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MAY 17—JUNE 15, 2013

BFA FINE ART EXHIBITION 2013


I speak for the Fine Art Faculty, Adam Brooks, McArthur Binion, Mario Castillo, Joan Giroux, Carol Haliday McQueen, Friedhard Kiekeben, Anna Kunz, and Duncan Mackenzie, when I say that it has been a pleasure working with this graduating class. A group so devoted to research and studio practice is easy to teach and being able to participate in their expansion of one idea into a full body of work is why we teach.

MY HUBRIS LIES IN THINKING THAT THE ADVICE I GIVE MY STUDENTS IS A: UNDERSTOOD EVEN WHILE NOT BEING VERY CLEAR, B: THAT WHAT I AM SAYING IS THE TRUEST THING THEY WILL EVER HEAR AND THAT C: THEY DEFINITELY SHOULD LISTEN AND DO WHAT IS SUGGESTED. I MAY NOT BE ALONE IN THIS. WHAT IS PARTICULARLY HUMBLING IS FINDING OUT THAT A: WHAT THEY UNDERSTOOD ME TO SAY IS NOT WHAT I THINK I HAVE SAID, B: THAT THEY DO NOT THINK WHAT I HAVE TOLD THEM IS TRUE OR PARTICULARLY MEANINGFUL AND THAT C: THEY ARE DEFINITELY NOT GOING TO DO WHAT I HAVE TOLD THEM TO DO. AND IT IS AT THAT MOMENT THAT I COME TO KNOW THAT THEY ARE REALLY ARTISTS. “When I work with Guattari each of us falsifies the other, which is to say that each of us understands in his own way notions put forward by the other. A reflective series with two terms takes shape. And there can be series with several terms, or complicated branching series. These capacities falsify to produce truth, that’s what mediators are about...”1 If misunderstanding can produce truth—a concept proposed in the essay, “Mediators” by Gilles Delueze, then perhaps successful teaching and learning can be said to engage the notion that the teacher and the student, being mediators, “each understanding in [her] own way notions put forward by the other,” falsify to produce truth. In this spirit, we are including an essay by Jason Foumberg, critic at Newcity, who has created a list of advice for our graduating students. We have also, in the same spirit, asked our students to make a list of the advice they heard (or think they heard) while pursuing their Bachelor of Fine Art degree— advice that they remember and perhaps will even use. Sabina Ott, 2013

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Deleuze, Gilles, Negotiations, trans. Martin Joughin (New York: Columbia University Press 1995) 126.


WE ASKED STUDENTS FROM THE 2013 BFA CLASS TO SHARE THE BEST PIECES OF ADVICE OR INFORMATION THEY HAVE RECEIVED, OR THINK THEY RECEIVED, WHILE AT COLUMBIA. DISTRIBUTED THROUGHOUT THE CATALOG ARE SOME OF THEIR RESPONSES.

Take care of your work and your work will take care of you.


The BFA in Fine Art: An Owner’s Manual

in your point of view. Don’t babble. Silences are okay. Your studio can definitely be in your home; don’t feel obligated to rent a studio just yet. Invite people over to see what you’re working on. Feed them hot tea in the winter, lemonade in summer, and cookies year-round.

BY JASON FOUMBERG

Congratulations on the purchase of your new Bachelor of Fine Art degree. Like a piece of endurance performance art, your degree—with incessant maintenance and obsessive operation—will last a lifetime.

Quick Start Guide

are good stepping-­stones for representation by a commercial gallery.

There is no such thing as a quick start; refrain from making microwave art.

D. Generosity Your generosity will make the art world seem less competitive. Should you give away free art? It is better to give your free time, energy, and ideas.

Normal Usage A. Art Supplies You need not spend a whole paycheck on art supplies. Instead, consider alternative material resources: the home improvement store, the dollar store, the recycling center, or go on an urban foraging expedition. B. Artist Statement Be brief, specific, and informative. Give the reader some personal insights. It is okay to write about eccentric and strange influences as long as they are written about in the clearest manner possible. C. Galleries You don’t need gallery representation immediately. Take the time to get to know which galleries you like—and therefore which are a good fit for you— by attending their exhibitions and speaking with their artists. Alternative and independent exhibition venues

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E. Metaphors You artwork is your pet—just keep feeding it. Your artwork is an invisible friend—you have to interpret what it says for others. You artwork is a ghost—it’s always stalking you. You artwork is your boyfriend—soon he will want you to move out of your parents’ home.

