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Roswell Daily Record

Vol. 122, No. 287 75¢ Daily / $1.25 Sunday

THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

November 30, 2013

www.rdrnews.com

SATURDAY

Washington Federal responds to ‘bumpy’ start JILL MCLAUGHLIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

Washington Federal Bank officials continue to work on smoothing out a transition for former Bank of America customers after acquiring the branch on Fifth and Main streets, said a senior marking representative in Seattle this week. But bigger changes may be in store. Bank officials may be considering closing the branch or merging it with a nearby location.

Kathy Cooper, senior vice president of marketing communications for Washington Federal Bank, declined to say whether Washington Federal plans to maintain its branch at the complex. Washington Federal has another branch at 300 N. Pennsylvania Ave., just a few blocks away. “It’s pretty obvious these two branches are pretty close together,” Cooper said. If the bank chooses to consolidate, it would do so

“carefully,” she said. “We haven’t announced anything,” Cooper said. “We wouldn’t want to, until things settle down.” The new Washington Federal Bank location, formerly a Bank of America branch, opened Nov. 1 as part of Washington Federal’s acquisition of 51 Bank of America branches in Washington, Idaho, Oregon and New Mexico. The bank recently assumed a five-year lease at Sunwest Centre Office Complex from Bank of

America, the center’s manager said this week. Washington Federal removed Bank of America signs at the top of the tower but hasn’t replaced any per manent signs on the building. Former longtime Bank of America customers had their accounts automatically transferred over during the recent transaction. Some Roswell customers complained of difficulties getting temporary checks, using debit cards and accessing their accounts

Roswell welcomes Santa

Above: Santa Claus arrives at the Roswell Mall with the assistance of the American Legion Riders, Friday morning, officially kicking off the Christmas season.

LOS ALAMOS (AP) — Tucked away in one of norther n New Mexico’s pristine mountain canyons is an old log cabin that was the birthplace not of a famous person, but a topsecret mission that forever changed the world. Pond Cabin, along with a nearby small and stark building where the second person died while developing the nuclear bomb, are among a number of structures scattered in and around the moder n-day Los Alamos National Laboratory that are being proposed as sites for a new national park commemorating the Manhattan Project. It’s an odd place for a national park, many admit. Besides the fact that some of the sites are behind the gates to what is supposed to be one of the most secure research facilities in the world, nuclear critics have called the plan an expensive glorification of an ugly chapter in history.

“It is a debasement of the national parks idea,” antinuclear watchdog Los Alamos Study Group cofounder Greg Mello said when the Interior Department two years ago recommended creating national parks at Los Alamos; Hanford, Wash.; and Oak Ridge, Tenn. He remains opposed to the plan, saying it will not provide a comprehensive picture of the Manhattan Project, and he notes that extensive interpretative concer ning museums development of the nuclear bomb already exist. Supporters, however, note that good or bad, the Manhattan Project transformed history. And they argue that key sites that have not already been bulldozed should be preserved and the public should be allowed to visit them. “It isn’t glorifying anything,” says Ellen McGe-

JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

Contreras run across the street holding his side and then fall to the ground. Contreras had been shot three times, twice in the thigh and once in the torso. He was transported to Eastern New Mexico Medical Center and then flown to Lubbock for further treatment. A warrant has been issued for the arrest of Joseph Greg Lucero, 37, on charges of second-degree murder. Lucero was last seen in a gray-colored vehicle, in the company of a brown-haired woman.

Los Alamos to create nat’l park

The victim of a shooting that occurred around noon on Wednesday in the 2900 block of Emerald Drive died of wounds that same night at a Lubbock hospital. According to the criminal complaint, the shooting resulted following an argument. The victim, Victor Contreras, approached another vehicle which was parked on Emerald. A fight started and shots rang out. The records state people in the area reported seeing

Right: The Sweet Leilani's perform prior to the arrival of Santa Claus at the Roswell Mall, Friday morning.

