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Management Diaries: 7 Perks to Motivate and Retain Your Team,

10 How to Recognize and Manage Burnout on Your Team (and for Yourself),

14 How to Make a Personalized Self-Care Plan,

24 Don’t Fear the DEA: 9 Tips for Compliant Controlled Substance Recordkeeping,

AAHA

PRESS

30

And more!

Catalog 2020

Books and resources to help veterinary teams thrive

American Animal Hospital Association


Welcome to the 2020 catalog for the American Animal Hospital Association Press

AAHA Press—the publishing arm of the American Animal Hospital Association—is an internationally regarded publisher and distributor of titles for veterinary care providers and pet owners. Specializing in user-friendly references in a variety of formats, AAHA Press publishes materials pertinent to the practice of companion animal medicine. We provide tools to achieve the AAHA standard of excellence to all members of the veterinary profession. Interested in writing for AAHA Press? AAHA Press is always looking for new authors and material. To submit a proposal or learn more, check out our submission guidelines at aaha.org/authorsubmissions. Have a question for AAHA Press staff members? We love hearing from our readers and welcome your questions and feedback. Please reach out to press@aaha.org if you have comments for the team.


How to Order Order online at press.aaha.org or call 800-883-6301.

Standard shipping is FREE for accredited members in the US and Canada! Shipping and Handling for Nonmembers in the US

Contents New and Forthcoming Products............................2 PRACTICE MANAGEMENT TOOLS

Up to $35...............................................$10.95 $36–$100..............................................$12.95 $101–$174...........................................$16.95 Over $175.............................................$20.95

Building Design.................................................... 5

Expedited Shipping and Handling for Members and Nonmembers in the US

Culture....................................................................22

Financial Management ..................................... 8 Marketing, Sales, and Ownership................16 Human Resources..............................................18

TOOLS FOR THE WHOLE TEAM

Two-day air...........................................$59.95 Next-day air..........................................$89.95

Education..............................................................26

Shipping and Handling for Nonmembers in Canada*

Veterinary Safety and OSHA Tools..............35

Regular delivery.................................$39.95 *

Medical Records and Forms .........................29 Medical and Dental Books .............................37 TOOLS FOR YOUR CLIENTS

International Orders

Education .............................................................39

Surface freight, shipments under 3 lbs. (3–4 months)........................................$59.95 Air freight, shipments over 3 lbs. (3–4 weeks)..........................................$79.95

Pet Behavior Brochures...................................44

*

All rates are in US dollars. Conversion rates may change actual amount charged.

Pet Health Brochures........................................47 Pet Brochure Sets ..............................................50 Book Swag............................................................51 Pet Loss .................................................................52

PRICING KEY

Index..............................................................................54

M Member    NM Nonmember

Ordering Information...............................................56

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  Companion website

Products for Accredited Members ....................57

  Available on Nook   Available on Amazon Kindle   Adobe PDF

The AAHA Voices sections offer glimpses into AAHA Press books.


2 

New & Forthcoming Products

SEE PAGE 5 SEE PAGE 8

Any time an animal goes from being awake to asleep and then awake again, the body goes through a process of rebooting, like your computer does when you turn it back on after it was off for a while. The medications your veterinarian chooses will safely allow your pet to not feel pain, discomfort, or stress during the procedure, but this loss of consciousness will take time to wear off. Overall, anesthesia is a safe procedure that has allowed animals to receive high-quality care they couldn’t have otherwise received while conscious. Your veterinary team will be happy to talk to you about any other questions or concerns you may have about your pet’s anesthesia.

SEE PAGE 26

Caring for Your Pet After Anesthesia

There seem to be a lot of things to worry about after anesthesia. Couldn’t I just avoid all of this by not using anesthesia?

SEE PAGE 47

Spaying or Neutering Your Pet

If neutering is done at an early age (six months or younger), it eliminates undesired reproductive behavior such as urine marking and roaming. Once a male cat begins to mark his territory by spraying urine, it may become a habit that continues even after neutering.

When should my pet have the surgery? Deciding when to spay or neuter your pet depends on several factors, such as breed and lifestyle. Many pets are spayed or neutered at about six months of age, but for others it may be beneficial to wait until they have finished growing. Your veterinarian will be able to recommend the most appropriate timing for your pet’s surgery.

ISBN 978-1-58326-281-8

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© 2019 AMERICAN ANIMAL HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

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P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S


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Dear Reader, At AAHA, our vision is to lead the profession in the provision of the highest quality of care for companion animals by improving standards of care, championing accreditation, and supporting AAHA member practices in all aspects of this pursuit. Our community of professionals, members, and readers all strive to excel in the field of veterinary medicine, and we hope to provide the very best resources to aid in this pursuit. While AAHA is best known for accreditation of companion-animal hospitals, the AAHA brand of excellence expands beyond the accreditation evaluation. As a trusted resource in the veterinary profession, AAHA collaborates with other future-focused experts within the profession to offer you a wide variety of top-tier content, including: y Superior books and products designed to give companion animal practices the latest information they need to thrive in a changing world y Resources to help practices promote positive organizational culture and improve the wellbeing of their teams y Cutting-edge guidelines that offer up-to-date recommendations for best practices in companion-animal medicine y High-value continuing education programs with an emphasis on dynamic, engaging learning methods When it comes to seeking the best in quality information, veterinary professionals know they can turn to AAHA every step of the way. If you want to be a member of our community of excellence, please visit aaha.org to learn how you can join us.

Michael T. Cavanaugh, DVM, DABVP (Emeritus) Chief Executive Officer, American Animal Hospital Association

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4  PRACTICE MANAGEMENT TOOLS

Good management doesn’t happen by accident. AAHA Press has the tools to help you build the practice management skills necessary to lead a thriving practice. PRACTICE MANAGEMENT TOOLS Building Design......................................................................................................................................................... 5 AAHA Voices: “10 Fast and Easy Ways to Improve Your Reception Area” ................................... 6 Financial Management .......................................................................................................................................... 8 AAHA Voices: “Management Diaries: 7 Perks to Motivate and Retain Your Team”.................10 AAHA Voices: “How to Recognize and Manage Burnout on Your Team (and for Yourself)”...14 Marketing, Sales, and Ownership.....................................................................................................................16 Human Resources ..................................................................................................................................................18 AAHA Voices: “Step-by-Step Guide to Improving Your Practice by Setting Individual- and Team-Level Goals”............................................................................................................20 Culture.........................................................................................................................................................................22 AAHA Voices: “How to Make a Personalized Self-Care Plan”..........................................................24

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PRACTICE MANAGEMENT TOOLS: BUILDING DESIGN  5 

Practical Guide to Veterinary Hospital Design: From Renovations to New Builds VICKI J. POLLARD, AIA, CVT, AND ASHLEY M. SHOULTS, AIA Written for veterinarians and practice managers, Practical Guide to Veterinary Hospital Design is a comprehensive, easy-to-follow guide to planning, designing, and building a successful hospital. Including up-to-date industry knowledge from the experts at Animal Arts, this book will guide you and your team from the initial visualization to move in—whether you’re working on minor renovations or a new build. In addition to technical components such as budgeting and planning for plumbing and electrical systems, the book details how to design a hospital that creates positive, anxiety-free spaces that enhance the relationships between hospital staff, pets, and clients. With full-color photos of hospitals the authors have designed alongside innovative floorplans, this book is your go-to reference for creating a hospital that is both contemporary and profitable.

2019 PubWest Design Award Winner!

Find updated AAHA building standards, Fear Free design tips, additional guidance, and inspiring photos on the companion website.

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$134.95 M    $174.95 NM  Product code VHDE1, paperback, 384 pages, 978-1-58326-057-9, AAHA Press 2018.

Praise for Practical Guide to Veterinary Hospital Design

Everything you need to know to transform your hospital design dream to a reality. This excellent resource covers nearly every aspect of the process—from brainstorming to completion. —DEANNE BONNER, RVT, CVPM

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6  AAHA VOICES

10 Fast and Easy Ways to Improve Your Reception Area VICKI J. POLLARD, AIA, CVT, AND ASHLEY M. SHOULTS, AIA, AUTHORS OF PRACTICAL GUIDE TO VETERINARY HOSPITAL DESIGN

A pleasant and comfortable reception area can set the tone for your practice and provide current and potential clients with the right first impression. When planning to improve their practice space, many hospital owners think of new equipment and large-scale renovations. But there are fast, inexpensive, and powerful changes you can make to your hospital’s reception area today. Here are our top ten tips for creating a welcoming reception area.

1

Paint. Often the most overlooked aspect of any building is the walls. Is your paint fresh and crisp? Is the color scheme current, and does it reflect the atmosphere you wish to convey? If not, this is an inexpensive and easy design update that can have a powerful effect on the overall look of your hospital. We recommend light color schemes that are centered on the blue, green, or violet end of the spectrum, or a scheme that is inspired by nature. The Fear Freesm color palette is also a great starting point.

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2

Create a feature wall. One way to promote your brand to your clients is to create a feature wall that’s visible to clients when they first walk in the building (for example, behind the reception desk). This can include an installation of tile, stone, or wood with your logo prominently displayed, or it can simply be a vibrant paint color. Choose a color that coordinates with your logo and marketing materials.

3

Separate your species. Many hospitals don’t have the luxury of enough space to create separate waiting rooms for different species, but there are some simple, inexpensive ways to create the illusion of separation by blocking views within your larger waiting area. Examples include building a pony wall, installing some shelving, and strategically placing seating within the space.

4

Put in a treat dispenser. Providing treats in your lobby is one way to help pets have


AAHA VOICES  7 

a more positive association with your practice and ease their way into the hospital and its unfamiliar sights, sounds, and smells.

Beyond new paint, there are many small things you can do to add color to your lobby, including petsafe potted plants, which bring visual interest and a calming natural element into the reception area.

5

Add amenities. These can range from a simple coffee bar with a machine and a variety of coffee pods to adding a small water feature to your lobby. The sounds of a bubbling fountain can be soothing to pets and their owners.

6

Upgrade your artwork. Adding some brightly colored, contemporary pieces of framed art can really help to provide some color and communicate your style to your clients. But remember that cats don’t like photorealistic images of other cats!

7

Improve your lighting. Numerous studies in a variety of settings have established a direct correlation between the amount and quality of lighting and productivity, retail sales, and even patient recovery times. Install some beautiful pendant lights over your front desk and change out your bulbs for color-corrected daylight bulbs or LED fixtures.

8

Create outside seating. Not every practice will have this as an option, but if you can, providing some outside seating for waiting clients and pets can help to reduce pet and owner stress.

9

Add color and texture. Beyond new paint, there are many small things you can do to add color to your lobby, including pet-safe potted plants, which bring visual interest and a calming natural element into the reception area. Colorful throw pillows are another great option to add warmth, along with tasteful knickknacks that can enliven a space and give it some personality.

10

Update your furnishings. Replacing your furniture pieces with new seating and accent tables can go a long way toward refreshing your space. Choose pieces with pet-friendly fabrics in neutral colors and patterns so you can add punch with more easily updated accents, such as throw pillows. Purchase tables that can be used to place cat carriers off the floor to help reduce pet stress. The entrance and reception areas of your practice are important for setting the tone for the service you’re providing. All of the ideas above, when integrated cohesively, create spaces that are warm and welcoming and that can help to illustrate your branding and communicate your personal philosophy of patient care to your clients.

Vicki J. Pollard, AIA, CVT, is a principal and architect at Animal Arts and a licensed veterinary technician. She has used her unique combined experience in architecture and veterinary technology to manage the design of a variety of general veterinary and veterinary specialty hospital projects.

Ashley M. Shoults, AIA, is an architect and one of the principals at Animal Arts in Boulder. She has a varied architecture portfolio, and manages veterinary, boarding/daycare, and animal shelter projects for the firm.

SEE PAGE 5

SEE PAGE 8

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8  PRACTICE MANAGEMENT TOOLS: FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

professionals, Compensation and Benefits will help you protect your staffing investments with competitive packages that attract and retain motivated, long-term employees.

country, the eighth edition of AAHA’s breakthrough report includes: • New data on employee turnover, nonmonetary incentives, and use of performance evaluations • In-depth demographic breakdowns of average salaries and wages for every member of the practice team • Detailed information on a variety of benefits, including paid time off, annual CE allowances, health insurance, veterinary services, retirement plans, bonuses, and more

Ninth Edition

Using the latest insights from more than 500 practices across the

When it comes to your hospital’s financial health, benchmarking is key. Do you know where your practice stands?

Compensation

Financial and Productivity Pulsepoints will help you evaluate your practice against industry standards, eliminate gaps in

Benefits

performance, and ensure continued growth. Our latest financial

and

report includes fresh data on practice demographics, hospital

expenses and revenue, and everything in between provided by hospitals across the country. Each data table is accompanied by an explanation, analysis, and discussion—giving you the

information you need to enact results in your practice, maintain a

competitive edge in your market, and run your business brilliantly. A must-have for every practice owner or manager, Financial

and Productivity Pulsepoints will ensure your hospital remains competitive and positioned for growth.

Ninth Edition

All-New Companion Website! Your key to a growing suite of decision-support tools, such as: • A profitability simulator: Experiment with various scenarios— boost your number of average transaction charges per week, reduce inventory costs, or hire additional staff—and watch the calculator reconfigure your profits. • Analysis of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs): Many factors influence profitability—but which ones really matter? AAHA’s veterinary management groups dove into their data to find out

Financial and Productivity Pulsepoints

resource for veterinary

Compensation and Benefits

Widely regarded as the most trusted and comprehensive

THE STANDARD FOR 20 YEARS

Financial

and Productivity

the

Fee

Veterinary

Reference

Tenth Edition

Tenth Edition

Receive all three books in the series and save—a critical first step in improving your practice’s financial health!

which budget line items have the biggest impact on profitability. Our finding: High-performing practices keep a tight rein on two

Get the tools you need to compare your pay and perks to those of other

next level.

cost centers while maximizing four revenue centers. Together, those six KPIs make the biggest difference to a practice’s bottom line. Read about them, listen to brief podcasts that lay them out—then apply the information to your practice. The website is periodically updated with new tools to help your money work smarter, not harder.

ISBN 978-1-58326-251-1

Tenth Edition

practices, ensure your offers are competitive, and take your team to the

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Get the competitive edge with the entire vital statistics series.

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$349.95 M    $494.95 NM 

9 781583 262511

Product code VSSS4

Compensation and Benefits, Ninth Edition AAHA Get the answers to all your burning salary questions. Compensation and Benefits is widely recognized as the most trusted and comprehensive resource for understanding veterinary pay and perks. Whether building your practice team, embarking on a job search, or entering the profession, this highly respected guide has the credible statistics and market conditions to help you move forward. Using information from more than 600 practices across the country, this entirely updated ninth edition includes: y Detailed demographic breakdowns of average salaries and wages for every member of the practice team y Information on a variety of benefits, including paid time off, annual CE allowances, health insurance, veterinary services, retirement plans, bonuses, and more y Methods of calculating and compensating veterinary staff on production y New data on employee turnover, nonmonetary incentives, and use of performance evaluations

NEW & UPDATED

Attract and retain a motivated, long-term team and get the insights you need with this respected guide to veterinary salary packages.

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$109.95 M    $149.95 NM  Product code CBEN9, paperback, 206 pages, 978-1-58326-282-5, AAHA Press 2019.

Praise for Compensation and Benefits, Ninth Edition

I use the Compensation and Benefits every year when I audit our pay scales. I reference it every time an employee asks about a raise. I use it to keep track of certain benefits that we might want to offer in the future in order to be a more than competitive employer. —LINDSAY PELTIER, PRACTICE MANAGER, CENTERVILLE ANIMAL HOSPITAL, CHESAPEAKE, VIRGINIA

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PRACTICE MANAGEMENT TOOLS: FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT  9 

Financial and Productivity Pulsepoints, Tenth Edition AAHA Is your practice performing at its peak potential? Financial and Productivity Pulsepoints is the industry standard for benchmarking. Now in its tenth edition, this bestselling practice management tool allows you to determine where your practice is successful and where improvements can be made. The new edition includes fresh data on practice demographics, hospital expenses and revenue, and everything in between provided by hospitals across the country. All data tables are accompanied by clear explanations, analyses, and discussions—giving you the information you need to curb expenses and accelerate profits. With purchase, enjoy free, exclusive access to decision-support tools such as the Profitability Simulator and KPI podcasts on the companion website. $144.95 M | $189.95 NM  Product code FPPU10, paperback, 264 pages, 978-1-58326-277-1, AAHA Press 2019.

The Veterinary Fee Reference, Tenth Edition AAHA One of the trickiest aspects of running a practice is simply knowing how much to charge. What will keep you profitable and competitive within your unique market? Solve the mystery of “right-size” pricing with the 20th anniversary edition of AAHA’s bestselling statistical book, which includes US veterinary fees for more than 530 services and cases and more than 640 tables with data on discounts, vaccination services, and time scheduled for procedures. Using the profession’s most reliable and well-organized information, you can confidently price your services correctly for your market (accounting for median household income of clients, metropolitan status of the practice, and so on) and for your practice’s philosophy, age, and size. With The Veterinary Fee Reference, you will be confident that your practice is establishing the right value for its services and products, resulting in fees that are both reasonable and competitive. $159.95 M | $269.95 NM  Product code VFRE10, paperback, 460 pages, 978-1-58326-027-2, AAHA Press 2018.

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10  AAHA VOICES

How to Help Your Team See the Purpose in Their Work Finding and keeping talented, motivated, and long-term staff members is one of the most difficult challenges faced by most owners and veterinary practice managers. At AAHA, we gather the data you need to attract top candidates and put together a competitive job offer with Compensation and Benefits, our guide to trends and averages in veterinary compensation packages. This invaluable information is a big part of the staff-building puzzle, but employee happiness is not just about money, perks, or promotions. Leaders must also provide staff with a meaningful role, or a why. Here are a few tips on how to ensure your staff is driven and engaged by meaning and purpose in the workplace. • Outline a team vision Office culture and a cohesive team starts from the top. Take time to ask yourself what your goals are for the practice and exactly how you hope to be of service to your community. Use this information to make a team vision or mission statement and get specific. What do you hope clients and pets take away from a visit to your practice? How do you want to be known in your community? What are staff members working together to create? If you can articulate these answers and make them clear to your staff, you will be on your way to ensuring a cohesive sense of team purpose. • Make the team vision personal for each staff member The best managers personalize. Dedicate some time to explain to each employee how and why their role is essential to the function of your practice, and how their work directly impacts the health and wellbeing of the pets in their community and the success of other members of the practice team. Understanding how each job fits into the bigger picture goes a long way in setting a person up for engagement as they go about tackling otherwise routine tasks. • Understand individual staff motivations and goals Anyone who enters the veterinary profession does so with the best of intentions. Most begin their careers with


AAHA VOICES  11 

a passion for animals and a goal of helping pets and their people. Sit down with each of your staff members and ask them what motivated them to get into veterinary medicine. Why did they choose this career path, and what about it is meaningful to them? For some, it may be getting to know and serve pets like their own. For others, it might be mastering medicine and finding the best, most efficient treatment protocols. You can also add this to your list of interview questions, include it as part of the onboarding process, or make it a group activity and integrate it into a staff meeting or team offsite. Once you have answers, try to help staffers get more time in the areas that motivate them, and be sure to integrate them into their annual goals. • Keep track of success stories, happy clients, and team wins Research from bestselling author and Wharton management professor, Adam Grant, has shown that employees who understand how their work has a meaningful impact on others are both happier and more productive.1 You can put this into practice in your hospital by keeping track of client success stories and positive client reviews. Institute a feedback system for your clients, such as a follow-up email asking for their thoughts after a visit or a feedback card that can be filled out at the front desk, or simply by calling clients to ask about their experiences. Share the positive responses you receive with the entire staff on a regular basis. Practices should also have a place to track collective successes and a means to give positive feedback to other staff members. Have a team “win board” so that employees can see the positive impact they have on their coworkers and on the health of the practice. When people see the cause and effect of their work, they feel a greater sense of satisfaction and the whole team benefits.

Long-term employee satisfaction and retention is not just about money, perks, or promotions. Leaders must also provide staff with a meaningful role, or a why.

AAHA is invested in helping veterinary teams thrive and giving managers and owners the tools to build their practice team. The updated ninth edition of Compensation and Benefits has the information and context you need to ensure you have the most competitive employment packages. You’ll find average salaries and wages for all team members, methods of compensating veterinary staff on production, and information on a variety of benefits to offer employees. Attract and retain motivated, longterm staff and get the insights you need with this respected guide.

Grant, Adam M., Elizabeth M. Campbell, Grace Chen, et al. 2007. “Impact and the Art of Motivation Maintenance: The Effects of Contact with Beneficiaries on Persistence Behavior.” Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes 103, number 1: 53–67. 10.1016/j.obhdp.2006.05.004. 1

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12  PRACTICE MANAGEMENT TOOLS: FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

Deciding to take your management skills—and your practice—to the next level is a big step. AAHA can help get you there with the Veterinary Hospital Managers Association’s (VHMA) recommended–reading set for the CVPM exam.

Practice Made Perfect: A Complete Guide to Veterinary Practice Management, Second Edition MARSHA L. HEINKE, DVM, EA, CPA, CVPM, WITH CONTRIBUTIONS BY JOHN B. MCCARTHY, DVM, MBA “Be all things to all people” could be the most accurate job description of leading a practice. From accounting to marketing to human resources, practice management requires a diverse, and sometimes daunting, skillset. Build or brush up on your skills with this fully updated second edition, which offers practical advice you can apply immediately, increasing your confidence as a manager and making you feel more in control. Each chapter has been reviewed by a subject-matter expert and includes sample forms, letters, logs, and more. New to the second edition:

Praise for Practice Made Perfect

The management information, resources, and step-by-step procedures contained in this book will help you carry out your duties in an organized and effective manner, assess your strengths and weaknesses, and improve your skills and knowledge. —LOUISE S. DUNN, OWNER, SNOWGOOSE VETERINARY MANAGEMENT CONSULTING

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y Strategic planning and brand creation y Internet-based marketing and social media y Budgeting and setting up internal controls in the bookkeeping process y A quick-start guide to managing overstocked inventory y Completely updated legal review Enjoy access to podcasts, a profitability simulator tool, and downloadable forms on the companion website.

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$95.95 M    $114.95 NM 

Product code PRMD2, paperback, 580 pages, 978-1-58326-172-9, AAHA Press 2012.


PRACTICE MANAGEMENT TOOLS: FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT  13 

a best seller now completely updated COMPANION WEBSITE

If you’re going to buy one practice management book, this is the one.

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Heinke Covsprd ToPress 1_3273.indd 1 Marsha L. Heinke, DVM, EA, CPA, CVPM

with contributions by John B. McCarthy, DVM, MBA

9 781583 261729

Heinke

practice management. Accessible and easy-to-understand chapters help you establish operational processes, make informed day-to-day decisions, allocate resources, budget expenses, and more. This book also provides:

• Charts, tables, checklists, and sample reports to illustrate the concepts • Key calculating ratios for measuring profitability and productivity • Tips on how to communicate effectively with financial professionals • Best practices for short- and long-term planning • A glossary of financial terms • Real-world examples

2nd Edition

Using the principles and techniques in this book, managers and generalist business owners alike can provide the practice with sound financial management, guarantee-

A ing Complete Guide the greatest opportunity for success. to Veterinary Practice Management

JUSTIN CHAMBLEE, MAcc, CPA, is a financial services manager for Coker Group. He works with clients in a variety of financial areas and ventures and has contributed to Coker publications, including Physician Entrepreneurs: Strength in Numbers—Consolidation and Collaboration Strategies to Grow Your Practice and Physician Entrepreneurs: Going Retail—Business Strategies to Grow Beyond Traditional Practice Models. MAX REIBOLDT, CPA, is president and chief executive officer of Coker Group. He is a prolific author and an accomplished public speaker on health-care management topics.

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT OF THE VETERINARY PRACTICE

with contributions by John B. McCarthy, DVM, MBA press.aaha.org

Reviewed by Nikki L. Quenette, CPA, CMA

ISBN 978--1-58326-124-8

55995

9 781583 261248

Abbreviations for Veterinary Medical Records

Justin Chamblee, CPA Max Reiboldt, CPA

ISBN 978-1-58326-124-8

Marsha L. Heinke, DVM, EA, CPA, CVPM

Standard

Abbr

VHMA Recommended-Reading Set

3rd Edition

51995

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9 781583 261446

AAHA Press

10495

practitioners and managers immediate working knowledge of the financial aspects of

THIRD EDITION

ISBN 978-1-58326-172-9

Financial Management of the Veterinary Practice is an all-in-one resource that gives

Chamblee | Reiboldt

marsha L. heinke, dVm, ea, CPa, CVPm, has dedicated herself to the veterinary profession through her accounting and consulting practice, Marsha L. Heinke, CPA, Inc. In addition to speaking at veterinary conferences and facilitating study groups, she shares knowledge and advice through her writing, having written numerous articles and authored and coauthored books for the veterinary profession.

A Complete Guide to Veterinary Practice Management

“The management information, resources, and step-by-step procedures contained in this book will help you carry out your duties in an organized and effective manner, assess your strengths and weaknesses, and improve your skills and knowledge. It will give veterinary hospitals the management information they need to be truly successful.” —Louise S. Dunn, owner, Snowgoose Veterinary Management Consulting

2nd Edition

Practice Made Perfect

Standard Abbreviations for Veterinary Medical Records

New to the second edition: • Internet-based marketing and social media • Strategic planning and brand creation • A quick-start guide for practices with inventory issues • Budgeting and setting up internal controls in the bookkeeping process • Companion website access containing all pertinent forms in the book • Completely updated legal review

FINANCIAL DECISIONS IMPACT THE SUCCESS OF EVERY BUSINESS. Today’s managers are expected to understand the nuances of financial data, the information yielded, and the applications that must be made to ensure fiscal stability.

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT OF THE VETERINARY PRACTICE

inventory, marketing and social media, accounting, and more. Whether you’re a new or seasoned manager, this is the only comprehensive practice management book designed specifically for you.

Practice Made Perfect

Great manaGement doesn’t haPPen by aCCident. The second edition of Practice Made Perfect provides practice managers with the wide range of skills necessary to successfully and confidently manage a veterinary practice. The book covers vital topics such as human resources,

Includes Practice Made Perfect, Financial Management of the Veterinary Practice, and Standard Abbreviations for Veterinary Medical Records.

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$149.95 M    $179.95 NM 

Product code CVPM1

Financial Management of the Veterinary Practice JUSTIN CHAMBLEE, CPA, AND MAX REIBOLDT, CPA; REVIEWED BY NIKKI L. QUENETTE, CPA, CMA Maybe you’re new to the financial side of the practice. Or maybe you’re just ready to take your skills—and your practice—to the next level. Whether you’re financially savvy or skittish, Financial Management of the Veterinary Practice is the one ally you’ll need. Easy to understand and brimming with examples, this all-in-one resource provides foundational financial information attuned to veterinary professionals. Learn how to establish sound operational processes, make informed decisions, and increase financial success.

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$54.95 M    $64.95 NM 

Product code FNMNV, paperback, 176 pages, 978-1-58326-124-8, AAHA Press 2005.

Standard Abbreviations for Veterinary Medical Records, Third Edition AAHA In today’s fast-paced practices, penning lengthy, explicit medical records simply isn’t realistic. On the other hand, abbreviations can get lost in translation—between practices in the case of a transfer, or even between doctors in the same hospital. Ensure that your patients get the best continued care with a trustworthy, truly standard set of veterinary abbreviations. This updated and expanded book provides general abbreviation rules, more than 650 general medical abbreviations, more than 100 imaging abbreviations, and oncology drug protocols and grading systems for conditions such as heart failure. Clear communication is essential to continued quality care for your patients.

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$19.95 M    $24.95 NM Product code SAVM3, paperback, 72 pages, 978-1-58326-144-6, AAHA Press 2010.

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How to Recognize and Manage Burnout on Your Team (and for Yourself) BY MARSHA HEINKE ADAPTED FROM PRACTICE MADE PERFECT, 2ND ED Burnout is characterized by prolonged feelings of unhappiness, frustration, depression, or anger, usually caused by chronic stress in the workplace. These symptoms can result from long hours, unrealistic job expectations, compassion fatigue, conflict with other team members, boredom, lack of challenge, financial pressures, personal troubles outside of work, among other reasons. Veterinary medicine is especially susceptible to burnout because our members are engaging in purpose-driven, meaningful work that requires high levels of empathy and caregiving. Any member of the veterinary practice staff can suffer from burnout, including practice managers and owners, and the effects can erode the bonds between team members, and between team members and clients. People who are burned out may still be technically proficient and able to complete surgeries and treatment, but they just aren’t able to effectively empathize with others. As a hospital manager, you should be aware of the signs of stress and burnout for yourself and your team. You can reduce the magnitude of such problems before they occur if you learn to recognize the early signs of burnout and act quickly. Signs that may indicate a problem with burnout include: y Arriving late to work y Missing days, calling in sick more often than usual y Paying less attention to appearance—neatness, hygiene, and hair care may suffer y Lacking a sense of humor y Complaining of overwork, exhaustion, boredom, or depression y Signs of apathy or aloofness


AAHA VOICES  15 

y Inappropriate anger—may include yelling, arguing with clients or other employees, throwing things, slamming doors, or engaging in abusive behavior toward animals y Lower productivity and diminished quality of work y Inattentiveness to details, lack of follow-up on assignments or necessary work requirements, failure to return calls y Preoccupation with nonproductive busywork, such as “researching” cases on the Internet y Making mistakes more frequently than usual Make sure that your team understands these signs and can identify feelings in themselves that might indicate a problem. Once recognized, you should take quick action to manage burnout in yourself or with your staff. Here are some suggestions for relieving one’s own burnout provided by the National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America: y Set realistic goals: Don’t try to do too much in too little time. Prioritize work to get the most important and challenging assignments done first. Having the tough work done first allows you to better enjoy your favorite parts of the job, rather than having what you dread hanging over your head. y Set limits: It’s okay to say no occasionally. Learn to delegate portions of your work, if possible; to ask coworkers for help; and to be thoughtful in making such requests. y Exercise: Working out is a proven stress reducer. y Relax: Practice relaxation techniques. Take a few minutes to close your eyes, relax the muscles in your neck and shoulders, and breathe deeply. y Meditate or pray: Reconnecting with your spiritual self can make a big difference in how you feel about life and work. y Listen to your body: If you always feel tired and run down, you may need a break. Take a vacation. Vacations and personal time are important for mental and physical health. y Treat yourself: Schedule time to do something you enjoy: going to the movies, eating at a nice restaurant, hiking, getting your hair done. Whatever you do, try to let go of your worries for a while. If a member of your staff is suffering from burnout, it is important to identify whether practice dynamics are leading to distress. Sit down with your employee and let them know that they seem to be suffering from burnout, express that they are a valuable

As a hospital manager, you should be aware of the signs of stress and burnout for yourself and your team. You can reduce the magnitude of such problems before they occur if you learn to recognize the early signs of burnout and act quickly.

member of the team, and suggest steps to help them combat their burnout. For example, can a part of their workload be temporarily distributed to other members of the team? Can they be granted a few days off to relax and reset their outlook? If a person is exhibiting advanced signs of burnout, you may need to intervene promptly. For example, abusive behavior toward coworkers could have a devastating effect and should not be tolerated for any length of time. If the situation is gradually escalating, use the corrective-action steps described in chapter 5 of Practice Made Perfect. Don’t delay. The most important step is to lead your team by example and to take steps in your own life to quickly identify and improve any sign of burnout in yourself. The best work environment and the best medical care take place in a practice that values the well-being of all members of the staff.

Marsha L. Heinke, DVM, EA, CPA, CVPM, has dedicated herself to the veterinary profession through her accounting and consulting practice, Marsha L. Heinke, CPA, Inc. In addition to speaking at veterinary conferences and facilitating study groups, she shares knowledge and advice through her writing, having written numerous articles and authored and coauthored books for the veterinary profession.

