been excellent.

Listings have already been secured with major distributors in the UK, as well as with the online retailer Amazon and Musti ja Mirri, the largest pet store chain in Scandinavia.   The products are available online on Fullolife linked at www.aak.com and the product launch is being supported by active marketing campaigns.   AAK has also joined the Pet Food Manufacturers’ Association (PFMA), which includes many of the best known brands in the sector including: Mars Petcare, Royal Canin and Hills Pet Nutrition.   Michael Bellingham, the chief executive of the PFMA, has already visited AAK to understand more about the business and the role in sustainability.   Following his visit AAK has offered to host a meeting of the group. This will involve member companies visiting AAK UK to learn more about how the company might be able to help them develop their product ranges.

For more information – info.products@aak.com

13


AAK Magazine  |  No 2, 2011

The Prep Guide to Good Oil Management

Vegetable

– helping customers to get the most out of their oil!

AAK have developed a tailor-made product range, specially refined to have the highest purity and taste quality, for use in milk powder. In comparison to milk fat using Akoblend the end product will receive an improved nutritional profile with maintained functionality at a lower cost.

Foodservice operators, from small independents to global chains, are likely to spend more on frying oil than on any other kitchen commodity. That’s why the AAK team behind the market leading Prep brand of high performance oils, has been working tirelessly to help customers get the most out of their frying oil.   The latest initiative in this campaign is the newly completed Prep Guide to Good Oil Management DVD. Its message is clear. Customers can extend the life of their cooking oil by at least 30 % if they take care of their oil and filter it regularly.   The guide also offers practical advice on how to choose the right oil for their frying needs, how to get the best out of their frying equipment and frying safety.   “Working closely with our customers, to help them get the very best from their frying oils, has played a huge role in the development of the Prep brand”, said Rachel Neale of AAK.   “AAK offers on-going, practical support and useful advice. This has helped AAK to establish a

valuable point of difference for Prep, and secure the number one brand position.   “It’s not just about helping customers to save money. Well maintained oil produces great tasting food. Customers know that quality is everything. Their customers rarely give them a second chance, and helping them to produce the very best is an on-going priority for the entire Prep team.”   Other initiatives in the Prep customer support campaign include an online ‘Do the maths’ calculator, which enables users to work out exactly how much they could save by switching from standard to long life oils. Online hints and tips are provided courtesy of ‘Professor-Know-it-Oil’, and easy-to-use oil filtration and discard kits are available for customers.   The new Prep Guide to Good Oil Management DVD was made on location at a customer’s training kitchen. It was presented by Stuart Cowell, AAK Commercial Manager.   The DVD has already received a warm welcome from customers. It’s proving its worth, not only in helping customers to manage their oil effectively and improve quality, but by providing a useful resource for staff training.

You can order a copy by visiting Prep linked at

www.aak.com

Milk replacer, imitation milk or filled milk are a replacement for whole milk, in which the butter fat has been replaced by vegetable fat. The benefit of using vegetable fat is cost reduction. The constant quality of the raw material makes it possible to run the production processes in a more stable and efficient way. Filled milk powder Production of filled milk powders for human consumption is increasing and the composition is equal to that of whole milk powder, i.e. 26-28 % fat. Various vegetable oils could be used, and usually the production is based on a mixture giving a melting characteristic close to butter fat. Various vitamins (mainly A, D, and E) are added.   The mixing of the skim milk powder, water, vitamins, and oil is carried out in a vacuum mixer and spraydried. The powder is mainly used in big institutions such as canteens, hotels and hospitals, but is in some countries sold in retail packages for direct use in households and spray dried. The fat-enriched skim milk powder can be produced in two ways: - Dry-mixing skim milk powder and fat - Drying an emulsion of skim milk concentrate and fat

Benefits by using Akoblend gives: Highest purity and taste quality Lower cost No seasonal variations Improved nutritional profile

Dry-mixing skim milk powder and fat Historically the dry-mixing procedure technique has been used. The fat-enriched skim milk powder was produced by spraying fat onto skim milk powder, which was carried out on a conveying belt passing a nozzle used to spray the fat. However, this product had neither a good solubility nor a good shelf life.   Since then another method has been developed, by which the fat is sprayed into a chamber to which skim milk powder is carried in an air current. This results in a product in which the globules of fat are covered with skim milk powder particles.