Locally-owned businesses benefit from Black Friday Black Friday conjures images of streams of shoppers queuing up for that big screen TV or new tablet on clearance at national chain stores. A less common association with America’s annual shopping spree is mom and pop stores enticing customers with special sales and refreshments. Multiple locally-owned retailers in Roswell offered promotions this holiday weekend for Black Friday

“We don’t want people to be upset. We did as much as we could think of to try to prepare people for it.” Washington Federal sent out packets to the new customers prior to opening day, Cooper said. Unfortunately, some customers were difficult to reach, she said. “Not everybody’s addresses were up to date,” Cooper said. “We had dif ficulty reaching people. We’ll do See RESPONSE, Page A3

1 dies in shooting

Mark Wilson Photos

TESS TOWNSEND RECORD STAFF WRITER

during the transition. Bank of America closed at noon and handed over the keys to the branch at midnight, Cooper said. Washington Mutual opened the next day. “It was not an easy situation for us. It was a pretty abrupt switch,” Cooper said. “It can be pretty difficult to deal with.” She said the bank realizes the transition can be a bit bumpy and it didn’t go smoothly. “I’m disappointed people are upset,” Cooper said.

and Small Business Saturday, when cities across the nation promote shopping at local businesses. Business owners said it was tough to contend with big name stores Friday but that the holiday shuffle still brought them valuable traffic. “There’s no way I can compete against a 2 a.m. opening or a midnight opening, but what I can provide and what has made this business survive is our customer service,” said Molly Boyles, who owns Once Again

HIGH 68 LOW 38

TODAY’S FORECAST

Consignment on North Main Street. The consignment shop offered discounts between 25 and 80 percent starting Friday and continuing today, in addition to refreshments and other promotions. Terry Lindberg, owner of Hippie Chicks Boutique on South Main Street, said Black Friday is her biggest annual sale. At 1:30 p.m., she said she had already seen See BUSINESSES, Page A3

• ORBAN WAGGONER

See PARK, Page A3

Mark Wilson Photo

Hippie Chicks salesperson Britt Lindberg, left, assists Zena Studdard and her daughter, Keely, on Black Friday.

TODAY’S OBITUARY PAGE B4

CLASSIFIEDS ..........B6 COMICS .................B5 ENTERTAINMENT .....A8 FINANCIAL ..............B3

INDEX GENERAL ...............A2 HOROSCOPES .........A8 LOTTERIES .............A2 OPINION .................A4

SPORTS .................B1

WEATHER ..............A8 WORLD ..................B4


A2 Saturday, November 30, 2013

GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Obama visits activists fasting for immigration

AP Photo

President Barack Obama, left, listens to Eliseo Medina, right, secretary-treasurer of Service Employees International Union (SEIU), as he meets with individuals who are taking part in Fast for Families on the National Mall in Washington, Friday.

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama on Friday told activists who are fasting to protest House inaction on immigration legislation that their “commitment to change” ultimately will help pressure lawmakers to act. On the day after the U.S. holiday of Thanksgiving marked by an abundance of food, Obama stopped in at a heated, white tent on the National Mall where some activists have drunk only water since Nov. 12 in support of immigration legislation. Obama mentioned the activists in an immigration speech in San Francisco

earlier this week. He delivered his message in person on Friday, accompanied by first lady Michelle Obama. “I want everybody to know I remain optimistic that we’re going to get this done,” he said, according to video of his remarks. He said passage of an immigration bill was “more a question of when than if.” “But I’d rather get this done sooner rather than later,” Obama said. The White House issued a statement after the approximately 40-minute visit that said Obama thanked the hunger strikers “for their sacrifice and dedication and told them

exact route because mule trains didn’t have as much impact on the ground as wagons, said Lauren Blacik, Aztec Ruins park ranger.

slip into next year, when midterm-election politics will make legislative action less likely. The House has moved too slowly to satisfy immigration advocates, including those on the hunger strike as well as a man who shouted during Obama’s speech in California for the president to stop separating families by deporting people who are living in the country illegally. Obama was the latest administration official to visit with the activists. Vice President Joe Biden, Cabinet secretaries and top White House advisers have also visited.

that the country is behind them on immigration reform.” Organizers of the fast said Obama expressed concern for the health of the hunger strikers, and held the shoe of an immigrant who died in the Arizona desert while trying to enter the U.S. House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, has refused to schedule a vote on a comprehensive immigration measure the Senate passed this summer. The House prefers a piecemeal approach, but Boehner hasn’t said whether lawmakers will consider any bills this year or whether the issue will