SEE PAGE 12

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16  PRACTICE MANAGEMENT TOOLS: MARKETING, SALES, AND OWNERSHIP

101 Veterinary Marketing Questions Answered ROBIN BROGDON, MA Marketing your practice is crucial to reaching pet owners and sustaining client loyalty. But it’s easy to feel discouraged when marketing efforts miss the mark or make you feel insincere. Finally, here is your guide to veterinary marketing success. This book imparts the “how-to’s” of marketing and offers cost-effective solutions to a range of veterinaryspecific marketing challenges. Author and industry expert Robin Brogdon, MA, counsels you through the following topics: y Message and brand development y Advertising and promotions y Public relations y Technology and social media You will discover what is unique about your practice and how to build an authentic marketing plan around it that will result in more client visits, greater compliance, and increased profitability.

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$24.95 M    $29.95 NM Product code VTMRQ, paperback, 152 pages, 978-1-58326-156-9, AAHA Press 2011.

The E-Myth Veterinarian: Why Most Veterinary Practices Don’t Work and What to Do About It MICHAEL E. GERBER AND PETER WEINSTEIN, DVM, MBA The E-Myth Veterinarian offers you a road map to creating a veterinary practice that’s self-sufficient, growing, and highly profitable. Bestselling author and small business guru Michael E. Gerber brings his expertise to the veterinary practice world and draws the vital, often overlooked distinction between working on your business and working in your business. After you have read The E-Myth Veterinarian, you will truly be able to grow your business in a predictable and productive way while also focusing on medicine.

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$24.95 M    $24.95 NM Product code EMYTH, hardcover, 228 pages, 978-1-61835-033-6, Prodigy Business Books 2015.

Praise for The E-Myth Veterinarian

I consider this book as a landmark synergy effort and a must-read for every practice owner/manager/leader. —THOMAS E. CATANZARO, DVM, MHA, LFACHE, DACHE, AND CEO, VETERINARY CONSULTING INTERNATIONAL

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PRACTICE MANAGEMENT TOOLS: MARKETING, SALES, AND OWNERSHIP  17 

Get more from the Practice Ownership Series with Lorraine Monheiser List’s e-books at aaha.org/ebooks: NEW Companion Website!

If you’re an associate, you might be wondering: Why buy a noncontrolling ownership interest? Is the buy-in price reasonable? Where do I get the money to buy in? How much control will I have and will I be given a chance to make decisions about the practice? All of these questions and much more are addressed in this unique, comprehensive resource—a must-have for anyone in this situation.

Structuring Successful Transitions

2nd Edition

Practice OwnershiP series

Compensation Models for Owners, Associates, and Staff

PRACTICE OWNERSHIP SERIES

New ion Compan ! Website

Starting

Lorraine Monheiser List, CPA, CVA

• “Top Ten Ways to Screw Up a Buy-In” appendix

management issues for veterinarians and their teams.

Lorraine Monheiser List, CPA, CVA

• A checklist for associate buy-ins

Lorraine Monheiser List, CPA, CVA, is a nationally recognized speaker, author, and consultant on financial and practice

Veterinary Practice

Lorraine Monheiser List, CPA, CVA

• More information on setting the price

Lorraine Monheiser List, CPA, CVA

• Expansion of issues for owners and associates to consider before buy-in • A chapter on financial concepts for owners and associates

Buying a

Associate Buy-Ins

Save money on consulting fees and rest assured you’ve made the right decisions for yourself and your practice with the help of this one-of-a-kind book.

New to the second edition:

Starting a Veterinary Practice

PRACTICE OWNERSHIP SERIES

Compensation Models for Owners, Associates, and Staff

Buying a Veterinary Practice

PRACTICE OWNERSHIP SERIES

2nd Edition

If you’re an owner, you may be asking yourself: How does my associate fit into my ultimate exit strategy? Why sell a piece of my practice now, and if I do, how much should I sell? What’s a reasonable price? How will we share making management decisions in the future?

Associate Buy-Ins

Whether you are an owner or an associate veterinarian, the decision to buy into or sell part of a veterinary practice could be one of the most important you’ll make. The second edition of Associate Buy-Ins: Structuring Successful Transitions will guide both parties through the process, helping everyone involved feel confident with the end result.

a Veterinary Practice

$49.95 ISBN 978-1-58326-070-8

55995

54995

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Lorraine Monheiser List, CPA, CVA 9 781583 260654

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Lorraine Monheiser List,9 781583 CPA,260692 CVA

Lorraine Monheiser List, CPA, CVA

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Valuation of Veterinary Practices: Understanding the Theory, Process, and Report, Second Edition LORRAINE MONHEISER LIST, CPA, CVA What is your practice worth? What is the practice you want to buy worth? Valuation of Veterinary Practices provides insight into valuation theory and practice for both owners and potential buyers. This updated second edition also provides information on appraisers, along with tips on how to effectively work with one.

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$39.95 M    $49.95 NM Product code VLVT2, paperback, 120 pages, 978-1-58326-145-3, AAHA Press 2010.

Selling Your Veterinary Practice: Issues and Answers, Second Edition LORRAINE MONHEISER LIST, CPA, CVA, AND GLENN HANNER, CPA, CITP, CVA, CGMA Nationally renowned practice sales consultants Lorraine Monheiser List and Glenn Hanner demystify the complex world of practice sales. Learn from their combined 50 years’ experience as they share insiders’ wisdom and expert advice on what to do—and avoid—to sell for top dollar, protect your profits from taxes, preserve your legacy, and create a bright future for everyone, including your patients.

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$39.95 M    $49.95 NM Product code SLGP2, paperback, 98 pages, 978-1-58326-249-8, AAHA Press 2015.

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18  PRACTICE MANAGEMENT TOOLS: HUMAN RESOURCES

BOOKS FOR HIRING AND KEEPING YOUR DREAM TEAM

AAHA Guide to Creating an Employee Handbook, Fourth Edition EDITED BY AMANDA L. DONNELLY, DVM, MBA, CHARLOTTE LACROIX DVM, JD, AND KELLIE G. OLAH, SPHR, SHRM-CP What can a great employee handbook do? Get your new hires up to speed faster. Set clear expectations. Eliminate the stress of ad hoc, arbitrary decision making. And, by detailing your compliance with federal and state regulations, even defend your practice against claims of discrimination or unfair treatment. With the AAHA Guide to Creating an Employee Handbook, you can easily create a professional handbook tailored to your unique practice. This comprehensive new edition includes updated information on:

y Articulating practice culture and your commitment to diversity y Rules and policies for social media and cell phone usage y Anti-harassment, violence prevention, and bullying (including cyberbullying) policies y Protocols surrounding marijuana laws, e-cigarettes, and vaping The AAHA Guide to Creating an Employee Handbook also includes exclusive access to a companion website with a customizable, downloadable employee handbook, a planning worksheet for mapping out a timeline to complete your handbook, and sample acknowledgment forms for new hires. .

NEW & UPDATED EDITION SPRING 2020

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$104.95 M    $129.95 NM  APPLICATION FOR EMPLOYMENT (Please print clearly)

Product code AGCH4, paperback, 144 pages, 978-1-58326-283-2, AAHA Press 2020.

An Equal Opportunity Employer Our practice does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, national origin, color, sex, age, veteran status, disability, or any other status protected by applicable law or regulation. It is our intent that all qualified applicants be given equal opportunity and that selection decisions be based on job-related factors.

Date _________________________________ Name _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Last

First

Have you worked for any entity under a different name?

 Yes

Middle

 No

If yes, give name _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Present address ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone __________________________ No.

Street

City

State

Zip

Position applied for ________________________________________________________________________________ Email address ______________________________________ Employment you are seeking

 Full-time

 Part-time

Specify days and hours if part-time ____________________________________________________

Were you previously employed by this organization? ___________ If yes, when? _________________________________________________________________________ List any friends or relatives working here, other than spouse ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Name(s)

Veterinary Employment Application

If your application is considered favorably, on what date will you be available for work? _____________20__________ Are there any other work experiences, skills, or qualifications that you feel would especially qualify you for employent here? Please add any additional comments you think are important for us to consider. Use an additional sheet of paper if necessary.

AAHA

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ If hired, can you furnish proof you are eligible to work in the United States? Have you previously applied here?

 Yes

 Yes

 No

 No

If yes, when? _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ If you are applying for a position with minimum age requirements, you may be required to submit proof of age.  Yes

For jobs with minimum age requirements: Are you 18 years of age or older? For driving positions only: Do you have a valid driver’s license?

 Yes

 No

 No

Driver’s license number ___________________________________ Type/Class of license _____________ State _____________ Has your driver’s license been revoked or suspended in the last 3 years?

 Yes

 No

Creating an employment application from scratch isn’t the best use of your time. Instead, opt for this attorney-reviewed, veterinary-specific four-page form that asks for all the pertinent information you need.

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$14.95 M    $18.95 NM Product code PMEMP, pack of 25 4-page forms, AAHA Press, updated 2017.

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PRACTICE MANAGEMENT TOOLS: HUMAN RESOURCES  19 

A Practical Guide to Managing Employee Performance in Veterinary Practices KAREN PARKER, DVM When done well, performance reviews improve communication, motivation, growth, productivity, and practice culture. This guide walks you through the process of conducting reviews that provide value to both the team member and manager and support the practice’s organizational and strategic goals. Managing employee performance is about more than just the review process—it’s about investing in the success of your team. Help employees reach their full potential and achieve sustainable results for your practice with this step-by-step guide.

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$44.95 M    $54.95 NM  Product code PRGU2, paperback, 190 pages, 978-1-58326-001-2, AAHA Press 2017.

101 Veterinary Human Resources Questions Answered KATHERINE DOBBS, RVT, CVPM, PHR, AND LOUISE DUNN Animals, no problem. But when it comes to people issues, let’s just say that human resources can be one of a veterinary practice’s most challenging aspects. The reality is that our business is built on caring for animals, but nurturing their caretakers is just as important. Part of the Veterinary Solutions Series, 101 Veterinary Human Resources Questions Answered is a vibrant, interactive presentation of the most pressing human resources questions today’s veterinary professionals face.

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$24.95 M    $29.95 NM Product code HMRSQ, paperback, 236 pages, 978-1-58326-185-9, AAHA Press 2013.

How We Do Things Here: Developing and Teaching Office-Wide Protocols NAN BOSS, DVM Competent, capable, well-trained team members are the most important contributing factor to a practice’s success. Avoid generic training materials and start using this interactive training program that can be customized with all of your practice’s procedures and protocols. The materials have been specifically designed for all new employees—regardless of their job position—and they also serve as a quick reference for experienced team members and doctors alike.

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$74.95 M    $89.95 NM  Product code HWWDT, PDF with editable documents, 978-1-58326-098-2, AAHA Press 2008.

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20  AAHA VOICES

Step-by-Step Guide to Improving Your Practice by Setting Individual- and Team-Level Goals KAREN PARKER, DVM, AUTHOR OF PRACTICAL GUIDE TO MANAGING EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE IN VETERINARY PRACTICES Having clear, compelling, and measurable goals is one of the most important steps you can take in motivating yourself and your team. Setting individual goals for your employees should ideally be done during their performance reviews and is one of the biggest opportunities you have to move your organization forward. Unless your team members meet their target goals, you will never achieve the aspirations you have for your practice. Let’s look first at your practice goals and then see how the review process can be designed to achieve them. Goals for Your Entire Practice Goals for your employees shouldn’t be random. Every goal should be tailored to the success of your practice as a whole. So, the first step in setting employee goals is to remind yourself of your practice goals.

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To do this, take your business plan for the upcoming year and translate it into the steps that must happen to achieve your plan and goals. For each step, determine who must accomplish the task, gain a new skill, or add to their knowledge base and by when that must be completed to keep your plan on pace. Match specific employees to the steps, and add the specific relevant goal to their list for the upcoming review period. Set review timelines to coincide with achievement deadlines; ensuring accountability for each goal and each step keeps the entire project in line. Goals for Individuals in Order to Meet Practice Goals Once you have a series of specific goals written down, you must establish the metrics by which you will measure achievement of the goals. This is a challenging task. Metrics should be done in concert with goals; think of it in terms of the phrase “as measured by.” Using a goal, the phrase “as measured by,” and the metric, all employees are clear about how success will be measured.


AAHA VOICES  21 

Break large organizational goals into smaller segments sufficient to create specific, clear, measurable goals relevant for each team member. A goal to increase gross revenue by 15% and decrease expenses by 5%, for example, might entail the following subgoals: y Additional customer service and sales training for receptionists and other appointment-setters y Audits to review charges, ensuring all are entered and charged y Audits of accounts receivable y Addition of new services y New equipment and training to support expanded services Those goals may be further broken down to specific and timeoriented goals with action plans for relevant team members. If you are purchasing a new dental unit to expand dental services or improve efficiency, set time-limited goals and action plans to best ensure meeting your goal: y Practice manager: Research dental units. Present viable options to practice owner. Agree on purchase. Make purchase and arrange for delivery or installation. y Technician: Learn to use and maintain new dental equipment. Complete dental prophylaxis procedures in 20% less time. Train technical staff to use equipment. To increase inventory turnover, set a goal for your inventory manager to develop a new system. Make the goal measurable by defining the expected increase in turnover. Define a time by which the goal must be met. For example, to implement a geriatric program, provide additional training for all staff members: y Train the receptionist and exam-room assistant to present the program. y Train the technician in data to collect and tests to run. y Prepare the veterinarian to address the results of diagnostic tests. y Prepare the veterinarian to educate clients about geriatric conditions.

Goals for your employees shouldn’t be random. Every goal should be tailored to the success of your practice as a whole.

unwieldy; you risk a lack of focus. Also, remember that not every goal for an employee can be based on the practice’s strategic goals. Leave room for personal professional improvement and the team member’s personal goal or goals. If you have a number of small and easily achievable tasks, consider grouping them in one goal. For instance, set three hours of training for your technician, including two for dental training and one for radiology training rather than separating them. Set a crosstraining goal for your receptionist and provide a checklist of all tasks she must learn to train as a veterinary assistant. Each goal and deadline advances your practice goals, both short term and long term. The performance appraisal process is an opportunity for managers to clearly communicate each team member’s role in achieving the practice’s objectives. Each goal reached is a milestone for the organization as well, another milestone on the path to exceptional medical care, top-notch customer service, efficiency, growth, and profit. Each team member must clearly see how their personal advancement contributes to the strategic advancement of the practice, giving them a stake in your business strategy.

Once you’ve written out all the individual goals needed to achieve your overall practice goals, take a look at how many goals are required of each employee. Set three to five goals for each team member; three is ideal. Anything over five becomes

Karen Parker, DVM, is a graduate of Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University. Parker is an experienced business manager, having managed a veterinary practice, a nonprofit organization, and a tech startup. As the former Director of Marketing at Innovetive Petcare she was in charge of the recruitment process and integral to establishing HR systems for the organization. Today, she runs her own consulting business.

SEE PAGE 19

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22  PRACTICE MANAGEMENT TOOLS: CULTURE

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO ESTABLISH A HEALTHY PRACTICE CULTURE

When Helping Hurts: Compassion Fatigue in the Veterinary Profession KATHLEEN AYL, PSYD Axiom Business Book Award Winner! Compassion inspired your career. Don’t let its flip side, compassion fatigue, burn you out. This practical book brings much-needed support to veterinary professionals, who encounter death three times more often than practitioners of human medicine. When Helping Hurts offers down-to-earth guidance on how to recognize and address the emotional challenges of caring for patients and clients who are grappling with illness, disability, or death. With helpful workbooks and quizzes, this veterinaryspecific resource will help you: y Assess yourself for compassion fatigue y Learn techniques for dealing with compassion fatigue y Recognize compassion fatigue in other team members y Keep employees happy and decrease turnover y Aid in avoiding workplace conflict

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$39.95 M    $49.95 NM 

Product code WNHLH, paperback, 158 pages, 978-1-58326-181-1, AAHA Press 2013.

Praise for When Helping Hurts

A must-read. This book offers a roadmap through the maze of companion-animal care, from its pitfalls to its joys. While defining compassion fatigue and the suffering that can stem from doing this highly motivational work, Dr. Ayl reminds us of the pleasure and satisfaction we can derive from caring for our dear, furry friends. —PATRICIA SMITH, FOUNDER, COMPASSION FATIGUE AWARENESS PROJECT

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PRACTICE MANAGEMENT TOOLS: CULTURE   23 

Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes Are High, Updated Second Edition KERRY PATTERSON, JOSEPH GRENNY, RON MCMILLAN, AND AL SWITZLER; FOREWORD BY STEPHEN R. COVEY Get unstuck with best-practice skills for high-stakes interactions.This New York Times business bestseller has transformed organizations and changed the way millions of people communicate. This new edition gives you the tools to: y Prepare for high-stakes situations y Transform anger and hurt feelings into powerful dialogue y Make it safe to talk about almost anything y Be persuasive, not abrasive Learn the simple yet powerful skills in this book and realize significant improvements to both your relationships and the results that matter most. $20.00 M/NM Product code CRUC2, paperback, 272 pages, 978-0-07-177132-0, McGraw-Hill 2011.

Praise for Crucial Conversations

The quality of your life comes out of the quality of your dialogues and conversations. Here’s how to instantly uplift your crucial conversations. —MARK VICTOR HANSEN, COCREATOR OF #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLING SERIES CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE SOUL

The Veterinary Caregiver’s Book of Quotes: A Collection of Meditations, Short Tails, and Puppy Kisses KATHERINE DOBBS, RVT, CVPM, PHR This collection of positive, inspiring quotations features heartfelt wisdom gathered from technicians, front-office staff, practice managers, and others, making it the perfect gift or resource for anyone on the practice team. Insightful commentary by the author follows each quote to help readers delve deeper into the words. Compassion fatigue is something everyone in veterinary care must grapple with. Let this upbeat resource be part of the solution.

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$14.95 M    $19.95 NM Product code HLPTH, paperback, 216 pages, 978-1-58326-117-0, AAHA Press 2010.

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24  AAHA VOICES

How to Make a Personalized Self-Care Plan FROM WHEN HELPING HURTS, BY KATHLEEN AYL, PSYD

Compassion fatigue is a problem for nearly every member of the veterinary profession, and recognizing it is the first step. Your next step involves learning how to take care of yourself. You cannot provide the the best possible care to pets and clients if you are emotionally and mentally depleted. I recommend creating a personalized self-care plan. Take out a blank piece of paper and divide it into five sections. Label

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them as follows: spiritual, physical, emotional, cognitive, and support system (SPECS). You can think of your SPECS as your specifications for where you want to be in your life and what you want to attain. First, identify what your goals are in each of these areas. What do you want to accomplish, both short and long term? Next, write


AAHA VOICES  25 

down specific steps that you will take to acheive each of those goals. Some questions to get you started are below. For your first go, use a large sheet of paper, and take up as much space as you want. Then you can decide what will go on your final list.

Changing habits is difficult, and you may find it hard to begin to take care of yourself. But you can do it!

1

Spiritual What makes your spirit soar? What inspires you? What makes you feel connected? What rejuvenates you? What gives you a sense of balance, calm, and peacefulness? Identify these things and write them down. Are there things that work against you spiritually that you want to avoid? Write these down, too. Next, identify your spiritual goals. How will you attain them? Give yourself specific, doable short- and long-term goals.

2

Physical What are your physical outlets? What physical activities do you do to take care of your body? What do you do physically that calms you, makes you feel good about yourself, or gives you a sense of your own physical power? Identify these and record them. What goals do you have for your physical self, and how can you reach those goals? Write down specific ways to achieve them.

3

Emotional What are the things that make you feel happy and safe? What gives you joy? What places make you feel good? What animals? What people? What do they look like, sound like, smell like, or feel like? Write down those things that lead to positive emotions for you. What goals do you have for your emotional self? How can you attain these goals? Again, be specific.

4

Cognitive What thoughts inspire and empower you and make you want to be your best? Where do those thoughts typically come

from? What thoughts allow you to not judge or blame yourself, but rather to accept yourself just as you are? What goals do you have for how you think about things, for how you think about yourself? How can you be successful in attaining these goals?

5

Support system Make a list of the people you know on whom you can depend. Who constitutes your social support system? How can you use their support for your success in attaining the goals that you have set on your self-care plan? Those who make it onto this list will be those who are closest to you and whom you have known for a long time. They have earned your trust and vice versa. Changing habits is difficult, and you may find it hard to begin to take care of yourself. But you can do it! Don’t put it off: Take one step today that will be in the right direction.

Kathleen Ayl, PsyD, is a Grief Recovery Institute–certified grief recovery specialist and has dedicated her practice to pet loss recovery and veterinary team support. She is the author of numerous articles and books on compassion fatigue and pet loss, and she presents workshops and lectures in these subject areas both nationally and internationally.

SEE PAGE 22

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26  TOOLS FOR THE WHOLE TEAM: EDUCATION

Order every book in the 80 Tips Series and save at press.aaha.org

Exceptional Customer Experience: 80 Tips for Compassionate Care, Clear Communication, and Authentic Client Connections AAHA Learn how communication can improve your relationship with your clients and your team. Exceptional Customer Experience is a quick resource for improving communication and covers all aspects of your practice from welcoming new clients and handling the front desk to conveying medical information and navigating challenging conversations with both teammates and clients.

COMING SPRING 2020!

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$9.95 M    $12.95 NM Product code CS80TIPS, paperback, 72 pages, 978-1-58326-286-3, AAHA Press 2020.

Be a Champion: 80 Tips to Work Smarter, Save Money, and Show the Love to Clients and Pets AAHA Gathered from AAHA-accredited practices, these little tips can make a big difference in your practice, inspiring your team to work smarter, not harder, to increase profitability, improve patient care and client service, and make the experience at your hospital a cut above the rest.

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$9.95 M    $12.95 NM Product code 80TIPS, paperback, 72 pages, 978-1-58326-253-5, AAHA Press 2016.

Fear Free: 80 Tips to Reduce Your Patients’ Fear, Anxiety, and Stress AAHA A quick and essential read for every member of the practice team, Fear Free: 80 Tips to Reduce Your Patients’ Fear, Anxiety, and Stress offers candid advice to help you enhance patient care, improve compliance, and create a safer and more rewarding veterinary experience for all involved.

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$9.95 M    $12.95 NM Product code FF80TIPS, paperback, 72 pages, 978-1-58326-005-0, AAHA Press 2017.

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TOOLS FOR THE WHOLE TEAM: EDUCATION  27 

Truths from Trends: 80 Tips for Better Communication, Happier Clients, and a Healthier Culture AAHA Sure, you could scour three years of Trends back issues to discover our industry’s very best business, patient care, and client service tips. Or, you could zip through this fun compilation of AAHA’s award-winning magazine’s best-of-the-best, super-useful tips. Put years of wisdom at your fingertips.

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$9.95 M    $12.95 NM Product code TR80TIPS, paperback, 72 pages, 978-1-58326-253-5, AAHA Press 2017.

Career Choices for Veterinary Technicians: Opportunities for Animal Lovers, Revised First Edition REBECCA ROSE, CVT, AND CARIN A. SMITH, DVM Explore the wide range of career opportunities available within the field of veterinary technology. In-depth career descriptions include daily responsibilities, salaries, required qualifications, and invaluable career advice from those working in the field. Whether you’re new to veterinary technology or are seeking a change, this book is filled with ideas to broaden your perspective.

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$29.95 M    $34.95 NM 

Product code VTTCC, paperback, 204 pages, 978-1-58326-196-5, AAHA Press 2013.

Educating Your Clients from A to Z: What to Say and How to Say It, Second Edition NAN BOSS, DVM Covering 26 topics from A (appointments) to Z (zoonotic diseases), author Nan Boss, DVM, uses entertaining, real-world examples and scripts to teach your staff how to convey a positive attitude to clients, increase their understanding of how to care for their pets, and show empathy and lend support when needed. This second edition reflects recent changes in veterinary medicine, marketing strategies and communication principles. Motivating, well-organized and fine-tuned to taking the guesswork out of talking to clients.

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$44.95 M    $54.95 NM 

Product code EYCF2, paperback, 288 pages, 978-1-58326-153-8, AAHA Press 2011.

press.aaha.org


28  TOOLS FOR THE WHOLE TEAM: EDUCATION

AAHA’s Complete Guide for the Veterinary Client Service Representative JILL RENFREW, MBA, CVPM, ACC You work hard to get clients in your door. Make sure to keep them coming back with excellent front-office customer service. This book will equip your client service representatives (CSRs) with the knowledge and skills necessary to best represent your practice to new, existing, and potential clients. Covers the following topics and more: y Client service y Telephone utilization y Scheduling appointments y The check-in and check-out process y Marketing and social media y Medical records Each chapter is followed by best-practices standard operating procedures, and the book includes instructions and keys to help managers customize it to take the hassle out of training, with all chapters and SOPs fully modifiable on the accompanying companion website.

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$74.95 M    $89.95 NM  Product code RCTRM, paperback, 160 pages, 978-1-58326-192-7, AAHA Press 2013.

101 Veterinary Technician Questions Answered KATHERINE DOBBS, RVT, CVPM, PHR Technicians pose their most pressing questions and experts answer them in this handy book. This ultimate resource for technicians by technicians includes tips you can implement immediately to make your job easier and more rewarding.

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$24.95 M    $29.95 NM Product code TPFTC, paperback, 208 pages, 978-1-58326-106-4, AAHA Press 2009.

Praise for 101 Veterinary Technician Questions Answered

This is an excellent and timely publication loaded with thought-provoking ideas and references. Technicians of all levels and abilities will gain valuable knowledge, and anyone interested in this field should read this book to gain insight into the profession. —DENISE MIKITA, MS, CVT, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, COLORADO ASSOCIATION OF CERTIFIED VETERINARY TECHNICIANS

press.aaha.org


TOOLS FOR THE WHOLE TEAM: MEDICAL RECORDS AND FORMS  29 

Standard Abbreviations for Veterinary Medical Records, Third Edition AAHA In today’s fast-paced practices, penning lengthy, explicit medical records simply isn’t realistic. On the other hand, abbreviations can get lost in translation—between practices in the case of a transfer, or even between doctors in the same hospital. Ensure that your patients get the best continued care with a trustworthy, truly standard set of veterinary abbreviations. This updated and expanded book provides general abbreviation rules, more than 650 general medical abbreviations, more than 100 imaging abbreviations, and oncology drug protocols and grading systems for conditions such as heart failure. Clear communication is essential to continued quality care for your patients.

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$19.95 M    $24.95 NM Product code SAVM3, paperback, 72 pages, 978-1-58326-144-6, AAHA Press 2010.

AAHA Controlled Substance Logs Set, Second Edition AAHA When it comes to DEA regulations, only bound, hard copies of your controlled substance records will do. With the AAHA Controlled Substance Logs, you’ll enjoy peace of mind knowing that your practice is in full DEA compliance—and you’re providing greater efficiency and security for your staff. Thoroughly revised, redesigned, and reviewed by industry experts, these logs: y Facilitate compliance with DEA regulations in all 50 states y Safeguard against human errors y Provide a source of internal accountability y Accommodate the separation of records for Schedule I–II drugs and Schedule III, IV, and V drugs y Allow you to complete all logging for one drug in one book The AAHA Controlled Substance Logs come with six copies of the Unopened and Opened Container Logs and two standalone Initial and Biennial Inventory Forms.

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$54.95 M    $69.95 NM Product code CNSB2, paperback, six softcover 56-page log books, two 8-page forms, 978-1-58326-114-9, AAHA Press 2010, updated 2017.

Extra Unopened and Opened Container Logs |

$13.95 M    $17.95 NM Product code CNUNO, paperback, 56 pages, 978-1-58326-119-4, AAHA Press 2010, updated 2017.

press.aaha.org


30  AAHA VOICES

Don’t Fear the DEA: 9 Tips for Compliant Controlled Substance Recordkeeping JACK TEITELMAN, RETIRED DEA SUPERVISORY SPECIAL AGENT

For veterinarians who handle controlled substances, documentation and good recordkeeping are the backbone of DEA compliance. Compliant controlled substance recordkeeping is not impossible, but it does require maintenance and work, including consistent logging, attention to detail, and the ability to keep up with requirements at both the state and federal levels. The DEA compliance experts at TITAN Group and authors of the forthcoming book, The AAHA Guide to Safeguarding Your Controlled Substances (fall 2020) are here to help with the following recordkeeping tips.

1

Your recordkeeping should tell a story. Documentation tells a story. What that means for you is that it’s all in the books. Your records have the power to snuff out allegations and prevent potentially threatening incidents from coming to fruition. The best way to protect your practice is by dedicating time and effort to recordkeeping.

2

Allocate roles and responsibilities and train your staff for consistency in logging. Veterinary personnel must be trained on the mechanics of good recordkeeping to ensure that the drug inventories and logbooks in your practice are properly managed and maintained. Empower ongoing compliance in your facility by clearly laying out recordkeeping policies and procedures and utilizing checklists to promote an environment of constant safety. With the right training, education, and attention to detail, your staff will be able to accurately record all transactions of your facility’s controlled substance use without the fear of failing a drug audit.

3

At a minimum, reconcile at the end of every week. The minimum reconciliation standard for veterinary facilities should be weekly audits for most companion-animal facilities. A best practice for all facilities is to routinely conduct audits of controlled drugs at the end of each shift. Keep in mind that unexpected circumstances such as a fire or break-in at your facility would drive the need for additional audits to be conducted.

press.aaha.org

4

Don’t forget your biennial inventory. A biennial inventory must be maintained for all controlled substances within a facility. The DEA requires a physical inventory of all controlled substances to be conducted every two years for each registered location. The inventory may be taken on any date within two years of the previous inventory date. The inventory form must be kept for at least an additional two years at the registered site after completion. If the container has been opened and the substance is listed in Schedule II, make an exact count or measure of the contents. If the substance is listed in Schedule III, IV, or V, make an estimated count or measure of the contents, unless the container holds more than 1,000 tablets or capsules, in which case make an exact count of the contents (Code of Federal Regulations 1304.11(e)(3)).

5

Always have two authorized witnesses for controlled substance waste or disposal. An authorized employee would have direct access to your controlled substance inventory and has responsibilities that include contact with or that affect the disposition of a controlled substance, including participation in the process of obtaining, dispensing, or otherwise distributing a controlled substance. In most hospitals, this is just about every employee, including the receptionist who hands the prescriptions to your clients. This includes contact or direct involvement in the storage, distribution, sale, or dispensing of a controlled substance and may include, for example, packaging, repackaging, ordering, licensing, shipping, receiving, taking inventory, providing security, prescribing, and handling of a controlled substance.

6

Take good notes and document irregularities using an internal chronological file. You should get used to keeping a daily log of any abnormal events that occur with the supply chain of your controlled substances in a chronological file (or “chron file”). For example, if you are confronted with a situation in which you have a missing drug, your investigative actions need to be memorialized in your chron file. This will be your “memory” of the event that you will be able to rely on when questioned by the DEA if they are in the process of auditing your books.


7

Balance your controlled substance inventory like a checkbook. The fast-paced, all-hands-on-deck environment of veterinary practices often results in an inability to pay attention to detail. Over time, neglecting to pay attention to detail throws things out of balance, leading to another common violation we see in the veterinary industry: failure to conduct timely reconciliation. Think of your logbook as a checkbook register. Balancing a checkbook may seem like an old-fashioned task, but it is something you need to do. Most of us dread the task (if we do it at all), but when it comes to the oversight of controlled substances, you must keep an accurate running balance of your drug inventories.

8

Pay attention to decimal points. Over time, going from .010 to .0010 can compound into significant discrepancies. Keeping accurate logs is particularly challenging when the chain of custody changes due to multiple shifts. If several different people are responsible for monitoring the drugs throughout the day, and not everyone follows the same protocol or security procedures, then you will sooner or later suffer a breakdown in the chain of custody, meaning everyone needs to be on the same page when recording drug transactions. This problem is particularly acute for emergency and specialty practices, which tend to go through a high volume

of drugs and have multiple shifts of employees accessing the controlled substance inventory. Mistakes can lead to theft, misuse, malpractice, and sometimes jail.

