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KULTUUR


Take a step into

Africa.


Africa and the cross cultural references it provides us with, can often be inspiration for many creatives, across the design industry. Looking to my own love of the continent, this publication will take a look at the most influential peices of design, photography, textiles, fashion and art that Africa has helped to imagine.


Contents Africa in Fashion Givenchy Menswear SUNO LABEL DRIU & TIAGO for Wonderland Magazine TRIBAL: Herring and Herring D Magazine Katie Fogarty, Max Doyle: Australian Vogue, 2011


Africa YYIEOAXG in YYRIEOAXGTOL Fashion

GIVENCHY MENSWEAR, SPRING 2014

TECHNO TRIBALISM


Ricardo Tisci, Creative Director for the Givenchy label, left an inescapable impression surrounding the French fashion house, alongside the Spring 2014 menswear collection. The impression exudes a feeling of “Techno Tribalism�, clearly inspired by both African print and modern culture. Less, a series of male models and more a tribe of soldiers, ready to fight a battle against conforming. Tisci himself, has admitted the obvious, divulging that his inspiration for the collection stems from the overused trend of layering, amongst African males. Also inspired by photographs of small African children playing with a boom-box, Tisci chose to encapsulate the joyous moment for the duration of the collection, via a series of technological repetitions. A combination of electrical components, leathers, and silks, come together to embody a modern Africa, (with the help of tribal face markings.) Tisci of course, did not move away from his trademark tailoring style, but did mostly, allow the magisterial prints, to do the talking. Equally, the collection posed a look into the L.A Skate scene. Large oversized T-Shirts and wrap around the waist hoodies, left an unusual twist on the colourful layering that he had previously noted. The Creative Director used a series of three colours, across three horizontal stripes, more than once in this collection; A


theme that has represented the liberation of Pan-African people, since 1920. “The Pan African ideology asserts that the fate of all African people and countries are intertwined. At its core PanAfricanism is “a belief that African people, both on the continent and across the rest of the world, share not merely a common history, but a common destiny.� Whether it be a coincidence or an obvious statement on African economy today, the adoption of the vivid horizontal stripes is as domineering as the razorsharp tailoring. Despite the tailoring Tisci transportst throughou t the collection, there is an obvious athletic ardor presented, which to many represents both strength and leadership of African males. The idea of freedom was at the heart of this collection, and it was successfully executed in both the physical and metaphorical senses, leaving audiences with the feeling of an ever hungry fashion revolution.


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SUNO is a New York based womenswear label, founded in 2008, by Max Osterweis, in collaboration with designer Erin Beatty. The collection was launched in Spring 2009 after postelection violence threatened to damage the economy and industry in Kenya, a long time second home to Osterweis. Using vintage Kenyan textiles thatOsterweis had been collecting, they created their first small collection, produced predominantly in Kenya. The collection was represented in its first season by Opening Ceremony, Maria Luisa, Enny di Monaco and Ikram. Since its inception, SUNO has evolved its business to include production in Kenya, India, Peru and its home base of New York. Via a combination of traditional, local techniques and high-end tailoring, as well as an emphasis on fit and fabric.


Spring 2014 RTW


‘P’ - DRIU & TIAGO:

WONDERLAND MAGAZINE, 2010

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Photographers Driu & Tiago perfectly captured Africas influence on the fashion industry, in ‘P’ their 2010 shoot for Wonderland Magazine. Dominican model Rose Cordero can be seen wearing traditional West African print united with modern styling by Grace Cobb.

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F H T G J Y A S R S X T T T Y Y X Z F G G J T T J

TRIBAL: HERRING AND HERRING, D MAGAZINE


Herring and Herring, is a collaboration of international fashion photographers, Jasper Carlsen and Dmitri Scheblanov. Having continually been inspired by tribal art, in their photo shoot for D MODE Magazine, the photographers chose to document their take on an African tribe, through contemporary fashion photography.


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KATIE FOGARTY: MAX DOYLE, AUSTRAlIAN

VOGUE,

2011.

When fashion photographer Max Doyle photographed American beauty Katie Fogarty, he set out to unite Africa and Australia through colour and print.Teamed with stylist Naomi Smith, the duo dedicated the shoot to showing women how to wear these styles with confidence.


