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THE AUTEUR HOUSE


THE AUTEUR HOUSE

Designed by Annie Chen


PART I

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BACKGROUND

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The Design Concept

ABSTRACT The Auteur House is a museum that celebrates various directors. It takes the work of the director and creates an enveloping sensory experience connecting the viewer, the work, and the space. This functions based on exhibits. Exhibits last a few weeks to a few months. The exhibit features one specific director. The gallery will function as an outlet to create the style and feel of the chosen director. The gallery will display videos and stills from the director’s various works, as well as having furniture, interior décor, costumes, and other significant props from the movies themselves. There are viewing rooms that will give more of a background to the director. Throughout the exhibition the guest is expected to further understand the director and his movies. As well as, the process and elements needed to complete one of his movies. The beginning of the exhibition there is a large gallery opening party. This will be a themed party where guests need to dress based on the director featured.

THE AUTEUR THEORY The genre of film is a historically successful medium that combines art and music. Film is the most influential medium available. It uses story telling, visuals, and sound. It is emotionally captivating, and it is a true experience. In film, the auteur theory is a way of “curating” a movie. These are movies stylized to be distinctly recognizable by the director. It is interesting that one person’s creative direction can create such influence. The term and concept was born out of an influential group of 1950’s French film critics and filmmakers. “Auteur” is a French word-meaning author. This is used, because the director is seen as the author of the movie rather than simply the director.

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Precedents

THE MUSEUM OF THE MOVING IMAGE The Museum of the Moving Image located in Queens, New York is a good example of the display movies in a three dimensional space. This multi-level space includes different showrooms, several screening rooms, multiple exhibits, an interactive area, and thousands of movie artifacts. This museum very effectly displays the history and process of movie making. This allows the user to have a round understanding of cinema.

THE GUGGENHEIM The Guggenheim looks very different in plan than it does in section view. In plan it shows a very fluid circulation pathway. There seems to be two circulation areas. One is in the atrium space. This is the angled ramp that encompasses the atrium. As a user walks up the ramp they are lead to different galleries along the path. The second is circulation space is around a staircase. These two circulation spaces are rather separate except for a small doorway.

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Precedents

THE SALVADOR DALI MUSEUM The Art Institute has a very orthogonal plan and the Guggenheim has a curved radial plan. The Salvador Dali Museum combines these two plan concepts. The museum is a simple box that has a fluid organic piece that extrudes out. The interior under this fluid extrusion is a organic interior. This is a circulation space to the orthogonal gallery space. This resembles Salvador Dali surreal style. He often takes something normal and stretches into something abnormal.

THE CAC The CAC is designed very differently from the rest of these museums. The plan and section is rather angular. Each floor represents a different spatial function. The first floor is reserved for the reception, shop, and lobby. The basement is the performance space. The second floor and on are galleries. The top floor consists of offices. Rather than a series of rooms, each gallery occupies an entire floor. Each floor is very open and spacious. The main circulation is strictly vertical. The staircase is black to emphasize the circulation path.

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User Profiles

FAMILIES Families can go to the Auteur house to enjoy a nice afternoon out. They can browse around in the emerging Over-the-Rhine, and then head over to the Auteur house. Parents need to be cautious of the director showing in the gallery. Just as movies are rated, so the exhibit in the museum is rated as well.

YOUNG ADULTS The target demographic is the young adult. These are people from the approximate age range of 18-30. The young adults are the ones going out late at night to the surrounding bars and clubs. They are living with a zest for life, and they excited to see new and different things.

ADULTS While not the target demographic, the Auteur House is open to all adults, aka 18+. Any movie lover or fanatic of the exhibiting director is more than welcome to come learn about and experience the director currently exhibiting.