9

Document. Document. Document. Your mission as a veterinary professional is to maintain controlled substance compliance, and the success of that mission depends on documenting facts, gathering information, and maintaining inventory records. The ability to document facts and account for who did what and when provides the ability to synthesize evidence, ensuring that nothing falls through the cracks. Your records have the power to snuff out allegations and prevent potentially threatening incidents from coming to fruition. In a busy veterinary practice, taking the time to update logs may seem secondary, but neglecting to take time to maintain records can inadvertently thrust your practice into a state of emergency. Dedicating daily time and effort to recordkeeping is the best way to protect your practice and enjoy peace of mind.

Jack Teitelman is a retired DEA supervisory special agent who spent 26 years gaining extensive experience in all facets of complex criminal drug conspiracy investigations. As founder and CEO of TITAN Group, Teitelman directs a team of leading DEA compliance and state regulatory compliance experts and investigators to ensure that veterinary clients receive the highest quality services and support.

SEE PAGE 29

press.aaha.org


32  TOOLS FOR THE WHOLE TEAM: MEDICAL RECORDS AND FORMS

Save time, add consistency to your medical records, and ensure your compliance with many medical record, anesthesia, and surgery standards. All in one convenient place.

Euthanasia Stickers

Urinalysis Stickers

AAHA

AAHA

Urinalysis

AUTHORIZATION TO PERFORM EUTHANASIA I, the undersigned, am the owner or duly authorized agent of the owner of the animal described hereon. I verify that said pet has not bitten any person or animal during the last ten (10) days and to the best of my knowledge has not been exposed to rabies. I hereby consent to and request humane euthanasia for my pet and release the doctor and staff from any and all claims, except claims for negligence, arising from or connected with this life-ending procedure and the subsequent disposal of my pet’s remains.

This simple authorization sticker explains disposal options and legalities while creating a note for your records. Staff will find this sticker easy to use, while clients will find it concise and self-explanatory—an ideal tool for communicating and updating your records during stressful appointments. It is my desire to provide decent and humane aftercare for my deceased pet that complies with all state, provincial, and local laws. I have been informed of all my options for disposition of the body and hereby authorize the attending veterinarian to dispose of the remains in accordance with hospital policy and via the option I have selected below:

____ Return remains to me for personal disposition ____ Communal burial or group disposal ____ Cremation (___communal or ___private with ashes ___returned ___not returned to the hospital) ____ Postmortem evaluation prior to the disposition method chosen above Signature _____________________________________________________ Date _______________

©2017 American Animal Hospital Association

10:28 AM

Page 1

Urinalysis Pet Name or ID _____________________________________________ Date__________ Method of Collection ______________________________ Characteristics

These comprehensive, easy-to-read stickers incorporate a comment section and include prompts for cellular descriptions and sediment properties.

Color __________________ Odor __________________ Turbidity _________________

Chemical Examination Sp. Gravity _____________ pH _____________________ Protein ___________________ Ketones ___________________ Glucose _________________ Bilirubin __________________ Urobilinogen ____________ Occult blood ______________ Creatinine ________________

Microscopic Exam Casts ___________________ Bacteria ________________ Crystals __________________ WBC ___________________ RBC ____________________ Epithelial cells _____________ Transitional cells _________ Yeast ___________________ Fat _______________________

Comments _____________________________________________________________________ © 2002 American Animal Hospital Association

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$6.95 M    $8.95 NM

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$6.95 M    $8.95 NM Product code PMSE1, pack of 50, 4" x 2.75", AAHA Press 2004.

I R

Product code PMSUR, pack of 50 stickers, 5.5" × 3", AAHA Press 2003.

Minor Surgical/Anesthetic Procedure Stickers

Minor Surgical/Anesthetic Procedure

II

III

IV

V

T G

AAHA Use these stickers for easy, speedy, consistent summaries of minor surgical and anesthetic procedures. Designed for systematic, thorough notetaking. Illustrations of the animal’s body allow you to note the surgical site, while abundant fields make it simple to record details on presurgical lab work, preanesthetic and anesthetic agents, and the most important parameters of anesthesia.

Size T

Pack of 50 $6.95 M    $8.95 NM

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Product code PMMSS, 5.375" × 4", AAHA Press 2005.

Physical Exam Checklist 1) Attitude/Appearance  N  A  NE

2) Oral Cavity/Teeth  N  A  NE

5) Ears  N  A  NE

6) Cardiovascular  N  A  NE

7) Respiratory  N  A  NE

8) Gastrointestinal  N  A  NE

9) Musculoskeletal  N  A  NE

10) Lymph Nodes  N  A  NE

11) Urogenital  N  A  NE

12) Integumentary  N  A  NE

14) Pain Score ______________

T______________P______________R______________

13) Nervous System  N  A  NE

11/5/03

3) Mucous Membranes  N  A  NE

N = Normal A = Abnormal NE = Not Examined

Indoor

4) Eyes  N  A  NE

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Product code PMMS2, 5.375" × 4" in a dispenser box, AAHA Press 2005.

Physical Exam Stickers AAHA

_____%

Diet ________________________________________ BCS___________ MCS___________ Wt.___________ © 2011 American Animal Hospital Association

Record information for all vital systems as well as a pain management assessment with this concise, easy-to-use sticker. Information completed on this sticker meets several of AAHA’s medical record and pain management standards. Pack of 50 $6.95 M    $8.95 NM

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Product code PMSP1, 5.25" × 2.25", AAHA Press 2010.

press.aaha.org

Roll of 500 $49.95 M    $59.95 NM

Roll of 500 $49.95 M    $59.95 NM

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Product code PMSP2, 5.25" × 2.25" in a dispenser box, AAHA Press 2010.


TOOLS FOR THE WHOLE TEAM: MEDICAL RECORDS AND FORMS  33 

CANINE VACCINATION SCHEDULE FOR GENERAL PRACTICE

Based on the 2017 AAHA Canine Vaccination Guidelines

WEEKS OF AGE 4

8

10

SQ

DISTEMPER (DAP±Pi)

CORE

6

RABIES

12

BOOSTER

14

16

18

Within 1 Year

20

EVERY 2–4 WEEKS

SQ/IM SQ

BORDETELLA

Subsequent Intervals

Vs. Antibody Testing

Every 3 years

Yes1

Per local law

No2

2–4 WEEKS AFTER FIRST DOSE

PO

Every year as the dog’s lifestyle risk dictates

NONCORE

IN* + Pi ± A

IN*

CANINE INFLUENZAƗ

SQ

LEPTOSPIRAǂ

SQ

LYME (B. burgdorferi)

SQ

2–4 WEEKS AFTER FIRST DOSE

AAHA

No3

No3

2–4 WEEKS AFTER FIRST DOSE

Boost your vaccination protocols at a glance with this handy magnet based on the 2017 AAHA Canine Vaccination Guidelines.

2–4 WEEKS AFTER FIRST DOSE

LEGEND

CORE

NONCORE

Earliest first dose recommended

IN

Intranasal

SQ

Subcutaneous

ANTIBODY TESTING CAVEATS 1

Booster every 2–4 weeks

IM

Intramuscular

Booster 2–4 weeks after first dose

PO

Orally, specifically in the buccal pouch

Give if at high risk

Pi ± A

Canine parainfluenza virus with or without adenovirus type 2

Give within 1 year after initial series

DAP±Pi

Distemper, adenovirus type 2, parvovirus with or without parainfluenza

MLV

Modified-live virus

While the only true test of protective immunity involves challenging the patient with the virulent pathogen and assessing the clinical outcome, a “positive” antibody test result generally correlates with protective (sterile) immunity in dogs.

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2

As of 2018, in the US and Canada, a “positive” test result for rabies virus neutralizing antibody is not legally recognized as an index of protective immunity and cannot be used in lieu of revaccination.

* Maternally derived antibody does not interfere with the immune response following mucosal vaccination (IN). There is no known value in administering the IN vaccine every 6 months. Ɨ When vaccination is recommended, dogs intended to be housed in boarding kennels or daycare facilities should BEGIN the initial vaccination series 4 weeks prior to entry (2 weeks between the initial vaccines plus 2 weeks to allow time for a humoral immune response to develop). Any dog deemed at risk for exposure to influenza virus should be vaccinated against both H3N2 and H3N8 strains.

$5.95 M    $7.95 NM

3

The antibody response following noncore vaccination tends to be short-lived and generally does not correlate with protection.

ǂ Because there is limited cross-protection among serovars, administration of a 4-serovar leptospirosis vaccine is recommended over a 2-serovar vaccine. Some MLV vaccines may lose the ability to immunize within 2 to 3 hr following reconstitution. It is recommended that unused MLV vaccines be discarded 1 hr after reconstitution regardless of whether or not the product has been refrigerated.

The Canine Vaccination guidelines were prepared by a task force of experts convened by the American Animal Hospital Association. The information in this document is intended as a guideline only, not an AAHA standard of care. These guidelines and recommendations should not be construed as dictating an exclusive protocol, course of treatment, or procedure. Variations in practice may be warranted based on the needs of the individual patient, resources, and limitations unique to each individual practice setting. ©2018 American Animal Hospital Association. THE 2017 AAHA CANINE VACCINATION GUIDELINES ARE SUPPORTED BY A GENEROUS EDUCATIONAL GRANT FROM BOEHRINGER INGELHEIM ANIMAL HEALTH, MERCK ANIMAL HEALTH, AND ZOETIS.

EATING/DRINKING NPO?

No   Time

Time

Food Intake

Product code VAXMAG, laminated magnetic card, 11" x 8.5", AAHA Press 2018.

AAHA Treatment Sheets

NURSING NOTES

Yes, until:

Diet:

Canine Vaccination Schedule Magnet

Initials Notes

Water

AAHA

URINE/STOOL/VOMIT/DIARRHEA

Last name:

First name:

Patient name:

Client ID:

Problem list:

CPR

Tentative DX: IV CATHETER Location:

Phone:

Date:

Weight:

kg

lb

DNR

Attending doctor(s):

Size:

Date/time placed:

Alerts: TREATMENTS

8 am 9 am 10 am 11 am 12 pm 1 pm 2 pm 3 pm 4 pm 5 pm 6 pm 7 pm

Removed:

Time checked: 8 pm 9 pm 10 pm 11 pm 12 am 1 am 2 am 3 am 4 am 5 am 6 am 7 am

Temp:

Notes:

HR: RR: MM/CRT: Admitted:

Ready to go home? Yes

Discharged:

Discharge time:

Charges:

Audited:

Attitude:

  No

Pain score: 1.

Scan/file:

2. ©2018 AAHA 3. 4.

If your practice’s treatment records are incomplete, who knows how much money you’re losing because someone forgot to record a charge? That’s why we designed a standardized, 24-hour treatment sheet based on input from people who would use them in practice. The result is an intuitive form for patient monitoring that allows staff members to capture medications, dosages, procedures, patient vital signs, nursing notes, and more.

5.

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6. 7.

$11.95 M    $13.95 NM

8. 9. 10. Fluid type:

Additives:

Rate: Time added:

Total fluid volume infused: Offer water: Offer food: Walk: Change litter:

Pain score: 1

 2

 3

 4

SOAP

 5

Anesthesia and Sedation Record Date:

Body Weight (kg):

Date:

Monitoring by: Anesthesia End Time:

Time:

__:00

__:15

__:45

__:00

__:15

__:30

Procedure End Time:

__:45

__:00

__:15

__:30

Sex: M (C) F (S)  

Total

1) General Appearance o  Normal  o  Abnormal

Temp:  

3 2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5

n O2 L/min  

Age: __________________

Body Weight (lb): ________________ Body Weight (kg): ________________

Preanesthetic Exam and Vitals:

¡ Inhalant Anesthetic Agent (%): 4

T: ________________ P: ________________ RR: _______________ Time: _________________

2) Oral Cavity/Teeth o  Normal  o  Abnormal

3) Mucous Membranes o  Normal  o  Abnormal

4) Eyes o  Normal  o  Abnormal

5) Ears o  Normal  o  Abnormal

6) Cardiovascular o  Normal  o  Abnormal

7) Respiratory o  Normal  o  Abnormal

8) Gastrointestinal o  Normal  o  Abnormal

9) Musculoskeletal o  Normal  o  Abnormal

10) Lymph Nodes o  Normal  o  Abnormal

11) Urogenital o  Normal  o  Abnormal

12) Integumentary o  Normal  o  Abnormal

13) Nervous System o  Normal  o  Abnormal

Pain Score:

Body Condition Score:

Time of Last Meal:

Blood Pressure: o   Noninvasive blood pressure monitoring o Doppler monitoring

Additional Exam Notes:

180

180

160

160

140

140

120

120

110

110

100

100

90

90

80

80

70

70

60

60

50

50

40

40

30

30

20

20

10

10

Diagnostic Testing:

o  CBC  o  Serum biochemical analysis  o UA  o  T4  o  Other (specify): Reviewed by veterinarian? o Yes   o  No o  Clinically significant abnormalities:

Preanesthetic/Sedative Medications

Dose (mg/kg)

Total Amount (mg)

Total Volume (mL)

Route (IV, IM, SC)

Time Administered

Initials of Administrator

Anesthetic Induction Medications

Dose (mg/kg)

Total Amount (mg)

Total Volume (mL)

Route (IV, IM, SC)

Time Administered

Initials of Administrator

Additional Medications

Dose (mg/kg)

Total Amount (mg)

Total Volume (mL)

Route (IV, IM, SC)

Time Administered

Initials of Administrator

IV Catheter Size and Location:

Anesthesia System:

IV Fluid Type and Rate of Administration:

Comments:

o Rebreathing o Nonrebreathing o Mechanical ventilator Time of Extubation:

Quality of Recovery:

Monitoring of Post-Anesthetic Vitals Time

Temp

AAHA

ASA Physical Status:

Symbols:

l HR ¡  RR   n Pulse oximetry r   End-tidal CO2 Blood pressure (mm Hg): ˆ Systolic — Mean ‡ Diastolic

Product code TREAT1, pad of 50 double-sided forms, two-hole punched at top, AAHA Press 2018.

Anesthesia and Sedation Record

Patient Identification:

Species/Breed:

__:45

IV Fluids (Type and Rate):

o Isoflurane o Sevoflurane

©2018 AAHA

Procedure:

Procedure Start Time:

__:30

  CHARGES

Anesthesia and Sedation Record

Patient Identification:

Veterinarian: Anesthesia Start Time:

SOAP

  CHARGES

HR

RR

Pain Score

IV Fluid Rate

Comments

Initials

Quality of Sedation: o  None   o  Slight   o  Moderate  o Profound

Intubated: o Yes  o  No   Endotracheal tube size:

Emergency Plan:

Monitoring and Support:

Atropine

0.04 mg/kg IV

__________ mg __________ mL

o  Blood pressure

Epinephrine

0.01 mg/kg IV

__________ mg __________ mL

o  Pulse oximeter

Lidocaine

2 mg/kg IV

Other:

__________ mg __________ mL

o  Capnograph

__________ mg __________ mL

o  Active warming device

o Continuous EKG o Body temperature o Esophageal stethoscope o Other:

o  Dedicated continuous observation Signature of Veterinarian:

Date:

Time:

Before, during, and after anesthesia and sedation, patient evaluation is essential. Stay AAHA compliant with this convenient Anesthesia and Sedation Record.

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$11.95 M    $13.95 NM

ASA, American Society of Anesthesiologists; C, castrated; CBC, complete blood cell count; EKG, electrocardiogram; F, female; HR, heart rate (beats/min); IM, intramuscular; M, male; P, pulse; RR, respiratory rate (breaths/min); S, spayed; SC, subcutaneous; T, temperature; T4, thyroxine; UA, urinalysis. © 2015 American Animal Hospital Association

© 2015 American Animal Hospital Association

Product code PMAR2, pad of 50 two-sided forms, AAHA Press 2015.

Praise for Anesthesia and Sedation Record

[A] thorough and well-laid-out form that helps us keep thorough anesthesia monitoring records of our patients. —WILLIAM STEARMAN, DVM, COPPELL VETERINARY HOSPITAL

press.aaha.org


34  TOOLS FOR THE WHOLE TEAM: MEDICAL RECORDS AND FORMS

AAHA Exam Report Card

R

L

R

L

AAHA Exam Report Cards

________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________

Date: _________________ Last name: _______________ First name: ______________ Client ID: ________________ Pet’s name: ______________ Sex: M F Spayed Neutered Intact Weight: ______________ Thin Normal Overweight Ideal weight: __________

________________________________________ ________________________________________

Behavior/Attitude ☐ Alert ☐ Lethargic ☐ Shy Coat and Skin ☐ Appear normal ☐ Dull, scaly, dry ☐ Oily ☐ Thinning

☐ Agitated ☐ Other: ____________

___________________

Gastrointestinal System ☐ Appear normal ☐ Tense/painful abdomen ☐ Enlarged organs ☐ Intestinal parasites ☐ Vomiting ☐ Other: ____________ ☐ Diarrhea ___________________

☐ Masses ☐ Other: ________ ☐ Itchy _______________ ☐ Inflamed/irritated _______________ ☐ Fleas _______________

Urinary/Genital Systems ☐ Appear normal ☐ Other: _____________ ____________________ ☐ Abnormal urination ☐ Abnormal genitalia ____________________

Eyes ☐ Left ☐ Right ☐ Both ☐ Appear normal ☐ Aging change: ☐ Discharge ☐ Lens ☐ Low tear production ☐ Iris ☐ Ulcer ☐ Other: __________ ☐ Inflamed/conjunctivitis _________________ Ears ☐ Left ☐ Right ☐ Both ☐ Appear normal ☐ Infection: ☐ Inflamed ☐ Yeast ☐ Itchy ☐ Bacteria ☐ Discharge ☐ Mites

Central Nervous System ☐ Appears normal ☐ Ataxic/off-balance ☐ Seizures ☐ Other: ____________ ☐ Loss of sensation ___________________ ☐ Disorientation ___________________

☐ Excessive hair ☐ Other: _________

________________ ________________

Mouth and Teeth ☐ Appear normal ☐ Gingivitis/inflamed gums ☐ Tartar buildup ☐ Broken teeth ☐ Loose teeth ☐ Masses

☐ Ulcers ☐ Overbite ☐ Underbite ☐ Baby teeth still present ☐ Other: _____________

Respiratory System ☐ Appears normal ☐ Coughing ☐ Congestion ☐ Breathing difficulty

☐ Nasal discharge ☐ Sneezing ☐ Other: _____________

____________________

____________________

Circulatory System ☐ Appears normal ☐ Abnormal: ☐ Murmur ☐ Rhythm ☐ Abnormal pulses ☐ Rate

Musculoskeletal ☐ Appears normal ☐ Signs of arthritis ☐ Painful ☐ Weakness ☐ Limping

☐ Abnormal gait/posture ☐ Loss of muscle mass ☐ Other: ____________

Today We Did: ☐ Exam ☐ Anal gland expression ☐ Vaccinations ☐ Heartworm test ☐ Fecal parasite test

☐ Bloodwork ☐ Urinalysis ☐ Tickborne disease test ☐ Other: ____________

___________________ ___________________

______________________________________

_______________ _______________

______________________________________ ______________________________________

Lymph Nodes ☐ Appear normal ☐ Enlarged (circle location) Submandibular Axillary Popliteal Inguinal ☐ Other: ___________________________________________

______________________________________

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$12.95 M    $15.95 NM

______________________________________ ______________________________________

__________________________________________________

______________________________________

Schedule next exam: _______________________________

© 2018 American Animal Hospital Association

Home-Care Instructions

Client ________________________________________________ Patient ________________________________________________ Admission Date _________________________________________ Release Date ____________________________________________ Procedure or Diagnosis _________________________________________________________________________________________ Proper Restraint

Please protect your pet when leaving the practice by using a leash or carrier.

Medications

❒ None dispensed ❒ Dispensed—directions attached ❒ Start medication ____________________________

Food and Water

❒ ❒ ❒ ❒ ❒ ❒

Exercise

❒ May resume normal activity in ________ day(s). ❒ Confine indoors. Take outside on leash only for elimination for ________ day(s). ❒ Strict confinement to cage or small room for ________ day(s). ❒ No running, jumping, or access to stairs.

Sutures

❒ Discourage your pet from licking or chewing at surgery site. Please check the incision line daily for any swelling, redness, or discharge. If it appears irritated or infected, notify us. ❒ Suture removal in ________ day(s). Please make an appointment. ❒ Sutures are absorbable and do not need to be removed. ❒ No sutures

Follow-up Instructions

❒ Recheck in ________ day(s). Please make an appointment. ❒ Please call us with a progress report in ________ day(s). ❒ Follow-up test(s) due in ________ day(s). Please make an appointment. ❒ No rechecks or follow-up required.

Monitor

Call the practice if any of the following occur: Ph#:__________________________________________________ • • • • • • • • •

Tidy up your patient records and improve compliance with AAHA’s Exam Report Cards. Intuitively organized and thoroughly reviewed by veterinarians and technicians, this form ensures that all information is captured. Bonus: The report card integrates forward booking right into the exam, so scheduling the next appointment is a breeze!

___________________

Recommendations ______________________________________

☐ Other: ________

AAHA

Only small amounts of food and water should be offered ____________________________________________. Normal feeding may resume ____________________________________________. Feed your pet his/her regular diet. Feed multiple smaller meals ________ times per day. Special diet _________________________________________________________________________________ Offer water with no restrictions.

Loss of appetite for more than two days Pain Sutures come out Discharge from eyes, ears, or nose Straining to urinate or defecate Change in breathing Refusal to drink water for more than one day Depression Other

• • • • • • • •

Excess drainage from incision Difficulty getting up or down Vomiting Diarrhea Swelling Abnormal odors Weakness Chewing, licking, or scratching sutures

Special Instructions

_____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________

After Hours Contact

_____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________

Product code EXAMCA, pad of 50 two-part carbonless forms, two-hole punched at top, AAHA Press 2018.

Home-Care Instructions Form AAHA Provide your clients with clear directions for caring for their pets after a procedure or surgery with this form. One copy of the form goes with the client, the other stays in the medical record.

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$12.95 M    $15.95 NM Product code PMHCI, pad of 50 two-part carbonless forms, two-hole punched at top, AAHA Press 2003.

Client Signature ____________________________________ Veterinarian Signature ____________________________________ © 2003 American Animal Hospital Association

Dental Discharge Instructions Form

Dental Discharge Instructions Client’s Name ____________________________________________________________________________ Pet’s Name _______________________________________________________________________________ Date of Dental Procedure _____________________

Diet

❒ ❒ ❒ ❒ ❒ ❒

Withhold food for _______ hour(s). You may offer water to your pet without restriction. Feed your pet his/her regular diet. Feed soft food for _______ days. Feed special diet _______________________________________________________ Special instructions _____________________________________________________

Medications and Other Dental Care Products

❒ ❒ ❒ ❒ ❒ ❒ ❒ ❒

Start medications tomorrow. Use medication(s) according to label directions. No medication dispensed Toothpaste ____________________________________ Oral cleaning gel ________________________________ Oral rinse _____________________________________ Home care ___________________________________________________________ Other _______________________________________________________________

Special Instructions

________________________________________________________________________

AAHA Send clients home with correct and clear written guidelines regarding the care of their pets’ teeth. After clients return home, they’ll have all the reminders they need with this two-part Dental Discharge Instructions Form. One copy provides your client with correct and clearly written guidelines regarding care of their pets’ teeth, and the other copy slips right into the medical record.

________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________

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$12.95 M    $15.95 NM

❒ Return visit scheduled on _________________ . ❒ Return in __________ days __________ weeks. ❒ Return visit not required.

Return Visit

If you have questions or your pet has complications, please contact the hospital. __________________________________________

__________________________________________

Veterinarian Signature

Client Signature

Product code PMDDI, pad of 50 two-part carbonless forms, two-hole punched at top, AAHA Press 2003.

© 2003 American Animal Hospital Association

Canine and Feline Dental Record

Canine Dental Record _________________________ PATIENT ID

____/____/_____ DATE

Remarks and Diagnosis: ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Dental Conditions: ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Canine Dental Record AB: Abrasion

_________________________ ____/____/_____ AL: Attachment level ______________________________________________________________________________________________ PATIENT ID

DATE

AT: Attrition

R

________________ 103 _______________ 102 ________________ 1 0 1 ________________ 201 _______________ 202 _______________ 203

______________________________________________________________________________________________ CA: Caries

L

CU: Contact ulcer ______________________________________________________________________________________________

CS: Caudal stomatitis Treatment Treatment Treatment Treatment CWD: Crowding ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Performed Recommended Recommended Performed EH: Enamel hypoplasia FE: Furcation involvement, exposure (F1-3) __________________ 204 104 ____________________ FX: Fracture (E: Enamel; UCF: uncomplicated Radiology Evaluation and Assessment: crown; CC/RF: Complicated crown +/- root fx) ____________________ ______________________ G: Granuloma ______________________________________________________________________________________________ GH: Gingival hyperplasia 105 _____________________________ ______________________________ 205 ______________________________________________________________________________________________ GR: Gingival recession MN/FX: Mandibular fracture 106 _____________________________ ______________________________ 206 ______________________________________________________________________________________________ MX/FX: Maxillary fracture M: Mobile tooth (1-3) ______________________________________________________________________________________________ 107 _____________________________ ______________________________ 207 Circled: Missing tooth OM: Oral mass ______________________________________________________________________________________________ ONF: Oronasal fistula 108 _____________________________ ______________________________ 208 PE: Pulp exposure ______________________________________________________________________________________________ PP: Periodontal pocket (Depth in mm) PD: Periodontal disease (1: Gingivitis; 2: <25% attachment loss; 3: 25–50% Treatment Summary and Plan: 109 _____________________________ ______________________________ 209 attachment loss; 4: >50% attachment loss) RD: Retained deciduous tooth ______________________________________________________________________________________________ 110 ____________________________ ______________________________ 210 ROT: Rotated tooth RTR: Retained tooth root ______________________________________________________________________________________________ SN: Supernumerary tooth 41 1 ____________________________ ______________________________ 3 1 1 ______________________________________________________________________________________________ ST/CU: Stomatitis, contact ulcer T/I: Impacted tooth 410 ____________________________ ______________________________ 3 10 ______________________________________________________________________________________________ T/LUX: Luxated tooth T/NV: Non-vital tooth ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Exam Findings TR: Tooth resorption (1: Mild dental hard tissue loss; 2: Moderate dental hard ______________________________________________________________________________________________ tissue loss; 3: Deep dental hard tissue 409 ____________________________ ______________________________ 309 loss; 4: Extensive dental hard tissue loss; ______________________________________________________________________________________________ 5: Remnants of dental hard tissue loss/ gingival covering is complete)

Other Notes:

AAHA, WITH CONTRIBUTIONS BY JAN BELLOWS, DVM, DAVDC, ABVP

Dental Treatment: 408 ____________________________

______________________________ 308

Feline Dental Record ______________________________________________________________________________________________ B/I: Biopsy, incisional _________________________

BG: Bone graft

____/____/_____

B/E: Biopsy, excisional ______________________________________________________________________________________________ PATIENT ID DATE

407 ____________________________

______________________________ 307

CRR: Crown reduction

F: Flap ______________________________________________________________________________________________

GV/GVP: Gingivectomy, plasty

Remarks and Diagnosis: ______________________________________________________________________________________________ ONF/R: Oronasal fistula repair 406 ____________________________

______________________________ 306

405 ____________________________

______________________________ 305

PCT: Perioceutic placement

______________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________ R/C: Restoration, composite RC: Root canal therapy Dental Conditions: ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Feline Dental Record ______________________________________________________________________________________________ RPC: Root planing, closed AB: Abrasion

RPO: Root planing, open ____/____/_____ _________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________ 304 404 ____________________ AL: Attachment level ______________________________________________________________________________________________

PATIENT ID

DATE

VP: Vital pulp therapy

AT: Attrition

__________________ ______________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________ X: Extraction ______________________________________________________________________________________________ CA: Caries XS: Extraction, sectioned

CS: Caudal stomatitis

303 ______

4 01 ______

3 01 ______

302 ______

403 ______

402 ______

CU: Contact ulcer ______________________________________________________________________________________________ XSS: Extraction, surgical CWD: Crowding ______________________________________________________________________________________________ : Accepted

EH: Enamel hypoplasia FE: Furcation involvement, exposure (F1-3) FX: Fracture (E: Enamel; UCF: uncomplicated crown; CC/RF: Complicated crown +/- root fx)

Radiology Evaluation and Assessment:

_____________________ 103 _____________________ 102 _____________________ 1 0 1 _____________________ 201 _____________________ 202 _____________________ 203

D: Declined F: Future

Better records, better results. Updated by a board-certified veterinary dentist, these two-sided record forms streamline your recordkeeping of exams and cleanings. These forms will empower your staff to keep succinct but comprehensive records in compliance with the AAHA Standards of Accreditation as well as the AAHA Dental Care Guidelines for Dogs and Cats.

G: Granuloma ______________________________________________________________________________________________

R

L

Note: Exam findings are recorded on the blank on the inside of the chart, treatment recommended is recorded on the line on the outside GH: Gingival hyperplasia of the chart, and whether treatment was performed is recorded in the checkbox. Note  if treated, D if treatment was declined, and F if ______________________________________________________________________________________________ GR: Gingival recession treatment is recommended in the future. ©2015 American Animal Hospital Association Treatment

Treatment

Treatment

Treatment

MN/FX: Mandibular fracture

______________________________________________________________________________________________ Performed Recommended Recommended Performed MX/FX: Maxillary fracture M: Mobile tooth (1-3) Missing tooth

______________________________________________________________________________________________ Circled: ____________________ 204 104 ___________________

OM: Oral mass ______________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________ _____________________

ONF: Oronasal fistula

PE: Pulp exposure ______________________________________________________________________________________________ 106 _____________________________ ______________________________ 206

PP: Periodontal pocket (Depth in mm) PD: Periodontal disease (1: Gingivitis; 2: <25% attachment loss; 3: 25–50% attachment loss; 4: >50% attachment loss) RD: Retained deciduous tooth ______________________________________________________________________________________________ ROT: Rotated tooth 108 _____________________________ ______________________________ 208 RTR: Retained tooth root ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Exam Findings SN: Supernumerary tooth ______________________________________________________________________________________________ ST/CU: Stomatitis, contact ulcer T/I: Impacted tooth 109 _____________________________ ______________________________ 209 ______________________________________________________________________________________________ T/LUX: Luxated tooth T/NV: Non-vital tooth ______________________________________________________________________________________________ TR: Tooth resorption (1: Mild dental hard tissue loss; 2: Moderate dental hard 409 _____________________________ ______________________________ 309 ______________________________________________________________________________________________ tissue loss; 3: Deep dental hard tissue loss; 4: Extensive dental hard tissue loss; ______________________________________________________________________________________________ 5: Remnants of dental hard tissue loss/ gingival covering is complete)

Treatment Summary and Plan: 107 _____________________________ ______________________________ 207

408 ____________________________ ______________________________ 308

Other Notes:

Dental Treatment: BG: Bone graft

______________________________________________________________________________________________ 407 _____________________________ ______________________________ 3 0 7 B/I: Biopsy, incisional

Canine Dental Record $11.95 M    $13.95 NM

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Feline Dental Record $11.95 M    $13.95 NM

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403 _______________________ 402 _______________________ 4 01 _______________________ 3 01 _______________________ 302 _______________________ 303 _______________________

B/E: Biopsy, excisional ______________________________________________________________________________________________

CRR: Crown reduction

F: Flap ______________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________ 304 404 ____________________

GV/GVP: Gingivectomy, plasty

______________________________________________________________________________________________ ONF/R: Oronasal fistula repair _____________________ ____________________ PCT: Perioceutic placement

______________________________________________________________________________________________ R/C: Restoration, composite RC: Root canal therapy

______________________________________________________________________________________________ RPC: Root planing, closed RPO: Root planing, open ______________________________________________________________________________________________ VP: Vital pulp therapy

X: Extraction ______________________________________________________________________________________________

XS: Extraction, sectioned XSS: Extraction, surgical

: Accepted D: Declined F: Future Note: Exam findings are recorded on the blank on the inside of the chart, treatment recommended is recorded on the line on the outside of the chart, and whether treatment was performed is recorded in the checkbox. Note  if treated, D if treatment was declined, and F if treatment is recommended in the future. ©2015 American Animal Hospital Association

press.aaha.org

Product code PMCD2, pad of 50 two-sided forms, AAHA Press 2015.

