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Undergraduate Landscape Architecture Portfolio

The Pennsylvania State University


andrew michael madl contact 364 E. College Ave State College, PA 16801 (email) amm6292@psu.edu

about me

(phone) 607.765.9063 education The Pennsylvania State University College of Arts and Architecture Bachelor of Landscape Architecture Minor in Environmental Inquiry Predicted Graduation Date- 2015 Currently in Fourth Year with Honors

University Park, PA 2010-2015

objective and interests To develop into a professional who is driven to make positive social and environmental changes through creating inspiring, creative, and sustainable spaces.

urban design- 3d visualization digital fabrication- conceptual/surreal design- remediation

proficiency weak

strong

very strong

methods of completion

or


project scale relationship

project size

XL

L

M

S 2012

2013 year

sp_2012

academic work

professional work

fa_2012

sp_2013

sm_2013


cfe (center for the environment) type: academic time: spring 2012 location: state college, pa advisor: professor eliza pennypacker programs used: autocad, rhino, adobe photoshop, adobe illustrator description: The Pennsylvania State University is constantly seeking ways in which to communicate and research sustainable practices on, or adjacent to, the University Park Campus. From this need to explore and represent sustainable approaches to development came the premise for the Center for the Environment (CFE). The CFE is located on property of the Pennsylvania State University that was acquired for construction and expanse of the Arboretum. The project is focused around the placement/orientation of three proposed buildings (Education Building, Research Building, and CafĂŠ), as well as the programmatic features that surround the CFE campus. Required on-site was the presence of a reestablished Mesic Meadow/Prairie, as well as a Hardwood Oak Forest. This allowed for the opportunity for the built environment of the CFE to be placed in the ecotone area, where the forest meets the prairie, and to act as a catalyst in the transition between these two ecosystems. The created design exhibits such sustainable program elements as artful stormwater demonstration, phytoremediation research, and artful representation of the vernacular landscape. The form that the design took was one of linear simplicity, to allow for the appearance of transition between the two ecosystems and for the presence of views that exhibit the site and local landscape context.


rendered aerial


entry drive

outdoor classroom

forest trail

service

drop off

parking lot

cfe campus

boardwalk

north

prairie

rendered master plan

sinkholes

site analysis diagrams

sun

wind


Legend

legend

legend

forest

-roadway to CFE Campus -rails to trails -to sunset park/overlook heights -trails linking CFE to overlook heights and sunset park route -service road

prairie

forest and prairie distribution map

Roadway to CFE Campus Rails to Trails To Sunset Park/Overlook Heights Trails linking CFE Campus to Overlook heights and Sunset Park Route Service Road

circulation

a b a’

b’ section a-a’

section b-b’


[Cistern] [Rainwater Conveyance Troughs Water Circulation & Cistern Water Collection]

[Legend] Existing Trees Primary Circulation Secondary Circulation Tertiary Circulation *note circulation is both for maintenance and park users

[Legend] Existing Trees

perspective view of education building courtyard

Nursery Plots Rainwater Conveyance Troughs Seating/Lawn


parking lot forest trail character


urban nursery type: academic Data Source: Lycoming Planning Office Projection: PA_State Plane_North

time: spring 2013 location: jersey shore, pa advisor: associate professor mallika bose programs used: archmap gis, rhino, adobe photoshop, adobe illustrator description: The goal of this project was to understand the fundamentals of and need for participatory-based community design through working with various community members ranging from bureaucrats to lifelong community residents. Working alongside the Major, the revitalization team, and other community members of Jersey Shore Pa, various needs and wants were expressed that held the promise of improving the aesthetics and livability of the Jersey Shore community. Many of these expressed needs/wants evolved around urban forest and the need to increase the canopy coverage of the city. Through understanding the concerns and wants of the community and applying these to the available sites in the city, it became clear that a solution to vacant/misused parkland can be the use of such tracts of land as tree nurseries. Through a phasing process these vacant/misused parcels can be used as tree nurseries and transformed into viable parkland. This solution was well received from the community, and they believed that it has a high potential to be implemented one day.