Maintenance A. Continuing Education Your continued education should be a creative and professional priority, self-­directed, and fun. This does not mean you need to jump right into an MFA program. You can add value to your degree by extending your education in some of these ways: Start or join a crit group. Meet once a month with peer artists to talk about your new artwork and receive suggestions on ways to move it forward. Start or join a reading group to discuss the books you didn’t get to read in school. Participate in an artist residency. There are many in the Midwest for emerging artists, such as ACRE, Harold Arts, Summer Forum, and Ox-­Bow. Start a blog. Update it weekly with responses to exhibitions that you visited or photos you take of your daily life.

Make up your own metaphors. F. Microscopes and Telescopes Use a microscope where others use a telescope, and vice-versa. G. Studio Visits During a studio visit you can direct the conversation in any direction you like, and visitors will be glad to revel

Visit an art museum, choose one artwork at random, and set the timer on your phone for ten minutes. Stare at the artwork. Figure drawing doesn’t always have to happen in class. Draw strangers’ portraits on the bus.


B. Networking You hear this term a lot, and it may be anxiety inducing, but don’t let it
 intimidate you. Sure, networking is all about making a personal connection, but it's fine enough to make a new acquaintance. Anyway, you’re not going to get along with everyone you meet, so don’t force it. Natural relationship chemistry is key. A compliment opens a door. C. Self-Promotion Until you are famous enough to hire a public relations agent, you will have to get the word out about your exhibitions on your own. DO learn who’s who in your art community (curators at all area museums and art centers, critics, journalists, writers, fellow artists, dealers and gallerists). Maintain an email list for professional announcements. DON’T bombard your email contacts with trifles. Send updates and announcements no more than five times per year. DO learn how to write a press release that contains factual information about who you are and what your art is about. DON’T interpret your artwork in a press release. Allow viewers to be enticed to figure it out on their own. DO maintain a website with updated images.

DON’T make your website design overly creative. The images, dates, and media descriptions should be visibly accessible. DO use social media to announce your forthcoming exhibitions, lectures, and events. DON’T use social media to talk only about yourself. People want to feel they have access to you via social media, but they won’t care if you’re overly self- involved.

Troubleshooting A. Creative Blocks To loosen the jam, you may need to remove yourself from the place where art is made. Take a walk. See some unfamiliar faces and dazzling detritus. The jimmy that will loosen the block will present itself to you. Write a letter. To an old friend, an old teacher, an artist you admire, or your future self. Attend a lecture on a topic you know nothing about. Take a yoga class. Often there are free “community” classes. Make something with your hands besides art, such as a new recipe.

Frequently Asked Questions I just need a job!! Your free time is more valuable than the money you’ll make in a full-­time job. I work in an office. Do I cease being an artist from 9–5? No, you are an artist whenever you want to be. Re-­visualize the office as an alternative art studio. The color copier is a printmaking device, your software’s clip art can be appropriated for some neo-­digital art, and office supplies are ripe materials for mail art, convenient if you have access to a corporate mail center. What kind of job does an artist have? Being an artist is work but it is not a job. Should I exhibit there? Is it a coffee shop, bar, or restaurant? No. Is it a coffee shop, bar, or restaurant where art curators and critics hang out? Yes. Should I apply to that open call or grant? Yes, if the application fee is low enough. Even if you are not awarded the grant or exhibition, during the selection process your images were shown to some important people in the arts, and they may take interest in your work at a later date. I forgot why I wanted this damn art degree.
Your degree does not entitle you entrance into an elite club. Rather, your degree is testament to your artistic and creative freedom.

JASON FOUMBERG is the contributing art critic of Chicago magazine and the editor of the art section at Newcity, and contributes criticism to Frieze, Photograph and Sculpture magazines. He enjoys crafting experiential, visual essays on the topics of contemporary art and culture.

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Don't forget about the edges.

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HANNA ANDERTON, Virginity Boxers, Documentation of a performance, 2012

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NINA LAWRIN, ROANNE, Burlap, bed sheet, 37” X 31.5”, 2012


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JESSICA EGAN, Microhabitat, Photographic documentation, 2012

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The way to become a full time artist is to make art full time.