Product code PMFD2, pad of 50 two-sided forms, AAHA Press 2015.


TOOLS FOR THE WHOLE TEAM: VETERINARY SAFETY AND OSHA TOOLS  35 

Praise for Manager’s Guide to Veterinary Workplace Safety, Second Edition

I rely on Phil Seibert and the Manager’s Guide to Veterinary Workplace Safety to ensure that I am keeping our safety standards current. The new edition is timely and just as easy to follow as the first. It makes both implementing a new program and updating an existing one much easier than wading through the vast requirements of OSHA. —CINDY REMICK, CVPM, EDMONDS VETERINARY HOSPITAL

Manager’s Guide to Veterinary Workplace Safety, Second Edition PHILLIP J. SEIBERT, JR., CVT Written by a veterinary professional, this manager’s guide conveniently compiles applicable OSHA standards into one clear-communicating resource, so managers can easily get started on creating their compliant safety plan. Includes helpful checklists and a companion website with dozens of useful templates to help you generate practicespecific policies and letters.

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$79.95 M    $94.95 NM  Product code BSMN2, paperback, 156 pages, 978-1-58326-199-6, AAHA Press 2014.

AAHA Veterinary Safety Training PHILLIP J. SEIBERT, JR., CVT

WORKBOOK

On one flashdrive, you’ll have two award-winning MP3 training videos: Veterinary Safety Training for the Whole Practice Team and Veterinary Safety Training for Medical & Technical Staff, designed for those who work directly with animals and chemicals. Approximately 25 minutes each. Videos come with twelve 16-page workbooks: 6 each of Veterinary Safety Training for the Whole Practice Team workbooks and Veterinary Safety Training for Medical & Technical Staff workbooks.

on Veterinary Safety Training

FOR

MEDICAL & TECHNICAL STAFF

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$184.95 M    $214.95 NM

er t

Jr. ,

CV T

WORKBOOK Ph ilip

J. S

eib

on Veterinary Safety Training

Product code OSHAU, flashdrive and 12 workbooks (16 pages each), AAHA Press 2017.

AAHA

SAFETY

TRAINING

Need extra workbooks? $9.95 M    $14.95 NM

©2007, 2015, 2017 AAHA Press

Ph ilip

J. S

eib

er t

Jr. ,

CV T

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Product code OSHAZW1, Whole Practice Team, 978-1-58326-081-4. Product code OSHAZW2, Medical & Technical Staff, 978-1-58326-082-1.

press.aaha.org


36  TOOLS FOR THE WHOLE TEAM: VETERINARY SAFETY AND OSHA TOOLS

Veterinary Secondary Container Labels with Poster AAHA Feel confident that you’re communicating chemical hazards effectively with the addition of AAHA Veterinary Secondary Container Labels. These waterproof stickers allow you to easily comply with OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard, are sized for veterinary practice containers, and come with an instructional poster. (Please note that purchasers are responsible for evaluating whether these labels meet their state’s requirements, which may differ from federal rules.)

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$49.95 M    $54.95 NM Product code OVSCP, 100 waterproof labels and poster, AAHA Press 2007.

Already have the poster? Get a refill of the labels!

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$44.95 M    $49.95 NM Product code OVSCL, 100 waterproof labels, AAHA Press 2007.

All-in-one safety: Buy the whole Be Safe set

WORKBOOK on Veterinary Safety Training

WORKBOOK

Be Safe Series: AAHA Veterinary Safety Training Videos (on flashdrive) and workbooks, Manager’s Guide to Veterinary Workplace Safety, Second Edition, and Secondary Container Labels with Poster

on Veterinary Safety Training

FOR

Sei be rt

Jr .,

CV T

MEDICAL & TECHNICAL Ph ilip

Second Edition Philip J. Seibert Jr., CVT

Covering safety concerns ranging from waste anesthetic gases and radiation to fire and emergency preparedness, this new edition includes: • Expanded information on hazardous chemicals, the Globally Harmonized System format for safety data sheets, secondary container labels, radiation, and waste anesthetic gases • A list of applicable OSHA regulations • An overview of the Hazard Communication Standard’s written plan requirement • Manager’s checklists on starting and documenting a safety program, completing administrative requirements, and training staff • Templates of policies to be included in a veterinary-specific safety manual

CV T Jr .,

MANAGER’S to Veterinary Workplace

SAFETY Ph ilip

J. S

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ert

Jr. ,

CV T

Philip J. Seibert Jr., CVT, is a certified veterinary technician with over 32 years of experience in the profession, specializing in safety and regulatory issues. He is a full-time author, speaker, and consultant.

press.aaha.org

PHILLIP J. SEIBERT, JR., CVT

GUIDE Ed itio n

Written by a veterinary professional, this manager’s guide conveniently compiles applicable OSHA standards into one resource, explains how they apply to the veterinary industry, and teaches you how to ensure your practice is in compliance. Including helpful checklists and a companion website including dozens of templates to help you generate practice-specific policies and letters, this resource will enable you to create a comprehensive safety training program and manual for your practice.

New ion Compan ! Website

co nd

Ph ilip

J.

Sei be rt

Keeping your team safe is a big responsibility. Do it right with the help of the second edition of Manager’s Guide to Veterinary Workplace Safety in the Be Safe Series. This comprehensive book will give you peace of mind, knowing that you have adhered to the veterinary-specific OSHA standards and have gone above the basic requirements to create a safe environment for your team.

Se

Hospital, Edmonds, WA

Assess and address workplace hazards.

Manager’s Guide to Veterinary Workplace Safety

—Cindy Remick, CVPM Edmonds Veterinary

J.

STAFF

“I rely on Phil Seibert and the Manager’s Guide to Veterinary Workplace Safety to ensure that I am keeping our safety standards current. The new edition is timely and just as easy to follow as the first. It makes both implementing a new program and updating an existing one much easier than wading through the vast requirements of OSHA.”

You know how critical it is to keep workers safe. But what you probably don’t know is how to fit high-quality safety training into an already jam-packed schedule. Here’s how: with succinct, 25-minute, OSHA-approved videos. An easily digestible manager’s guide and workbooks. And compliant chemical container labels. All conveniently packaged together at a 10% discount. Show employees you care about their safety—and reduce your chances of litigation and worker’s compensation claims—with this veterinary practice–specific program. While saving time with checklists, call-outs, and other efficiencies, this program exceeds OSHA regulations in covering all significant veterinary hospital hazards.

AAHA

SAFETY

TRAINING ©2007, 2015, 2017 AAHA Press

Product code BSFSU, AAHA Press 2007, 2014, 2017.

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$279.95 M    $324.95 NM

press.aaha.org


TOOLS FOR THE WHOLE TEAM: MEDICAL AND DENTAL BOOKS  37 

Canine Medical Massage: Techniques and Clinical Applications NARDA G. ROBINSON, DO, DVM, MS, FAAMA, AND SHELLEY SHEETS, BA, CMT, CAMT The evidence is in: Massage and soft-tissue therapy can help alleviate the pain and stress of hip dysplasia, osteoarthritis, epilepsy, and more. Canine Medical Massage provides the science-based training you need for mastery. Includes access to instructional videos on a companion website.

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$65.95 M    $74.95 NM  Product code CNMDM, paperback, 216 pages, 978-1-58326-205-4, AAHA Press 2015.

What’s That? A Beginner’s Guide to Veterinary Abdominal Ultrasound TOMAS W. BAKER What’s That? A Beginner’s Guide to Veterinary Abdominal Ultrasound provides staff new to ultrasounds with the actual techniques needed to identify abdominal organs and evaluate them for normalcy. More than 260 ultrasound images in the book and accompanying website were selected to train readers to observe organs, identify abnormalities, and facilitate the identification of disease.

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$79.95 M    $94.95 NM  Product code BGGDT, wire-o-bound paperback, 112 pages, 978-1-58326-104-0, AAHA Press 2009.

The Small Animal Veterinary Nerdbook, Third Edition SOPHIA YIN, DVM, MS When every second counts, you don’t want to be scrambling for information. Count on The Small Animal Veterinary Nerdbook, the profession’s gold standard for quick access to the information vital to everyday clinical practice. This book features y Enhanced cross-referencing y Index of commonly used drug dosages y Access to abundant resources on the official Nerdbook website

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$79.95 M    $89.95 NM Product code ATNR3, paperback, 480 pages, 978-0-96415-185-7, CattleDog Publishing 2007.

press.aaha.org


38  TOOLS FOR THE WHOLE TEAM: MEDICAL AND DENTAL BOOKS

Low Stress Handling, Restraint and Behavior Modification of Dogs & Cats: Techniques for Developing Patients Who Love Their Visits SOPHIA YIN, DVM, MS Talking patients through their fear: it’s not just for humans anymore. This book and DVD set breaks down exactly what your patient’s behavior is communicating— and provides you with the responses you need to calm their fears. Create a safer environment for your team and, best of all, start developing patients who love their visits.

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$134.95 M    $144.95 NM Product code LWSTH, paperback with DVD, 480 pages, 978-0-96415-184-0, CattleDog Publishing 2009.

A Veterinary Technician’s Guide to Exotic Animal Care, Second Edition THOMAS N. TULLY, JR., DVM, MS, DABVP (AVIAN), DECZM (AVIAN), AND MARK A. MITCHELL, DVM, MS, PHD, DECZM (HERPETOLOGY) Give your vet techs the exotic pet know-how with this full-color, concise guide to proper handling, diagnostic testing, surgical and anesthetic assistance, and more. Species covered include avian, reptiles and amphibians, ferrets, rabbits, rodents, fish, and more.

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$75.95 M    $86.95 NM Product code TGEA2, paperback, 256 pages, 978-1-58326-146-0, AAHA Press 2012.

Companion-Animal Dental and Surgical Instruments: A Reference for Veterinary Technicians and Assistants GAIL E. MARSHALL, AHT, MBA, WITH KARL M. PETER, DVM Along with the instrument name and picture, this quick-access guide provides the purpose and features of surgical, dental, orthopedic, ophthalmologic, and other types of instruments for clearer communication and efficiency among techs, assistants, and doctors.

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$42.95 M    $52.95 NM Product code CMAND, spiral-bound paperback, 450 pages, 978-1-58326-154-5, AAHA Press 2011.

press.aaha.org


TOOLS FOR YOUR CLIENTS: EDUCATION  39 

Understanding Your Pet’s Health: A Visual Guide AAHA Think of this as the ultimate client education tool. Highly visual. Written for laymen. And laminated for a long, well-thumbed lifetime of educating clients in the exam room. This convenient, easy-to-store guide uses color photos and illustrations to aid you in discussing wellness topics and diagnostic tools with clients, but it can also serve as a training tool and reminder for new support staff members.

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$19.95 M    $24.95 NM Product code CMFLF, ring-bound, 46 laminated pages, 978-1-58326-183-5, AAHA Press 2013.

Healthy Mouth, Healthy Pet: Why Dental Care Matters JOSEPHINE M. BANYARD, DVM, DAVDC It’s funny how the same clients who brush and floss daily never think twice about their pets’ teeth. It’s a common disconnect that often requires lots of explanation—which is why this visual exam room tool is such a time saver. Using hundreds of images and illustrated charts, Healthy Mouth, Healthy Pet shows clients precisely why high-quality dental care is needed for pets, and the benefits it provides. Customize already-made client handouts for your practice via the companion website.

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$49.95 M    $59.95 NM  Product code GDDND, spiral-bound paperback, 96 pages, 978-1-58326-189-7, AAHA Press 2013.

Pet Care Coloring Book AAHA Entertain children visiting your hospital with crayons and coloring books that will leave them feeling good about their pets’ care. A great take-home gift, it reinforces animal care and compliance and is appropriate for children ages four through seven. The pages are glued together rather than stapled to avoid injury to children.

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$17.95 M    $19.95 NM Product code THFRV, pack of 50 8-page glue-bound booklets, 978-1-58326-229-0, AAHA Press 2010.

Nontoxic Crayons $4.95 M/NM Product code CRAYO, pack of 5 boxes (4 crayons each), AAHA Press.

press.aaha.org


40  TOOLS FOR YOUR CLIENTS: EDUCATION

101 Essential Tips Series JASON NICHOLAS, BVETMED (HONS), WITH FULL-COLOR ILLUSTRATIONS BY CHUCK GONZALEZ Start your clients and their new pets off on the right paw for a safe, healthy relationship on the first visit. The education and awareness you provide your clients on a new pet visit begin your relationship with both pet and client. There’s far too much to cover in the exam room, and your clients simply can’t absorb it all at once. Photocopied handouts just don’t cut it for today’s pet owner . . . and now they don’t have to!

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1–10 copies (each) $6.95 M    $8.95 NM

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11–30 copies (each) $5.95 M    $7.95 NM

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31 or more copies (each) $4.95 M    $5.95 NM 101 Essential Tips: Puppy or New Dog—Health & Safety Product code DOG101, paperback, 88 pages, 978-0-98837-812-4, Preventive Vet 2016.

press.aaha.org

101 Essential Tips: Kitten or New Cat—Health & Safety Product code CAT101, paperback, 104 pages, 978-0-98837-813-1, Preventive Vet 2017.


TOOLS FOR YOUR CLIENTS: EDUCATION   41 

8

How much water should your cat drink? Just like people, different cats have different hydration needs. Your cat’s water intake depends on their size, diet, activity level, and overall health— along with the weather, humidity, and several other factors. In general, cats should consume about 3.5 – 4.5 ounces of water per 5 pounds of body weight per day. Of course, it is possible to have too much of a good thing … even water. If your cat is drinking more than 7.5 ounces of water per 5 pounds of body weight per day, they could be showing signs of a health condition such as diabetes, kidney disease, hyperthyroidism, or other problems. If you think your cat is drinking too much water, it’s time for a visit to your vet.

r-old shorthair an overweight, 6-yea more water

a lot had been drinking Ol iv er ased thirst, he was l. On top of his incre

than usua r said). Though storm” (as his owne also “peeing up a his owner be otherwise OK, Oliver seemed to k-up. Catching him in for a chec ght brou y ed kfull than t he not only avoid mean early etes Oliver’s diab y (diabetic medical emergenc a more serious change and diet his that t mean ketoacidosis), it also sooner. Because could be started insulin treatment ssion after etes went into remi of this, Oliver’s diab ths. just five mon

14

45 Health &

You’re likely aware that spaying or neutering your cat will prevent unintended • 11 Safety pregnancies. But what you may not know is that it can also tame undesirable behaviors (like fighting, spraying, and “in-heat” behaviors) and help prevent disease (uterine infections and certain cancers). Speak with your veterinarian about the procedure and when would be the best time to have it done for your kitty.

What eats more socks than a dryer? Dogs! Your pup loves how you smell, so they might be tempted to play with your dirty laundry when you’re not around. If that play turns into chewing … nom, nom, nom … and swallowing then they’re in trouble. Many a dollar has been spent removing socks, towels, underwear, and other garments from the stomachs and intestinal tracts of dogs. Put all dirty laundry in closed hampers and keep your dog out of the laundry room. Don’t forget about children’s rooms, too. And be extra cautious with baby and toddler clothes, which are often stained with all kinds of enticing food (and other) splatters. Oh, and speaking of laundry … be sure to keep bleach, laundry detergent pods, and dryer sheets well out of your dog’s reach, too.

Spaying and neutering: It’s not just about pet overpopulation

46

Oral health = Overall health Imagine the state of your mouth if you never brushed your teeth or had them cleaned! And it’s not just teeth that suffer from poor oral care; it’s also the kidneys, heart, and other organs. Introducing your cat to having their teeth brushed early on can make their oral care easier for life. Good dental health can be achieved with toothbrushing, certain treats or diets (VOHC approved), and regular dental exams and cleanings with your veterinarian. Be sure to ask your vet for a brushing demonstration and other tips to help you keep your cat’s mouth minty, err… I mean “poultry” fresh.

42 • PREVENTIVE VET

15

14 • PREVENTIVE VET

Hide the ‘Kitty Crunchers‘ “Kitty Crunchers,” “Kitty Roca,” or just plain old “cat poop.” Whatever you call it, your dog calls it “DELICIOUS!” Unfortunately, these litter box snacks are not at all kind to your dog’s digestive system—and the results won’t be kind to your carpets either. Prevent your dog’s access by keeping litter boxes behind baby gates or partially cracked doors (prevent full opening with an eyeLeave no ear, tooth, hook or “door strap”). Your cat will appreciate or paw untouched this, too! And even if you don’t have a cat, if you It’s important, from Day 1, to get your ever bring your dog to visit someone who does, pup accustomed to you touching and be sure to keep this tip in mind. evaluating their teeth, ears, and paws. Not only will this make your at-home, routine care easier, it will also greatly reduce the stress your pup may experience in your vet’s office and at the groomer. As an added bonus, it will help you detect problems earlier and may make the treatment of those problems easier and less expensive.

84

85

Regular baths and brushings make for a happier, healthier dog Some basic grooming will not only keep your dog’s coat clean and free of mats and certain parasites, but it will help you with early detection of wounds, swellings, and potentially cancerous growths. Brushing and combing also helps decrease stress—for both you and your pup. The recommended frequency of bathing and grooming can vary between breeds, time of year, and lifestyle factors, and too much bathing, or bathing with the wrong type of shampoo, can lead to dry, irritated skin. So, talk with your veterinarian, breeder, or your groomer to learn what frequency and products are best for your dog.

68 • PREVENTIVE VET

Praise for 101 Essential Tips Series

These books are a great educational tool that allow clients to have a valid informational piece in their hands when they walk out the door. Hopefully it avoids some of the Dr. Google searches that misinform clients. This helps my staff and myself be more efficient in exam rooms without spending hours overwhelming new pet owners with information! I love the easy-to-understand format and my clients do, too! —TAMMY STEVENSON, DVM

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Schooling Pet Parents: Steps to Integrate Client Education in Your Practice One of the best ways to build strong, trust-based bonds with your clients is by giving them all the education and awareness they want and need, even if they might not realize it yet. Not only does this increase compliance for the health and safety of their pets, it can also be a huge step in establishing a relationship with your clients, ensuring that they become repeat, devoted clients who see you and your practice as the go-to resource for their pets (and refer their friends and family to you, too). Veterinary teams should provide their clients with a broad range of preventive health and safety information so that pet owners can best raise and care for their cats and dogs. Here are a few easy tips to make client education an integrated, seamless part of your practice. Leave educational materials in the lobby and exam rooms. Help give your clients something to do during wait times by offering trusted educational handouts and books in your reception area and in your exam rooms. Even better, rotate them throughout the year to correspond to the treatment your practice is promoting. For example, offer dental client education during National Pet Dental Health month. Offer solid information in a new pet welcome kit. Instead of offering free or discounted pet wellness exams to new pet owners and new clients, promote your practiceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s value and level of dedication to your clients and their pets by advertising that all first-time clients receive a new pet welcome kit. The kit can include a toothbrush, educational materials, and a treat to welcome them to your practice. Distribute tips on social media and via your practice newsletter. All veterinary practices struggle with content for their marketing efforts, whether that be through a client newsletter, advertising,


AAHA VOICES  43 

Help give your clients something to do during wait times by offering trusted educational handouts and books in your reception area and in your exam rooms. Even better, rotate them throughout the year to correspond to the treatment your practice is promoting.

or social media channels. Client education books and materials are a perfect, pre-vetted resource. Take tips and add them to your Facebook page as part of a weekly pet health series—for example, as part of a quiz to get your followers involved. Be sure to credit and tag the original source. And don’t forget about client education that can be included in some customizable waiting or exam room TV screen packages and practice apps.

Understanding Your Pet’s Health: A Visual Guide

Offer free educational gifts as part of a promotion. Create a fun, interactive promotion using client education materials. You can create a contest on social media for the best pet photo: Advise followers to tag your practice in their photos, to be entered to win a pet owner essentials kit that includes your practice-approved products, such as client education materials, pet treats, toys, and other coveted items. Not only will this garner your practice some organic social media promotion, but it can ensure that client education materials get distributed throughout the year. mask noises that may trigger barking. Finally, never use the crate for punishment. Dogs will learn to avoid places used for punishment, and isolation can be stressful for members of social species.

frequently, especially after eating, awakening, or prolonged, vigorous exercise. Young puppies need to eliminate every hour or two when awake. The puppy will thrive if you manage to meet the needs of this schedule when training your pup to use a crate.

Veterinarians typically recommend that a female pet be spayed before her first heat Training Puppies cycle, which means at about six months of If at any point the puppy becomes very distressed and If you decide to use a crate to help train your puppy, age. Male dogs and cats can be neutered at crying does not diminish over five to ten minutes, or it introduce your puppy to the crate as soon as possible worsens, or the puppy destroys bedding, panics and six months also, but many veterinarians now and allow the dog to explore and enter the crate on upsets food and water dishes, or tries to escape the perform the surgery on pets that are as young her own. Praise her when she goes in and plays with crate by chewing or digging, let her out of the crate. as two to three months. Your veterinarian will a toy or eats a treat. Start feeding her in the crate with Try again when she is calm. If the dog either continues be able to recommend the most appropriate the door open. Then, when she seems comfortable can be helpful. Your veterinarian can help you decide these treats should to beexhibit given only during the same level of distress or the distress timing for your pet’s surgery. in the crate, begin to close the door for increasingly longer periods, ensuring she does not become distressed. With practice, your puppy will learn to associate going into her crate with a request to do so (“go in your house”; “kennel up”).

counterconditioningworsens, sessions. At first, therecommended treats crating hergive is not and may when your cat enters the roomtowith the visitor there. contribute the development of anxiety. Next, have the visitor calmly flip treats to your cat

Spaying or Neutering Your Pet

When Should My Pet Have the Surgery?

if medicine to treat fear, anxiety, and stress would be helpful for your cat. Some fearful cats will display intense aggression instead of avoidance. If this is the case with

If you have aThe regular with minimal hand movement. treatsroutine shouldfor when your dog goes your pet, your veterinarian may suggest referral to a to Ifher crate, maycalm soonand begin to enter voluntarily veterinary behaviorist who can develop a treatment plan land close to the cat. your cat she seems it’sflip time to rest or to land play with a toy. If your puppy for these more serious problems. interested, have thewhen guest treats so they The first confinement session should be after a period no signs of distress in thein crate and enters it closer to the guest,shows prompting the cat to approach of play, exercise, and elimination (when she is ready happily,reaching you can allow theyour dogcat, to nap or play in the small increments. Without toward to take a nap or quietly play with a toy). Place your can’t the visitor can allowcrate yourwhen cat toyou come upsupervise and sniff her directly. puppy in her crate with a treat and a toy and close or take food from an open hand if she is interested the door. Leave the room but remain close enough to in doing so. For cats who really enjoy playing, toys Training Adult Dogs hear her. You can expect some distress the first few may be another alternative for making a positive times your puppy is separated from family members, Creating the Perfect Adults can be trained to use crates in the same way as association with a stranger. but she should soon settle down if she is tired. Never puppies, but remember that dogs who have been overly reward the pup by letting her out when she cries or confined or entrapped may never feel comfortable in Fear of Objects whines. Instead, ignore her until the crying stops and a crate. Some puppies may never learn to love a crate. Desensitization and counterconditioning also can be release her before it starts again. If your puppy still Identifying who will and will not do well in a crate can helpful for reducing fear of inanimate things, such won’t settle in her crate, make sure that you have help you meet your dog’s needs in a kind manner as objects and noises. For example, if your kitten chosen a time when she has had sufficient play and throughout her life. If your dog needs to be hospitalized, exercise and that she has recently eliminated so she becomes frightened when a kitchen timer beeps,

Caring for Your Pet After Anesthesia

There seem to be a lot of things to worry about after anesthesia. Couldn’t I just avoid all of this by not using anesthesia?

Any time an animal goes from being awake to asleep and then awake again, the body goes through a process of rebooting, like your computer does when you turn it back on after it was off for a while. The medications your veterinarian chooses will safely allow your pet to not feel pain, discomfort, or stress during Cave the procedure, but this loss of consciousness will take time to wear off. Overall, anesthesia is a safe procedure that has allowed animals to receive high-quality care they couldn’t have otherwise received while conscious. Your veterinary team will be happy to talk to you about any other questions or concerns you may have about your pet’s anesthesia.

Crate Training

is ready to relax or nap. If young puppies are tired and happy when introduced to their crate, a toy and a treat in a quiet place will be at its most appealing. Check periodically for signs of distress, and if she is asleep or just quiet, tell her she is very good. Then, after a short period, open the door and allow her to come out if she wishes. The next time, she can spend longer in the crate before being let out. When the puppy is happy to be left for at least two hours without showing any signs of distress, you can leave the puppy for that amount of time. Remember, puppies need to eliminate

sure to your veterinary team whether your dog cover the timer withbe a towel totell produce a sound so is looks comfortable crate, as thisthen information will help quiet that your kitten towardinit awithout fear, determine how the besttreat, to manage toss a treat. If your kitten retrieves repeat your dog in the hospital. this activity again and again, uncovering the timer little by little. Eventually your cat will look forward to the noise because she has become conditioned to expect something good after hearing it. Remember, cats learn to run toward can openers because they The AAHA behavior brochures were developed by a team associate them with food! of veterinarians and certified veterinary behaviorists to reflect best practices as outlined in the 2015 AAHA Canine A similar approach can be taken with a cat that and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines, available at becomes afraid when you carry objects, such as large aaha.org/professional/resources/behavior2015.aspx. garbage bags. Take several bags that are so small 2016 American Animal Hospital Association they do not make the cat anxious and place©them in locations around the home next to containers of tasty treats. Whenever you walk by, pick up a bag and toss a treat to your cat. When you can tell that your cat gets excited whenever you pick up a bag, increase the size of the bags and repeat.

Additional Help Commercial pheromone products are safe and may effectively relieve anxiety in some cats. For severely distressed and fearful cats, antianxiety medication

Canine

Scaredy Cat

Helping Cats and Kittens with Fear

aaha.org/petowner

PET BEHAVIOR BROCHURE SERIES

© 2015 AMERICAN ANIMAL HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

ISBN 978-1-58326-281-8

90000

The AAHA behavior brochures were developed by a team of veterinarians and certified veterinary behaviorists to reflect best practices as outlined in the 2015 AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines, available at aaha.org/professional/resources/behavior2015.aspx.

aaha.org 9 781583 262818

PET BEHAVIOR BROCHURE SERIES

© 2019 AMERICAN ANIMAL HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

© 2016 American Animal Hospital Association

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can get guidance uppy can learn in sure to choose s. ty and has a e training session ns ignoring your may need a be a puppy. ur puppy to be a head halter or help you to get able puppies their own before e mix.

developed by a team ry behaviorists to e 2015 AAHA Canine idelines, available at avior2015.aspx.

44  TOOLS FOR YOUR CLIENTS: PET BEHAVIOR BROCHURES

Explain to your clients the mysteries of pet behavior and give them practical strategies for preventing or correcting behavior problems.

Pet Behavior Brochures How do I housetrain my puppy? Why is my cat destroying my sofa? So many questions, so little time. With easy-to-understand text and engaging illustrations, these brochures explain to your clients the mysteries of pet behavior and offer practical strategies for preventing or correcting problems. The AAHA Pet Behavior brochures, developed by a team of veterinarians and certified veterinary behaviorists, reflect best practices as outlined in the 2015 AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines. Your clients will appreciate this handy, take-home reference. You will appreciate time-saving backup in educating your clients and preserving the human-animal bond. Check the bulleted lists to see a sample of what each brochure covers.

|

$12.95 M    $15.95 NM Each brochure pack contains 50 trifolded brochures, 3.5" x 8.5".

Alone Time There are times when your dog will need to spend time on her own. Dogs who have a regular and appropriate social enrichment program may use these times to nap and rest. Learning to relax and settle is an important skill for dogs. Provide your dog with her own space—a room with a dog bed, a crate (open or closed) with a bed and water—for resting and “alone time.” Some dogs may still be energetic and want to engage in further play at times when they need to be left alone. These dogs can be given an opportunity to occupy their alone time by playing with toys that require them to work at getting some of their daily ration of food and calories, as in a puzzle or fooddispensing toy. These toys are not a replacement for social interaction, but they can provide a calm transition for active dogs. If your dog seems stressed when left alone, consult your veterinarian.

Basic Training Other Tips

Providing social and mental engagement for dogs can involve more than just exercise, training,

Teaching Your Puppy to Mind Her puzzles, games, or sports. Grooming sessions (teaching a dog to offer one paw or aManners specific side of the body at a time), massage sessions, and just calm quiet time together where you watch and talk softly to your dog help build a positive relationship and meet the need for social and mental interactions. These calmer interactions also work well for highenergy dogs who may need cool-down or relaxation periods throughout their day.

PET BEHAVIOR BROCHURE SERIES

Basic Training: Teaching Your Puppy to Mind Her Manners BPBT3 y How to know when your puppy is ready for training y The basic commands: come, sit, lie down, and stay y Additional tips The AAHA behavior brochures were developed by a team of veterinarians and certified veterinary behaviorists to reflect best practices as outlined in the 2015 AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines, available at aaha.org/professional/resources/behavior2015.aspx.

Training Puppies If you decide to use a crate to help train your puppy, introduce your puppy to the crate as soon as possible and allow the dog to explore and enter the crate on her own. Praise her when she goes in and plays with a toy or eats a treat. Start feeding her in the crate with the door open. Then, when she seems comfortable in the crate, begin to close the door for increasingly longer periods, ensuring she does not become distressed. With practice, your puppy will learn to associate going into her crate with a request to do so (“go in your house”; “kennel up”). The first confinement session should be after a period of play, exercise, and elimination (when she is ready to take a nap or quietly play with a toy). Place your puppy in her crate with a treat and a toy and close the door. Leave the room but remain close enough to hear her. You can expect some distress the first few times your puppy is separated fromGood family members, Are Dogs but she should soon settle down if she is tired. Never reward the pup by letting her out when she cries or whines. Instead, ignore her until the crying stops and release her before it starts again. If your puppy still won’t settle in her crate, make sure that you have chosen a time when she has had sufficient play and exercise and that she has recently eliminated so she is ready to relax or nap.

Busy Dogs

If young puppies are tired and happy when introduced to their crate, a toy and a treat in a quiet place will be at its most appealing. Check periodically for signs of distress, and if she is asleep or just quiet, tell her she is very good. Then, after a short period, open the door and allow her to come out if she wishes. The next time, she can spend longer in the crate before being let out. When the puppy is happy to bePET left for at least two hours without showing any BEHAVIOR BROCHURE SERIES signs of distress, you can leave the puppy for that amount of time. Remember, puppies need to eliminate

Busy Dogs Are Good Dogs

is to provide a digging area. Build an eight-inchdeep wood frame and sink it into the ground. Mix the soil with sand and partially bury bones, chews, or toys (smear a small amount of cheese or meat juice on the exposed ends). Occasionally give your dog food treats to reinforce appropriate digging. Sometimes having a second dog for companionship and play can reduce chewing and digging, but you must meet the needs of both dogs. You do not want to end up with two dogs who destroy. Dogs who like other dogs and who play with them may benefit the most from having a canine companion. As with chewing, punishment should not be used to stop your dog’s digging. If you do not identify and address the cause, the digging will continue in your absence. If your dog digs only while she is outside, you may be able to change her behavior by changing the way the area feels by covering the surface with wire mesh, stones, or permeable paving materials. In many cases, though, the dog will just find another spot that is like the original. If such dogs enjoy being

Destructive Cats

outside and are otherwise not distressed, you can consider building an outdoor run or kennel with a Chewing concrete floor. ButSolving if your dog is distressed in and the run,

Scratching confinement may not be the answer. Problems

Finally, please remember that some breeds are more likely to dig than others. “Earth dogs” like dachshunds and Jack Russell terriers have historically been asked to dig as part of their jobs. These puppies may benefit from training that takes advantage of their skills to seek out and find things, such as nose work and earth dog trials.