12.5% Cano py

Canopy

In Jersey Shore, Pa., there is currently canopy coverage of roughly 12.5%. The American Forests organization recommends 40% canopy coverage should be present within any urban area. This percentage is deemed to be realistic and


nursery to parkland method


[Cistern]

[phase 1]

Ju n o d A ll ey

St.

tnut A

lley

[Rainwater Conveyance Troughs Water Circulation & Cistern Water Collection]

Ches

S Broa d

[Legend] Existing Trees Primary Circulation Secondary Circulation Tertiary Circulation *note circulation is both for maintenance and park users

Locust

[Legend]

Street

Existing Trees Nursery Plots Rainwater Conveyance Troughs

Urban Nursery

Phase 1-The Nursery 0 15 30

Legend 60

120ft

Seating/Lawn

Existing trees Nursery trees

axon of design layers

illustrative plan

Nursery Plot

Sidewalk

Open Lawn Area

Path/Access

Nursery Plot

Path/Access

Nursery Plot

Path/Access

section of site as nursery


perspective of tree nursery


[Cistern]

[phase 2]

[Rainwater Conveyance Troughs Water Circulation & Cistern Water Collection]

Ches

S Broa d St.

tnut A

lley

Ju n o d A ll ey

Locust

[Legend] Existing Trees Maintained Nursery Trees Primary Circulation Secondary Circulation

Street

[Legend] Existing Trees Maintained Nursery Trees

Urban Nursery

Rainwater Conveyance Troughs

Legend

Phase 2-The Park

Seating/Lawn

Existing trees 0 15 30

60

120ft

Nursery trees

axon of design layers

illustrative plan

[Rainwater Conveyance Troughs Water Circulation & Cistern Water Collection]

Existing and Maintained Trees/ Planting Area

Walkway

Existing and Maintained Trees/ Planting Area

Walkway

section of site as park

Existing and Maintained Trees/ Planting Area


perspective of created parkland


j.c. main street type: professional time: summer 2013 location: johnson city, ny advisor: michael haas rla asla programs used: autocad, adobe photoshop, adobe illustrator description: While employed as an intern at HAAS Landscape Architects, I had the opportunity to work on 10+ projects that ranged from residences to the municipality level. One such municipal level project is the Johnson City Main Street Revitalization. I was involved heavily in the analysis and design concept phase of this project (which is still currently being designed). My duties consisted of extensive fieldwork involving the recognition of opportunity areas and the measuring and drafting of these areas. From this information and created base maps from the fieldwork, various parcels were conceptually designed. I was placed in charge of the production of both working and presentation graphics. The designs were very well received from the client, and the design is currently being implemented.


simulation of parking improvements


[Legend] Existing Trees Maintained Nursery Trees Primary Circulation Secondary Circulation

[Legend] Existing Trees Maintained Nursery Trees Rainwater Conveyance Troughs Seating/Lawn

concept designs for outlined spaces


simulation of parking & streetscape improvements


simulation of vacant space revitalization


design option for parking/park space


cultural greenway type: academic time: fall 2012 location: state college, pa advisor: associate professor larry gorenflo programs used: archmap gis, autocad, adobe photoshop, adobe illustrator description: The Spring Creek Watershed Analysis allowed for an understanding of how political, social, and environmental systems run throughout the landscape and interact with one another. The project consists of GIS-based analysis of the watershed. This data was complied into a booklet that began to organize the second part of the project, which was a watershed wide planning /design initiative. The product of my analysis was the concept design for a historical/cultural greenway that weaved through three different counties and made connections to various local historic, social, and environmental sites that are not currently available. The goal of the greenway was to renew and brand the surrounding community through presenting the historic, cultural, and environmental uniqueness by means of providing connections to these entities through passive recreation.