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HANNA ANDERTON, Virginity Boxers, documentation of a performance, 2012

ALEXANDRA NOE, Shelter, detail, Paper, yarn, wire, wax, plastic, dimensions variable, 2013

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WESLEY GROVES, Prometheus/Helios, Still from digital video, 2013


ERIN SCHILLER, Vertical Cityscape, Acrylic on canvas, 14”x11”, 2013

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Stop behaving.

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CORINNA COWLES, Peel, Acrylic, Mustard, Wine, Steak sauce, and Coffee grounds on Sewn Linen napkins, 15” x 15”, 2012

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LEILA RYNDAK, Digital Video Still I, Hand-painted film, dimensions variable, 2012

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bottom: Digital Video Still II, hand-painted film, dimensions variable, 2012


CAROLINE GOHLKE, Transpiration: Journey to the Nearest Exit, Video installation, 2012

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K SHELTON, Untitled, Inkjet print, 11” x 17”, 2013


JOHN C MORENO, Self, Laser cut digital print, Variable dimensions, 2012

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DANIELLA ELLIOT DOLL, My Grandma is My Grandpa: LS 1996, 5” x 8”, 2013


Don't make work that you know you will like. Don't make work that you know someone else will like.

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NICKI PENZ, Wednesday Morning, Oil paint and sawdust on canvas, 48” x 60”, 2012


SARA DAUER, Orifices, 7 of 15, Oil on Linen, 2012

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ANNIE WOZNIAK, Pattern IV, Acrylic on canvas, 12� diameter (each), 2013


MONIQUE ROQUET, Look Closely, Collage, 36” x 36”, 2012

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BRITTANY JOHNSON, Elisa at Twelve, Oil on canvas paper, 16”x12”, 2013


BRIANNA BAURICHTER, Seven Nation Army, Oil on canvas, 48” x 72”, 2012

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PAUL GAIR, Imagination Battery (with 2 Free Refills), Glass, oil, metal, paper, 10”x6”X14”, 2013


RACHEL WEST, Whenever You Feel Like It, Paper, metal rings, ink, 3’x4’, 2012

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KYLE GENANDER, Florida Sweat, Spray paint and acrylic on canvas, 18”x24”, 2012


ALLIE HOCK, Who Run the World, Wood block print, 14”x11”, 2011

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MELISSA PATINO, Rorschach Red, Acrylic and ink, 12” x 9”, 2012


JESSICA QUINTERO, Cueva de El Castillo, Watercolor and gouache on paper, 8”x11”, 2013

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KRISTINA MAGDA, Obsession, Mixed media on wood panel, 36” x 24”, 2012


Don't be an asshole.

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MADELEINE LOWERY, Untitled, Dried acrylic paint, 20”x14”x10”, 2012

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LEOTA MEAD, Leathy Bear, Shaped and stitched leather, 20� long, 2013

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AMY ZAHI, Puppet Show, HD video, 9:02 min, 2013

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You should treat your work like a love affair, and when you’re done with it, put it to the side


art

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d e s i gn

A+D

C33

AVERILL AND BERNARD LEVITON

C33 GALLERY

A+D GALLERY

33 EAST CONGRESS PARKWAY

TUESDAY – SATURDAY

619 SOUTH WABASH AVENUE

FIRST FLOOR

11AM – 5PM

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60605

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60605

THURSDAY

312 369 8687

312.369.6856

11AM – 8PM

COLUM.EDU/ADGALLERY

COLUM.EDU/DEPS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The 2013 graduating class would like to thank the faculty and staff in the Department of Art and Design for their support and generosity. They would also like to thank the staff of the A+D Gallery and the Department of Exhibition and Performance Spaces for their hard work in organizing this exhibition.

GALLERY HOURS

SARA DAUER HANNA ANDERTON BRIANNA BAURICHTER CORINNA COWLES DANIELLA DOLL JESSICA EGAN PAUL GAIR KYLE GENANDER CAROLINE GOHLKE WESLEY GROVES ALLYSON HOCK BRITTANY JOHNSON NINA LAWRIN MADELEINE LOWERY KRISTINA MAGDA LEOTA MEAD JOHN MORENO ALEXANDRA NOE NICOLE PENZ MELISSA PATINO JESSICA QUINTERO MONIQUE ROQUET LEILA RYNDAK ERIN SCHILLER K SHELTON RACHEL WEST ANNIE WOZNIAK AMY ZAHI


bfa2013catalogue