PET BEHAVIOR BROCHURE SERIES

n Animal Hospital Association

Destructive Cats: Solving Chewing and Scratching Problems

BPBS3

If at any point the puppy becomes very distressed and crying does not diminish over five to ten minutes, or it worsens, or the puppy destroys bedding, panics and upsets food and water dishes, or tries to escape the crate by chewing or digging, let her out of the crate. Try again when she is calm. If the dog either continues to exhibit the same level of distress or the distress worsens, crating her is not recommended and may contribute to the development of anxiety.

y How to set up a positive training environment y Tips for providing appropriate Training Adult Dogs exercise y Tips for providing mental stimulation

If you have a regular routine for when your dog goes to her crate, she may soon begin to enter voluntarily when it’s time to rest or to play with a toy. If your puppy shows no signs of distress in the crate and enters it happily, you can allow the dog to nap or play in the crate when you can’t supervise her directly.

Adults can be trained to use crates in the same way as

y Exploration and play y Preventing chewing and scratching problems y What to do if problems persist The AAHA behavior brochures were developed by a team of veterinarians and certified veterinary behaviorists to reflect best practices as outlined in the 2015 AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines, available at aaha.org/professional/resources/behavior2015.aspx. © 2016 American Animal Hospital Association

press.aaha.org

BPCT3

Crate Training

Creating the Perfect Canine Cave

puppies, but remember that dogs who have been overly confined or entrapped may never feel comfortable in a crate. Some puppies may never learn to love a crate.

y Training puppies y Training adult dogs y How to choose a crate

Identifying who will and will not do well in a crate can help you meet your dog’s needs in a kind manner

throughout her life. If your dog needs to be hospitalized, be sure to tell your veterinary team whether your dog is comfortable in a crate, as this information will help determine how best to manage your dog in the hospital.

The AAHA behavior brochures were developed by a team of veterinarians and certified veterinary behaviorists to reflect best practices as outlined in the 2015 AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines, available at aaha.org/professional/resources/behavior2015.aspx.

PET BEHAVIOR BROCHURE SERIES

© 2016 American Animal Hospital Association

Making Progress Step by Step Once your dog learns to accept unfamiliar people who move slowly and calmly, he should gradually be introduced to similar but progressively more challenging situations, including quicker movements and various tones of voice used by the person who is approaching. If there is risk of aggression, seek the assistance of a veterinary behaviorist before starting these exercises. Specific things about a person may make a dog anxious, such as beards, glasses, hats, carried objects, uniforms, canes, wheelchairs, and tone of voice. Pay attention to what makes your dog most anxious and avoid these stimuli in your initial training sessions. For example, if your dog is especially afraid of beards and glasses, wait until he is

BPDC3

Crate Training: Creating the Perfect Canine Cave

frequently, especially after eating, awakening, or prolonged, vigorous exercise. Young puppies need to eliminate every hour or two when awake. The puppy will thrive if you manage to meet the needs of this schedule when training your pup to use a crate.

© 2016 American Animal Hospital Association

n Animal Hospital Association

developed by a team ary behaviorists to he 2015 AAHA Canine uidelines, available at avior2015.aspx.

mask noises that may trigger barking. Finally, never use the crate for punishment. Dogs will learn to avoid places used for punishment, and isolation can be stressful for members of social species.

comfortable with people without beards and glasses before including them in the conditioning sessions. Slowly add accessories such as hats, large purses, sunglasses, and backpacks, and gradually change the type of person (for example, from a man with a beard to a woman with a walker).

Destructive Doggies

If your dog is overly fearful or anxious, antianxiety medications, natural supplements, or pheromones may help him to be less distressed and to become Solving Digging and happier and calmer. Discuss these options with your veterinarian.

Chewing Problems

Preventing the Fear of People In most cases, dogs will not become fearful of people if they have ample opportunities to experience and interact with a wide variety of people under nonfearful conditions during the first few months of life, are frequently handled in a gentle manner, and are raised without harsh training techniques or physical punishment. Enrolling in puppy classes can be an excellent way to ensure exposure to a variety of people, dogs, and environments. Puppies as young as eight weeks of age can and should be enrolled in classes designed for them and given by trainers who BEHAVIOR SERIES use PET only positive methodsBROCHURE and avoid restraint and fear.

Destructive Doggies: Solving Digging and Chewing Problems

Fearful Fido: Helping Your Dog Overcome the Fear of People

BPDD3

y Socialization and counterconditioning y Controlling social situations y Improving control and safety

y How to select and use chew and feeding toys y Preventing digging and chewing problems y Anxiety and destructive behavior

The AAHA behavior brochures were developed by a team of veterinarians and certified veterinary behaviorists to reflect best practices as outlined in the 2015 AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines, available at aaha.org/professional/resources/behavior2015.aspx. © 2016 American Animal Hospital Association

BPFF3

Fearful Fido

Helping Your Dog Overcome the Fear of People

PET BEHAVIOR BROCHURE SERIES


TOOLS FOR YOUR CLIENTS: PET BEHAVIOR BROCHURES  45 

Praise for Pet Behavior Brochures

We love the behavior brochures. I feel like we hand one out at least every other appointment. They provide great information for clients to understand without being filled with medical terminology. They also provide a lot of good tips and tricks for puppy and kitten owners! —MEAGAN DARROW, CERTIFIED VETERINARY ASSISTANT, DOGWOOD VETERINARY HOSPITAL AND LASER CENTER

We are very happy to have the behavior brochures. The information is informative but succinct. It is nice to have something to hand to clients to reinforce what I tell them behavior wise, especially with the limited time we have to cover behavior during routine appointments. —RACHEL L. SCOTLAND, VMD, ABSECON VETERINARY HOSPITAL

ention

heaths as one way of se cats use their paws in idea to keep those nails m snagging sensitive skin. at to accept nail trimming, and pick the right time. ail trimming is when your tens occasionally nap, so e to trim nails. Handle the d your cat with praise, a t. Next, manipulate his er and repeat the pattern object. Finally, clip the end ur cat. If you go at the cat’s s agitated, you should be imming is a great time, and elping. Never force any nail trim, and always cease ts.

adult sitting across the room. Each adult takes turns calling the dog back and forth to sit for a treat. Coach your child to say “come” and “sit” with the grown-up and toss the treat to your dog. As your child learns the words, the adult’s voice can be phased out.

Keeping Things Safe Babies and young children should never be left alone with any dog and must be closely supervised when a dog is present. When you cannot supervise, you should use a room or crate for your dog in a quiet spot to keep the child and dog separated. Even friendly dogs and family dogs can pose an unintended danger to small children. The child could also unintentionally injure the dog. Teach your child safe behaviors around dogs. Tell your child to avoid dogs that are resting, eating, or playing, or dogs that seem hurt. Discourage your child from hugging dogs and petting their faces. Dogs are happiest when petted on the back first. Also instruct children not to run when playing with or near dogs. Tell your child to never hit or yell at the dog. Tell your child to always say the family dog’s name before a pat so the dogthe isn’t caught off with guard. an Attitude Taming Kitten

The Feisty Feline

You must teach by example because kids typically mimic their parents’ behavior. If you are ever concerned about your dog’s proximity to your child, use a happy tone to call the dog out of the situation. When you cannot properly supervise their interaction, confine your dog. Never use physical punishment or harsh words to correct the dog. When your child and dog are next to each other, never scold either one. Instead, reward both your dog and your child for exhibiting calm, safe behaviors.

es were developed by a team veterinary behaviorists to ned in the 2015 AAHA Canine ment Guidelines, available at ces/behavior2015.aspx.

PET BEHAVIOR BROCHURE SERIES

The Feisty Feline: Taming the Kitten with an Attitude

when he will need to be

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, particulate, soft litter, like ompostable litters. Cats e surfaces may do well

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es were developed by a team veterinary behaviorists to ned in the 2015 AAHA Canine ment Guidelines, available at ces/behavior2015.aspx.

16 American Animal Hospital Association

Once your dog is better, if she is taking medication, do not rush to wean her from it. Discuss the benefits of long-term treatment with your veterinarian. If at any point in the future you see her beginning to show signs of distress again, get help immediately. This is one behavioral emergency that is best treated as early as possible.

BPFL3 y Felines’ natural instincts y Providing attack/ play outlets y Controlling nighttime attacks

The AAHA behavior brochures were developed by a team of veterinarians and certified veterinary behaviorists to reflect best practices as outlined in the 2015 AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines, available at aaha.org/professional/resources/behavior2015.aspx.

16 American Animal Hospital Association

If your dog never played with her food toys when you were gone, couldn’t take a treat, and wouldn’t eat before you left but now she can do these things, she is improving! Continue what you are doing; it’s working!

Fido Was First

Training Your Dog for Baby’s Arrival

PET BEHAVIOR BROCHURE SERIES

Fido Was First: Training Your Dog for Baby’s Arrival BPDW3 y Training dogs to tolerate children y Helping babies and dogs interact safely y Tips for interactions with newborns, toddlers, and beyond

The AAHA behavior brochures were developed by a team of veterinarians and certified veterinary behaviorists to reflect best practices as outlined in the 2015 AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines, available at aaha.org/professional/resources/behavior2015.aspx.

© 2016 American Animal Hospital Association

settle, and instantly reward quiet. If you practice this, you will be able to gradually increase the amount of time your dog is quiet. Verbal and physical punishment is generally ineffective in the control and correction of barking. It may actually increase your dog’s fear and anxiety, and in turn the barking may increase or change to aggression when the situation is repeated (like meeting new people). In fact, if barking is due to fear, treatment should focus on addressing the fear itself. For this intervention to be successful, you may need the help of your veterinarian and/or a veterinary behaviorist. The use of head halters to close the dog’s mouth is sometimes recommended as an intervention for barking. If you are at the point of doing this, please consult your veterinarian and/or a veterinary behaviorist so that proper ways of interrupting one behavior and then rewarding a substituted behavior can be discussed.

Litter Box Blues Practical Products

There are a number of remote-activated products on the market (ultrasonic collars, shock collars, citronella Solving Housesoiling collars) that are meant to interrupt or punish barking. Problems None of these meet the requirement of making clear to the dog the appropriate or desired behavior or provide a reward for the good behavior. All of these products can scare dogs, and their use is not recommended. Remote treat dispensers may be helpful for teaching “quiet” to dogs who bark reactively when someone visits. These dispensers can be triggered from a distance without any obvious clue that anyone is

Litter Box Blues: Solving Housesoiling Problems y Types of housesoiling y Ruling out medical problems y Marking and housesoiling solutions

making this happen as soon as someone comes to the door. Because they provide a primary auditory signal indicating a treat will come, a secondary auditory signal in the noise made delivering the treat, and, in some devices, a visual signal about the reward, dogs who are not distressed very often quickly learn to run to the treat dispenser when someone is at the door. Clever placement of the dispenser also means that by

PET BEHAVIOR BROCHURE SERIES

the time dogs greet guests, they are happy, calmer, and not rushing them by the door!

BPHM3

Home Alone

Solving Separation Anxiety Problems

PET BEHAVIOR BROCHURE SERIES

biting. (See also our brochure “Basic Training.”)

Noisy Canines: Solving Barking Problems

Teach your puppy what behaviors you expect of her before she gets any rewards. For example, ask her to sit before giving her things she wants. This will help

BPNC3

dogs to “look” gets their attention, while “sit” acts as a stop signal that interrupts bratty behaviors. Training sessions should combine social time, mental stimulation, and learning new skills while keeping your puppy focused on behaviors other than play

and these signals establish a shared pattern in your calm behaviors that is rewarded.

Training Aids A dragline can be a helpful tool for managing your pup’s biting behavior. Attach a long line (10 feet indoors and 20 feet or longer outdoors) to your pet’s collar so you can quickly grab the line when you need to stop the biting. Be sure that your dog is

Noisy Canines

closely supervised when she is wearing a dragline. With a gentle pull on the leash you can immediately stop mouthing and biting. Release tension as soon Solving Barking Problems

as she settles down. If your puppy will not focus, gets easily distracted, or uses her mouth excessively, more effective control of the head and muzzle can

Piranha Puppies: Keeping Mouthing and Biting Under Control

say “okay” and give her the food. If she touches your hand before two seconds pass and before you say “okay,” immediately say “enough” with sufficient force to make her back away but not frighten her. Be dramatic, lean toward your pup, and make eye

contact when you give the instructive reprimand. Gradually increase the time your puppy has to wait. Once she learns to leave the food alone on command, practice the exercise without food by using only your hand. Later, repeat the exercise when your puppy is more keyed up.

y Why dogs bark and growl y Preventing excessive barking y Correcting bad habits The goal is to get to the point that your puppy will

not take food or touch your hand once you have said “enough,” no matter how tasty the treat or how interesting your hand. For this technique to work,

the whole family must be very consistent, have precise timing, and practice every day. If necessary, a leash and head halter can also be used to teach the

BPPI3

“enough” command. Whenever your puppy ignores the command to stop biting, a gentle pull on the leash will close her mouth. Eventually, she will stop biting when you give the command.

Piranha Puppies

Keeping Mouthing and Biting Under Control

be achieved by using the dragline with a head halter. Head halters can give all family members, even young children, a considerable amount of control over the pet.

Enough Is Enough: Using a “Stop” Command If biting begins during play, it is important that your puppy learns to stop on command. This can be done by giving an “enough” command when she is biting. Begin training when your puppy is very calm. Hand

The AAHA behavior brochures were developed by a team of veterinarians and certified veterinary behaviorists to reflect best practices as outlined in the 2015 AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines, available at aaha.org/professional/resources/behavior2015.aspx. © 2016 American Animal Hospital Association

y What causes separation anxiety y What other behavior issues anxiety may cause y How to help dogs overcome the problem

© 2016 American Animal Hospital Association

her to learn to pay attention to you. If you often just ask her to sit and look at you for no reason and then give her a treat, she will learn that you are consistent

BPLB3

Home Alone: Solving Separation Anxiety Problems

her a small piece of dry food as you say “okay” in a relaxed tone. Next, hold another piece of food in front of her and firmly say “enough” without raising

BROCHURE SERIES yourPET voiceBEHAVIOR or yelling. If she doesn’t attempt to make contact with your hand or the food for two seconds,

The AAHA behavior brochures were developed by a team of veterinarians and certified veterinary behaviorists to reflect best practices as outlined in the 2015 AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines, available at aaha.org/professional/resources/behavior2015.aspx.

y How to discourage biting y Tips for channeling energy y Teaching the “stop” command

PET BEHAVIOR BROCHURE SERIES

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46  TOOLS FOR YOUR CLIENTS: PET BEHAVIOR BROCHURES

these treats should be given only during counterconditioning sessions. At first, give the treats

ential loss of her s whose moms ut food and may

when your cat enters the room with the visitor there. Next, have the visitor calmly flip treats to your cat with minimal hand movement. The treats should land close to the cat. If your cat seems calm and

ans) who approach ou are not a threat almly, you will put a , place about 10% come and eat.

interested, have the guest flip treats so they land closer to the guest, prompting the cat to approach in small increments. Without reaching toward your cat, the visitor can allow your cat to come up and sniff

dog sit, then pick peat, occasionally eats all the food.

or take food from an open hand if she is interested in doing so. For cats who really enjoy playing, toys may be another alternative for making a positive

whining, stop. Just veterinarian about duce any threat me near her while

Pushy Pups: Using the Power of Positive Control can be helpful. Your veterinarian can help you decide

if medicine to treat fear, anxiety, and stress would be helpful for your cat. Some fearful cats will display intense aggression instead of avoidance. If this is the case with your pet, your veterinarian may suggest referral to a veterinary behaviorist who can develop a treatment plan for these more serious problems.

BPPP3

Fear of Objects Desensitization and counterconditioning also can be helpful for reducing fear of inanimate things, such as objects and noises. For example, if your kitten becomes frightened when a kitchen timer beeps, cover the timer with a towel to produce a sound so quiet that your kitten looks toward it without fear, then

undisturbed, and threat if you re hungry.

Pushy Pups

toss a treat. If your kitten retrieves the treat, repeat this activity again and again, uncovering the timer

Using the Power ofyour Positive Control little by little. Eventually cat will look forward to

nly if it does not behavior. Teach

the noise because she has become conditioned to

e game begins game without command during esume play. When

expect something good after hearing it. Remember, cats learn to run toward can openers because they associate them with food!

away and give a og (as long as she aggressive).

A similar approach can be taken with a cat that becomes afraid when you carry objects, such as large garbage bags. Take several bags that are so small they do not make the cat anxious and place them in

may arise. If you

y Choosing the right dog y How to handle your hound y Teaching the “drop it” command

locations around the home next to containers of tasty treats. Whenever you walk by, pick up a bag and toss a treat to your cat. When you can tell that your cat gets excited whenever you pick up a bag, increase

py or controlling ct your veterinarian.

developed by a team ry behaviorists to e 2015 AAHA Canine uidelines, available at avior2015.aspx.

Additional Help Commercial pheromone products are safe and may PET BEHAVIOR BROCHURE SERIES effectively relieve anxiety in some cats. For severely distressed and fearful cats, antianxiety medication

known verbal requests, or fail to execute tasks with their former skill, enthusiasm, or accuracy. Such tasks may include obedience or agility routines and more complex, trained work like sniffing for drugs

work keeps dogs and cats interested in using their innate odor-detection skills to find items for which they are rewarded.

or working as a guide dog. Some dogs and cats appear to forget their normal patterns and locations for urination and defecation.

Dogs and cats who are aging may also have liver,

kidney, or another organ system disease, like diabetes, that requires special diets, modified exercise, and changes in schedules or environments to meet the need of increased frequency of urination or defecation.

BPSC3

you see any of these signs of change. A complete physical and laboratory exam will investigate possible medical and physical causes of the problem. A neurological exam will explore basic

The litter box may need to be changed more frequently and moved to a place where the cat can reach it more easily. More litter boxes with lower sides at the entry

y How to understand why some cats feel fearful y Tips for helping cats with a fear of people y Tips for helping cats with a fear of objects

brain and nervous system function. More detailed tests such as ultrasound, X-rays, or brain imaging (MRI, CT) may be required. Behavioral tests are

point may be required. Dogs may need shorter, more frequent walks or an automatic dog door. Many dogs benefit from harnesses that help them negotiate stairs or obstacles. Physical therapy, including strengthening

being developed that may detect early changes in behavior associated with brain aging, but behavioral signs are nonspecific, so this is difficult.

The AAHA behavior brochures were developed by a team of veterinarians and certified veterinary behaviorists to reflect best practices as outlined in the 2015 AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines, available at aaha.org/professional/resources/behavior2015.aspx.

n Animal Hospital Association

Scaredy Cat

Treating Behavior Problems in Older Pets Helping Cats andforKittens with Fear Fortunately, treatments cognitive problems are now available. These include prescription diets

designed to boost cognitive function and protect the brain from the effects of changes in metabolism of the brain cells, supplements, and medications, available through your veterinarian, that may slow the progression of cognitive changes associated with brain aging and improve the behavioral signs noted. In addition to medical treatments and diet, there are other things you can do to help your pet. For example,

Exercise your dog or cat daily, play games frequently, and use verbal requests to enhance and test skills

When Mistakes Occur When mistakes occur, thoroughly clean all soiled areas with a commercial odor neutralizer. Never punish your kitten for making a mess outside his litter box. Punishment can make the problem worse and might cause your kitten to fear you, especially if you swat him or rub his nose in the mess. Instead, after rinsing repeatedly with club soda or sparkling water (which will help make it easier to clean) and sopping/ drying the area, use a good odor eliminator and cover the area with plastic. This will both protect the area from resoiling and change the way it looks and feels to the cat. Then, place a box that your cat likes with the litter that he likes nearby. Reward the cat when he uses it. Once your cat routinely uses the box, you can move it very slowly to a more desirable (for you) area if the box is not where you want it.

a happy, confident nd patience. If you you about her ssible.

If the box cannot be moved or the cat continues to seek other areas, consult your veterinarian and/or a veterinary behaviorist. A physical exam and diagnostic tests can help to rule out medical problems. For example, bladder conditions, diarrhea, and constipation can irritate yourto kitten he Introducing Your Puppy thewhen World eliminates and cause him to avoid the box.

The Social Scene Spraying

Spraying is a form of social marking that may begin around six months of age. Spraying cats generally back up to a vertical surface, such as a wall or sofa, tread their feet, stretch out and wiggle their tail, and spray urine against the vertical object. Some cats exhibit the behaviors but do not spray. Neutering eliminates spraying in some cats and decreases it in others, but neutered cats of both sexes may spray. Spraying can be a sign of concerns about the social environment and actually provides you with information about how your cat sees his world. If your cat continues to spray, your veterinarian and/or a veterinary behaviorist can help you determine what is bothering your cat and how he can be helped.

developed by a team ry behaviorists to e 2015 AAHA Canine uidelines, available at avior2015.aspx.

PET BEHAVIOR BROCHURE SERIES

The Social Scene: Introducing Your Puppy to the World BPSH3 y Socialization y Habituation y Additional ways to help puppies develop

The AAHA behavior brochures were developed by a team of veterinarians and certified veterinary behaviorists to reflect best practices as outlined in the 2015 AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines, available at aaha.org/professional/resources/behavior2015.aspx.

n Animal Hospital Association

Understanding Behavior Changes in Aging Pets

The AAHA behavior brochures were developed by a team of veterinarians and certified veterinary behaviorists to reflect best practices as outlined in the 2015 AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines, available at aaha.org/professional/resources/behavior2015.aspx.

during daily walks and play. Reward dogs and cats for participation and positive responses to ensure that you PET maintain those close BROCHURE communication skills that BEHAVIOR SERIES

y Healthcare for older pets y Medical problems that affect behavior y Treating behavior problems

Senior Moments

And, of course, be sure to give your pet lots of love and attention during his or her golden years. Old dogs and cats have shared your life and are special. They deserve special care.

PET BEHAVIOR BROCHURE SERIES

© 2016 American Animal Hospital Association

© 2016 American Animal Hospital Association

e. During the early itive and minimize ppy anxious. r puppy seems ple, or pets. Just its should also be reats, toys, mats, with veterinary ughout their inary exam, she uppies who are nation need extra r positive training

BPSM3

exercises, hydrotherapy, and coordination training may lessen pain and strengthen muscles. All of these physical interventions also appear to have beneficial effects on brain aging.

data suggest that keeping dogs and cats physically and mentally active improves cognitive function.

the size of the bags and repeat.

Senior Moments: Understanding Behavior Changes in Aging Pets

will allow you to monitor cognitive change. Newer food toys and puzzles for cats and dogs offer increasingly challenging ways for them to feed themselves and are helpful for maintaining problem-solving skills. Nose

Your veterinarian should be consulted as soon as

association with a stranger.

at into her bowl as reat, consult your growling while at wl just because

Scaredy Cat: Helping Cats and Kittens with Fear

new tasks may be greatly impaired in dogs and cats with brain aging. Dogs may no longer respond to

Taking the Hassle Out of Keeping Your Cool Housetraining Your Kitty

Taking the Hassle Out of Housetraining Your Puppy

BPHK3

BPHP3

the rooms, using baby gates, moving furniture over the soiled areas, or increasing supervision.

When you are unable to provide supervision because you are busy, sleeping, or away from home, confine your pup to a relatively small, safe area or a crate. A wire or plastic crate may provide a safe place in which to confine your puppy when you cannot observe her. Crates should have comfortable, safe, and clean bedding so that your pup feels secure and warm. Most pups will quickly adapt to a crate, but some will be distressed. If distress lasts longer than 15 minutes, a crate may not work for your puppy, but a more open x-pen might. Be sure to associate good things with the crate; never use it to banish or punish your dog, or as a babysitter. Don’t use a crate for longer than your puppy can physically control her need to eliminate, or for more than four hours at a time during the day on a daily basis. Remember that crates must be large enough that growing dogs will always be able to stand up, stretch fully, and turn around, and that they must have flooring on which the puppy cannot slip.

No pup was ever housetrained without the dog or human making a mistake or two. Be prepared for the inevitable. It doesn’t help to become frustrated and harshly discipline your puppy. Punishment is the least effective and most overused approach to housetraining. Punishment of any kind—yelling, hitting, throwing tins of pennies, shoving the dog’s nose into the urine or feces—will scare your puppy, convince her you are not trustworthy, and damage your relationship. Your goal is to teach your puppy where to eliminate. Puppies must eliminate, so your ability to help meet your dog’s needs is critical. If you see your puppy beginning to squat, quickly call to her and scoop her up. These actions may be enough to stop her mid-course, and you can then quickly take her to the place you wish her to eliminate (and praise her when she does).

y Selecting the right equipment y What to do when mistakes occur y Causes of housesoiling and marking

If your pup will be home for longer periods, arrange for Taking the Out of someone to walk her every fewHassle hours or use a daycare facility that has a puppy program. If neither of these is an option, you can confine your pup to a larger area (e.g., a small room or an x-pen) with enough space to rest and play and a spot to eliminate. Ensure that the elimination spot is recognizable as such. Commercially available puppy elimination pads are absorbant and decrease mess and odors.

Housetraining Your Kitty

Taking the Hassle Out of

Housetraining Your Puppy

Some dogs urinate as they greet family members. Don’t yell or discipline—a dog like this may be nervous or excited, and scolding will make the problem worse. Instead, avoid any type of greeting that triggers this behavior. Once you have stopped triggering the behavior, you can teach her to sit for a treat and that she only gets the treat if she looks up at you and does not leak. For this strategy to work, you must ensure your dog’s bladder is empty before you start. You can then work with rewarding a sit and look outside, moving indoors when the dog is perfect in many places. Within one to two days of repeated practice, the majority of these dogs have their problems solved.

Returning to the Crime Scene To help prevent your pup from returning to previously soiled areas, clean well. First, remove the urine and feces; then clean with soap and water. Follow all product-specific cleaning instructions for rugs. Follow the wash with at least one club soda soak, which will help bubble up any remaining urine or feces. Blot and repeat until the rinse is clear. Then, apply a good, commercially available odor-eliminating product. The best products both enzymatically break down urine or feces and remove odors that may attract your puppy. If your pupBEHAVIOR begins eliminating in areas of the home, PET BROCHURE SERIES prevent access to these areas by closing doors to

y Getting the message across y Scheduling dinnertime y Preventing mistakes

If you remember that your puppy is a baby, it will be easier to have the patience to help this baby mature, and housetraining will follow naturally. The AAHA behavior brochures were developed by a team of veterinarians and certified veterinary behaviorists to reflect best practices as outlined in the 2015 AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines, available at aaha.org/professional/resources/behavior2015.aspx.

© 2016 American Animal Hospital Association

PET BEHAVIOR BROCHURE SERIES

© 2016 American Animal Hospital Association

See page 50 and press.aaha.org for cost-saving brochure sets! move on—gradually—to longer distances. No puppy can learn to stay readily if you leave her sight unless she has gradually been taught that she can happily stay for smaller distances.

Additional Tips Here are some additional tips to make great progress during basic training. Patience, consistency, and repetition are key! • Start training in a quiet area. When the puppy’s responses to your commands become dependable, move the training to environments with more distractions. • Be sure your puppy knows one signal before proceeding to the next. Tone of voice is important. When teaching “come,” “sit,” and “down,” use a calm, positive, and consistent tone of voice to get the dog’s attention and a short, high-pitched signal to mark a wellperformed task. Deeper, slower words have been shown to help dogs stay still, so “stay” should be a request delivered in deeper, drawn-out tones. • Avoid repeating commands if your dog is not paying attention. If she doesn’t respond, go back to the last signal in training that she did well and repeat that. If the puppy is not paying attention to you, consider that she may need a bathroom or attention break. If you return to a short session, you should be able to make progress by going slowly and repeating the steps noted. • Praise your puppy and say “good dog” whenever you give a food reward. This will reinforce desired behavior and help maintain a strong response, even as the food reward is gradually withdrawn. • Some dogs do best with verbal signals; others benefit from hand signals. Hand signals can be learned with verbal signals if praise acts as a marker for the signal (“good sit”). If the dog starts to follow your hands but does not listen to the signal, return to verbal signals and instantaneous rewards to ensure your puppy understands the concept.

• Enroll in a Time puppy class so you can get guidance Alone from the instructors and your puppy can learn in There are times when your dog will need to spend the presence of other dogs. Be sure to choose time on her own. Dogs who have a regular and one that uses positive methods. appropriate social enrichment program may use • When your puppy seems fidgety and has a these times to nap and rest. Learning to relax and shorter attention span, keep the training session settle is an important skill for dogs. Provide your dog short and stop before she begins ignoring your with her own space—a room with a dog bed, a crate signals. Consider that the dog may need a (open or closed) with a bed and water—for resting bathroom break or time to just be a puppy. and “alone time.” • If you have difficulty getting your puppy to be calm and focused, a lead and a head halter or Some dogs may still be energetic and want to engage front-attachment harness may help you to get in further play at times when they need to be left the desired response. Distractable puppies alone. These dogs can be given an opportunity to should be able to work well on their own before occupy their alone time by playing with toys that other puppies are added to the mix. require them to work at getting some of their daily ration of food and calories, as in a puzzle or fooddispensing toy. These toys are not a replacement for social interaction, but they can provide a calm transition for active dogs. If your dog seems stressed when left alone, consult your veterinarian.

Other Tips Providing social and mental engagement for dogs can involve more than just exercise, training, puzzles, games, or sports. Grooming sessions (teaching a dog to offer one paw or a specific side of the body at a time), massage sessions, and just calm quiet time together where you watch and talk softly to your dog help build a positive relationship and meet the need for social and mental interactions. These calmer interactions also work well for highenergy dogs who may need cool-down or relaxation periods throughout their day.

The AAHA behavior brochures were developed by a team of veterinarians and certified veterinary behaviorists to reflect best practices as outlined in the 2015 AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines, available at aaha.org/professional/resources/behavior2015.aspx. © 2016 American Animal Hospital Association

mask noises that may trigger barking. Finally, never use the crate for punishment. Dogs will learn to avoid places used for punishment, and isolation can be stressful for members of social species.

My dog has recently recovered from the flu. Is she still contagious?

frequently, especially after eating, awake

How can I prevent canine flu in my dog? It is important for you to stay informed of disease risks in your area. Your veterinarian can help you stay up to date with outbreaks in the area and avoid the higher-risk areas if you are traveling with your dog.

(“go in your house”; “kennel up”). The first confinement session should be after a period of play, exercise, and elimination (when she is ready to take a nap or quietly play with a toy). Place your puppy in her crate with a treat and a toy and close the door. Leave the room but remain close enough to hear her. You can expect some distress the first few

Basic Training

times yourYour puppy isPuppy separatedto from familyHer members, Teaching Mind but she should soon settle down ifManners she is tired. Never

As people can move the flu virus between dogs on their hands and clothing, dog owners should wash their hands after touching other dogs, especially dogs who are sick.

Busy Dogs

Vaccines are available to help protect your dog from the flu. Vaccines may be advised for dogs who are likely to be around many other dogs or based on flu outbreaks in your area. As with human flu vaccines, canine flu vaccines may not completely prevent infection in vaccinated dogs, but they will decrease the chance of your dog becoming infected and developing severe illness. Talk to your veterinarian about whether your dog should be vaccinated against canine influenza.