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Site Analysis

1329 MAIN STREET The site is situated on Main Street. The street is filled with artisan shops, cafÊs, galleries, and bars. It is a lively area that attracts people of their early twenties. The buildings are colorful, and they have delicate details, such as Victorian styled moldings. The street has energy, but a rustic look and feel to it. Main Street is adjacent to Vine Street. Vine Street is newly developed with more commercial restaurants. People are able to experience two different styles of places on one trip. Main Street is one that celebrates the arts. It is a hot street for final Fridays. The museum on this spot would allow it to be another stop on the road of art and drinking. There is, also, no large museums in this proximity, allowing the Auteur House to be celebrate as it’s own.

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Site Analysis

1329 MAIN STREET

Site

Final Friday Locations

1 Min. Walk

2 Min. Walk

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Parti

COLLAGED FEEL This is a collaged image that represents the parti. This describes the energy and feeling the museum will evoke. The circularity of the image describes the constantly changing and evolving theme of the museum. Images of different exhibits and events inhabit the collage. This displays the temporary nature of the museum, since exhibits only last a few months and then are replaced. The base image is the Guggenheim. The Guggenheim is a prominent museum, which this museum is as well. This shows the permanent shell that is the museum. It is simple and uncomplicated. The exhibits that inhabit the museum are high energy, attracting, and colorful. The museum is the canvas for the exhibit.

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PART II

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MUSEUM DESIGN

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MUSEUM LOOK & FEEL There are a couple of words that could surmise the design of the museum shell. These words are stark, minimal, and simple. Mies van der Rohe once said, “Less is more”. The design of the museum shell sticks to that view. The images on the right illustrate the overall style and feel of the building and the space. These images, also, act as a direct representation of the different design aspects that will be incorporated in the building. It, also depicts the different kinds of materials that will be used in the space, as well as depicting the material’s usage. For example, the interior and exterior of the space will be mainly white or light grey, with accents of black and natural wood tones. The staircase image shows a grand open staircase enveloped by glass, which will be the feature staircase in the space. The image of the house with different rectangles and square shapes extruded out will be another feature of the building. Circular ceiling tiles will be another accent. Needless to say this is a good representation of the “look and feel” of the museum.

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MATERIALS This section shows the exact materials that will be used in the space. As said in the look and feel section the colors are very stark and reserved. It is mainly white and grey, with accents of black and natural wood tones. The museum is kept very minimal in color and style, so it does not distract from the exhibit. This allows the museum shell to act as a canvas for the exhibit. The floors are mainly a herringbone-patterned wood. This is a bit darker than the white mainly used, so it allow for a slight grounding with the floors. The angled striations, also, symbolize strips of film. This gives a nod to movie and filmmaking. Accents on the floors are the different marble materials. This emphasizes specialty areas. All existing brick walls are painted white, and the ceiling is a white painted wood. The black and the beige wood tones emphasize structure in spots that use glass in the building. Emphasis is very purposefully and delicately placed.

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Italian White Marble

Black Painted Wood

Bog Oak Sealed

Black Marble

Fior de Pesco Marble

White Painted Wood

Ash

White Felt

Laser Cut Steel Sheet

White Painted Brick

Herringbone Patterned Wood

White Laminate

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EXTERIOR FACADE The exterior façade has two main features – the rectangular shapes extruding out from the brick structural walls and the metal panels overlaying the windows. The large curtain wall rectangular extrusions have dual purposes. For once, it allows for large views in and out of the building. This gives people a peek to the inside of the museum and a peek of the exhibit. The other purpose is a display space for different props or graphics to occupy. This display space is directed at people perusing in the neighborhoods. Perhaps they will be interested in the props in the displays and go inside the museum. The rectangular shapes and “black box” that are the extrusions, abstractly represent the screen. It is as if going into the building will be going into a screen or a movie. This represents the idea of experiencing a movie spatially. The other feature is the movable panels. These panels have small circular incision on them, and they are controlled electronically. They act as a form of external “blinds”. They move during different parts of the day to block sunlight.