14

For more information – info.products@aak.com


fats for milk powder Drying an emulsion of skim milk concentrate and fat With this method a premix is normally produced, which contains a higher amount of fat (up to 60% fat of the total solids content) than is desired in the finished mixture. The premix is then mixed with other components according to the requirements from the end user. The raw products should consist of: - normally treated skim milk (pasteurized) - fats with the lowest possible free fatty acid content <0.2 % (as oleic acid). The skim milk is evaporated to 40-45 % solids and heated to 65 °C.The fats are melted and heated to approx. 55 °C. If the fat is delivered in road tankers it will usually have a temperature of 50-55 °C, and melting equipment will not be necessary. Antioxidants may be added to the melted fat. If emulsifying agents are desired, they will have to be added at this stage. The fat is then heated to approx. 65 °C and mixed with the skim milk concentrate, and the mixture of fat and skim

For more information – info.products@aak.com

milk concentrate is then led through a homogenizer, and the emulsion is ready to be dried. Milk fat replacer The main reasons for using Akoblend as milk fat replacer in skimmed milk powder are many. The same quality of the finished products as with milk fat can be reached at a lower raw material and production cost. Vegetable fat has a favourable cost compared to milk fat and is not limited to only one raw material. There are no seasonal variations in the supply and Akoblend is always delivered with constant quality wich will make the production run easy and convenient. The same manufacturing equipment as for ordinary dairy production can be used. By using Akoblend it will also be possible to improve the nutritional profile of the final product.

15


AAK Magazine  |  No 2, 2011

The raw material market The raw material market is influenced by many parameters. Below you can find some of the factors having impact on the market, resulting in a very dynamic and interesting field of work. Weather The vegetable oil market is highly dependent on weather patterns throughout the world. Adequate precipitation during the crop year is essential. We closely follow the weather patterns in the US and South America for the soyabean crop, the monsoon rains in India, tropical storms affecting the crops in the Philippines, Vietnam and China. Europe and Canada is also highly dependent on weather as the rapeseed yield varies a lot due to such influences. Currency The swings in currency exchange rates have a very big effect on raw material prices. If a commodity is unchanged in its original currency, it can very well be that it is heavily pressured by movements in other currencies. The cross rate USD/EUR is one example.

Rapeseed

Factors influencing the price

Weather Currency

Supply

Vegetable Oil market

Speculation

Biofuels

Mineral oil Politics

16

Demand

For more information – info.products@aak.com


Shea

Sunflower

Palm

Soyabean

Coconut

Supply World production of oils and fats increased from 115 million MT to 175 million MT in 10 years.   Palm oil market share rose from 18 % to 28 % in the same period of time.   South America is the dominating soyabean producer and has surpassed the US since almost 10 years.

Politics There is a high focus on IP (Identity Preserved), sustainability, environmental and health issues as well as regional protection. Political decisions and tactics taken, have an impact of the usage, price and availability of vegetable oils.   Policies are formulated to achieve given targets or to promote and stimulate certain areas.

Demand The demand is reflecting the economic development in the world as well as population growth. Imports of vegetable oils to China and India have increased from 2 million MT to 6 million MT during a ten year period. The Energy sector is consuming more than 10 % of the total world production of vegetable oils.

Examples: Change of import/export duties and other restrictions Directive of mandatory blending of renewables in fuel.

Mineral Oil The energy sector, with the mineral oil as a key price driving factor, is closely connected to the vegetable oils.This is due to the increasing usage of vegetable oils for bio-fuel where traditionally mineral oil was used.   World production of mineral oil is hovering around 74 million barrels per day (bpd), equivalent to 3,65 billion MT per year.   Vegetable oil production is about 175 million MT per year, i.e. vegetable oil production is approximately 5 % of mineral oil production.   A small change in mineral oil (production, consumption, and price) can have a big effect on vege­table oil prices.   At AAK the sourcing department are following these developments very closely and in customer contacts the AAK representative always have the latest information.

Speculation Speculation is a financial action that does not promise safety of the initial investment. It could be funds or other market players investing in a commodity, speculating in prices going up or down. Contrary to speculation another tool is hedging, which is an action covering the risks from a transaction, i.e. selling is covered by buying and vice versa.

Bio fuels About 65 % of the EU rapeseed harvest is used for production of bio-diesel. Mandatory blending has increased in several countries.   World usage of oils and fats for energy (bio fuels) is estimated at 20 million MT.