Are Good Dogs

reward the pup by letting her out when she cries or whines. Instead, ignore her until the crying stops and release her before it starts again. If your puppy still won’t settle in her crate, make sure that you have chosen a time when she has had sufficient play and exercise and that she has recently eliminated so she is ready to relax or nap. If young puppies are tired and happy when introduced to their crate, a toy and a treat in a quiet place will be at its most appealing. Check periodically for signs of distress, and if she is asleep or just quiet, tell her she is very good. Then, after a short period, open the door and allow her to come out if she The AAHA behavior brochures were developed by a team wishes. The next time, she can spend longer in the of veterinarians and certified veterinary behaviorists to before being let out. When puppy is Canine happy reflect crate best practices as outlined in the the 2015 AAHA to beBehavior left for atManagement least two hours withoutSERIES showing any and Feline Guidelines, available at PET BEHAVIOR BROCHURE signs of distress, you can leave the puppy for that aaha.org/professional/resources/behavior2015.aspx. amount of time. Remember, puppies need to eliminate

Here are a few tips to keep your dog safe: • Be sure that all of your puppies and dogs are vaccinated properly against parvovirus. • Don’t skip or delay any of your puppy’s vaccinations in the initial immunization series. • Ask your veterinarian to remind you when your dog needs booster vaccinations. • Minimize contact with other puppies or dogs and limit visits to places frequented by other dogs. Until your puppy is fully vaccinated, avoid visits to high-risk areas, such as parks and pet stores. (Note: Puppies need contact with other puppies and dogs for socialization. Talk to your veterinarian about the best time to begin socializing your puppy.) • If one of your puppies or dogs has parvovirus, keep him or her physically separated from the others. • If a visiting puppy or dog has an “accident” in your home, promptly remove any fecal material and disinfect the area with a solution of 1/2 cup (4 ounces) of bleach diluted in 1 gallon of water as a precaution. • Use the bleach-and-water solution as part of a general cleaning process for areas of your house frequented by unvaccinated puppies or dogs.

Your veterinarian will be able to tell you when your dog can be around other dogs. To prevent illness in other dogs, any dogs who are suspected or known to have the flu should be kept separated from other dogs for several weeks after recovery.

Training Puppies If you decide to use a crate to help train your puppy, introduce your puppy to the crate as soon as possible and allow the dog to explore and enter the crate on her own. Praise her when she goes in and plays with a toy or eats a treat. Start feeding her in the crate with the door open. Then, when she seems comfortable in the crate, begin to close the door for increasingly longer periods, ensuring she does not become distressed. With practice, your puppy will learn to associate going into her crate with a request to do so

Canine Parvovirus

Canine Influenza Virus

There seem to be a lot of things to worry about after anesthesia. Couldn’t I just avoid all of this by not using anesthesia? Any time an animal goes from being awake to asleep and then awake again, the body goes through a process of rebooting, like your computer does when you turn it back on after it was off for a while. The medications your veterinarian chooses will safely allow your pet to not feel pain, discomfort, or stress during the procedure, but this loss of consciousness will take time to wear off. Overall, anesthesia is a safe procedure that has allowed animals to receive high-quality care they couldn’t have otherwise received while conscious. Your veterinary team will be happy to talk to you about any other questions or concerns you may have about your pet’s anesthesia.

Caring for Your Pet After Anesthesia

• Give your pet insulin at the same time every day, after your pet eats. Don’t make any changes in medication without first checking with your veterinarian. • Do not give insulin to your pet if she is not eating or vomits soon after eating. Call your veterinarian or a local emergency veterinary hospital immediately if you notice any change in appetite or behavior. • Reward your pet for good behavior when you give insulin injections. Try to make the experience as comfortable as possible by being patient, loving, and gentle. • Keep a small container of corn syrup on hand to give your pet if she acts weak or begins tremoring, as this may indicate that her blood glucose is too low. Do not try to give your pet corn syrup if she is too weak to swallow. If this situation occurs, contact your veterinarian or emergency veterinary hospital as soon as possible and ask what should be done. This can be a life-threatening emergency.

Many pet owners feel overwhelmed when they learn their pet is diabetic and will require additional care. After several weeks of this new routine, you may be surprised by how well you and your pet have adjusted. Staying in close contact with your veterinary team is especially important in the first few months of treatment.

Dental Anesthesia

How Should I Clean My Pet’s Ears and Administer Ear Medications?

Your veterinarian will recommend how often you should clean and medicate your pet’s ears and will demonstrate the proper procedure. Generally, you will need to clean the ear prior to using ear medication. Your veterinary staff can recommend products designed for cleaning the ears at home. You may use small pieces of cotton, tissue, or cotton swabs to clean the smaller crevices that you can see near the opening of the ear canal. Do not use cotton swabs to probe deeper than you can see, as this may cause damage to the tympanic membrane (eardrum). To administer ear medication, squirt it directly into the pet’s ear, as directed by your veterinarian. Make sure the medication runs down to the intersection between the vertical and horizontal canal (see illustration). Gently massage the ear canal between your forefinger and thumb. Allowing your pet to shake his or her head may help loosen debris that lies deeper in the canal.

Visit aaha.org/diabetes for more information on diabetes management in dogs and cats. ISBN 978-1-58326-281-8

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Diabetes in Pets

Ear Conditions in Pets

Detecting this state requires additional, more specific testing. Your veterinarian can provide supportive care for your cat and treat some of the secondary illnesses that develop as a result of the infection.

Keep in mind that palliative care is not only for pets living with a terminal disease, but can also be used to manage curable or long-term conditions. Your pet’s quality of life is extremely important, and the goal of palliative care is to support or improve his or her quality of life.

Frequently, diagnostic tests such as a blood profile, fecal exam, urinalysis, and radiographs (X-rays) are required to help your veterinarian know which supportive treatments are needed. These may include administration of fluids, B vitamins, appetite stimulants, or antidiarrheal medications.

End-of-life care and decisionmaking should take into consideration all of your pet’s needs and should maximize your pet’s comfort and minimize suffering. A collaborative and supportive partnership between you and your veterinary healthcare team is important in this process.

No drugs or therapeutic agents have been approved for treating feline immunodeficiency viruses at this time, but cats may benefit from certain prescription medications or nutritional supplementation as prescribed by your veterinarian.

What happens after choosing hospice care for your pet? Similar to human medicine, some veterinarians focus on end-of-life care for pets. Your veterinarian may offer this service or refer you to such a professional. Whether you are working with a hospice veterinarian or your own veterinarian, the process will be similar. After the terminal diagnosis, your veterinary healthcare team will: 1. Educate you about your pet’s disease 2. Evaluate your needs, beliefs, and goals for your pet 3. Develop a personalized end-of-life treatment plan 4. Implement palliative care measures

Cats can live long and relatively healthy lives despite retroviral infection. Some related disorders (including secondary infections) can be well controlled if they are diagnosed early and treated aggressively.

How Can These Diseases Be Prevented? First, test your cat to see if he or she is already infected. Second, consider vaccinating your cat against these viruses if he or she is at risk for infection. Discuss your cat’s potential exposure with your veterinarian so that you can make an informed decision. Third, consider keeping your cat indoors. It is impossible to ensure that your cat will not be exposed to infected cats if you allow him or her to roam freely outdoors. aaha.org/petowner Keep in mind, however, the risk of exposure is P ET H E A LT H BR O C H U R E are S Einfected. RIES also indoors if housemates © 2015 AMERICAN ANIMAL HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION

Working with your veterinarian will ensure that your pet’s quality of life is maintained and his or her needs are being met until the very end. This care will help make your final moments with your pet by your side be as aaha.org/petowner peaceful, gentle, and comfortable as possible.

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

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Feline Immunodeficiency Viruses

Cats The veterinary community now knows that heartworm infection is more prevalent in cats than previously thought, but no heartworm treatment medications that kill adult worms have yet been approved for use in cats. Once heartworm infection is diagnosed, treatment will vary for individual cats: • One option is to allow your cat’s body to handle the infection without specific treatment. This option may be the best for those cats who test positive for heartworms but have no apparent physical signs of heartworm disease. If the cat develops signs of heartworm disease, he or she will need to be re-evaluated. • For those cats showing physical signs of heartworm disease, the best option is to control and treat the conditions that are present. Cats with heartworm infection may develop heartworm associated respiratory disease (HARD) or die suddenly. Cats who develop HARD will require treatment to help with breathing and may need drugs to remove and prevent formation of fluid in the chest and lungs. Continued medical treatment is usually needed once cats show physical signs of heartworm disease. • Another option is to treat the cat with drugs approved only for use in dogs. These drugs are known to have side effects, including respiratory failure and death, in a small percentage of cats. Your veterinarian will discuss these options with you. • Regardless of the treatment decided upon, your cat should begin a monthly heartworm prevention regimen to prevent aaha.org/petowner new infections from occurring while managing the current one.

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A Gentle Goodbye How Do I Keep My Pet from Getting Intestinal Parasites?

To avoid parasites, keep your pet away from other animal feces. Dispose of your own pet’s bowel movements as quickly as possible, and keep your pet and their environment clean. Here are some other ways you can protect your pet: • Be alert to fleas in the environment— your pet may swallow a flea that is carrying tapeworm eggs. • A fecal examination should be part of your pet’s preventive care visit at least once yearly. • Routine, frequent fecal checks are important for predatory dogs and cats because some types of worms are ingested when a pet eats an infected rodent or other small mammal. • Use preventive medications for internal and external parasites, as directed by your veterinarian.

Heartworm Disease in Pets

Intestinal Parasites in Pets

Fecal Examination A veterinary health-care professional examines your pet’s feces with a microscope to check for the presence of intestinal parasites, such as roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, tapeworms, Giardia, or coccidia, or to evaluate various intestinal disorders.

Your pet will be sent home with medications and/or supplements required for continued treatment. After your pet leaves the hospital, your veterinarian will repeat blood tests and urinalyses to monitor your pet’s condition at regular intervals or when the need arises. Your veterinarian may recommend a special diet to decrease protein and sodium intake. Be sure to administer any prescribed medications and feed your pet as directed. You may need to administer fluids under your pet’s skin at home to help maintain normal hydration. This treatment is usually only for cats. Your veterinary health care team will provide instructions if this becomes necessary. Following instructions and working closely with your veterinarian will give your pet a better quality of life and may help prolong his or her life.

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Lab Testing for Your Pet

Fungal Culture If your veterinarian is concerned about the possibility of a fungal infection on your pet’s skin, she or he will pluck hair samples from your pet. The hair is then placed into a culture medium to test for the presence of fungi, such as ringworm. It takes one to two weeks to get a final result from the fungal culture. Fine-Needle Aspirates When your pet has a lump, your veterinarian may take a sample by using a sterile syringe and needle to withdraw cells and/or fluid from the lump. The sample is put on a slide, stained with special dyes to make the cells easier to identify, and viewed with a microscope. The fine-needle aspirate is a quick way to diagnose infections and screen for some forms of cancer.

Can I Get Intestinal Parasites from My Pet? Under some conditions, intestinal parasites can be transmitted from pets to people. Especially at risk are children, pregnant women, and immunocompromised individuals. Parasitic larvae can migrate through the human body and enter the eyes, brain, or other areas, which can cause blindness or other severe health problems. Avoid walking barefoot or letting children play in areas where dogs and cats defecate. Discuss the risk with aaha.org/petowner your veterinarian and physician.

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

Kidney Disease in Pets

Skin Scraping Skin scraping is one of the most frequently used tests in veterinary dermatology. After scraping the skin, the veterinarian examines the material collected under the microscope to confirm the presence or absence of certain types of external parasites.

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P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

PET BEHAVIOR BROCHURE SERIES

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How can I prevent lepto in my dog? Avoid slow-moving water, puddles, or areas known to have high populations of rodents or raccoons. These areas are often at higher risk for contamination by Leptospira bacteria. Vaccination against lepto is available to help protect your dog. This vaccine is often recommended for dogs who spend time in contaminated areas or dogs who are at risk for having contact with the urine of wildlife. This might include dogs who spend time outdoors in areas with high populations of rodents or raccoons, or those involved in outdoor events, such as hunting or field trials. Current lepto vaccines need to be given every 12 months. Available dog vaccines protect against many but not all types of Leptospira bacteria.

If my dog has lepto, is that a health concern for me? Yes. People who care for infected dogs may become sick after having contact with the dog’s urine. If you are around an infected dog, avoid contact with the dog’s urine or urine-contaminated objects, such as bedding. Ensure the dog only urinates in areas away from other animals and people. These steps are most important until the dog has received appropriate antibiotics for several days. People should contact their human healthcare provider if they have concerns regarding exposure to an infected animal.

The specialist should be happy to partner with both you and your regular veterinarian in making medical decisions and identifying treatment options for your pet.

What kind of treatment options might be available, and how well do they work? Will my pet get sick from the treatments? There is no right or wrong choice for cancer treatment. Common treatment options include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these. Some treatment options are palliative, focusing primarily on supportive care, such as managing pain. Dogs and cats respond to cancer treatment very differently than people do. Typically, they handle cancer treatment much better, with far fewer side effects than people do. Improving or preserving the quality of your pet’s life is equally as important as fighting the cancer itself. For many types of cancer, pets who receive treatment enjoy a longer life and a better quality of life than pets who do not receive treatment. Treatment can often improve the quality of life even for animals with advanced stages of cancer. One of the most important things to remember is to stay positive—there are almost always things that can be done to help your pet. Visit your veterinarian as soon as possible to start exploring your options. aaha.org/petowner © 2018 AMERICAN ANIMAL HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION

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Leptospirosis

pain medication to feel so good that they hurt themselves by being too active before they have fully healed. However, once your pet’s activity level starts to return to normal, your veterinarian may ask that you confine or sedate your pet to restrict his or her activity. It is important to consider diet and metabolic needs for pets with chronic pain, which is pain that continues for a long period of time or recurs frequently. Some pets in chronic pain lose their appetites and suffer from malnutrition; others may overeat, decrease their activity, and become obese. For arthritic pain, your veterinarian probably will prescribe a structured exercise program and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID).

What Are the Risks of Treating My Pet for Pain? All drugs have side effects. You and your veterinarian should discuss the risks versus the benefits of the drugs prescribed for pain management, including quality-of-life issues for your pet. Your veterinarian may ask you to monitor your pet for vomiting, diarrhea, and changes in eating patterns. In all cases, discontinue all medication and contact your veterinarian immediately if you see that your pet is vomiting or depressed, has diarrhea or constipation, or shows signs of decreased activity or loss of appetite. Some drugs prescribed for chronic pain will require your pet to visit the veterinary hospital periodically for blood and urine testing to identify any possible negative aaha.org/petowner effects of the drug.

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Living with Cancer

Skin and Coat The skin is the body’s largest organ and a good indicator of your pet’s health. Your veterinarian will examine the condition of the skin and haircoat as a means of detecting nutritional deficiencies, allergies, infections, hormone problems, and tumors. The veterinarian will also check for fleas, ticks, other external parasites, and wounds. Joints and Muscles The veterinarian will check your pet’s legs and feet to evaluate the condition of the joints and muscles and may also test your pet’s reflexes.

Managing Your Pet’s Pain

veterinarian. If you suspect a wild animal near How Often Should My Pet your home or workplace has rabies, warn Be Vaccinated? others and do not go near the animal. Contact authorities in yourbearea and allow them to How the often your pet should vaccinated locate capture animal.breed, age, depends on and many factors,the including and lifestyle. Dogs should be vaccinated against Indistemper some areas, youcanine are required by law to canine virus, parvovirus-2, report an animaland suspected of having rabies, canine adenovirus-2, rabies virus. Cats should in order to protect the panleukopenia public. Notify your be vaccinated against feline virus theherpesvirus-1, local animal-control (felineveterinarian distemper),and feline feline department immediately (in vaccines Canada, may call the calicivirus, and rabies virus. Other local police and health-control office). be appropriate based on where you live and other

Preventive Care Exams

When Should My Pet Have the Surgery?

Veterinarians typically recommend that a female pet be spayed before her first heat cycle, which means at about six months of age. Male dogs and cats can be neutered at six months also, but many veterinarians now perform the surgery on pets that are as young as two to three months. Your veterinarian will be able to recommend the most appropriate timing for your pet’s surgery.

factors. Your veterinarian will discuss with you the recommended vaccination protocol for your pet’s unique situation.

Heart and Lungs The veterinarian will use a stethoscope to listen to your pet’s heart and lungs. The early signs of heart disease often are recognized during a routine health exam.

If the veterinarian finds any abnormalities during your pet’s examination, the veterinarian may recommend additional tests to diagnose or confirm a health problem.

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The body’s response to a vaccine is to produce antibodies, and these antibodies are what protect your pet from disease. Veterinarians can perform a titer test to measure a pet’s antibody levels and then can vaccinate only when the antibodies drop below a certain level. Titer tests for canine distemper, adenovirus, and parvovirus are thought to be quite reliable, but current laws state that a titer test cannot be used in place of a rabies vaccine.

How often does my pet need to be vaccinated?

Abdomen and Reproductive System Your veterinarian will feel the abdomen to detect irregularities such as enlarged organs, masses, or areas that are painful. Your pet’s reproductive system will be examined for swelling or discharges. If your pet has not been spayed or neutered, your veterinarian will explain that spaying or neutering provides many health benefits beyond birth control.

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

Rabies

Is there a test that can determine if my pet needs to be vaccinated?

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In the past, pets were vaccinated with every vaccine every year. Over time, vaccine technology has improved, and research shows that certain vaccines protect pets longer than previously thought. Several vaccines can now be given every three years. Other vaccines still need to be given yearly to prevent certain diseases. Work with your veterinarian to create a vaccination plan tailored specifically to your pet’s lifestyle, risk of exposure to certain diseases, and environment. It is important to take your pet to the veterinarian at least once a year for a checkup, no matter how often vaccines are given. This yearly exam will give your veterinarian the chance to address your pet’s problems, answer your questions, and keep your pet healthy and happy. aaha.org/petowner

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Spaying or Neutering Your Pet

Vaccinating Your Pet

How Can I Take Care of My Pet’s Teeth at Home?

• Brittle nails • Arthritis • Constipation in cats • Sensitivity to temperature changes • Coughing and exercise intolerance • Increased water consumption • Behavioral changes, changes in urination and defecation patterns, increased vocalization, and changes in sleep patterns • Confusion and disorientation in dogs (known as “canine cognitive dysfunction”)

Dental care does not end with a visit to your veterinarian. Brushing your pet’s teeth is an important part of home dental care. It is helpful to begin this routine with very young puppies and kittens as part of their training, even though their teeth look healthy. Older dogs and cats may be resistant. Talk to your veterinary health-care team about daily tooth-brushing and alternative techniques to control the accumulation of plaque. Special toothbrushes and toothpaste are available. Products are also available for pets who won’t tolerate brushing. Do not use products made for people on pets.

Many of these changes could also indicate disease, so talk to your veterinarian right away if you notice any of these signs or any unusual changes in activity level and attitude. Don’t just dismiss changes in your pet’s health or habits as “part of the aging process”—they may be signs of serious disease.

Your Aging Pet

exercise than an eight-year-old dachshund with heart disease. With your veterinarian’s approval, you can embark on an exercise program that won’t seem like work at all—to your pet, it’s play. Exercising Your Dog The key to exercising your dog is to start out slowly and then steadily increase the length and intensity of the workouts. Just like people, dogs who go from little or no exercise to a lengthy or strenuous routine will experience soreness and may even suffer from damage to weak ligaments. If your dog is stiff or slow to rise the day after exercise, slow down. Hiking, walking, and running are all great exercise for your dog, and he or she will most likely be thrilled to participate. If your dog is unable or unwilling to walk due to stiffness or injury and is comfortable around water, swimming may be a good option. If you’d like to try something else, playing keep-away or hide-and-seek with a toy and two or more people is another excellent way to exercise your dog. Tug-of-war is not a good game because it can damage your dog’s teeth and may increase aggressive behavior. Increasingly, people are looking for other ways to interact with their dogs. Activities such as obedience classes, agility training and competitions, and fly-ball competitions are wonderful means of enjoying your dog and socializing with other people and dogs. And they are great forms of exercise!

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P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

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Your Pet’s Dental Care

Exercising Your Cat • Always practicing personal hygiene. While yourPeople cat probably won’t to at higher riskwant for zoonoses should accompany you onwash a five-mile run, he or she may always their hands after handling like to playanimals games and withavoid you that involve kissing petschasing or allowing somethingthem attached to their a stick or string. Many to lick faces. Quickly wash cats love to chase light from a laser pointer bites andthe scratches from animals, and (be carefuldo notnot to allow shinepets it in your eyes, as to lickcat’s open wounds. this can cause can Havedamage). someoneYou who is provide at lowertoys risk for clean your cat tolitter playboxes, with that simulate small prey, and cages, and aquariums, such as stuffed mice or smallwear balls.gloves. Cats inKeep if thattoy is not possible, multi-cat households also play with each litter boxes can away from kitchens and food other for exercise. preparation areas. • Caring for pets properly. Have any new Whatever pets gameexamined you play with your cat, don’t use by a veterinarian before your hand you or fingers as “bait” or as the object of bring them home. If your pet is ill, teasing. Such teachcare yourascat thatasit possible. is all seekgames veterinary soon right to scratch your hands—a Keep and petsbite away from wildlifelesson or places you do notthey wantcould him get or her to learn.disease: Also, do keep not a zoonotic let your catcats playindoors with yarn string hein andordogs onbecause a leash or or she maya choke it, get it stuck in theFollow throat fencedon yard when outdoors. or the digestive or become routinesystem, preventive care as dangerously recommended entangled by in it. your veterinarian, including

Your Pet’s Diet and Exercise Plan

Zoonotic Diseases

vaccinations and steps to control and prevent ticks and fleas. Feed your pets canned or dry commercial food or wellcooked home-prepared food. Pets provide many health benefits to people, and maintaining the human-animal bond is incredibly important. In almost all cases, people do not need to give up their pets to protect themselves from zoonoses. Instead, they should have discussions with their veterinarian and physician to come up with ways to reduce disease risks. These simple steps will go a long way to keep you and your pet healthy. aaha.org/petowner

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P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

Pet Behavior Set     Canine-Specific Set     Feline-Specific Set    Pet Health Set    Preventive Care Set

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TOOLS FOR YOUR CLIENTS: PET HEALTH BROCHURES  47 

Supplement your pet health conversations with handy, take-home brochures that clients can refer to again and again.

Pet Health Brochures Busy, distracted, or overwhelmed clients may not be absorbing everything you’re saying. Supplement the conversation with a handy, take-home brochure that clients can refer to again and again. These low-cost brochures about common animal health concerns have been recently reviewed and updated by board-certified veterinarians. All 23 Pet Health Brochures feature a convenient question-and-answer format and fresh new design. Check the bulleted lists to see a few of the client questions each brochure addresses.

Canine Influenza Virus

My dog has recently recovered from the flu. Is she still contagious?

Your veterinarian will be able to tell you when your dog can be around other dogs. To prevent illness in other dogs, any dogs who are suspected or known to have the flu should be kept separated from other dogs for several weeks after recovery.

It is important for you to stay informed of disease risks in your area. Your veterinarian can help you stay up to date with outbreaks in the area and avoid the higher-risk areas if you are traveling with your dog.

As people can move the flu virus between dogs on their hands and clothing, dog owners should wash their hands after touching other dogs, especially dogs who are sick.

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PHINF4 y What is canine influenza virus (dog flu)? y How do dogs get infected with canine influenza? y How is canine influenza virus infection treated?

How can I prevent canine flu in my dog?

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Canine Influenza

Vaccines are available to help protect your dog from the flu. Vaccines may be advised for dogs who are likely to be around many other dogs or based on flu outbreaks in your area. As with human flu vaccines, canine flu vaccines may not completely prevent infection in vaccinated dogs, but they will decrease the chance of your dog becoming infected and developing severe illness. Talk to your veterinarian about whether your dog should be vaccinated against canine influenza.

Each brochure pack contains 50 trifolded brochures, 3.5"  8.5".

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We have carried the Pet Health brochures for many years and pass them out regularly to our clients. These brochures cover many topics, are very informative, and help us to convey a clear message of understanding regarding the standard of care we offer to our patients. . . . I highly recommend including these brochures in any clinic’s client education program.

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

Canine Parvovirus

Here are a few tips to keep your dog safe: • Be sure that all of your puppies and dogs are vaccinated properly against parvovirus. • Don’t skip or delay any of your puppy’s vaccinations in the initial immunization series. • Ask your veterinarian to remind you when your dog needs booster vaccinations. • Minimize contact with other puppies or dogs and limit visits to places frequented by other dogs. Until your puppy is fully vaccinated, avoid visits to high-risk areas, such as parks and pet stores. (Note: Puppies need contact with other puppies and dogs for socialization. Talk to your veterinarian about the best time to begin socializing your puppy.) • If one of your puppies or dogs has parvovirus, keep him or her physically separated from the others. • If a visiting puppy or dog has an “accident” in your home, promptly remove any fecal material and disinfect the area with a solution of 1/2 cup (4 ounces) of bleach diluted in 1 gallon of water as a precaution. • Use the bleach-and-water solution as part of a general cleaning process for areas of your house frequented by unvaccinated puppies or dogs.

Canine Parvovirus PHCAN3 y What is canine parvovirus, and how do dogs get it? y What are the physical signs of the infection? y How can I keep my dog from getting parvovirus, and how is it treated?

—JENNIFER BALLINGER, CVT, PRACTICE MANAGER, PINELLAS ANIMAL HOSPITAL aaha.org/petowner © 2015 AMERICAN ANIMAL HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION

Caring for Your Pet After Anesthesia

Caring for Your Pet After Anesthesia PHCAR4 y What is anesthesia, and why is my veterinarian recommending it? y What can I expect when my pet has anesthesia? y Is constipation normal?

Dental Anesthesia

Dental Anesthesia

• Give your pet insulin at the same time every day, after your pet eats. Don’t make any changes in medication without first checking with your veterinarian. • Do not give insulin to your pet if she is not eating or vomits soon after eating. Call your veterinarian or a local emergency veterinary hospital immediately if you notice any change in appetite or behavior. • Reward your pet for good behavior when you give insulin injections. Try to make the experience as comfortable as possible by being patient, loving, and gentle. • Keep a small container of corn syrup on hand to give your pet if she acts weak or begins tremoring, as this may indicate that her blood glucose is too low. Do not try to give your pet corn syrup if she is too weak to swallow. If this situation occurs, contact your veterinarian or emergency veterinary hospital as soon as possible and ask what should be done. This can be a life-threatening emergency.

PHDA3

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Diabetes in Pets

y How does anesthesia make dental work possible for my pet? y Why is anesthesia necessary? y What special precautions are taken to protect my pet?

Diabetes in Pets PHDIA4 y What is diabetes mellitus, and what causes the disease? y What are the physical signs? y How can I take care of my pet at home?

Many pet owners feel overwhelmed when they learn their pet is diabetic and will require additional care. After several weeks of this new routine, you may be surprised by how well you and your pet have adjusted. Staying in close contact with your veterinary team is especially important in the first few months of treatment. Visit aaha.org/diabetes for more information on diabetes management in dogs and cats.

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48  TOOLS FOR YOUR CLIENTS: PET HEALTH BROCHURES

Ear Conditions in Pets

Ear Conditions in Pets

Detecting this state requires additional, more specific testing. Your veterinarian can provide supportive care for your cat and treat some of the secondary illnesses that develop as a result of the infection.

PHEAR3

Frequently, diagnostic tests such as a blood profile, fecal exam, urinalysis, and radiographs (X-rays) are required to help your veterinarian know which supportive treatments are needed. These may include administration of fluids, B vitamins, appetite stimulants, or antidiarrheal medications.

y What causes ear conditions in pets? y How can I prevent my pet from getting ear infections? y How do I clean my pet’s ears and administer ear medications?

No drugs or therapeutic agents have been approved for treating feline immunodeficiency viruses at this time, but cats may benefit from certain prescription medications or nutritional supplementation as prescribed by your veterinarian.

Cats can live long and relatively healthy lives despite retroviral infection. Some related disorders (including secondary infections) can be well controlled if they are diagnosed early and treated aggressively.

How Can These Diseases Be Prevented?

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OSPITAL ASSOCIATION

First, test your cat to see if he or she is already infected. Second, consider vaccinating your cat against these viruses if he or she is at risk for infection. Discuss your cat’s potential exposure with your veterinarian so that you can make an informed decision. Third, consider keeping your cat indoors. It is impossible to ensure that your cat will not be exposed to infected cats if you allow him or her to roam freely outdoors. Keep in mind, however, the risk of exposure is P ET H E A LT H B R O C HU R E SifEhousemates RIES also indoors are infected.

Heartworm Disease in Pets

How Do I Keep My Pet from Getting Intestinal Parasites?

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Heartworm Disease in Pets

To avoid parasites, keep your pet away from other animal feces. Dispose of your own pet’s bowel movements as quickly as possible, and keep your pet and their environment clean. Here are some other ways you can protect your pet: • Be alert to fleas in the environment— your pet may swallow a flea that is carrying tapeworm eggs. • A fecal examination should be part of your pet’s preventive care visit at least once yearly. • Routine, frequent fecal checks are important for predatory dogs and cats because some types of worms are ingested when a pet eats an infected rodent or other small mammal. • Use preventive medications for internal and external parasites, as directed by your veterinarian.

PHHEA3

Can I Get Intestinal Parasites from My Pet?

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OSPITAL ASSOCIATION

y What are heartworms, and how does my pet get infected? y How can I prevent the disease in my pet? y How is the disease treated?

Under some conditions, intestinal parasites can be transmitted from pets to people. Especially at risk are children, pregnant women, and immunocompromised individuals. Parasitic larvae can migrate through the human body and enter the eyes, brain, or other areas, which can cause blindness or other severe health problems. Avoid walking barefoot or letting children play in areas where dogs and cats defecate. Discuss the risk with your veterinarian and physician.

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

Lab Testing for Your Pet

How can I prevent lepto in my dog?

Lab Testing for Your Pet PHLAB3

Vaccination against lepto is available to help protect your dog. This vaccine is often recommended for dogs who spend time in contaminated areas or dogs who are at risk for having contact with the urine of wildlife. This might include dogs who spend time outdoors in areas with high populations of rodents or raccoons, or those involved in outdoor events, such as hunting or field trials. Current lepto vaccines need to be given every 12 months. Available dog vaccines protect against many but not all types of Leptospira bacteria.

y Why is laboratory testing important for my pet? y What does each test do? y How quickly will I know the test results?

Yes. People who care for infected dogs may become sick after having contact with the dog’s urine. If you are around an infected dog, avoid contact with the dog’s urine or urine-contaminated objects, such as bedding. Ensure the dog only urinates in areas away from other animals and people. These steps are most important until the dog has received appropriate antibiotics for several days. People should contact their human healthcare provider if they have concerns regarding exposure to an infected animal.

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

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A Gentle Goodbye

PHFEL3

y What are feline immunodeficiency viruses? y How do I know if my cat has these diseases? y Can the viruses be treated?

What happens after choosing hospice care for your pet?

Similar to human medicine, some veterinarians focus on end-of-life care for pets. Your veterinarian may offer this service or refer you to such a professional. Whether you are working with a hospice veterinarian or your own veterinarian, the process will be similar. After the terminal diagnosis, your veterinary healthcare team will: 1. Educate you about your pet’s disease 2. Evaluate your needs, beliefs, and goals for your pet 3. Develop a personalized end-of-life treatment plan 4. Implement palliative care measures

Working with your veterinarian will ensure that your pet’s quality of life is maintained and his or her needs are being met until the very end. This care will help make your final moments with your pet by your side be as peaceful, gentle, and comfortable as possible.