Grant to help story of historic trail Shoppers brave cold for bargains

AZTEC (AP) — A national monument in northwestern New Mexico will use a federal grant to develop part of a historic trail and tell its story. Aztec Ruins National Monument is receiving a $95,000 grant from the National Park Service to study and develop part of the Old Spanish Trail in a partnership with the city of Aztec. Plans call for a pedestrian and bicycle trail from Aztec’s downtown historic district to the monument on the other side of the Animas River. “A major goal of the project has always been con-

necting visitors to Old Spanish T rail history by developing the national historic trail, but retracing the route was largely speculative,” monument officials said in a statement announcing the project. “The Connecting Trails to Parks grant will bring historical accuracy and colorful detail to this important partnership project.” Travelers with caravans of pack mules used the trail, which was too rough for wagons, in the early 19th century to go between what is now New Mexico and California. The trade took blankets and other

woolen goods to California in exchange for horses and mules. The route through Aztec was one of several branches of the Old Spanish Trail, and it was only used briefly because it was deemed too difficult and dangerous. Aztec Ruins Superintendent Larry Turk will work with the Old Spanish Trail Association and National Parks Service to find the route. Researchers will rely on historical journals, letters and books to uncover the route. However, it will be a challenge to deter mine the

Democratic field for governor up to five

School District Board, post notices whenever a quorum of a body might be in the same place. Taos County does not do this. Superintendent of the district Rod Weston said the school board’s attorney advised them to post notices on their website whenever a quorum of the board might be together. Malone advised the commission at its meeting Nov. 19 to stop going to lunch because any time a quorum is together, it’s easy for a member of the public to claim he or she heard the commissioners discussing county matters. “ We ’ r e o b v i o u s l y i n a gray area here,” Malone said.

north on Highway 68 near Velarde, according to an incident report obtained by The Taos News. A radar indicated the off-duty police cadet was traveling at 114 mph, the report stated, noting that the marked speed limit was 60 mph.

STATE BRIEFS

SILVER CITY — State Sen. Howie Morales, D-Silver City, could have at least four opponents in next year’s Democratic primary election for governor. Lawrence Rael entered the race Wednesday, joining Morales, Attorney General Gary King, state Sen. Linda Lopez of Albuquerque and Santa Fe business owner Alan Webber on the ballot. The winner will face of f against incumbent Republican Gov. Susana Martinez. Rael, who helped start the Rail Runner commutertrain system, has more than 30 years’ experience in local, state and federal gover nment jobs. He recently resigned as state executive director of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Farm Service Agency.

Attorney to commission: Stop going to lunch

TAOS — Taos County’s attorney told commissioners they should no longer meet in a quorum to have lunch, because “you have no control over accusations someone might make.” Earlier this month, The Taos News published a story about the commissio ners ’ periodi c lunch meetings, in which a quorum of commissioners meet at a local restaurant and eat together. The New Mexico Open Meeting Act mandates that meetings of public bodies should be open to the public, and that the public should be given sufficient notice in advance of any meeting in which officials plan to discuss public business. The Taos Municipal

Police cadet arrested after high-speed chase

TAOS — An off-duty Taos Police Department cadet was arrested after a high-speed pursuit Nov. 15 that led law enforcement through Taos Canyon, around the Horseshoe and ended after the driver rumbled over spikes laid across Highway 68 south of Taos. Steven Lucero, a 26year -old local resident four weeks shy of graduating from the New Mexico Law Enforcement Academy, was subseq u e nt l y ch a rg e d w i th a felony count of aggravated fleeing and a misdemeanor count of driving under the influence. Lucero is no longer employed by the Taos Police Department, Chief David Weaver confirmed on Nov. 19. The pursuit began when Lucero passed a Río Arriba County Sheriff’s deputy while driving

BLM considers leasing parcels in Rio Arriba County

TAOS (AP) — Federal land managers are proposing to lease nearly 21 square miles for potential oil and natural gas development in Rio Arriba County. The Bureau of Land Management says it’s seeking public comments. A public meeting is scheduled in Cebolla on Tuesday. The 16 parcels near Cebolla would be offered during the October 2014 lease sale. The BLM had originally considered making these parcels available for lease during its sale last January. Following an environmental review, the agency recognized the need for additional public involvement and to gather more information regarding key issues such as potential impacts to groundwater resources. The BLM says it partnered with Rio Arriba County in an effort to fully engage the public and to have the best information on hand before making a decision.