Rapeseed-, soya- and palm oil vs mineral oil brent, 1996-2011 1700 1600 1500 1400 1300 1200 1100 1000 900 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0

USD/EUR, 1996-2011

USD/MT 3 m Rapeseed oil exw Rotterdam 3 m Soyabean oil exw Rotterdam 3 m Palm oil crude cif Rotterdam 3 m Crude oil Brent ICE London

96

97

98

99

00

01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

11

12

1.600 1.550 1.500 1.450 1.400 1.350 1.300 1.250 1.200 1.150 1.100 1.050 1.000 0.950 0.900 0.850 0.800

USD/EUR 3 m Eurozone Euro/USD (spot&fwd)

96

97

98

99

For more information – info.products@aak.com

00

01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

11

12

17


AAK Magazine  |  No 2, 2011

Food Safety

AAK has a long experience in supplying tailor made vegetable oil products to different parts of the food industry. Due to our different factories around the world, our wide range of raw materials and processes we have endless possibilities to produce tailormade products. In order to do so Food Safety is a top priority in all we do. Food Safety AAK Food Safety are built by the following building blocks: Raw materials, HACCP, Refining technology, Control programme.   In this issue of Global we will focus on the raw materials, supplier evaluation. In the coming issues you will learn more about the other parts of our Food Safety program.

18

Food Safety – Assessment and approval of raw material suppliers Evaluation of critical suppliers Selection of suppliers who share AAK company values with respect to quality, food and feed safety, environmental and ethical standards is the starting platform in AAK Food Safety. Each critical supplier is assessed and approved before use.   The complete system covers three categories of suppliers: A. Raw material sourcing of oils & fats B. Suppliers of critical materials C. Toll producers The further description is focused on “Raw material sourcing”. Approval levels In order to be an approved supplier it is necessary to pass the assessment on a company level as well as per purchased product.

For more information – info.products@aak.com

  The company approval can be reached by a satisfactory scoring of a replied Questionnaire, and in most cases, by a subsequent on-site audit.   On a product level there need to be a signed specification by both parties. For applicable products other approvals might be needed as well; for example Kosher, Halal, Organic.   During the first year a supplier gets “provisional approval” for a certain product and after this a final decision is taken for a “final approval” .   If a supplier is not used during a period of three years there will be a re-assessment and approval before use. Trained auditors Audits can be done by: Questionnaires or Onsite audit.   All assessments and scorings are carried out by trained auditors.


Questions The Questionnaires are designed to screen a number of important areas and issues. If any doubt about a certain supplier as a total, specific area or critical issue, the decision is that an approval cannot be given without a more extensive on-site audit. On-site audits The on-site audits are conducted according to an annual established programme. Besides there are un-planned visits during the year when needed. For each on-site audit the extent and manning is defined as: “Full”: Audit team is manned with one trained auditor + responsible purchaser. “CSR extended”: Additional focus on environmental and ethical issues. Normally one extra audit day is spent on top of a “full” audit in order to do a more in depth check of compliance with the “Code of Conduct”. “Reduced”: Carried out by actual purchaser using pre-defined check lists. The purpose is to take advantage of ordinary “business” visits and combine with a simplified assessment.

Scoring For both Questionnaires and on-site audits there are scoring charts used for evaluation. To be “Approved” requires > 80 % of full score. Each single area scored must meet a defined minimum level as well. In between 40-60 % “Improvements required” before an approval can be given. If the score is below 40 % the supplier is for the moment at a too low level to be further dealth with. Feedback and follow-up The supplier always receives the result from evaluation of a replied Questionnaire. For an on-site audit there is an extensive report written for internal use. The audited supplier gets a feedback with brief overall conclusions, “Required actions” and “Recommendations”. Feedback is returned to AAK with the actions taken and the date for when in place. The given non-conformities are continuously tracked at AAK.

Auditors There is a selected experienced and trained group of auditors and with an auditor leader keeping related matters together. It is with the responsibility of the leader to make sure the individual auditors live up to the required competence criteria’s, i.e. auditing skill, quality assurance, food/feed safety, HACCP, legislations, CSR issues. Management Annual audit meeting where a follow-up of supplier performance take place and an on-site audit plan is decided for the coming year(s). The suppliers to audit is actively selected based on the suppliers performance, any non-conformities, new subjects of interest, etc. The approach is to find the “needs” and most useful audits and focus on these.

s – in all we do

Food Safety in focu Control programme

mme

– monitoring progra

Refining technology

nt removal – optimized for efficie ents pon com red of undesi

Raw materials

– auditing and select material suppliers

HACCP

identified – risk analysis and nts poi l tro critical con

ing raw

A certified company Quality – ISO 9001 01 Enviroment – ISO 140 safety – ISO 22000 Food safety incl feed Food safety – HACCP – ISO/IEC 17025 Laboratory services Energy – SS 627750 KRAV and SKAL Organic products – Kosher incl Badatz Halal