Electronic Movable Panels

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ADJACENCY PROGRAM The adjacency program shows the different kinds of spaces that will exist within the museum. The diagram shows at upon entrance will be the reception space. The reception leads the lounge area. This occupies the front of the building. This then leads to the galleries, which are the largest part of the interior. The galleries have two viewing rooms, These viewing rooms show different clips and montages about the exhibiting auteur. The back of the museum consists of the office spaces, the storage, and the loading area. This creates a clear distinction and program within the interior. Instinctively the adjacency program acts as a web of connections between the different kinds of spaces. It, also, show the accessibility of each of the spaces, and the size. The larger the box the larger the space. The thicker the lines between each of the spaces the easier the connection, and the more access points there would be.

RECEPTION

LOUNGE

BATHROOM

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VIEWING ROOM 2 CURATORIAL

REGISTRAR

ADMINISTRATIVE

GALLERIES

MANAGERIAL

LOADING DOCK

COLLECTION STORAGE

BACK ENTRANCE

GENERAL STAFF

VIEWING ROOM 1

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MUSEUM PLANS The next couple of pages consist of the plans of the museum. These are the plans of the bare space. The idea of the Auteur House is similar to that of a pop up shop. There is an empty existing space, and a designer will come in and fill the space for a pop up shop. The exhibit space or the galleries act as an empty space for the exhibitor to do as they please. There are no walls or division of the space in the galleries, this allows the exhibit designer to have full control of all aspects of the exhibit. This includes the flow and the break up of the space, as well as all graphical and signage elements. The other permanent areas in the museum have been identified in the adjacency program. These spaces are situated in the rear of the building. This allows the front of the building to be for the exhibits and the main attraction of the museum. The reception and lounge area are one in the same, and situated at the entrance. The stairs divides the space, and creates a circulation pattern around it. It, also, adds verticality to the otherwise very horizontal floors.

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1 RECEPTION/LOUNGE

4 WOMENS RESTROOM

2 VIEWING ROOM

5 MENS RESTROOM

3 EXHIBIT SPACE

6 FIRE STAIR

7 BACK OF HOUSE

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FIRST FLOOR PLAN

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1 EXHIBIT SPACE 2 FIRE STAIR 3 BACK OF HOUSE

There is minimal design on this floor. The entire floor is essentially empty. This allows for the exhibit designer to have full freedom of the space. They are able to manipulate the space any way they please.

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SECOND FLOOR PLAN

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1 EXHIBIT SPACE

4 OPEN OFFICES

2 VIEWING ROOM

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3 HANDICAP BATHROOM

6 BACK OF HOUSE

The third and first floor are almost the same. The differences lie with the replacement of the public bathrooms with a handicapped bathroom and an open office.

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THIRD FLOOR PLAN

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PERSPECTIVES The entrance/reception perspective shows the reception desk that plays off the extruded rectangles on the exterior of the building. The large curtain walls allows for clear views out into the street. The main feature of the interior is the staircase. The staircase cuts through all three floors of the interior. It is encased in a glass surround that allows for views up and down to the different levels. Another view of the stair can be seen in the second floor stair perspective. The stair has a grand and elegant feel to it, while being simple and minimal at the same time. The black marble highlights the stair even more by differentiating it from the light grey and white tones in the rest of the space. Glass floor panels are, also, highlighted with black painted wood. This gives emphasis to the views up to the other levels. It acts as a little preview for what is to come.

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Entrance/Reception

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PERSPECTIVES CONT.