SPRING watershed

REGIONAL ANALYSIS

LAN D FO R M

SOils

cover page for study booklet


Narrative This atlas presents data from various fields of study that is used to assess and analyze landscapes with the intended result of improving land planning and landscape design. The focus area for the analysis presented in the pages that follow is the Spring Creek Watershed. This area is located within Centre County, Pennsylvania. The area of study does not include all of Centre County, but just a portion. The first category that is looked at in the analysis is landform (p.1-2). The landform of the area follows the ridge and valley system that cuts through central Pennsylvania. Sandstone ridges and limestone valleys are the defining features of the region. Next, the hydrology of the area was studied (p.3-5). The network of streams that run through the watershed where classified according to the Strahler Stream System, which is a system based on size and branching. The sub-basins within the watershed are outlined, and their sizes are shown. Geologic formations and soils were analyzed next (p.6-8), connecting the soils to the parent material rocks that form the landform. Ultimately, the formations and landform dictated land use for the region. Human populations were then studied (p.9-11) to understand the demographic of the people who live in the area. It was found that population statistics follow a correlating logarithmic pattern with the population of the United States as a whole. Next the study focused on cultural resources, iron ore mining processing in particular (p.12-13). It is found that artifacts of the past industrial history of iron ore mining and processing still exist throughout the landscape. These artifacts/ cultural resources can be highlighted through design and planning as a way to educate the public regarding the area’s industrial past. Finally, a “Creative Map” was produced that examines the correlation of land use to pollution in regards to riparian buffer zones. Through performing this landscape study, all of the major parts that create the landscape and act as a system have been highlighted and studied to gain a better understanding of the watershed area to produce valid planning and design ideas and successful implementations for the region.

Photo Source: Madl 12 Map Source: LArch 311

I

SPRING WATERSHED

SPRING WATERSHED

EXPLODED DIAGRAM SHOWING CONTEXT AND STREAM NETWORK

Break down of Population Study Area

STREAMS

The Strahler Stream Order is simply a hydrology classification system that denotes and organizes streams based on tributary systems. This system is represented through the use of the numbers 1-12 to classify stream size (1 being the smallest ranging to 12 being the largest). First order streams (1) begin at headwaters and form second order streams (2) when two first order streams come together. Streams of lower orders converge together to form streams of higher orders. Lower stream orders do not impact streams of a higher order. If a third order stream branches into a second order stream, the stream still remains a third order. For a fourth order stream to come about in this instance, two third order streams would have to order for the region is reached. The Strahler Stream Order system is valuable as it creates a stream order that is useful for understanding stream systems because it helps to present stream size and drainage area. In the map to the right, the stream order for the selected region is shown by having the orders represented by color, increasing in line weight as the order increases.

2010

Spring Creek Elevation

Blocks in Study Area

SPRING CREEK ELEVATION

for Population

Pleasant Gap

People per Square Mile

2,879

The break down for the measurement units of the spring Creek Elevation starts at the county level. Centre County is isolated then broken down into block units so population can be accurately accounted and analyzed. Next the selected area for the spring Creek Elevation is overlaid, and the blocks that lie inside or intersect the selected area are used for the population demographics.

Canyon Parcels

CANYON PARCELS

Bellefonte

Population

6,187 Context Analysis

Center County Blocks

CENTRE COUNTY

State College

42,034

*maps not to scale Data Source: LArch 311 Graphic: (Madl12)

(Madl 12)

STRAHLER STREAM ORDER DIAGRAM 1

1

2

1

4

2

3,722

To the right, the population statistics for the United States and Pennsylvania from 1990 to 2010 are shown and below is a bar chart presenting the data. The curve seen in the chart for the United States and Pennsylvania is what would be expected for population growth. The population is still increasing but almost reaching its max before leveling out. Looking at Centre County PA (below), the curve is similar but the population is still climbing and will take longer than the US/Pa to reach its max and level off.

1

3

2

Boalsburg

History U.S and PA

1 2

3

1

Major Cities

Population

1

Pine Grove Mills Source: http://preview.turbosquid.com/Previ ew/Content_2009_09_18__17_05_ 38/people1.jpg05038e98-dbc1-47b 4-8933-bbfe2461eddcLarger.jpg (October 7,2012)

1,502

5

University Park

population 1

major

Map

city

centers

5 people

(Madl 12)

LEGEND STRALHER STREAM ORDER

Population

History Centre County

1

http://geography.about.com/od/physicalge ography/a/streamorder.htm

2 3

http://ohioline.osu.edu/aexfact/pdf/AEX44501StreamClassification.pdf

4 5 CANYON PARCELS MAJOR_CITIES_S_CREEK_ WATERSHED

03

HYDROLOGY

Data Source: LArch 311

NETWORKED STREAMS AND ORDER

ANDREW MADL

SPRING WATERSHED

_LARCH311

_PHASE1

* Note all Population Data (numbers) displayed in charts and graphs and to the right of the 2010 Population map were found at the US Census Bureau website

04

Projection: PA_ State_Plane_ North

_EXB

Milesburg Iron Works (1797-1890)

Railroads and Iron Mines in Context of Centre County

(1795-1882)