Judge issues a temporary stay in land dispute

SANTA FE (AP) — A federal magistrate has issued a temporary stay in a court case seeking to block Texas investors from ousting cabin owners from a north-

“There’s really nothing left, but we know from writings that they came through Aztec,” Blacik said. “Ideally, we’d like to find it, but a mule trail from the 1830s may mean it will be an interpretation.”

Work on the trail project is expected to be completed during the summer of 2014.

ern New Mexico property long used as a conference center.

The Santa Fe New Mexican reports that the magistrate issued the stay during proceedings in a lawsuit filed by one of the cabin owners, Little Rock, Ark., business consultant Kirk Tompkins’ suit. The suit attempts to block the investors’ planned purchase of the LifeWay Glorieta Conference Center from LifeWay Christian Resources, a Southern Baptist Conference group that has run the center since the 1950s.

LifeWay has sought to dismiss the case by arguing that Tompkins’ allegations should have been filed in state court.

Man throws 2 dogs from truck

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Animal welfare officers in Albuquerque are trying to locate a man who threw two dogs from a pickup truck onto a street. Of ficer Kathryn Waite says a bulldog suffered a serious leg injury during the incident Wednesday but that the second dog, a pug, wasn’t injured.

KOB-TV reports that a witness saw the dogs thrown onto Central Avenue near Dorado but wasn’t able to get a licenseplate number for the truck. It’s described as a fourdoor vehicle described as gray or silver. Waite says the driver could face animal cruelty charges.

She says unwanted dogs should be taken to a shelter and these two dogs will be available for adoption in the next few days.

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ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Braving freezing temperatures and expecting large crowds, bargain hunters in New Mexico took to stores and malls Friday in search of much-hyped Black Friday deals. At ABQ Uptown openair shopping center in Albuquerque, hundreds of coat-wearing shoppers early Friday ventured in and out of stores offering discounts of up to 40 percent of f. However, parking lots were not as full as some expected and some stores had more employees than shoppers. Most stores opened at 8 a.m. Across the street at Coronado Mall, stores saw moderately busy traffic and shoppers said lines seemed to move quickly. “I don’t think it’s that crowded at all,” said Ally Yuen, 36, of Albuquerque. “I actually found parking, so it’s been nice.” Yuen said the smaller crowds allowed her to quickly go through her checklist of gifts for her children. Mark Martin, who owns a mall kiosk selling brightly lit “puzzle

lamps,” said the mall was busy when its doors opened at 8 a.m., but within two hours, crowds began to thin out. “I think it’ll be steady throughout the day and not too crazy,” he said. Rex Wilson, 59, said he and his two children decided to join in on the Black Friday tradition at Uptown just to see what they could find. Before 9 a.m., Wilson said he scored a pullover shirt that was 30 percent of f and hopes to find more inexpensive gifts. “It was a good deal to come out an hour early,” he said. In Santa Fe, religious activists joined a nationwide protest targeting Wal-Mart stores over workers’ salaries. Advocates held vigils at all three of the Wal-Mart locations in Santa Fe and shared readings on economic justice and workers’ rights from the Bible. The National Weather Service said temperatures would reach as high as the mid-50s Friday, with mostly clear skies. Temperatures were expected to drop to the mid-20s by Friday evening.

MAIN WELLS FARGO BANK SET UP FOR DONATIONS In Wednesday’s Daily Record, a story appeared about a mother who is struggling to pay her son’s medical bills. The child suffers from a rare blood disorder, with prescriptions costing up to $4,500. The article noted Wells Fargo Bank, 400 N.

Pennsylvania Ave., as the location where donations may be taken. The main Wells Fargo Bank is the only bank set up to receive donations. Ask for Joshua’s medical account and mention the mother’s name, Allison Curtis.