Third Floor Back Spaces

Third Floor Viewing Room 34

Walking up to the third floor the first view that is the backspace on the third floor. There is a hallway that leads to the back emergency stair. To the right is the third floor viewing room, and to the left is the handicap bathroom room and open offices. The ceiling is main feature on this floor. The ceiling in the back half of the space is an exposed structure ceiling. The beams are exposed and visible. They are painted or stained black. Other accents include the doors, which are framed with bog oak and ash. The third floor view out allows for a visual of the skylight. This allows for natural light to flow through the staircase to the other floors, and it allows light to accent the staircase. All brick structure is the existing brick. The brick is simply painted white, to keep in line with the starkness of the concept. The exterior panels can, also, be seen in the view. They have moved so the windows are more open. The last perspective is of the third floor viewing room. The black leather Herman Miller Museum Benches occupy this area. A white marble floor elevates the bench seating. The change in floor material and elevation emphasizes that this area is for seating. The projector is embedded into the wall. The main part of the ceiling is the circular tiles. These tiles are a scallop felt acoustic tiles created by Anne Kyyro Quinn.


Third Floor View Out

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PART III

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EXHIBIT DESIGN

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Feature Auteur

STANLEY KUBRICK The director that has the luxury of being the premier exhibit at the Auteur House is Stanley Kubrick. Stanley Kubrick is quite a character and quite a director. He is obsessive and a bit insane. He takes his time making his movies, because of his obsessivecompulsive personality. He pours his heart and soul into the movie. In total he has done, thirteen full-length feature movies in about 40 years. His movies are very much about this dark and eerie feeling. There is a hint of paranoia and uncertainty. His movies are about a lonesome solitary journey that acclimates to a point of exacerbation. The downfall offers no relief, but only more confusion. Each movie is specifically stylized to the needs and theme of the movie. There is often a picturesque quality to the movie. It is beautiful and taunting at the same time with sexual undertones lining the entirety of his filmography. Stanley Kubrick is a dark horse.

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EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE The rendering to the left is the exterior of the Auteur House during the Stanley Kubrick Exhibit. The rectangular extrusions are used to display different props and as well as hold graphics. The extrusions are constructed so there is a front glass pieces and, also, one lining the interior. Since the extrusions do not sit at each level, it is there for safety reasons. This, however, becomes another surface to apply graphics. The window displays a scene from 2001: A Space Odyssey and Barry Lyndon. The window display space that is at ground level shows different things from Stanley Kubrick’s life as well as giving a little brief/summary of him and his work. The Auteur house logo is located above the door. It is a graphic applied directly onto the curtain wall. The window displays allow for good windowshopping for people walking past the building. Perhaps gaining some unexpected participants.

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EXHIBITION INSPIRATION This page demonstrates the style and kinds of exhibits that will occupy the exhibit section of the Auteur House during the Stanley Kubrick Exhibit. Stanley Kubrick has a very progressive mind. There is a conspiracy theory that he filmed the Apollo moon landing. Someone with this kind of reputation is obviously progressive. The design for his exhibit has to be progressive and different from a typical exhibit. This would reflect the forward thinking nature of his mind in the space. The exhibit should be beautiful and delicate, yet dark and twisted. There should be something light and airy about the exhibits, yet full of content and information. It is complicated, because they such contradicting things. However, it makes sense, because Kubrick is such a complicated director. The inspiration images on the far right are images existing Kubrick Exhibits. This provides an example of props that can be shown, and it provides ways to display the props and information to correspond to his movies and his style.

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THE DIRECTOR

FIRST FLOOR

THE MOVIES

SECOND FLOOR

BEHIND THE SCENES

THIRD FLOOR

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OVERALL EXHIBIT SCHEME The overall exhibit scheme is a standard manner in which the exhibits are set up in the Auteur House. Since the Auteur House features one director. The first floor will involve the background information about the director. This means some history about the director and his origins. For Stanley Kubrick, he started off as a photographer and didn’t start directing or being interested in directing until his late 20s. There will, also, be space for the different movie posters from the director’s filmography. This acts as a little preview for the next section. The next section is the next floor. This floor or the second floor is completely open exhibit space. The entire floor is open for exhibitions. That means this is the largest gallery space in the museum. Since this is a museum regarding movies and film, it makes sense for the largest exhibit space to focus on the movies of the featured auteur. The next section and last floor holds information about behind the scenes work. From conception to final cut, the amount of work it takes to produce a movie is vast. Each director has his or her own work process. Stanley Kubrick, for example, does some crazy things on set, and he is often times abusive and pushy with his actors. This section will discuss all the neurosis of Stanley Kubrick, and it will reveal how he creates his masterpieces.