(1798-1882)

(1888-1891)

Past Iron Mine Locations

Data Source for All Maps: LArch 311 _LARCH311

_PHASE1

Projection: PA_ State_Plane_ North

_EXD

1: Suburban Area Legend Water

Stream Map (Strahler Order)

Landuse Bordering and Intersecting Riparian Buffers

Iron Forges Iron Smelting Furnaces

Rails to Trails

Logan Furnace (1797-1842)

Julian Furnace (1832-1858)

Vacant/Unused Utility Transportation Residential Recreation

The maps on this page provide a brief study on the correlation between land uses and water pollution. The study identifies the land uses that are adjacent to, and intersect with, aquatic ecosystems and identifies the possible pollutions that can be created by the land uses and how these pollutants can affect the local water quality. Proposed riparian buffer zones are used in the analysis. The buffer size is a 50-foot radius spanning from both sides of the streams. The minimal length for a riparian buffer to be functional is 35-100 feet, which is quite difficult to implement in a developed area. The buffers intersect and cover a majority of the flood plains for the area to help combat flooding to developed areas. The presence of the riparian zones relates to the function that these zones provide, which is a natural filter for contaminants to go through before being introduced into streams. Riparian zones are also hotspots for wildlife and plant life, which will increase the biodiversity for the local ecosystem. By looking at the selected areas presented on the map to the right, it can be seen that many of the land uses for the area encroach on this much needed riparian zone, and are potential threats to water quality. The percent of each land use for the selected areas has been calculated in order to display what are the major pollution concerns for the area and for the local Spring Creek Watershed as a whole. The results conclude that the land uses: argirculture and transportation and their pollution types are of the most critical for the area.

Major Cities

Bellefonte Furnace

09

Charts and Graphs: (Madl 12)

ANDREW MADL

Summary

(1795-1818)

Harmony Forge

October 7-9 2012

ANALYSIS

SPRING WATERSHED

Turner Ironworks Valentine & Thomas Iron Works

POPULATION

Public/Semi Public Forest Communication Commerical Agriculture Stream

Data Source: LArch 311

Projection: PA_ State_Plane_ North

Ag.

For.

Rec.

Trans.

Va.

Com.

Pub.

Res.

Ut.

Wa.

Majority Land Use: Transportation 48.20%

2: Urban Area (State College) Legend Water Vacant Structure Structure Vacant Vacant/Unused Utility Transportation Residential Recreation Public/Semi Public Forest Commercial Agriculture Communication Stream Data Source: LArch 311

3.

1.

Projection: PA_ State_Plane_ North

Ag.

For.

Rec.

Trans.

Va.

Com.

Pub.

Res.

Ut.

VaS.

Legend Transportation

2.

4.

Diagramatic Section of Riparian Buffer

Water Utility Recreation Residential Vacant/ Unused Land Forest Agriculture

Data Source: LArch 311

Railroad and Mine Analysis

Va.

Wa.

Utility Residential Recreation Forest

Ag.

For.

Res.

Com.

Rec.

Trans.

Commercial Agriculture

Ut.

Wa.

Va.

Stream Data Source: LArch 311

Point Source Pollution Point source pollution regards pollutants that enter water directly, from a known source, e.g. a drainage pipe. With this type of pollution, the exact location where the contaminants enter the water can be identified. Examples of point source pollution include sewage treatment plants and other industrial sources. Because of the Clean Water Act in 1972, the majority of point source pollution has decreased because of the required permits for the disposal of waste that are needed.

Nonpoint Source Pollution

Tussey Furnace Hannah Furnace

(1810-1818) Sources:

Mine Locations: http://dscholarship.pitt.edu/13445/25/mcguire_etd201 2.pdf

cultural references Data Source: LArch 311

Projection: PA_ State_Plane_ North

12

Projection: PA_ State_Plane_ North

Majority Land Use: Agriculture 53.30%

Land Use Map of Spring Creek Watershed and Associated Pollution

Pollution Forms

Furnace and Forge Locations: http://www.centrecountyhistory.org/events/Iron Industry.pdf

_EXD

Ut.

Trans.

Water

Projection: PA_ State_Plane_ North

(1792-1809 & 1826- 1858)

(1830-1850)

_PHASE1

Res.

Rec.

Transportation

Scotia

_LARCH311

Pub.