LOTTERY NUMBERS Mega Millions 9-41-43-47-57 Mega Ball: 5

Roadrunner Cash 1-6-13-30-37 Pick 3 3-9-7

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GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Response Continued from Page A1

everything we can to smooth it out for people.” Anyone who still had lingering problems can call Washington Federal’s Client Care line at 1-800-324-9374. Customers can also visit any other Washington Federal

Businesses

Continued from Page A1

between 75 and 100 customers — many of whom she knew by name — and expected roughly 100 more by closing time. Hippie Chicks offered discounts of 25 and 40 percent on Friday, plus other promotions. Items are also on sale today. Lindberg said she had to put some constraints on sale prices due to paying more for individual items than big-box stores do. She said she purchases specialty merchandise in small batches, in contrast to chain stores, which purchase items in bulk. Hippie Chick patrons said they saw special value in shopping local, even if prices are lowest at national chains. Zena Studdard, 49, and her teenage daughter were browsing holiday gifts at the boutique yesterday. Studdard said she would rather spend more money on merchandise at

Saturday, November 30, 2013

branch in Roswell for assistance. Washington Federal client care workers can help customers figure out any problems with accounts, Cooper said. “We want to make sure people are happy and satisfied,” Cooper said. Washington Federal has seen a decline of some 3.7 percent in customer balances at the 11 branches the bank acquired in New Mexico from Bank of America.

independently-owned businesses than on items at big-box stores so as to support the local economy. She said she and her daughter, who reside part time in Roswell and the other part in House, visited large chain stores Thanksgiving Day for early bird promotions but reserved Black Friday for “the small businesses.” “It seems like they have more unique stuff,” said Studdard. While Hippie Chicks and Once Again played with the big dogs Friday, other local businesses forwent day-after Thanksgiving sales in favor of Small Business Saturday promotions. Among those businesses were Tinnie Mercantile, Pecos Flavors Winery, Imagine That! Scrapbooks and Gift Store and Bows and Britches Boutique. MainStreet Roswell director Dusty Huckabee said Small Business Saturday “probably goes back into the ’60s” and is one of multiple ways that the city encourages resi-

dents to “shop Roswell first.” T innie Mercantile on Lea Avenue left Black Friday alone, aside from a fish tacos special at its deli.

Spicy

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manager T innie Brinkman Randle said Black Friday “only goes to the big stores” and today’s sales events at mom and pops across the city are “more celebrating our own kind.” The store has a sale on handbags today.

Pecos Flavors Winery on North Main saved discounts of 30 and 50 percent off select items for today.

The winery held a happy hour to greet those finishing up an afternoon of shopping yesterday. One staff member said the shop had benefited from foot traffic generated by sales at other enterprises. “We do a ton of business on Black Friday,” said server Michelle Hartman.

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This undated image provided by the Los Alamos National Laboratory shows the Quonset hut where the bomb that was dropped on Nagasaki was assembled. Tucked away in one of northern New Mexico’s pristine mountain canyons is the birthplace of a top-secret mission that forever changed the world.

Park

hee, historical facilities manager for Los Alamos labs. “It’s really more a commemoration ... History is what it is. We can’t pick and choose what’s historically significant.” The park service, she said, would help people learn about the controversies, the people and the social, political and military legacy surrounding development of nuclear weapons. “There are a lot of emotions rolled up in this story,” she said. “That’s why the park service is the best entity to tell this story. They can approach it as an outsider. They have no real interest in how it is told. They can tell it from a national perspective.” Among the proposed park’s biggest supporters are lab workers like McGehee. She has been working since an act was passed in 2004 to study creation of such parks, to help identify and preserve areas in town and within lab property to include. Potential park properties include some build-

ings in downtown Los Alamos, a town that was essentially created to support the lab, as well as 17 buildings in six “industrial sites” within the lab’s fence. They include the V-site, where the first atomic bomb to be detonated at the Trinity Site was assembled, as well as the areas where the Little Boy and Fat Man nuclear bombs that were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, respectively, were assembled. Also on the list is the Pajarito site, which includes Pond Cabin and the Slotin Building. Pond Cabin had been part of a boys’ school and dude ranch that was purchased and taken over to create Los Alamos lab. It was tur ned into a key plutonium research office after the first so-called “criticality accident” killed physicist Harry Daghlian, prompting of ficials to move research to the cabin in a more remote area. A few hundred yards away is the Slotin Building, where Louis Alexander Slotin was

killed after a slipped screwdriver accidentally began a fission reaction, making him the second casualty of the Manhattan Project. Legislation to create the parks at the nation’s nuclear sites passed the House and one Senate committee earlier this year. If it is passed and signed into law, the parks would be limited to areas involved in the Manhattan Project that created the first nuclear weapons. But McGehee has also been busy researching and documenting other now closed areas of the lab. For example, during a 70th anniversary commemoration this summer, lab officials took a media tour and workers and their families on tours of what until recently had been a secret tunnel where the nation’s nuclear stockpile was stored after World War II. “It’s a fascinating process and really exciting from a historian’s point of view,” McGehee said. “It’s a weird hometown history.”