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1 MONTAGE OF KUBRICK MOVIES

5 DISPLAY ROOM: REMEMBERING STANLEY KUBRICK

2 KUBRICK STYLED AUTEUR HOUSE LOGO

6 MOVIE POSTERS

3 BRIEF BIO OF KUBRICK

7 KUBRICK THE PHOTOGRAPHER & EARLY YEARS

4 PROPS FROM MOVIES UNDERNEATH STAIRCASE

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FIRST FLOOR PLAN

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1 COOPER NEORAY 22DR

5 LUTRON FINIRE SQUARE

2 COOPER SHAPER PENDANT 441/ PRUDENT LIGHTING ZENITH

6 SONY VPL FHZ55

3 PRUDENT LIGHTING ZENITH/SCALLOP FELT ACOUSTIC TILES ANNE KYYRO QUINN 4 INTENSE LIGHTING ONE TWO CIRCUIT TRACK/COOPER HALO STASIS 20516

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FIRST FLOOR CEILING PLAN

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First Floor Perspectives

ENTRANCE There are many things happening once entering the Auteur House. However the eye travels to the projection on the back wall. This is the first projection. It displays a montage of the featured director’s movies. In this case, the back wall shows a montage of different Stanley Kubrick movies. The first space consists of the lounge area and the reception desk. This is where one would buy tickets for the exhibit, or they could sit to wait for their friends. The Auteur House logo behind the reception desk is adjusted so that the image in the circle is now a picture of the featured director. In the original, it is an image of filmstrips. On the brick wall across from this is an image of the director with a small bio about him. The exhibit on the first floor can be seen to the left through the curtain wall that holds the stair. The curtain wall breaks up the space, while it does not break up eye site through the space. Peeks to the exhibit on the second floor can, also, be seen from the entrance.

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First Floor Perspectives

MOVIE POSTERS & EARLY YEARS This is a view from behind the staircase to the front corner of the building. This view focuses on the movie poster exhibit system. This shows how the movie poster frames area a dark matte plastic material. The frames are then suspended by metal wiring from the corners, so they are angled. This goes back to this strong feeling that Stanley Kubrick evokes in his movies. It is this sense that everything should be normal, and yet it is slightly off. Behind the movie poster area lies the exhibit system for Stanley Kubrick – the photographer. This exhibit system plays off the movie poster exhibit system. There is a dark heavy frame that creates a separation between the movie poster exhibit and this exhibit. Content and graphics are attached directly onto the frames. Inside the frame sit angled fabric pieces with Stanley Kubrick’s photographs printed directly. There are, also, stands, in the frame, for different cameras he owned during this time.

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1 DIRECTIONAL SIGNAGE FOR SECOND FLOOR

4 A CLOCKWORK ORANGE

2 BARRY LYNDON

5 EYES WIDE SHUT

3 THE SHINING

6 2001: A SPACE ODYESSY

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SECOND FLOOR PLAN

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1 INTENSE LIGHTING ONE TWO CIRCUIT TRACK/COOPER HALO STASIS 20516 & INCAND SPAN 202CB 2 CANDELS SUSPENDED FROM CEILING 3 HEXAGONAL MIRRORED CEILING TILES