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

Intestinal Parasites in Pets

A Gentle Goodbye PHEOL3 y What are the options at the end of a pet’s life? y What is hospicesupported natural death? y What happens after choosing hospice care?

End-of-life care and decisionmaking should take into consideration all of your pet’s needs and should maximize your pet’s comfort and minimize suffering. A collaborative and supportive partnership between you and your veterinary healthcare team is important in this process.

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Intestinal Parasites in Pets

Your pet will be sent home with medications and/or supplements required for continued treatment. After your pet leaves the hospital, your veterinarian will repeat blood tests and urinalyses to monitor your pet’s condition at regular intervals or when the need arises. Your veterinarian may recommend a special diet to decrease protein and sodium intake. Be sure to administer any prescribed medications and feed your pet as directed.

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

Kidney Disease in Pets

Kidney Disease in Pets

PHINT3

PHKID3

y What are the physical signs pets show when infected? y How is an infection treated? y How can I keep my pet from getting intestinal parasites?

y What is kidney failure, and what are the causes? y What are the physical signs of kidney disease? y How is kidney disease diagnosed and treated?

You may need to administer fluids under your pet’s skin at home to help maintain normal hydration. This treatment is usually only for cats. Your veterinary health care team will provide instructions if this becomes necessary. Following instructions and working closely with your veterinarian will give your pet a better quality of life and may help prolong his or her life.

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Leptospirosis

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P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

Leptospirosis

Living with Cancer

Living with Cancer

The specialist should be happy to partner with both you and your regular veterinarian in making medical decisions and identifying treatment options for your pet.

PHLEP4

y What is leptospirosis? y How do pets get leptospirosis? y How is leptospirosis treated?

There is no right or wrong choice for cancer treatment. Common treatment options include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these. Some treatment options are palliative, focusing primarily on supportive care, such as managing pain. Dogs and cats respond to cancer treatment very differently than people do. Typically, they handle cancer treatment much better, with far fewer side effects than people do. Improving or preserving the quality of your pet’s life is equally as important as fighting the cancer itself.

For many types of cancer, pets who receive treatment enjoy a longer life and a better quality of life than pets who do not receive treatment. Treatment can often improve the quality of life even for animals with advanced stages of cancer. One of the most important things to remember is to stay positive—there are almost always things that can be done to help your pet. Visit your veterinarian as soon as possible to start exploring your options. aaha.org/petowner

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PHONC3 y What is cancer, and why does it occur? y What types of cancer are most common in dogs and cats? y What kind of treatment options might be available, and how well do they work?

What kind of treatment options might be available, and how well do they work? Will my pet get sick from the treatments?

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OSPITAL ASSOCIATION

Feline Immunodeficiency Viruses

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Avoid slow-moving water, puddles, or areas known to have high populations of rodents or raccoons. These areas are often at higher risk for contamination by Leptospira bacteria.

If my dog has lepto, is that a health concern for me?

Feline Immunodeficiency Viruses

Keep in mind that palliative care is not only for pets living with a terminal disease, but can also be used to manage curable or long-term conditions. Your pet’s quality of life is extremely important, and the goal of palliative care is to support or improve his or her quality of life.

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TOOLS FOR YOUR CLIENTS: PET HEALTH BROCHURES  49 

Managing Your How Often Should My Pet Vaccinated? Pet’sBePain

Managing Your Pet’s Pain

Skin and Coat The skin is the body’s largest organ and a good indicator of your pet’s health. Your veterinarian will examine the condition of the skin and haircoat as a means of detecting nutritional deficiencies, allergies, infections, hormone problems, and tumors. The veterinarian will also check for fleas, ticks, other external parasites, and wounds.

How often your pet should be vaccinated depends on many factors, including breed, age, and lifestyle. Dogs should be vaccinated against canine distemper virus, canine parvovirus-2, canine adenovirus-2, and rabies virus. Cats should be vaccinated against feline panleukopenia virus (feline distemper), feline herpesvirus-1, feline calicivirus, and rabies virus. Other vaccines may be appropriate based on where you live and other factors. Your veterinarian will discuss with you the recommended vaccination protocol for your pet’s unique situation.

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Joints and Muscles The veterinarian will check your pet’s legs and feet to evaluate the condition of the joints and muscles and may also test your pet’s reflexes. Heart and Lungs The veterinarian will use a stethoscope to listen to your pet’s heart and lungs. The early signs of heart disease often are recognized during a routine health exam. Abdomen and Reproductive System Your veterinarian will feel the abdomen to detect irregularities such as enlarged organs, masses, or areas that are painful. Your pet’s reproductive system will be examined for swelling or discharges. If your pet has not been spayed or neutered, your veterinarian will explain that spaying or neutering provides many health benefits beyond birth control. If the veterinarian finds any abnormalities during your pet’s examination, the veterinarian may recommend additional tests to diagnose or confirm a health problem.

y Why is it important to control pain? y What are the physical signs of pain in dogs and cats? y What are the risks of treating my pet for pain?

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Spaying or Neutering Your Pet

The body’s response to a vaccine is to produce antibodies, and these antibodies are what protect your pet from disease. Veterinarians can perform a titer test to measure a pet’s antibody levels and then can vaccinate only when the antibodies drop below a certain level. Titer tests for canine distemper, adenovirus, and parvovirus are thought to be quite reliable, but current laws state that a titer test cannot be used in place of a rabies vaccine.

How often does my pet need to be vaccinated?

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Spaying or Neutering Your Pet PHSPA4 y What is spaying or neutering? y Why is it important to spay or neuter my pet? y When should my pet have the surgery?

In the past, pets were vaccinated with every vaccine every year. Over time, vaccine technology has improved, and research shows that certain vaccines protect pets longer than previously thought. Several vaccines can now be given every three years. Other vaccines still need to be given yearly to prevent certain diseases. Work with your veterinarian to create a vaccination plan tailored specifically to your pet’s lifestyle, risk of exposure to certain diseases, and environment. It is important to take your pet to the veterinarian at least once a year for a checkup, no matter how often vaccines are given. This yearly exam will give your veterinarian the chance to address your pet’s problems, answer your questions, and keep your pet healthy and happy.

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Your Pet’s Dental Care

Your Pet’s Dental Care

Exercising Your Cat While your cat probably won’t want to accompany you on a five-mile run, he or she may like to play games with you that involve chasing something attached to a stick or string. Many cats love to chase the light from a laser pointer (be careful not to shine it in your cat’s eyes, as this can cause damage). You can provide toys for your cat to play with that simulate small prey, such as stuffed toy mice or small balls. Cats in multi-cat households can also play with each other for exercise.

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Exercising Your Dog The key to exercising your dog is to start out slowly and then steadily increase the length and intensity of the workouts. Just like people, dogs who go from little or no exercise to a lengthy or strenuous routine will experience soreness and may even suffer from damage to weak ligaments. If your dog is stiff or slow to rise the day after exercise, slow down.

y What are the physical signs of dental disease? y Why is anesthesia necessary? y How can I take care of my pet’s teeth at home?

Hiking, walking, and running are all great exercise for your dog, and he or she will most likely be thrilled to participate. If your dog is unable or unwilling to walk due to stiffness or injury and is comfortable around water, swimming may be a good option.

Whatever game you play with your cat, don’t use your hand or fingers as “bait” or as the object of teasing. Such games teach your cat that it is all right to scratch and bite your hands—a lesson you do not want him or her to learn. Also, do not let your cat play with yarn or string because he or she may choke on it, get it stuck in the throat or the digestive system, or become dangerously entangled in it.

If you’d like to try something else, playing keep-away or hide-and-seek with a toy and two or more people is another excellent way to exercise your dog. Tug-of-war is not a good game because it can damage your dog’s teeth and may increase aggressive behavior.

Increasingly, people are looking for other ways to interact with their dogs. Activities such as obedience classes, agility training and competitions, and fly-ball competitions are wonderful means of enjoying your dog and socializing with other people and dogs. And they are great forms of exercise! aaha.org/petowner

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Rabies PHRAB3 y What is rabies? y Will my pet get rabies if another animal bites him? y How can I recognize a rabid animal and what should I do if I suspect an animal has rabies??

y Why does my pet need a “preventive care examination”? y How often should he or she get one? y What will happen during my pet’s preventive care exam? aaha.org/petowner

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

Vaccinating Your Pet • • • • • • •

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Vaccinating Your Pet

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

Your Aging Pet

Brittle nails Arthritis Constipation in cats Sensitivity to temperature changes Coughing and exercise intolerance Increased water consumption Behavioral changes, changes in urination and defecation patterns, increased vocalization, and changes in sleep patterns • Confusion and disorientation in dogs (known as “canine cognitive dysfunction”)

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Your Aging Pet PHAGI3 y Do I need to care for my pet differently as he or she gets older? y How does a senior pet examination differ from my pet’s usual exam? y What other changes might I see in my pet?

y Which vaccines does my pet need? y What are the possible risks? y How often does my pet need to be vaccinated?

Many of these changes could also indicate disease, so talk to your veterinarian right away if you notice any of these signs or any unusual changes in activity level and attitude. Don’t just dismiss changes in your pet’s health or habits as “part of the aging process”—they may be signs of serious disease.

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Your Pet’s Diet and Exercise Plan

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Your Pet’s Diet and Exercise Plan

• Always practicing personal hygiene. People at higher risk for zoonoses should always wash their hands after handling animals and avoid kissing pets or allowing them to lick their faces. Quickly wash bites and scratches from animals, and do not allow pets to lick open wounds. Have someone who is at lower risk clean litter boxes, cages, and aquariums, and if that is not possible, wear gloves. Keep litter boxes away from kitchens and food preparation areas. • Caring for pets properly. Have any new pets examined by a veterinarian before you bring them home. If your pet is ill, seek veterinary care as soon as possible. Keep pets away from wildlife or places they could get a zoonotic disease: keep cats indoors and dogs on a leash or in a fenced yard when outdoors. Follow routine preventive care as recommended by your veterinarian, including vaccinations and steps to control and prevent ticks and fleas. Feed your pets canned or dry commercial food or wellcooked home-prepared food.

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

Zoonotic Diseases

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Zoonotic Diseases PHZOO4 y What are zoonotic diseases (zoonoses)? y How do pets and people get zoonotic diseases? y How can I protect myself from getting a zoonotic disease from my pet?

y How can I tell if my pet is overweight? y What is an appropriate diet for my pet? y What’s a good exercise routine?

Pets provide many health benefits to people, and maintaining the human-animal bond is incredibly important. In almost all cases, people do not need to give up their pets to protect themselves from zoonoses. Instead, they should have discussions with their veterinarian and physician to come up with ways to reduce disease risks. These simple steps will go a long way to keep you and your pet healthy.

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Rabies

In some areas, you are required by law to report an animal suspected of having rabies, in order to protect the public. Notify your veterinarian and the local animal-control department immediately (in Canada, call the local police and health-control office).

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exercise than an eight-year-old dachshund with heart disease. With your veterinarian’s approval, you can embark on an exercise program that won’t seem like work at all—to your pet, it’s play.

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Preventive Care Exams

veterinarian. If you suspect a wild animal near your home or workplace has rabies, warn others and do not go near the animal. Contact the authorities in your area and allow them to locate and capture the animal.

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P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

Is there a test that can determine if my pet needs to be vaccinated?

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Preventive Care Exams

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P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

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50  TOOLS FOR YOUR CLIENTS: PET BROCHURE SETS

Pet Behavior Brochure Set

ually—to longer distances. No puppy

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ly been taught that she can happily distances.

Tips

additional tips to make great progress

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(18 packs of 50 brochures each)

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• Enroll in a Time puppy class so you can get guidance Alone from the instructors and your puppy can learn in There are times when your dog will need to spend the presence of other dogs. Be sure to choose time on her own. Dogs who have a regular and one that uses positive methods. appropriate social enrichment program may use • When your puppy seems fidgety and has a these times to nap and rest. Learning to relax and shorter attention span, keep the training session settle is an important skill for dogs. Provide your dog short and stop before she begins ignoring your with her own space—a room with a dog bed, a crate signals. Consider that the dog may need a (open or closed) with a bed and water—for resting bathroom break or time to just be a puppy. and “alone time.” • If you have difficulty getting your puppy to be calm and focused, a lead and a head halter or Some dogs may still be energetic and want to engage front-attachment harness may help you to get in further play at times when they need to be left the desired response. Distractable puppies alone. These dogs can be given an opportunity to should be able to work well on their own before occupy their alone time by playing with toys that other puppies are added to the mix. require them to work at getting some of their daily ration of food and calories, as in a puzzle or fooddispensing toy. These toys are not a replacement for social interaction, but they can provide a calm transition for active dogs. If your dog seems stressed when left alone, consult your veterinarian.

Other Tips Providing social and mental engagement for dogs can involve more than just exercise, training, puzzles, games, or sports. Grooming sessions (teaching a dog to offer one paw or a specific side of the body at a time), massage sessions, and just calm quiet time together where you watch and talk softly to your dog help build a positive relationship and meet the need for social and mental interactions. These calmer interactions also work well for highenergy dogs who may need cool-down or relaxation periods throughout their day.

The AAHA behavior brochures were developed by a team of veterinarians and certified veterinary behaviorists to reflect best practices as outlined in the 2015 AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines, available at aaha.org/professional/resources/behavior2015.aspx.

Training Puppies

dog food treats to reinforce appropriate digging. If at any point the puppy becomes very distressed and cryingSometimes does not diminish five dog to ten or it having aover second forminutes, companionship worsens, thecan puppy destroys bedding, panics but andyou and or play reduce chewing and digging, upsets foodmeet and the water dishes, or tries to escape the want must needs of both dogs. You do not crate to byend chewing or two digging, herdestroy. out of the crate. up with dogslet who Dogs who like Try again calm. If the dog either otherwhen dogsshe andiswho play with them maycontinues benefit the to exhibit same levela of distress or the distress mostthe from having canine companion. worsens, crating her is not recommended and may As with punishment should not be used to contribute to chewing, the development of anxiety. stop your dog’s digging. If you do not identify and If youaddress have a regular routine whenwill your dog goes the cause, the for digging continue in your to herabsence. crate, she may soon begin to enter voluntarily If your dog digs only while she is outside, whenyou it’s time play with toy. If your may to berest ableortotochange herabehavior bypuppy changing showsthe noway signs distress the crate and it with theofarea feelsinby covering theenters surface happily, you can allow the to nap or play inmaterials. the wire mesh, stones, ordog permeable paving crate In when you can’tthough, supervise many cases, theher dogdirectly. will just find another

If you decide to use a crate to help train your puppy, introduce your puppy to the crate as soon as possible and allow the dog to explore and enter the crate on her own. Praise her when she goes in and plays with a toy or eats a treat. Start feeding her in the crate with the door open. Then, when she seems comfortable in the crate, begin to close the door for increasingly longer periods, ensuring she does not become distressed. With practice, your puppy will learn to associate going into her crate with a request to do so (“go in your house”; “kennel up”). The first confinement session should be after a period of play, exercise, and elimination (when she is ready to take a nap or quietly play with a toy). Place your puppy in her crate with a treat and a toy and close the door. Leave the room but remain close enough to hear her. You can expect some distress the first few times yourYour puppy isPuppy separatedto from familyHer members, Teaching Mind but she should soon settle down ifManners she is tired. Never reward the pup by letting her out when she cries or whines. Instead, ignore her until the crying stops and release her before it starts again. If your puppy still won’t settle in her crate, make sure that you have chosen a time when she has had sufficient play and exercise and that she has recently eliminated so she is ready to relax or nap.

If young puppies are tired and happy when introduced to their crate, a toy and a treat in a quiet place will be at its most appealing. Check periodically for signs of distress, and if she is asleep or just quiet, tell her she is very good. Then, after a short period, open the door and allow her to come out if she The AAHA behavior brochures were developed by a team wishes. The next time, she can spend longer in the of veterinarians and certified veterinary behaviorists to before being let out. When puppy is Canine happy reflect crate best practices as outlined in the the 2015 AAHA to beBehavior left for atManagement least two hours withoutSERIES showing any and Feline Guidelines, available at PET BEHAVIOR BROCHURE signs of distress, you can leave the puppy for that aaha.org/professional/resources/behavior2015.aspx. amount of time. Remember, puppies need to eliminate

(13 packs of 50 brochures each)

Busy Dogs

Basic Training

Crate Training

spot that is like the original. If such dogs enjoy being

outside Adult and are otherwise Training Dogs not distressed, you can

consider building an outdoor run or kennel with a Are Good Dogs Adultsconcrete can be trained to use crates same way as run, floor. But if your dogin is the distressed in the

Destructive Doggies

Creating the Perfect Canine Cave

puppies, but remember thatbe dogs have been overly confinement may not thewho answer. confined or entrapped may never feel comfortable in Finally, remember that some are more a crate. Someplease puppies may never learn to breeds love a crate. likely who to dig than dogs” Identifying will andothers. will not“Earth do well in a like cratedachshunds can andmeet Jack your Russell terriers have been asked help you dog’s needs in ahistorically kind manner to dig as part of their jobs. These puppies may benefit throughout her life. If your dog needs to be hospitalized, from training that takes advantage of their skills to be sure to tell your veterinary team whether your dog seek out and find things, such as nose work and earth is comfortable in a crate, as this information will help dog trials.

Includes Basic Training, Busy Dogs Are Good Dogs, Crate Training, Destructive Doggies, Fearful Fido, Fido Was First, Home Alone, Noisy Canines, Piranha Puppies, Pushy Pups, Senior Moments, The Social Scene, and Taking the Hassle Out of Housetraining Your Puppy.

Solving Digging and Chewing Problems

determine how best to manage your dog in the hospital.

The AAHA behavior brochures were developed by a team of veterinarians and certified veterinary behaviorists to reflect best practices as outlined in the 2015 AAHA Canine and Feline Management Guidelines, available at PETBehavior BEHAVIOR BROCHURE SERIES aaha.org/professional/resources/behavior2015.aspx.

© 2016 American Animal Hospital Association

© 2016 American Animal Hospital Association

Canine-Specific Behavior Brochure Set

frequently, especially after eating, or is to provide a digging area.awakening, Build an eight-inchprolonged, vigorous exercise. Young puppies need toMix deep wood frame and sink it into the ground. eliminate every hour or two awake. puppy the soil with sand andwhen partially buryThe bones, chews, will thrive if you manage to meet the needs of this or toys (smear a small amount of cheese or meat schedule training yourends). pup toOccasionally use a crate. give your juicewhen on the exposed

mask noises that may trigger barking. Finally, never use the crate for punishment. Dogs will learn to avoid places used for punishment, and isolation can be stressful for members of social species.

© 2016 American Animal Hospital Association

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The AAHA behavior brochures were developed by a team of veterinarians and certified veterinary behaviorists to reflect best practices as outlined in the 2015 AAHA Canine and Feline Management Guidelines, available at PETBehavior BEHAVIOR BROCHURE SERIES aaha.org/professional/resources/behavior2015.aspx. © 2016 American Animal Hospital Association

PET BEHAVIOR BROCHURE SERIES

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Product code BBSC1, AAHA Press 2016.

Feline-Specific Behavior Brochure Set (6 packs of 50 brochures each) D

Includes Destructive Cats, The Feisty Feline, Litter Box Blues, Scaredy Cat, Senior Moments, and Taking the Hassle Out of Housetraining Your Kitty.

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$59.95 M    $79.95 NM Product code BBSF1, AAHA Press 2016.

My dog has recently recovered from the flu. Is she still contagious?

Here are a few tips to keep your dog safe: • Be sure that all of your puppies and dogs are vaccinated properly against parvovirus. • Don’t skip or delay any of your puppy’s vaccinations in the initial immunization series. • Ask your veterinarian to remind you when your dog needs booster vaccinations. • Minimize contact with other puppies or dogs and limit visits to places frequented by other dogs. Until your puppy is fully vaccinated, avoid visits to high-risk areas, such as parks and pet stores. (Note: Puppies need contact with other puppies and dogs for socialization. Talk to your veterinarian about the best time to begin socializing your puppy.) • If one of your puppies or dogs has parvovirus, keep him or her physically separated from the others. • If a visiting puppy or dog has an “accident” in your home, promptly remove any fecal material and disinfect the area with a solution of 1/2 cup (4 ounces) of bleach diluted in 1 gallon of water as a precaution. • Use the bleach-and-water solution as part of a general cleaning process for areas of your house frequented by unvaccinated puppies or dogs.

Your veterinarian will be able to tell you when your dog can be around other dogs. To prevent illness in other dogs, any dogs who are suspected or known to have the flu should be kept separated from other dogs for several weeks after recovery.

How can I prevent canine flu in my dog? It is important for you to stay informed of disease risks in your area. Your veterinarian can help you stay up to date with outbreaks in the area and avoid the higher-risk areas if you are traveling with your dog. As people can move the flu virus between dogs on their hands and clothing, dog owners should wash their hands after touching other dogs, especially dogs who are sick. Vaccines are available to help protect your dog from the flu. Vaccines may be advised for dogs who are likely to be around many other dogs or based on flu outbreaks in your area. As with human flu vaccines, canine flu vaccines may not completely prevent infection in vaccinated dogs, but they will decrease the chance of your dog becoming infected and developing severe illness. Talk to your veterinarian about whether your dog should be vaccinated against canine influenza.

Canine Parvovirus

Canine Influenza Virus

There seem to be a lot of things to worry about after anesthesia. Couldn’t I just avoid all of this by not using anesthesia? Any time an animal goes from being awake to asleep and then awake again, the body goes through a process of rebooting, like your computer does when you turn it back on after it was off for a while. The medications your veterinarian chooses will safely allow your pet to not feel pain, discomfort, or stress during the procedure, but this loss of consciousness will take time to wear off. Overall, anesthesia is a safe procedure that has allowed animals to receive high-quality care they couldn’t have otherwise received while conscious. Your veterinary team will be happy to talk to you about any other questions or concerns you may have about your pet’s anesthesia.

Caring for Your Pet After Anesthesia

• Give your pet insulin at the same time every day, after your pet eats. Don’t make any changes in medication without first checking with your veterinarian. • Do not give insulin to your pet if she is not eating or vomits soon after eating. Call your veterinarian or a local emergency veterinary hospital immediately if you notice any change in appetite or behavior. • Reward your pet for good behavior when you give insulin injections. Try to make the experience as comfortable as possible by being patient, loving, and gentle. • Keep a small container of corn syrup on hand to give your pet if she acts weak or begins tremoring, as this may indicate that her blood glucose is too low. Do not try to give your pet corn syrup if she is too weak to swallow. If this situation occurs, contact your veterinarian or emergency veterinary hospital as soon as possible and ask what should be done. This can be a life-threatening emergency.

Many pet owners feel overwhelmed when they learn their pet is diabetic and will require additional care. After several weeks of this new routine, you may be surprised by how well you and your pet have adjusted. Staying in close contact with your veterinary team is especially important in the first few months of treatment.

Dental Anesthesia

How Should I Clean My Pet’s Ears and Administer Ear Medications?

Your veterinarian will recommend how often you should clean and medicate your pet’s ears and will demonstrate the proper procedure. Generally, you will need to clean the ear prior to using ear medication. Your veterinary staff can recommend products designed for cleaning the ears at home. You may use small pieces of cotton, tissue, or cotton swabs to clean the smaller crevices that you can see near the opening of the ear canal. Do not use cotton swabs to probe deeper than you can see, as this may cause damage to the tympanic membrane (eardrum). To administer ear medication, squirt it directly into the pet’s ear, as directed by your veterinarian. Make sure the medication runs down to the intersection between the vertical and horizontal canal (see illustration). Gently massage the ear canal between your forefinger and thumb. Allowing your pet to shake his or her head may help loosen debris that lies deeper in the canal.

Visit aaha.org/diabetes for more information on diabetes management in dogs and cats. ISBN 978-1-58326-281-8

90000

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How can I prevent lepto in my dog?

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

The specialist should be happy to partner with both you and your regular veterinarian in making medical decisions and identifying treatment options for your pet.

Avoid slow-moving water, puddles, or areas known to have high populations of rodents or raccoons. These areas are often at higher risk for contamination by Leptospira bacteria.

What kind of treatment options might be available, and how well do they work? Will my pet get sick from the treatments?

Vaccination against lepto is available to help protect your dog. This vaccine is often recommended for dogs who spend time in contaminated areas or dogs who are at risk for having contact with the urine of wildlife. This might include dogs who spend time outdoors in areas with high populations of rodents or raccoons, or those involved in outdoor events, such as hunting or field trials. Current lepto vaccines need to be given every 12 months. Available dog vaccines protect against many but not all types of Leptospira bacteria.

There is no right or wrong choice for cancer treatment. Common treatment options include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these. Some treatment options are palliative, focusing primarily on supportive care, such as managing pain. Dogs and cats respond to cancer treatment very differently than people do. Typically, they handle cancer treatment much better, with far fewer side effects than people do. Improving or preserving the quality of your pet’s life is equally as important as fighting the cancer itself.

If my dog has lepto, is that a health concern for me? Yes. People who care for infected dogs may become sick after having contact with the dog’s urine. If you are around an infected dog, avoid contact with the dog’s urine or urine-contaminated objects, such as bedding. Ensure the dog only urinates in areas away from other animals and people. These steps are most important until the dog has received appropriate antibiotics for several days. People should contact their human healthcare provider if they have concerns regarding exposure to an infected animal.

For many types of cancer, pets who receive treatment enjoy a longer life and a better quality of life than pets who do not receive treatment. Treatment can often improve the quality of life even for animals with advanced stages of cancer. One of the most important things to remember is to stay positive—there are almost always things that can be done to help your pet. Visit your veterinarian as soon as possible to start exploring your options. aaha.org/petowner © 2018 AMERICAN ANIMAL HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION

Examination HowFecal Often Should My Pet A veterinary health-care professional Be Vaccinated?

examines your pet’s feces with a microscope to check presence of intestinal How often yourfor petthe should be vaccinated parasites, as roundworms, hookworms, depends on manysuch factors, including breed, age, whipworms, tapeworms, Giardia,against or coccidia, and lifestyle. Dogs should be vaccinated to evaluate various intestinal disorders. canineor distemper virus, canine parvovirus-2, canine adenovirus-2, and rabies virus. Cats should Skin Scraping be vaccinated against feline panleukopenia virus Skin scraping is one of the most frequently (feline distemper), feline herpesvirus-1, feline used tests in veterinary dermatology. After calicivirus, and rabies virus. Other vaccines may scraping the skin, the veterinarian examines be appropriate based on where you live and other the material collected under the microscope factors. Your veterinarian will discuss with you the to confirm the presence or absence of certain recommended vaccination protocol for your pet’s types of external parasites. unique situation. Fungal Culture If your veterinarian is concerned about the possibility of a fungal infection on your pet’s skin, she or he will pluck hair samples from your pet. The hair is then placed into a culture medium to test for the presence of fungi, such as ringworm. It takes one to two weeks to get a final result from the fungal culture.

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

© 2019 AMERICAN ANIMAL HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION

Leptospirosis

pain medication to feel so good that they hurt themselves by being too active before they have fully healed. However, once your pet’s activity level starts to return to normal, your veterinarian may ask that you confine or sedate your pet to restrict his or her activity.

Skin and Coat The skin is the body’s largest organ and a good indicator of your pet’s health. Your veterinarian will examine the condition of the skin and haircoat as a means of detecting nutritional deficiencies, allergies, infections, hormone problems, and tumors. The veterinarian will also check for fleas, ticks, other external parasites, and wounds. Joints and Muscles The veterinarian will check your pet’s legs and feet to evaluate the condition of the joints and muscles and may also test your pet’s reflexes.

What Are the Risks of Treating My Pet for Pain?

aaha.org/petowner Your veterinarian will be able to tell you when your dog can be around other dogs. To prevent illness in other dogs, any dogs who are suspected or known to have the flu should be kept separated from other dogs for several weeks after recovery.

© 2015 AMERICAN ANIMAL HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION

© 2018 AMERICAN ANIMAL HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION

Managing Your Pet’s Pain

How Can These Diseases Be Prevented? First, test your cat to see if he or she is already infected. Second, consider vaccinating your cat against these viruses if he or she is at risk for infection. Discuss your cat’s potential exposure with your veterinarian so that you can make an informed decision. Third, consider keeping your cat indoors. It is impossible to ensure that your cat will not be exposed to infected cats if you allow him or her to roam freely outdoors. aaha.org/petowner Keep in mind, however, the risk of exposure is

P ET H E A LT H BR O C H U R E are S Einfected. RIES also indoors if housemates

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Preventive Care Exams

How Can I Take Care of My Pet’s Teeth at Home? Dental care does not end with a visit to your veterinarian. Brushing your pet’s teeth is an important part of home dental care. It is helpful to begin this routine with very young puppies and kittens as part of their training, even though their teeth look healthy. Older dogs and cats may be resistant. Talk to your veterinary health-care team about daily tooth-brushing and alternative techniques to control the accumulation of plaque. Special toothbrushes and toothpaste are available. Products are also available for pets who won’t tolerate brushing. Do not use products made for people on pets.

veterinarian. If you suspect a wild animal near your home or workplace has rabies, warn others and do not go near the animal. Contact the authorities in your area and allow them to aaha.org/petowner locate and capture the animal.

P ET HInEsome A LT H BROCHURE SERIES areas, you are required by law to

© 2015 AMERICAN ANIMAL HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION

report an animal suspected of having rabies, in order to protect the public. Notify your veterinarian and the local animal-control department immediately (in Canada, call the local police and health-control office).

How can I prevent canine flu in my dog? It is important for you to stay informed of disease risks in your area. Your veterinarian can help you stay up to date with outbreaks in the area and avoid the higher-risk areas if you are traveling with your dog. As people can move the flu virus between dogs on their hands and clothing, dog owners should wash their hands after touching other dogs, especially dogs who are sick.

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P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

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Lab Testing for Your Pet

• Brittle nails • Arthritis • Constipation in cats • Sensitivity to temperature changes • Coughing and exercise intolerance • Increased water consumption • Behavioral changes, changes in urination and defecation patterns, increased vocalization, and changes in sleep patterns • Confusion and disorientation in dogs (known as “canine cognitive dysfunction”)

Many of these changes could also indicate disease, so talk to your veterinarian right away if you notice any of these signs or any unusual changes in activity level and attitude. Don’t just dismiss changes in your pet’s health or habits as “part of the aging process”—they may be signs of serious disease.

Canine Influenza Virus

How can I prevent lepto in my dog?

Avoid slow-moving water, puddles, or areas aaha.org/petowner known to have high populations of rodents or

P ET Hraccoons. E A LT H These B R Oareas C H Uare R Eoften S E at R Ihigher E S risk

© 2015 AMERICAN ANIMAL HOSPITALbacteria. ASSOCIATION for contamination by Leptospira

Vaccination against lepto is available to help protect your dog. This vaccine is often recommended for dogs who spend time in contaminated areas or dogs who are at risk for having contact with the urine of wildlife. This might include dogs who spend time outdoors in areas with high populations of rodents or raccoons, or those involved in outdoor events, such as hunting or field trials. Current lepto vaccines need to be given every 12 months. Available dog vaccines protect against many but not all types of Leptospira bacteria.

Yes. People who care for infected dogs may become sick after having contact with the dog’s urine. If you are around an infected dog, avoid contact with the dog’s urine or urine-contaminated objects, such as bedding. Ensure the dog only urinates in areas away from other animals and people. These steps are most important until the dog has received appropriate antibiotics for several days. People should contact their human healthcare provider if they have concerns regarding exposure to an infected animal. aaha.org/petowner © 2018 AMERICAN ANIMAL HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION

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Is there a test that can determine if my pet needs to be vaccinated?