For more information – info.products@aak.com

19


AAK Magazine  |  No 2, 2011

e s m o r f – d e e s Rape

Oil extraction Rapeseed contains a full 44 % oil, which makes it particularly suitable for oil extraction by mechanical pressing.   The first stage in the process is to clean the seeds, removing all particles. The seeds are then flaked and heat-treated to 90 °C.   The heat treatment breaks down the cell walls, and makes the extraction of the rapeseed oil easier.   Pressing the rapeseed flakes extracts about 2/3 of the oil.   The pressed cake, containing about 20 % rapeseed oil, passes on to the extraction stage.   The rapeseed residue, in the form of meal, now contains about 2 % oil, and is a very valuable source of protein for the animal feed industry.   The pressed oil and the extracted oil are treated separately with small amounts of water, and are then put through centrifuges to remove most of the phospholipids (lecithin) from the oil.   The oil is then pumped to the crude oil storage facility.   AAK maintains two different qualities of rapeseed oil throughout the refining chain. Pressed (Swedish) Lobra Oil and Rapeseed Oil. Rapeseed Oil may be a blend of pressed and extracted oils, and it is the most common product on the international market.

Refining the rapeseed oil The purpose of refining the oil is to remove unwanted components, while retaining the valuable properties of the oil, such as tocopherols (Vitamin E), sterols and the high omega-3 content. Unpurified oil has a strong taste, and is highly susceptible to oxidation on contact with air and light.   It is absolutely crucial to carry out the refining stage without admitting air, and that the process is as gentle as possible. Cleaning Crude rapeseed oil contains high levels of lecithin, even though most of the lecithin is removed during the oil extraction process. The phosphorus compounds which are not soluble in water, such phospholipids containing calcium and magnesium salts, must be treated with acids to form soluble substances. Weak phosphoric acid or citric acid is very effective at this stage of refining.   The next purification stage involves adding a weak solution of lye to the oil at a temperature of around 90 °C.   This refining stage is called neutralisation, which means that the lye reacts with free fatty acids to form soap stock. The water soluble phospholipids absorb the lye and coagulate.   The oil and the soap stock are separated using centrifuges. After this, the oil is repeatedly cleaned and put through centrifuges with water

to remove residual soap, residues from the seed cell walls and metal soaps.   The oil is then dried under vacuum at 90 °C before passing directly to the next stage, bleaching. Decolouring The cleaned oil is treated with a natural bleaching agent, bentonite. Bentonite is a natural clay, which has been washed and sieved, and which acts as an absorbent in removing pigment from the oil. The bentonite clay adsorbs soap residues, colour compounds such as chlorophyll and carotene, metal particles, peroxides and secondary oxidation products, such as aldehydes.   The treatment takes place in closed tanks at 90 °C under vacuum.   The particles are then removed using filtration. The oil is significantly lighter in colour, but it is also highly susceptible to oxidation and has a very strong taste.   The rapeseed oil is cooled and pumped to an intermediate bleached rapeseed oil storage facility. The storage time for the bleached oil must be kept as short as possible to avoid oxidation.   The bleached rapeseed oil is analysed to ensure quality before the final refining stage, steam distillation.   The used bentonite clay can be mixed with the phospholipids removed earlier in the refining process and sold for use as an agricultural fertilizer.

Growing year for rapeseed

Europe: Autumn-sown oil plants can be exposed for winter killing.

January

20

February

Europe: Weather-sensitive period. China: Harvest season. Canada: Spring oil crops sown.

Europe: Spring oil crops sown. China: Harvest season.

Europe: Spring-sown oil crops harvested, autumn oil crops sown. Canada: Harvest. China: Oil crops sown.

Europe and Canada: Weather-sensitive period.

March

April

May

June

July

August

For more information – info.products@aak.com

September

October

Europe: Growing period for autumn oil crops, weather-sensitive period. China: Oil crops sown.

November

December


eed to oil

Reception of seed Analysis

Oil extraction Analysis

Raw material storage Analysis

Cleaning Analys

Decolouring Analysis

Intermediate storage Analysis

Steam distillation Analysis certificate

Finished product storage

For more information â&#x20AC;&#x201C; info.products@aak.com

21


Looking to improve the health image of your chocolate and confectionery products? This revolutionary confectionery filling fat Chocofill™ LS, allows to reduce the quantity of less healthy saturated fatty acids in fillings by at least 25 % compared to traditional, non-lauric, non-hydrogenated fats. And, naturally, without compromising on the texture.

READY FOR A HEALTHIER CHOICE?