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TWO BIG DAYS

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A4 Saturday, November 30, 2013

OPINION

Historic ‘Southwest Chief’ route endangered HAL RHODES UPON REFLECTION

Nostalgia has long surrounded the demise of legendary Route 66 after Interstate 40 swept its way through the Southwest. Yet there was at least some comfort to be had in knowing that a major roadway had come into being, upon which motorists would wend their way to and fro our dramatic region. Unfortunately, the tenuous future of a historic Amtrak train invites a less sanguine frame of mind. During the era of Santa Fe Railway, it was known as the Super Chief. In this age of Amtrak, it’s called the Southwest Chief, and it is still the stuff of history and legend. But unless New Mexico, Colorado and Kansas come up with the wherewithal to keep the Chief operating on its present route, many towns and cities in those

EDITORIAL

HAL

RHODES

UPON REFLECTION

states will lose the passenger train service that started boarding travelers in their communities in the 1930s. As matters stand, the Chief, once a jewel in America’s railroad crown, runs on tracks owned by Burlington Northern Santa Fe. These are tracks suitable principally for freight trains, and they have been so degraded over the years that BNSF itself no longer uses them. If the three states through which they run fail to come up with a cost-sharing plan capable of improving the rail system by

2016, BNSF has threatened to force Amtrak to re-route the Chief to another rail system. For those who missed it, this is not breaking news. Red flags about the peril facing the Southwest Chief first appeared when Bill Richardson was governor and he, in concert with two successive Colorado governors, began making plans to avert the looming crisis. Richardson’s successor, Susana Martinez, however, turned thumbs down on any such proposal and let it be known that she’s not inclined to soften her views on the matter at the upcoming 30-day budget session of the Legislature. It’s an amazingly shortsighted posture, and there are those who suspect that, not unlike her attempt to unravel the state’s burgeoning movie industry, it is simply another Martinez swipe at her predecessor’s legacy. As presently envisioned, unless

Roswell Daily Record

a cost-sharing agreement between the three states is reached by 2016, BNSF will divert the Chief’s route at Wichita and send it packing down to Amarillo before it heads west to Albuquerque and on through to Arizona until it reaches Los Angeles. Towns and cities in Colorado scheduled to lose rail service include Lamar, La Junta and Trinidad. In New Mexico Raton, Las Vegas and Lamy (in other words Santa Fe) would be cut off from passenger service. The passenger train has played a large part in the history of these cities. During World War II Lamy was the doorway through which the most famous scientists of the era — Oppenheimer, Fermi, Bethe, Rabi, among them — secretly passed en route to Los Alamos where they would develop the first atomic weapon. Beyond times past, passenger

trains still play a vital part in New Mexico’s economy. As the crackerjack journalist Tom Sharpe recently noted in the Santa Fe New Mexican, last year alone “nearly 125,000 passengers boarded or disembarked the Chief in New Mexico…” Moreover, the state benefits to the tune of “an estimated $29 million annual economic impact from spending related to train passengers.” Small wonder there is support among many state and local officials for a proposal that would have the three states, Amtrak and BNSF divvy up $4 million annually over a period of ten years to upgrade the rails and keep the Chief running on its present course. As state Sen. Tom Keller, DAlbuquerque, put it, “The price tag ... is very low and very feasible.” But then there’s the governor.