Vacant/ Unused Land

Data Source: LArch 311

(1881-1912)

Iron ore mining and processing

Ag. For.

Majority Land Use: Forest 81.40%

Legend

http://www.riparianbuffers.umd.edu/PDFs/FS725.pdf

Centre Furnace

Mines

ANDREW MADL

Projection: PA_ State_Plane_ North

4: Agricultural Area

Shown above are the stream channels present in the Spring Creek Watershed. The streams are ordered according to the Strahler stream system, presenting an order based on size and tributaries. (*Note the riparian buffers are not based on the stream size for this study, a standard 50 foot buffer is used for all streams.)

(1793-1852)

When looking at the railroad routes that run through Centre County and the Spring Creek elevation, it can be seen that the paths in which the railroads travel were dicated by various factors. The railroads follow close to the streams as this landscape provided a level ground plane, as well as a path out of the enclosed valleys through gaps in the ridges. The railroads logically pass near or through the major cities of the region as trains hosted a mode of transportation for people and industrial products, with the except of iron ore which was carried by horeback or by canal.( The railroads were not established until after the iron industry boom)

sample pages

Stream Data Source: LArch 311

Rock Iron Works

Railroads

Generally looking at the location of past iron mines, it can be seen that they are located near stream banks and at top and slopes of the ridges. The location of the ore made the mining of iron fairly simiply as in these areas the ore was located near the surface, so surface mining was the method used. Also, when studying the placement of the iron mines, it is seen that they are clusted around the areas of major cities, which lead to the growth of power and population of these industrial cities of the region.

Projection: PA_ State_Plane_ North

Non-point source pollution can be viewed as “polluted runoff,” as the exact location of the source of the pollution can not be identified as it comes from entire landscape regions. This form of pollution is the number one major water problem in the United States, and it directly relates to land use. Rainfall carries the contaminants which could include, but are not limited to: sediment, nutrients, and chemicals that enter bodies of water. These contaminants come from various land uses: residential, industrial, commercial, etc. Agricultural lands are major sources for non-point pollution. This land use creates such contaminants as sediment, pathogens, nutrients, and pesticides. Urban landscape also play a major role in creating non-point pollution contaminants such as sediment, pathogens, nutrients, oxygen-demanding substances, heavy metals, oil/petroleum products, and road salt.

Sediment

Metal

Sediment pollution comes from cropland erosion, streets/impervious surfaces, construction sites, and stream bank erosion. The erosion of stream banks is mainly caused by excess runoff created by development. Sediment pollution affects aquatic life and complicates water treatment.

Metal contaminants include: copper, calcium, zinc, lead, mercury, and chromium. The sources for these contaminants are metals from automobiles, industrial activities, atmospheric deposition, and illicit sewage connections. These pollutants can affect wildlife by accumulating in fish tissues and by adding complications to sensitive animal and plant species.

Pathogen Pathogen pollutants are: E. coli, viruses, bacteria, and protozoa. The source for these contaminants is fecal matter from warm-blooded animals. Agricultural areas present a large danger for producing these types of pollutants as these areas include wildlife, livestock, manure, and malfunctioning septic tanks. Urban areas also present a significant source for these pollutants from sources such as: septic systems in unsewered areas, sewage treatment plant discharges, and animal life such as pets and wild birds.

Nutrient

Nutrient contaminants primarily concern nitrogen and phosphorus levels. Nitrogen pollutants can create oxygen deficient bodies of water that cannot support aquatic life. High levels of phosphorus lead to excessive production of algae that can complicate lakes and reservoirs by “clogging” them. The major culprit in this type of pollution is agricultural lands which use fertilizer and livestock manure, and utilize septic systems which create rises in nutrient levels in the landscape. Urban areas also generate nutrient pollution through the use of fertilizer on lawns, gardens, and golf courses, from pet waste, and from discharges from industries and sewage treatment plants.

Pesticides

Pesticides are contaminants that affect drinking water supplies that use surface water. Pesticide concentrations in streams adjacent to agricultural land can exceed drinking water standards, but the high level concentrations usually do not stay around long enough to affect drinking water. Usually pesticide concentrations are higher around agricultural land use areas than in urban areas

Oil/Petroleum Oil/petroleum product contaminants accumulate from oil leaks, automobile emissions from roads and parking lots, and improper disposal of oil that can be considered waste. These contaminants can be in levels high enough to be fatal for aquatic life.