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Cats The veterinary community now knows that heartworm infection is more prevalent in cats than previously thought, but no heartworm treatment medications that kill adult worms have yet been approved for use in cats. Once heartworm infection is diagnosed, treatment will vary for individual cats: • One option is to allow your cat’s body to handle the infection without specific treatment. This option may be the best for those cats who test positive for heartworms but have no apparent physical signs of heartworm disease. If the cat develops signs of heartworm disease, he or she will need to be re-evaluated. • For those cats showing physical signs of heartworm disease, the best option is to control and treat the conditions that are present. Cats with heartworm infection may develop heartworm associated respiratory disease (HARD) or die suddenly. Cats who develop HARD will require treatment to help with breathing and may need drugs to remove and prevent formation of fluid in the chest and lungs. Continued medical treatment is usually needed once cats show physical signs of heartworm disease. • Another option is to treat the cat with drugs approved only for use in dogs. These drugs are known to have side effects, including respiratory failure and death, in a small percentage of cats. Your veterinarian will discuss these options with you. • Regardless of the treatment decided upon, your cat should begin a monthly heartworm prevention regimen to prevent aaha.org/petowner new infections from occurring while managing the current one.

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

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• Brittle nails • Arthritis • Constipation in cats • Sensitivity to temperature changes • Coughing and exercise intolerance • Increased water consumption • Behavioral changes, changes in urination and defecation patterns, increased vocalization, and changes in sleep patterns • Confusion and disorientation in dogs (known as “canine cognitive dysfunction”)

Many of these changes could also indicate disease, so talk to your veterinarian right away if you notice any of these signs or any unusual changes in activity level and attitude. Don’t just dismiss changes in your pet’s health or habits as “part of the aging process”—they may be signs of serious disease.

In the past, pets were vaccinated with every vaccine every year. Over time, vaccine technology has improved, and research shows that certain vaccines protect pets longer than previously thought. Several vaccines can now be given every three years. Other vaccines still need to be given yearly to prevent certain diseases. Work with your veterinarian to create a vaccination plan tailored specifically to your pet’s lifestyle, risk of exposure to certain diseases, and environment. It is important to take your pet to the veterinarian at least once a year for a checkup, no matter how often vaccines are given. This yearly exam will give your veterinarian the chance to address your pet’s problems, answer your questions, and keep your pet healthy and happy. aaha.org/petowner

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

Feline Immunodeficiency Viruses

Spaying or Neutering Your Pet

The body’s response to a vaccine is to produce antibodies, and these antibodies are what protect your pet from disease. Veterinarians can perform a titer test to measure a pet’s antibody levels and then can vaccinate only when the antibodies drop below a certain level. Titer tests for canine distemper, adenovirus, and parvovirus are thought to be quite reliable, but current laws state that a titer test cannot be used in place of a rabies vaccine.

How often does my pet need to be vaccinated?

If my dog has lepto, is that a health concern for me?

Vaccines are available to help protect your dog from the flu. Vaccines may be advised for dogs who are likely to be around many other dogs or based on flu outbreaks in your area. As with human flu vaccines, canine flu vaccines may not completely prevent infection in vaccinated dogs, but they will decrease the chance of your dog becoming infected and developing severe illness. Talk to your veterinarian about whether your dog should be vaccinated against canine influenza.

Working with your veterinarian will ensure that your pet’s quality of life is maintained and his or her needs are being met until the very end. This care will help make your final moments with your pet by your side be as aaha.org/petowner peaceful, gentle, and comfortable as possible.

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

Rabies

When Should My Pet Have the Surgery?

Veterinarians typically recommend that a female pet be spayed before her first heat cycle, which means at about six months of age. Male dogs and cats can be neutered at six months also, but many veterinarians now perform the surgery on pets that are as young as two to three months. Your veterinarian will be able to recommend the most appropriate timing for your pet’s surgery.

factors. Your veterinarian will discuss with you the recommended vaccination protocol for your pet’s unique situation.

If the veterinarian finds any abnormalities during your pet’s examination, the veterinarian may recommend additional tests to diagnose or confirm a health problem.

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

What happens after choosing hospice care for your pet? Similar to human medicine, some veterinarians focus on end-of-life care for pets. Your veterinarian may offer this service or refer you to such a professional. Whether you are working with a hospice veterinarian or your own veterinarian, the process will be similar. After the terminal diagnosis, your veterinary healthcare team will: 1. Educate you about your pet’s disease 2. Evaluate your needs, beliefs, and goals for your pet 3. Develop a personalized end-of-life treatment plan 4. Implement palliative care measures

Cats can live long and relatively healthy lives despite retroviral infection. Some related disorders (including secondary infections) can be well controlled if they are diagnosed early and treated aggressively.

Preventive Care Exams

veterinarian. If you suspect a wild animal near How Often Should My Pet your home or workplace has rabies, warn Be Vaccinated? others and do not go near the animal. Contact authorities in yourbearea and allow them to How the often your pet should vaccinated locate capture animal.breed, age, depends on and many factors,the including and lifestyle. Dogs should be vaccinated against Indistemper some areas, youcanine are required by law to canine virus, parvovirus-2, report an animaland suspected of having rabies, canine adenovirus-2, rabies virus. Cats should in order to protect the panleukopenia public. Notify your be vaccinated against feline virus theherpesvirus-1, local animal-control (felineveterinarian distemper),and feline feline department immediately (in vaccines Canada, may call the calicivirus, and rabies virus. Other local police and health-control office). be appropriate based on where you live and other

End-of-life care and decisionmaking should take into consideration all of your pet’s needs and should maximize your pet’s comfort and minimize suffering. A collaborative and supportive partnership between you and your veterinary healthcare team is important in this process.

No drugs or therapeutic agents have been approved for treating feline immunodeficiency viruses at this time, but cats may benefit from certain prescription medications or nutritional supplementation as prescribed by your veterinarian.

Abdomen and Reproductive System Your veterinarian will feel the abdomen to detect irregularities such as enlarged organs, masses, or areas that are painful. Your pet’s reproductive system will be examined for swelling or discharges. If your pet has not been spayed or neutered, your veterinarian will explain that spaying or neutering provides many health benefits beyond birth control.

Some drugs prescribed for chronic pain will require your pet to visit the veterinary hospital periodically for blood and urine testing to identify any possible negative aaha.org/petowner effects of the drug. © 2017 AMERICAN ANIMAL HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

Ear Conditions in Pets

Keep in mind that palliative care is not only for pets living with a terminal disease, but can also be used to manage curable or long-term conditions. Your pet’s quality of life is extremely important, and the goal of palliative care is to support or improve his or her quality of life.

Frequently, diagnostic tests such as a blood profile, fecal exam, urinalysis, and radiographs (X-rays) are required to help your veterinarian know which supportive treatments are needed. These may include administration of fluids, B vitamins, appetite stimulants, or antidiarrheal medications.

Heart and Lungs The veterinarian will use a stethoscope to listen to your pet’s heart and lungs. The early signs of heart disease often are recognized during a routine health exam.

All drugs have side effects. You and your veterinarian should discuss the risks versus the benefits of the drugs prescribed for pain management, including quality-of-life issues for your pet. Your veterinarian may ask you to monitor your pet for vomiting, diarrhea, and changes in eating patterns. In all cases, discontinue all medication and contact your veterinarian immediately if you see that your pet is vomiting or depressed, has diarrhea or constipation, or shows signs of decreased activity or loss of appetite.

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

Living with Cancer

It is important to consider diet and metabolic needs for pets with chronic pain, which is pain that continues for a long period of time or recurs frequently. Some pets in chronic pain lose their appetites and suffer from malnutrition; others may overeat, decrease their activity, and become obese. For arthritic pain, your veterinarian probably will prescribe a structured exercise program and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID).

Fine-Needle Aspirates When your pet has a lump, your veterinarian may take a sample by using a sterile syringe and needle to withdraw cells and/or fluid from the lump. The sample is put on a slide, stained with special dyes to make the cells easier to identify, and viewed with a microscope. The fine-needle aspirate is a quick way to diagnose infections and screen for some forms of cancer.

My dog has recently recovered from the flu. Is she still contagious?

Your Pet’s Ear Canal aaha.org/petowner

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Diabetes in Pets

Detecting this state requires additional, more specific testing. Your veterinarian can provide supportive care for your cat and treat some of the secondary illnesses that develop as a result of the infection.

A Gentle Goodbye How Do I Keep My Pet from Getting Intestinal Parasites?

To avoid parasites, keep your pet away from other animal feces. Dispose of your own pet’s bowel movements as quickly as possible, and keep your pet and their environment clean. Here are some other ways you can protect your pet: • Be alert to fleas in the environment— your pet may swallow a flea that is carrying tapeworm eggs. • A fecal examination should be part of your pet’s preventive care visit at least once yearly. • Routine, frequent fecal checks are important for predatory dogs and cats because some types of worms are ingested when a pet eats an infected rodent or other small mammal. • Use preventive medications for internal and external parasites, as directed by your veterinarian.

Heartworm Disease in Pets

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

© 2015 AMERICAN ANIMAL HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION

Vaccinating Your Pet

© 2015 AMERICAN ANIMAL HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION

exercise than an eight-year-old dachshund with heart disease. With your veterinarian’s approval, you can embark on an exercise program that won’t seem like work at all—to your pet, it’s play. Exercising Your Dog The key to exercising your dog is to start out slowly and then steadily increase the length and intensity of the workouts. Just like people, dogs who go from little or no exercise to a lengthy or strenuous routine will experience soreness and may even suffer from damage to weak ligaments. If your dog is stiff or slow to rise the day after exercise, slow down.

It is helpful to begin this routine with very young puppies and kittens as part of their training, even though their teeth look healthy. Older dogs and cats may be resistant. Talk to your veterinary health-care team about daily tooth-brushing and alternative techniques to control the accumulation of plaque. Special toothbrushes and toothpaste are available. Products are also available for pets who won’t tolerate brushing. Do not use products made for people on pets.

Hiking, walking, and running are all great exercise for your dog, and he or she will most likely be thrilled to participate. If your dog is unable or unwilling to walk due to stiffness or injury and is comfortable around water, swimming may be a good option.

Your Pet’s Dental Care

Is there a test that can determine if my pet needs to be vaccinated?

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Your Aging Pet

Lab Testing for Your Pet

Fungal Culture If your veterinarian is concerned about the possibility of a fungal infection on your pet’s skin, she or he will pluck hair samples from your pet. The hair is then placed into a culture medium to test for the presence of fungi, such as ringworm. It takes one to two weeks to get a final result from the fungal culture.

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P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

Your Aging Pet

How Can I Take Care of My Pet’s Teeth at Home? Dental care does not end with a visit to your veterinarian. Brushing your pet’s teeth is an important part of home dental care.

Kidney Disease in Pets

Skin Scraping Skin scraping is one of the most frequently used tests in veterinary dermatology. After scraping the skin, the veterinarian examines the material collected under the microscope to confirm the presence or absence of certain types of external parasites.

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P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

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Your Pet’s Dental Care

Exercising Your Cat • Always practicing personal hygiene. While yourPeople cat probably won’t to at higher riskwant for zoonoses should accompany you onwash a five-mile run, he or she may always their hands after handling like to playanimals games and withavoid you that involve kissing petschasing or allowing somethingthem attached to their a stick or string. Many to lick faces. Quickly wash cats love to chase light from a laser pointer bites andthe scratches from animals, and (be carefuldo notnot to allow shinepets it in your eyes, as to lickcat’s open wounds. this can cause can Havedamage). someoneYou who is provide at lowertoys risk for clean your cat tolitter playboxes, with that simulate small prey, and cages, and aquariums, such as stuffed mice or smallwear balls.gloves. Cats inKeep if thattoy is not possible, multi-cat households also play with each litter boxes can away from kitchens and food other for exercise. preparation areas. • Caring for pets properly. Have any new Whatever pets gameexamined you play with your cat, don’t use by a veterinarian before your hand you or fingers as “bait” or as the object of bring them home. If your pet is ill, teasing. Such teachcare yourascat thatasit possible. is all seekgames veterinary soon right to scratch your hands—a Keep and petsbite away from wildlifelesson or places you do notthey wantcould him get or her to learn.disease: Also, do keep not a zoonotic let your catcats playindoors with yarn or string because he and dogs on a leash or in or she maya choke it, get it stuck in theFollow throat fencedon yard when outdoors. or the digestive or become routinesystem, preventive care as dangerously recommended entangled by in it. your veterinarian, including

Pet Health Brochure Set (23 packs of 50 brochures each)

Fine-Needle Aspirates When your pet has a lump, your veterinarian may take a sample by using a sterile syringe and needle to withdraw cells and/or fluid from the lump. The sample is put on a slide, stained with special dyes to make the cells easier to identify, and viewed with a microscope. The fine-needle aspirate is a quick way to diagnose infections and screen for some forms of cancer.

Can I Get Intestinal Parasites from My Pet? Under some conditions, intestinal parasites can be transmitted from pets to people. Especially at risk are children, pregnant women, and immunocompromised individuals. Parasitic larvae can migrate through the human body and enter the eyes, brain, or other areas, which can cause blindness or other severe health problems. Avoid walking barefoot or letting children play in areas where dogs and cats defecate. Discuss the risk with aaha.org/petowner your veterinarian and physician.

Increasingly, people are looking for other ways to interact with their dogs. Activities such as obedience classes, agility training and competitions, and fly-ball competitions are wonderful means of enjoying your dog and socializing with other people and dogs. And they are great forms of exercise!

© 2018 AMERICAN ANIMAL HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION

Fecal Examination A veterinary health-care professional examines your pet’s feces with a microscope to check for the presence of intestinal parasites, such as roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, tapeworms, Giardia, or coccidia, or to evaluate various intestinal disorders.

You may need to administer fluids under your pet’s skin at home to help maintain normal hydration. This treatment is usually only for cats. Your veterinary health care team will provide instructions if this becomes necessary. Following instructions and working closely with your veterinarian will give your pet a better quality of life and may help prolong his or her life.

If you’d like to try something else, playing keep-away or hide-and-seek with a toy and two or more people is another excellent way to exercise your dog. Tug-of-war is not a good game because it can damage your dog’s teeth and may increase aggressive behavior.

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P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

Intestinal Parasites in Pets

Your pet will be sent home with medications and/or supplements required for continued treatment. After your pet leaves the hospital, your veterinarian will repeat blood tests and urinalyses to monitor your pet’s condition at regular intervals or when the need arises. Your veterinarian may recommend a special diet to decrease protein and sodium intake. Be sure to administer any prescribed medications and feed your pet as directed.

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Your Pet’s Diet and Exercise Plan

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

Zoonotic Diseases

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$239.95 M    $299.95 NM

vaccinations and steps to control and prevent ticks and fleas. Feed your pets canned or dry commercial food or wellcooked home-prepared food.

Product code PTHK4, AAHA Press 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019.

Pets provide many health benefits to people, and maintaining the human-animal bond is incredibly important. In almost all cases, people do not need to give up their pets to protect themselves from zoonoses. Instead, they should have discussions with their veterinarian and physician to come up with ways to reduce disease risks. These simple steps will go a long way to keep you and your pet healthy. aaha.org/petowner

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

© 2015 AMERICAN ANIMAL HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION

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P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

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P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

Preventive Care Health Brochure Set

Vaccinating Your Pet

The body’s response to a vaccine is to produce antibodies, and these antibodies are what protect your pet from disease. Veterinarians can perform a titer test to measure a pet’s antibody levels and then can vaccinate only when the antibodies drop below a certain level. Titer tests for canine distemper, adenovirus, and parvovirus are thought to be quite reliable, but current laws state that a titer test cannot be used in place of a rabies vaccine.

(10 packs of 50 brochures each)

How often does my pet need to be vaccinated? In the past, pets were vaccinated with every vaccine every year. Over time, vaccine technology has improved, and research shows that certain vaccines protect pets longer than previously thought. Several vaccines can now be given every three years. Other vaccines still need to be given yearly to prevent certain diseases. Work with your veterinarian to create a vaccination plan tailored specifically to your pet’s lifestyle, risk of exposure to certain diseases, and environment. It is important to take your pet to the veterinarian at least once a year for a checkup, no matter how often vaccines given. This yearly exam will give your •areAlways practicing personal hygiene. veterinarian the chance to zoonoses address your pet’s People at higher risk for should problems, answer your questions, and keep always wash their hands after handling your pet healthy and kissing happy. pets or allowing animals and avoid aaha.org/petowner them to lick their faces. Quickly wash

Rabies

bites P ET H E A LT H and B Rscratches O C H U Rfrom E Sanimals, E R I E Sand

© 2015 AMERICAN ANIMAL HOSPITAL do not allow pets to lick openASSOCIATION wounds.

Have someone who is at lower risk clean litter boxes, cages, and aquariums, and if that is not possible, wear gloves. Keep litter boxes away from kitchens and food preparation areas. • Caring for pets properly. Have any new pets examined by a veterinarian before you bring them home. If your pet is ill, seek veterinary care as soon as possible. Keep pets away from wildlife or places they could get a zoonotic disease: keep cats indoors and dogs on a leash or in a fenced yard when outdoors. Follow routine preventive care as recommended by your veterinarian, including vaccinations and steps to control and prevent ticks and fleas. Feed your pets canned or dry commercial food or wellcooked home-prepared food. Pets provide many health benefits to people, and maintaining the human-animal bond is incredibly important. In almost all cases, people do not need to give up their pets to protect themselves from zoonoses. Instead, they should have discussions with their veterinarian and physician to come up with ways to reduce disease risks. These simple steps will go a long way to keep you and your pet healthy. aaha.org/petowner

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

© 2018 AMERICAN ANIMAL HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION

Leptospirosis

Cats The veterinary community now knows that heartworm infection is more prevalent in cats than previously thought, but no heartworm aaha.org/petowner treatment medications that kill adult worms yetHbeen cats. Once P ET Hhave E A LT B Rapproved O C H Ufor R EuseS in ER IES © 2018 AMERICAN ANIMAL HOSPITAL treatment ASSOCIATION heartworm infection is diagnosed, will vary for individual cats: • One option is to allow your cat’s body to handle the infection without specific treatment. This option may be the best for those cats who test positive for heartworms but have no apparent physical signs of heartworm disease. If the cat develops signs of heartworm disease, he or she will need to be re-evaluated. • For those cats showing physical signs of heartworm disease, the best option is to control and treat the conditions that are present. Cats with heartworm infection may develop heartworm associated respiratory disease (HARD) or die suddenly. Cats who develop HARD will require treatment to help with breathing and may need drugs to remove and prevent formation of fluid in the chest and lungs. Continued medical treatment is usually needed once cats show physical signs of heartworm disease. • Another option is to treat the cat with drugs approved only for use in dogs. These drugs are known to have side effects, including respiratory failure and death, in a small percentage of cats. Your veterinarian will discuss these options with you. • Regardless of the treatment decided upon, your cat should begin a monthly heartworm prevention regimen to prevent aaha.org/petowner new infections from occurring while P ET H E A LTmanaging H B R Othe C Hcurrent U R E one. SERIES © 2018 AMERICAN ANIMAL HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION

Zoonotic Diseases

Heartworm Disease in Pets

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

Includes Preventive Care Exams, Lab Testing for Your Pet, Your Pet’s Dental Care, Your Aging Pet, Vaccinating Your Pet, Canine Influenza Virus, Rabies, Leptospirosis, Zoonotic Diseases, and Heartworm Disease in Pets.

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$99.95 M    $129.95 NM aaha.org/petowner

P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

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P ET H E A LT H B R O C H U R E S E R I E S

Product code PREVPAK2, AAHA Press 2015, 2017, 2018.


BOOK SWAG  51 

AAHA Press Tote Bag AAHA These stylish, reusable cotton tote bags sport the phrase that all veterinary professionals live by! Showcase your love of animals and carry all the essential books and items your busy schedule needs with the roomy, sturdy bags from AAHA Press. Made in the USA. A random list of things you can carry in the new AAHA Press bag: y At least one puppy (not really though) y A copy of Practice Made Perfect and a chewed-up laptop y One grown cat, or four kittens (but please don't) y A box of Physical Exam Stickers and four sets of clean (or dirty) scrubs y One AAHA water bottle, ten slip leads, 50 poop bags, and hundreds of treats Cat Hair Don’t Care Tote Bag

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1–5 (each) $16.95 M    $19.95 NM

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5 or more (each) $14.95 M    $16.95 NM Product code CATTO1, cotton tote bag, Size: 13"w  16"h  5"g, AAHA Press 2019.

Dog Hair Don’t Care Tote Bag

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1–5 (each) $16.95 M    $19.95 NM

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5 or more (each) $14.95 M    $16.95 NM Product code DOGTO1, cotton tote bag, Size: 13"w  16"h  5"g, AAHA Press 2019.

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52  TOOLS FOR YOUR CLIENTS: PET LOSS

A Final Act of Caring: Ending the Life of an Animal Friend MARY AND HERB MONTGOMERY This booklet provides comfort as it encourages pet owners to turn to you for medical answers and to review options when considering a planned passing for a pet.

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1–10 copies (each) $5.95 M    $6.95 NM

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11 or more copies (each) $5.45 M    $6.45 NM Product code PLFC1, paperback, 32 pages, 978-1-87977-902-0, Montgomery Press 2000.

Good-Bye My Friend: Grieving the Loss of a Pet MARY AND HERB MONTGOMERY Addressing issues such as pain, memories, grief, and how to help children through pet loss, this booklet will help your clients deal with losing a beloved animal friend.

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1–10 copies (each) $5.95 M    $6.95 NM

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11 or more copies (each) $5.45 M    $6.45 NM Product code PLGO1, paperback, 32 pages, 978-1-87977-900-6, Montgomery Press 2000.

Forever in My Heart: Remembering My Pet’s Life MARY AND HERB MONTGOMERY Emotions are raw at the loss of a pet. Help your clients deal with their loss by giving them this remembrance journal, which celebrates the human-animal bond and allows them to recall treasured memories.

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1–10 copies (each) $5.95 M    $6.95 NM

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11 or more copies (each) $5.45 M    $6.45 NM Product code FMHEA, paperback, 32 pages, 978-1-87977-907-5, Montgomery Press 2000.

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TOOLS FOR YOUR CLIENTS: PET LOSS  53 

I Remember: A Book About My Special Pet MARY AND HERB MONTGOMERY This fill-in memory book will help children and adults frame the loss of a pet in terms of joy and memories, from the joyful beginning to the sad farewell.

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1–10 copies (each) $5.95 M    $6.95 NM

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11 or more copies (each) $5.45 M    $6.45 NM Product code IRMBK, paperback, 32 pages, 978-1-87977-906-8, Montgomery Press 2000.

Pet Loss Booklet Set Buy the four booklets on this page together and save.

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$21.95 M    $24.95 N 

Product code PTLS1.

Coping with the Loss of Your Pet KATHLEEN AYL, PSYD Help your clients through their grief and strengthen the bond they feel with your practice with this sensitively written resource.

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1–10 copies (each) $5.95 M    $6.95 NM

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11 or more copies (each)$5.45 M    $6.45 NM Product code PLCOP, paperback, 20 pages, Grief Associates 2007.

A Special Place for Charlee: A Child’s Companion Through Pet Loss DEBBY MOREHEAD, ILLUSTRATED BY KAREN CANNON This well-crafted, sensitive volume will aid practitioners and parents in guiding children through the loss of a pet. In addition to covering the meaning of love and pet loss, the book emphasizes the practitioner’s role throughout a pet’s life.

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1–10 copies (each) $9.95 M    $10.95 NM

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11 or more copies (each) $8.95 M    $9.95 NM Product code PLSPC, paperback, 28 pages, 978-0-96540-490-7, Partners in Publishing, LLC 1996.

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54 INDEX

Index 101 Veterinary Human Resources Questions Answered (Dobbs and Dunn), 19

Destructive Cats: Solving Chewing and Scratching Problems (brochure), 44, 50

101 Veterinary Marketing Questions Answered (Brogdon), 16

Destructive Doggies: Solving Digging and Chewing Problems (brochure), 44, 50

101 Veterinary Technician Questions Answered (Dobbs), 28

A AAHA Controlled Substance Logs Set, 29 AAHA Exam Report Cards, 34 AAHA Guide to Creating an Employee Handbook ( Donnelly, ed), 18 AAHA Guide to Safeguarding Your Controlled Substances, 30

Diabetes in Pets (brochure), 47–48

E Ear Conditions in Pets (brochure), 48 Educating Your Clients from A to Z: What to Say and How to Say It (Boss), 27 80 Tips Series, 26–27

AAHA Veterinary Safety Training, 35, 36

The E-Myth Veterinarian: Why Most Veterinary Practices Don’t Work and What to Do About It ( Gerber and Weinstein), 16

AAHA’s Complete Guide for the Veterinary Client Service Representative (Renfrew), 28

Euthanasia Stickers, 32

Associate Buy-Ins: Structuring Successful Transitions (Monheiser-List), 17

Exceptional Customer Experience: 80 Tips for Compassionate Care, Clear Communication, and Authentic Client Connections ( AAHA), 27

B

exotic animal care, 38

Basic Training: Teaching Your Puppy to Mind Her Manners (brochure), 44, 50 Be a Champion: 80 Tips to Work Smarter, Save Money, and Show the Love to Clients and Pets (AAHA), 26 Be Safe Series, 36

F Fear Free: 80 Tips to Reduce Your Patients’ Fear, Anxiety, and Stress (AAHA), 26

Busy Dogs are Good Dogs (brochure), 44, 50

Fearful Fido: Helping Your Dog Overcome the Fear of People (brochure), 44, 50

Buying a Veterinary Practice ( Monheiser-List), 17

The Feisty Feline: Taming the Kitten with Attitude (brochure), 45, 50

C

Feline Immunodeficiency Viruses (brochure), 48

Canine and Feline Dental Record, 34

Feline-Specific Behavior Brochure Set, 50

Canine Influenza (brochure), 47, 50

Fido Was First: Training Your Dog for Baby’s Arrival (brochure), 45, 50

Canine Medical Massage: Techniques and Clinical Applications (Robinson and Sheets), 37

A Final Act of Caring: Ending the Life of an Animal Friend ( Montgomery and Montgomery), 52

Canine Parvovirus (brochure), 47

Financial and Productivity Pulsepoints (AAHA), 9

Canine Vaccination Schedule Magnet, 33

Financial Management of the Veterinary Practice ( Chamblee and Reiboldt), 13

Canine-Specific Behavior Brochure Set, 50 Career Choices for Veterinary Technicians: Opportunities for Animal Lovers, Revised ( Rose and Smith), 27

Forever in My Heart: Remembering My Pet’s Life ( Montgomery and Montgomery), 52

Caring for Your Pet After Anesthesia (brochure), 47

G

Companion-Animal Dental and Surgical Instruments: A Reference for Veterinary Technicians and Assistants ( Marshall and Peter), 38

A Gentle Goodbye (brochure), 48

Compensation and Benefits (AAHA), 8, 11

Good-Bye My Friend: Grieving the Loss of a Pet ( Montgomery and Montgomery), 52

Compensation Models for Owners, Associates, and Staff  (Monheiser-List), 17

H

Coping with the Loss of Your Pet ( Ayl), 53

Heartworm Disease in Pets (brochure), 48, 50

Crate Training: Creating the Perfect Canine Cave (brochure), 44, 50

Home Alone: Solving Separation Anxiety Problems (brochure), 45, 50

Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes Are High (Patterson et al.), 23

Home-Care Instructions Form, 34

D

Healthy Mouth, Healthy Pet: Why Dental Care Matters ( Banyard), 39

How We Do Things Here: Developing and Teaching Office-Wide Protocols ( Boss), 19

DEA regulation of controlled substances, 29, 30–31

I

Dental Anesthesia (brochure), 47

I Remember: A Book About My Special Pet ( Montgomery and Montgomery), 53

Dental Discharge Instructions Form, 34

press.aaha.org


INDEX  55 

Initial and Biennial Inventory Forms, 29

The Small Animal Veterinary Nerdbook ( Yin), 37

Intestinal Parasites in Pets (brochure), 48

The Social Scene: Introducing Your Puppy to the World (brochure), 46, 50

K

Spaying or Neutering Your Pet (brochure), 49

Kidney Disease in Pets (brochure), 48

A Special Place for Charlee: A Child’s Companion Through Pet Loss (Morehead and Cannon), 53

L Lab Testing for Your Pet (brochure), 48, 50

SPECS (spiritual, physical, emotional, cognitive, and support system), 24–25

Leptospirosis (brochure), 48, 50

Standard Abbreviations for Veterinary Medical Records ( AAHA), 13, 29

Litter Box Blues: Solving Housesoiling Problems (brochure), 45, 50

Starting a Veterinary Practice ( Monheiser-List), 17

Living with Cancer (brochure), 48 Low Stress Handling, Restraint and Behavior Modification of Dogs & Cats: Techniques for Developing Patients Who Love Their Visits ( Yin), 38

M Manager’s Guide to Veterinary Workplace Safety ( Seibert), 35, 36

T Taking the Hassle Out of Housetraining Your Kitty (brochure), 46, 50 Taking the Hassle Out of Housetraining Your Puppy (brochure), 46 Treatment Sheets, 33

Managing Your Pet’s Pain (brochure), 49

Truths from Trends: 80 Tips for Better Communication, Happier Clients, and a Healthier Culture (AAHA), 26

N

U

neutering and spaying, 49

Understanding Your Pet’s Health: A Visual Guide ( AAHA), 39

Noisy Canines: Solving Barking Problems (brochure), 45, 50

Unopened and Opened Container Logs, 29

O

Urinalysis Stickers, 32

older pets, 46, 49

V

P

Vaccinating Your Pet (brochure), 49, 50

Pet Care Coloring Book ( AAHA), 39

Vaccination Schedule Magnet, 33

pet health brochures, 47–50

Valuation of Veterinary Practices: Understanding the Theory, Process, and Report ( Monheiser-List), 17

Pet Loss Booklets Set, 52 Physical Exam Stickers, 32 Piranha Puppies: Keeping Mouthing and Biting Under Control (brochure), 45, 50

The Veterinary Caregiver’s Book of Quotess: A Collection of Meditations, Short Tails, and Puppy Kisses ( Dobbs), 23 The Veterinary Fee Reference ( AAHA), 9

A Practical Guide to Managing Employee Performance in Veterinary Practices ( Parker), 19

Veterinary Safety Training for Medical & Technical Staff ( video), 35

Practical Guide to Veterinary Hospital Design: From Renovations to New Builds ( Pollard and Shoults), 5

Veterinary Secondary Container Labels with Poster ( AAHA), 36

Practice Made Perfect: A Complete Guide to Veterinary Practice Management ( Heinke and McCarthy), 12, 14–15 Practice Ownership Series, 17 Preventive Care Exams (brochure), 49, 50 Preventive Care Health Brochure Set, 50

Veterinary Safety Training for the Whole Practice Team (video), 35

A Veterinary Technician’s Guide to Exotic Animal Care (Tully and Mitchell), 38

W What’s That? A Beginner’s Guide to Veterinary Abdominal Ultrasound (Baker), 37

Pushy Pups: Using the Power of Positive Control (brochure), 46, 50

When Helping Hurts: Compassion Fatigue in the Veterinary Profession (Ayl), 22, 24–25

R

Y

Rabies (brochure), 49, 50

Your Aging Pet (brochure), 49, 50

S

Your Pet’s Dental Care (brochure), 49, 50

Scaredy Cat: Helping Cats and Kittens with Fear (brochure), 46, 50

Your Pet’s Diet and Exercise Plan (brochure), 49

Selling Your Veterinary Practice: Issues and Answers ( Monheiser-List and Hanner), 17

Z Zoonotic Diseases (brochure), 49, 50

Senior Moments: Understanding Behavior Changes in Aging Pets (brochure), 46, 50

press.aaha.org


56 

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2020 AAHA Press Catalog  

AAHA Press—the publishing arm of the American Animal Hospital Association—is an internationally regarded publisher and distributor of titles...

2020 AAHA Press Catalog  

AAHA Press—the publishing arm of the American Animal Hospital Association—is an internationally regarded publisher and distributor of titles...

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