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THE AFRICAN FASHION MOVEMENT Amy Morgan, November 2013

Creative Directors, stylists, designers and photographers are continually looking to African influences throughout their work. African visuals are renowned to be emotive, for many reasons. Ever since the liberation of black communities in western society, black women have been used throughout fashion industry, carrying positive and often powerful connotations.As racial differences are increasingly celebrated, (notably, down to the campaigning of successful black models such as Iman and NaomiCampbell), over the past few decades, black models have increasingly featured on the catwalk as well as appearing in both, high caliber and commercial magazine spreads. Herring and Herring, is a collaboration of international fashion photographers, Jasper Carlsen and Dmitri Scheblanov. Having always been inspired by tribal art, in their photo shoot for D MODE Magazine, the photographers chose to document their take on an African tribe, through contemporary fashion photography. At full length, this photo shoot pushes the boundaries and expectations of colour, in the same way African women do, in their everyday dress. The shoot contains boundless personality and styling is taken to the extreme. In opposition to the Australian Vogue shoot, carefully chosen black African models are used. Models Rila Fukushim and Mey Bun, are seen to have body modifications, including tongue piercings, the fashion industries very own take on the modifications we already associate with Africa’s tribes.


Many publications are eager to celebrate what the African-­‐American woman stands for, and as we see this more often, we also see African styling filter through to the every day English rose. When Max Doyle photographed Kate Fogarty for Australian Vogue, in 2011, he set out to unite the dress sense of Australian and African women. Having caught on to the fact, too many women shy away from bold print and colour, upon the instruction of Vogue Australia, stylist Naomi Smith was inspired to learn how women could relate to African dress. “I started off asking myself why African women are so proud to wear such domineering prints, and what is it that makes them wear them so gracefully.” It turns out confidence is the answer. “African women have been wearing bright tones and textures for centuries, in comparison to women across the rest of the world. Africans have become so used to wearing such fabrics, they naturally wear them with confidence.” When choosing items for the shoot, the team turned to designers who embrace print such as Dianne Von Furstenberg, Emilio Pucci and Burberry. The shoot encapsulates African dress for the modern women. Although entirely different in substance and theme, these two editorial shoots are not too different in their result. Both are greatly influenced by the colour and print Africa gives to the fashion industry and ultimately, both celebrate the African woman. The fashion industry is recurrently using white models teamed with pieces of obvious African influence, in an effort to show women how to combat and incorporate the bright print and textures of African Styling, into their habitual lives. More often than not, women are keen to blend these two combative cultures together; a combination of the two will result in women feeling experimental, as well as evermore exotic and due to the diversity in African styling, it is a theme women of all ages are slowly undertaking. Although print and colour are strong influencers in the African/English fashion ideology, stylists united will agree statement


Jewelry pieces are key to adding depth and notes of texture, to the modern African, fashion representation. As affordable, as well as high street brands are tuning into this idea, the African input is gradually becoming accessible to women from all walks of life. Hopefully, in the future we can look forwards to witnessing women embrace African culture throughout their dress, in a more distinct approach. For now, seeing women adopt and positively experiment with African trends is another exciting step for Africa, in getting their footing firmly in the door of the Fashion World, that we all so crave acceptance from.


Emily shoot


Emily shoot


JOHN KENNY

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John Kenny is a British portrait photographer, who photographs African Tribes. His work is heavily influenced by “Chiaroscuro”, a term which literally means light and dark, in the Italian language. Kenny has no interest in using lighting equipment, as he is careful not to give his images a false sense of reality. The photographer travels alone, across Africa photographing the continents most remote tribes. Kenny feels his subjects become more interesting, once he removes them from their “normal, often dull, surroundings”, so photographs each member in the same way, on a blank wall, which is then later edited. Photographing in a documentary style, Kenny does not ask his subjects to pose, nor does he style them. Kenny’s works speak of the real struggle that Africa’s forgotten tribes are, going through today. These images are a stark contrast in the way Africa has been portrayed, so far throughout this publication. I find his images incredibly emotive.


Dark, dusty, evocative Struggling, surviving, spiritual,

Africa Africa

Exploited and forgotten, is everything Africa Untouched and vibrant, you are inspiration Africa. Children Show us

unite, warm how Africa is

and alive

bright, tonight.

Hopeful, shades of yellow, orange, red, the colours of Africa, trapped this way, in my head.

Amy Morgan, November 2013



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