Sediment

Pathogen

Nutrient

Pesticides

Oxygen-Demanding Substances

Metal

Road Salts Road salts create excess levels of sodium and chlorides, which accumulate in surface and ground water. The melting of snow causes increased runoff and carries these pollutants to the bottom of ponds and lakes, creating high salt/chloride concentrations which can be toxic to some organisms.

Source for Pollution Information:https://engineering.purdue.ed u/SafeWater/watershed/landuse.html

Oil/Petroleum

Road Salts

Oxygen-Demanding Substances

CREATIVE MAP

Oxygen-demanding substances regard organic material that depletes dissolved oxygen when it is decomposed by microorganisms. This dissolved oxygen is incredibly important for aquatic life and for maintaining water quality. Urban runoff, which can include decaying organic matter such as leaves and grass clippings, can severely impact the dissolved oxygen in water after storms.

RIPARIAN ZONES AND LANDUSE ANDREW MADL

_LARCH311

_PHASE1

_EXD

Data Source: LArch 311

Projection: PA_ State_Plane_ North

Wa.

Majority Land Use: Transportation 40.70%

3: Forested Area

14


Cultural Greenway Result Chosen Existing Corridor For Greenway

Through completion of the planning process, the Greenway ultimately is proposed to be placed in the eastern side of the Watershed. The Greenway will have trail heads located at Spring Creek Park and Talleyrand Park. The path the Greenway utilizes is comprised of existing corridors. There is an existing walking/biking trail that connects Spring Creek Park to Millbrook Marsh Nature Center and to Dalevue Park. This existing trail runs alongside the Mt. Nittany Expressway, and the Greenway will branch off from the existing trail via a pedestrian tunnel running under the roadway and will connect with another existing corridor, a high transmission line corridor. This corridor will be followed until its connection with East College Ave, and will then continue on to the next existing corridor. This next corridor to be utilized is an active railroad line that terminates in Bellefonte. Along the course of the Greenway, various cultural sites will be highlighted as embedded points of interest. These cultural sites include historical, social, and natural sites of importance that help to provide a sense of identity to the region.

1.

Legend Existing Walk/Bike Trail High Transmission Line Corridor Rail line

3.

9 I9

Mt .N

itta ny E

xp y

2.

Cultural Greenway Extent And Highlighted Cultural Sites

Legend Data Source: LArch 311 Projection: PA_ State_Plane_ North

Greenway Extent Cultural Sites Major Cities

Justification/ Need for Cultural Greenway 9 I9

The implementation of such a trail will provide communities of the region with new recreational opportunities while also providing education regarding the region’s historical and cultural past. It will also serve to preserve and present the natural identity of the region. The ability to enjoy such recreational/educational activities does not presently exist in the Watershed, and this Greenway can become a very successful tool for providing recreation, education, and transportation. Mt .N

itta ny E

xp y

Data Source: LArch 311 Projection: PA_ State_Plane_ North

greenway concept


Bellefonte

18.

17. 16.

I9

9

15. 14.

ny itta N . Mt

1. 8. 2. 3. 4.

9.

7. 5.

6.

Mt. N

ittany

Expy

perspective views of concept designs along greenway

Pleasant Gap


Bellefonte

18.

17. 16.

I9

9

15. 14.

12. 11.

10.

13. ny itta N . Mt

1. 8. 2. 3. 4. State College

9.

7. 5.

6.

Mt . N

ittany

Expy

perspective views of concept designs along greenway


SECTION A- A’

te

fon

lle Be

.

18

C’ C

.

17 .

16

. 15

ap tG n a asForested

Ple

.

Forested Land

Land

Trail 10 feet

14

200 feet Right of Way and 15 feet Vertical Limit:

SECTION B- B’

.

13

B

ny

11.

itta

. 12

B’

Mt .N

I99

Pleasant Gap

Buffer 6 feet

0.

1

Trail 10 feet

Adjacent Landuse (Forest Shown, but Varies

SECTION C- C’

1.

8. A

2. 3. 4.