Chocofill™ LS benefits include: • Reduced amount of saturated fatty acids • Non-temper – easy to use • Non-hydro – label as “vegetable fat” • Same texture as in non-hydrogenated, non-lauric filling fat • Improved melt-down • Good shelf life • Suitable for pralines, biscuits, bars and wafers

REDUCE SATURATED FATS IN CONFECTIONERY FILLINGS BY AT LEAST 25 %

AAK CHALLENGES YOU TO A TEST Can you taste a difference? – order a test kit by visiting Chocofill linked at www.aak.com


AAK Academy in the world AAK Academy, is the seminar that AAK provides exclusively for customers. The seminars offer a range of courses from basic fat chemistry and technology to special courses with focus on current issues, application areas or raw material. A small insight in different Academies around the world is described below.

AAK Academy – Dairy solutions in Mexico At this seminar that was held in Mexico, customers within the dairy industry was specially invited with focus on those who work with R&D, Product development and Marketing. The programme included fat chemistry, process- and application knowledge especially for the dairies. The lectures are AAK’s own specialists within the different areas. The participants had possibilities to put questions directly to the specialists during presentations and plant tour.   At these academies the programme also includes production trials at the pilot plant. There are possibilities to make all different kind of dairy products for example cheese or cream. The type of products is chosen according to participant’s interest and the trials are followed by a sensory evaluation. By having these Academies the understanding of different applications will increase and the cooperation with customers will be closer.

AAK Academy – General course in Sweden At the seminar in beginning of October the participants learned about the latest developments within vegetable fats. On the agenda for this seminar was; general fat knowledge, health, sourcing of raw materials as well as processing and the role of fat in food products. Many of the participants are working in the R&D, Product Development field and also within buying, sales and marketing. The course brings a deeper understanding of oils and fats that can generate new ideas. It facilitates the dialogue between customers and AAK, and helps to create a closer cooperation in the future.   At the last page of this edition the calendar for 2012 including AAK Academies can be found. AAK look forward to meet as many customers as possible at one of the many different Academy seminars or other possible events.

AAK US strengthened its position in North America AAK US acquired Golden Foods/Golden Brands LLC of Louisville, Kentucky. It is considered the leading North American processor of specialty fats and oils and manufacturer of flaked shortenings for the bakery and food service industries.   This acquisition significantly strengthens AAK US’s ability to supply existing and new customers with a broader portfolio of specialty oils and fats solutions in a wider geographic area. Sales offices

Production plants

For more information – info.products@aak.com

Customisation plants

Sourcing operations

23


GLOBAL AAK Magazine  |  No 2, 2011

Calendar 2011-2012 2011 AAK Academy Seminars

Language

Date

Location

Pricing & Purchasing within Vegetable Oils and fats

English

December 1

Paris, France

Filling Fats for Chocolate and Confectionery Products

English

March 13-14

Aarhus, Denmark

General Seminar in Vegetable Oils and Fats for the Food Industry

Swedish

April 17-18

Karlshamn, Sweden

Cocoa Butter Alternatives for the Chocolate and Confectionery Industry

English

May, 22-23

Aarhus, Denmark

Infant Nutrition

English

May 22-23

Karlshamn, Sweden

Pricing and Purchasing

English

September 13

-

General Seminar in Vegetable Oils and Fats for the Food Industry

English

October 2-3

Karlshamn, Sweden

English

December 8-9

New York, USA

NCA State of the Industry Conference

English

February 26-29

Miami, USA

NCA State of the Industry Conference

English

March 11-13

Palms Springs USA

NIOP Annual Convention

English

March 18-19

Atlantic City, USA

Food Ingredients China

English

March 28-30

Shanghai, China

St. Louis IFT Suppliers' Night

English

April 12

St. Louis, USA

NCA Candles

English

April 16-19

Las Vegas, USA

NY/NJ IFT Suppliers' Night

English

April 17

Somerset, USA

In-Cosmetics

English

April 17-18

Barcelona, Spain

Great Lakes IFT Suppliers' Night

English

April 18

Battle Creek, USA

AOCS Annual Meeting and Expo

English

April 29-May 2

Long Beach, USA

PMCA Production Conference

English

April 30-May 2

Lancaster, USA

Milling & Baking Purchasing Seminar

English

June 3-5

Kansas City, USA

IFT Annual Meeting & Food Expo

English

June 25-28

Las Vegas, USA

Dairy China

English

August 19-21

Hangzhou, China

NCA Washington Forum

English

September 19-21

Washington USA

AACT Technical Seminar

English

October 1-3

Lincolnshire, USA

Ice-Cream China

English

October 17-19

Tianjins, China

2012 AAK Academy Seminars

2011 Exhibitions and other events NYSCC Annual Meeting 2012 Exhibitions and other events

www.aak.com


/global_no_2_2011