Issuu on Google+

Shreepad Joglekar | 806 543 1030 | www.aabhaa.com  Artist Statement for photographic work  Driving past the vacant lots, strip malls, deteriorating community parks, and new gated subdivisions with  country  club  aesthetics,  I  am  puzzled  by  the  sluggish  expanse  of  a  generic  small  town  in  south  Texas  whose character is omnipresent across the USA. Witnessing the construction of a new jogging track, tilled  up soil of a lot proposed to be a water‐park, or demolition of an old apartment complex, I am intrigued  with  the severity of  human  engagement with  the land. I  believe  these spaces, often  in flux, archive  our  attitude  toward  our  surroundings  and  give  form  to  the  abstract,  often  romantic,  idea  of  human‐ environment relationship.  Literature,  art,  and  social  sciences  often  address  the  role  that  a  ‘sense  of  belonging  to  a  place’  plays  in  enriching our social lives. When I moved to the United States for graduate studies, after initial amazement  about  the  freeways  and  air‐conditioning,  I  became  starkly  aware  of  my  inability  to  relate  to  my  surroundings. This sense of alienation intrigued me. It also made me interested in the history of American  vernacular  landscape,  architectural  theory,  and  the  psychological  relation  we  have  with  built  spaces  around  us  –  in  the  words  of  Gaston  Bachelard:  the  “poetics  of  space.”  The  built  environments  not  only  occupy  space  but  also  embody  time.  They  can  be  experienced  as  recessed  in  the  past  or  projected  in  future.  For  example,  signs  such  as  ‘moved  to,’  ‘coming  soon,’  ‘future  home  of…’  imply  spatial,  and  architectural forms that are in the process of becoming. In my work, I interpret my current landscape as  an  immigrant  transitioning  from  being  an  outsider  to  an  insider.  In  this  way  photography,  for  me,  is  a  process  of  acclimatization,  not  only  of  perception  but  also  of  all  senses  that  read  cultural  stimuli.  The  phenomenology of the manufactured or altered spaces around me is the core subject matter of my work.   Photography  is  essentially  a  creative  intervention  in,  and  also  subtle  manipulation  of,  space.  My  work  allows  me  to  critically  situate  myself  in  space  and  subtly  aestheticize  the  relationship  between  my  surrounding and me. I am especially interested in assessing the architecture of public and private spaces.  Layers  of  human  imagination  can  be  found  embedded  in  their  renovations,  or  ruins.  These  spaces  also  exhibit  residues  of  the  communal  and  personal  histories,  in  the  form  of  an  abandoned  artifact,  an  antiquated pattern, or, at times, in the form of a memory of the inhabitant. I often pair the images with  an  array  of  metadata  about  the  unseen  aspects  of  the  space  such  as  its  GPS  coordinates,  basis  for  its  abandonment, or even the reverie of its projected future. I believe such context bolsters the interpretive  value of the images and translates space into a site.  The  process  of  photography  lets  me  explore  the  contemporary  culture  that  harbors  affinity  for  instant  gratification  through  short  term  (sighted)  planning  and  casual  abandonment,  and  the  commendable  human quality of tirelessly altering the surroundings, as if in the pursuit of happiness. 


artist statement