9. A’

7. Ex ittany Mt. N

py Urban/Industrial Landuse

5. 6.

sections of trail character & signage/experience

Buffer 6 feet

Trail 10 feet


Public and Non-Public Lands Map

Stakeholders

Legend

Organizations/ Department Landowners

Townships

Central Pennsylvania Inc. Owners Association Dept. of Justice Dept. of Justice Bur. Correction Dept. of Forest and Waters Development Corp. Fisher Real Estate Historical Museum Bellefonte Inc. Pennsylvania Fish Commission First Energy Power Company Robey Railroads

College Township Benner Township Spring Township

Greenway Extent Cultural Sites Public Lands Non-Public Lands

Private Landowners

Data Source: LArch 311 Projection: PA_ State_Plane_ North

Phase 1 & 2 Implementation Legend Greenway Extent Cultural Sites

Management Plan The implementation of the Cultural Greenway will be broken into two parts or phases that are defined by two of the three existing corridors where the proposed trail will be placed.

Major Cities Phase 1 Phase 2

Data Source: LArch 311 Projection: PA_ State_Plane_ North

Phase 1: Phase one of the implementation of the Cultural Greenway will pertain to the installation of the Trail starting at the pedestrian tunnel that travels beneath the Mt. Nittany Expressway. The trail continues through the high transmission corridor and ends where it meets and connects to the Trail that travels alongside the rail line that terminates in Bellefonte Phase 2: Phase two of the Cultural Greenway installation will encompass the Trail that travels alongside the railroad line that goes into Bellefonte. This Trail will have a slightly different identity than the one through the high transmission line corridor, as more plantings will be needed along with a fence to complete the safety buffer alongside the railroad. This phase will have a longer construction time and more funds will be needed to successfully complete it as compared to the trail through the high transmission corridor.

Management of the Greenway will ultimately require communication and cooperation among the various stakeholders that it affects. This cooperation is quite important with regards to this proposed project, in that the corridors incorporated by the Greenway belong to various stakeholders that already have cooperation agreements in place. The power company, First Energy in this case, has certain rights over the land that is occupied by their high transmission lines, but does not own the land. The power company needs to manage and maintain the right of way for the lines, performing tasks like tree trimming, etc. Every time the power company needs to maintain the corridor, the landowner must be notified as to when and what work is to be done. A similar case is also present with regards to the rail line, as the company that manages/maintains the rail line does not necessarily own the land on which the rails rest, but requires access in order to perform its maintenance. Because of the many stakeholders encompassed by this Greenway project, management will be simplified by assigning it to the township level. The townships in which the Greenway will pass are: College Township, Spring Township, and Benner Township. In the case of this Greenway, arrangements will need to be established between private and organizational landowners and the townships. The townships will be responsible for overseeing and funding the initial implementation as well as providing the continued maintenance and upkeep of the trails, all in coordination and in communication with all the other various stakeholders.


weave/digital workshop type: academic time: spring 2013 location: state college, pa advisor: adjunct professor dylan salmons programs used: rhino, adobe photoshop, adobe illustrator description: Larch 322 served to be a semester long digital workshop where learning the program Rhinoceros 3d 5 was at the center of the curriculum. Through learning this program, various approaches to conceptual designing were investigated. These approaches largely consisted of creating rules that dictated the manipulations of the design, whether it was the form or program element locations. Through using such methods, it became evident that the role of digital technologies in design can be quite beneficial. Explored in the class was the use of digital fabrication (CNC routing) as a means to quickly and accurately produce 3d site models. Also presented in the class were techniques to strengthen Photoshop perspective renderings and diagramming. The semester-long project resulted in the creation of a landform that was modeled digitally, milled, and graphically visualized.


sample pages

landform perspective generated through rhino-vray-photoshp


16.98

12.31

9.45

8.68

Madl, Pritchett Spring 2013

rhino exploration through headphone modeling


method & rules for landform creation

digital landform model progression

cnc milled landform


+ [Plan 2_Improvements & Program] Scale: 1”=30’

[Plan Scale:

[Plan 1_Original Surface] Scale: 1”=30’ planset & axon of landform design

LArch 322

Assignment 03b

Spring 2013_Landform Plan Set_Andrew Madl


+

3_Concept Plan] : 1”=30’

[Axon Original w/ Vegetation + Improved Circulation + Improved Program]


atmospheric (Rain) rendering of landform design


night rendering of landform design


thank you

Andrew Madl

Undergraduate Landscape Architecture Portfolio

The Pennsylvania State University


Andrew Madl: Penn State Undergraduate Landscape Architecture Portfolio