5 SONY VPL FHZ55

4 CHRISTMAS LIGHTS SUSPENDED FROM CEILING

6 FLUORESCENT TUBE LIGHTS SUSPENDED IN STRIPS

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SECOND FLOOR CEILING PLAN

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Second Floor Perspectives

DIRECTIONAL SIGNAGE & BARRY LYNDON Upon walking up the stairs to the second floor one arrives at the directional signage for the floor. This is a large angled backlit wall. It is a graphic wall that shows one the different movies that have exhibits on the floor. It, also, shows the relation of the exhibit to the others. It is a diagram map of the floor. It helps one direct and plan through the exhibits on this floor. To the left of the directional signage wall exists the Barry Lyndon exhibit. An aspect of Barry Lyndon is that it was filmed with only candlelight. Candles are placed in glass votives, and then they are hung from the ceiling. The exhibit is lit with mainly candlelight to evoke the same feeling and quality of Barry Lyndon. Barry Lyndon has, also, a very grandeur feel to it. The exhibit system for Barry Lyndon uses a lot of gold colored metals, to reflect the grandeur feeling in the exhibit. The exhibit acts as an experience of the movie in real time.

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Second Floor Perspectives

THE SHINING The Shining exhibit incorporates many themes from the movie. For one the idea of a small corridor is present in the movie, and it is how one would enter into the exhibit. This small corridor, also, reflects the claustrophobic feeling that the Shining instills on its viewer. At the end of the hallway is a maze of pedestals. This reflects idea of the maze that is constantly used in the movie. From the actual maze they explore to the maze of hallways in the hotel. This confusing wind about way is a concept used throughout the movie. Graphics are very important here as they show different images and content from the movie.

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Second Floor Perspectives

A CLOCKWORK ORANGE A Clockwork Orange revolves around a dystopian future world. The exhibit fixtures were designed so they would be futuristic looking. There is an orange glow at the bottom of the fixtures, because orange is a main theme color for the movie. This dystopian world is dark and twisted, which is reflected in the use of black for the fixtures. While this is a dystopian future, it is still eerily close and similar to our world. The fixtures were designed to be partitions. The space is created as if it is a room in a house, because the house and home was stressed in the movie. The walls through are angular, sharp, and twisted because the “A Clockwork Orange� world is a twisted version of our own world.

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Second Floor Perspectives

EYES WIDE SHUT Eyes Wide Shut like Barry Lyndon is a movie with a surreal dream like quality to it. With Barry Lyndon this fantasy feeling was evoked with the use of candlelight. With Eyes Wide Shut this dream like quality was done with Christmas lights that hung against the wall. This gave different scenes this glowing fantasy atmosphere to it. It is this real is it not? That was the main theme of the movie. One strange night created an on going mystery, and the questioning of the reality of the situation. Since there was this surreal nature to the movie, it was best if this nature was reflected in the exhibit fixtures as well. The fixtures are graphics printed on cloth then strung from the ceiling and the floor. This results in the cloth being suspended in the air. This creates this surreal, impermanent, and lightness to the fixtures. The prop pedestal are plexi glass stands that, also, have this weightlessness to them. They seem heavy and sturdy, but they are completely transparent at the same time. It bends the mind creating a more surreal feel to this exhibit.

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Second Floor Perspectives

2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY 2001: A Space Odyssey is a very visually stunning movie. There are many scenes that are completely visual. They involved the movement of streams of light to a point, or changing the color quality of the picture to different tones. The stunning visual quality created such a futuristic multidimensional feel to the movie, it was important to reflect this in the exhibit. The main light tones that were present in the movie are red, orange, and yellow. These colors of light were used in the space repetitively. It was a signal or warm, warmer, and hot or danger. There is a light installation quality to this exhibit. Since light installations are so visually stunning, it was a good way to capture the visual stunning atmosphere of the movie. The graphic displays, the prop sets, and the prop displays all use led lights to outline the different object. This also creates an emphasis on the different components. Three different light colors are, also, used to differentiate between the different kinds of displays.

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1 DIRECTIONAL/INFORMATIONAL GRAPHIC

4 BEHIND THE SCENES: PROJECTIONS AND LED SCREEN STANDS

2 DISPLAY ROOM: CONSPIRACY THEORIES

5 PROCESS WORK: STORY BOARDS AND SKETCHES

3 BEHIND THE SCENES: PROPS AND STILLS

6 UNREALIZED PROJECTS

4 3 6

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THIRD FLOOR PLAN

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1 INTENSE LIGHTING ONE TWO CIRCUIT TRACK/COOPER HALO STASIS 20516 & INCAND SPAN 202CB 2 PRUDENT LIGHTING ZENITH/SCALLOP FELT ACOUSTIC TILES ANNE KYYRO QUINN

4 COOPER SHAPER PENDANT 441

3 COOPER NEORAY 22DR

5 SONY VPL FHZ55

5 1 4

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THIRD FLOOR CEILING PLAN

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Third Floor Perspectives

BEHIND THE SCENES The third floor has a main theme of using fabric for all of the exhibits. This is because the process of making movies feels in someway illusory and imaginary. People that daydream a lot are usually depicted as having their head in the clouds. The movie making process is so full of pretending and fantasy, it seems unreal. This stage is what the third floor is about. This part when the dream is still a dream, and not real. The fabric represents the “clouds�, and the third floor represents the place where clouds exist. This is the place where daydreaming exists. The image on the left is that of the behind the scenes exhibit section. This section include billowing sail like fabric pieces, projections of behind the scenes action, cameras and other things used on set, and graphics with content.

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Third Floor Perspectives

STORYBOARDS AND SKETCHES The storyboard and sketches section is done in an installation manner. There are two tension strung fabric pieces that were structured in a curvilinear manner. These pieces are long and entwined within each other. Sketches, storyboards, and other process work Kubrick has are printed directly on the fabric. This allows users to walk in and feel as if they are walking into his mind. The users are surrounded and enveloped by the long winding and connecting thoughts. Stanley Kubrick has often been painted as insane, and being in his mind in the beginning of a movie making process would be a disorienting process. This installation creates a very fluid, and yet perplexing feeling, such as Kubrick’s mind would be.

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Third Floor Perspectives

UNREALIZED PROJECTS The last section of the Stanley Kubrick exhibit is the unrealized projects. This section is last, because Kubrick has such prominent work. The projects, that he was unable to make physical, are sometimes pushed to the back and forgotten. Unless someone was a huge Kubrick fan, they might not know about this aspect about him. Some of the movies he was unable to make are the Burning Secret, Natural Child, Napoleon, Aryan Papers, Shadow in the Sun, Veit Harlan, and Lunatic at Large. These are just a few movies he was not able to make. Stanley Kubrick had many interests. It was hard for him to keep up with his own interests. This section adds some more insight into Kubrick’s mind and how he works. It shows some of his interests and his passions, beyond the movies that he created. Each pod holds/displays one of the movies he was unable to create. In Kubrick’s mind and soul he had a section for each of these movies, and each of the pods represents the spot this idea has in his mind.

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SECTION CUT This is a longitudinal section that cuts through the highlighted staircase. This is a main feature of the interior. It creates verticality in the otherwise very horizontal interior. The glass curtain wall that holds the staircase stretches from the first floor up to the third floor. The rectangular extrusions seen in the exterior can be seen again in the section. The section cuts through two of the extrusions, the prop sitting in the extrusion is visible. It is clear that the extrusions are good window displays. This section, also, shows a good overview of the different style of each of the floors. The first and third floors are rather straightforward. There is the reception upon entering on the first floor then a viewing room in the back. On the third floor there is the process work installation behind the staircase glass, and there is another viewing room in the back. The second floor is a bit more colorful with different styles of exhibits put together for an interesting mixture.

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A film is - or should be - more like music than like fiction. It should be a progression of moods and feelings. The theme, what’s behind the emotion, the meaning, all that comes later.

STANLEY KUBRICK

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Profile for Annie Chen

The Auteur House  

Annie H Chen University of Cincinnati Interior Design Senior Capstone Museum and Exhibit Concept Design

The Auteur House  

Annie H Chen University of Cincinnati Interior Design Senior Capstone Museum and Exhibit Concept Design

Profile for aaanniec
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