Opting for needless ‘nuclear’ war

Extraordinary circumstances, as the saying goes, require extraordinary measures. Memo to Harry Reid: these are not extraordinary circumstances. At the end of the week, Reid led Senate Democrats in greatly constricting the use of the filibuster for presidential appointments, exercising the so-called “nuclear option” that both parties have long threatened when an obstructive minority aims to delay or outright prevent presidential nominations. As a result, the filibuster will now be an option only for Supreme Court nominees. All lesser confirmations will require the approval of a simple majority, not the 60 votes necessary under the old system. We do not hold the filibuster as a sacrosanct component of American government. The provision, it bears noting, is a tradition born of the Senate’s internal rules, not a creation of the Constitution. Thus, Reid’s gambit does no violence to the essential functioning of the legislative branch. Moreover, we share the widespread frustration that Washington increasingly embraces gridlock for gridlock’s sake. Even bearing those factors in mind, however, we cannot endorse Reid’s decision to go nuclear. The ostensible cause of the showdown was Senate Republicans’ repeated blocking of President Obama’s nominations to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. The D.C. Circuit is one of the nation’s most important appellate courts ... but it’s also one that’s not exactly in need of more judges. The court has the lowest caseload of any appellate circuit in the country. As recently as 2006, Democrats blocked one of George W. Bush’s nominees to the court precisely because they argued that it had no need for any further judges. That judgment was persuasive then, and it’s persuasive now. While Sen. Reid claims this effort was meant to reduce the effects of partisan bickering in Washington, we suspect that it will have precisely the opposite effect. While the filibuster itself is an imperfect tool, it is representative of the ethos that makes the Senate distinct from the House of Representatives: it is a body built around consensus, with deliberation and accommodation — as opposed to the raw majoritarianism of the lower chamber — serving as its organizing principle. Whatever gain Sen. Reid and his cohort realize from this effort will pale in comparison with the cost of destroying that sensibility. Moreover, the claim that restricting the use of the filibuster is essential to getting the nation’s most important work done doesn’t survive close scrutiny. If that is the case, why retain its use for Supreme Court justices, inarguably more significant than the judges who preside over lower courts? We agree it’s a problem that Washington can’t more effectively discharge the duties of governing. It’s an even larger problem, however, when the gridlock can only be broken with sheer legislative force rather than with reasoned compromise. As such, the nuclear option only makes things worse. Guest Editorial The Orange County Register DEAR DOCTOR K: I sometimes get short of breath. Should I worry that it’s serious? DEAR READER: Shortness of breath is often no big deal. It’s normal to be short of breath for a little while after strenuous exercise or at high altitudes. Some people breathe hard when they’re anxious. When should you worry that shortness of breath might indicate a serious heart or lung condition? I tell my patients that they know their own bodies a lot better than I do. Their bodies are sending their brains signals every minute. If they think they are getting short of breath in situations that never made them short of breath before, that’s a red flag.

Green energy subsidies: Part of outdated energy policy The whole idea of green energy — renewable resources — grew out of an energy reality different from today’s. In the 1970s, following the OPEC Oil Embargo, solar panels began popping up on rooftops and “gasohol” subsidies were enacted. It was believed that green energy would move the U.S. off of foreign oil and prevent oil from being used as an economic weapon against us. Today, that entire paradigm has been upended and OPEC’s power has been virtually neutered by increasing domestic oil production and decreasing gasoline consumption. In a Nov. 17 editorial, the

Doonesbury

Maybe they have to stop to catch their breath after climbing one flight of stairs, and that never used to happen. Maybe they sometimes feel winded even when they’ve just been sitting, and that never used to happen. Maybe they suddenly feel short of breath for no apparent reason. The key question to ask yourself: Is this new for you? If so, talk to your doctor. Ther e still may not be a serious underlying pr oblem, but you need to be sure of that. The other really important question to ask yourself when you become unusually short of breath is whether you are also experiencing other worrisome symptoms: — Chest pain or discomfort — Swollen ankles and feet

Ethanol

MARITA NOON ENERGY MAKES AMERICA GREAT INC.

Wall Street Journal sums up the current renewable resource status: “After 35 years of exaggerations about the benefits of renewable fuels, the industry has lost credibility.” Similarly, on the same day, the Washington Post went a step further, stating that ethanol “has been exposed as an environmental and economic mistake.”

ASK DR. K UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

— Fever — Unusual fatigue — Painful cough with blood or yellow, green or reddish mucus — Wheezing and coughing When these symptoms occur along with unusual shortness of breath, you should contact your doctor promptly. They raise the likelihood you may be

Mandated for blending into America’s gasoline supply in 2007 through the Energy Security and Independence Act, ethanol now has an unlikely coalition of opponents — including car and smallengine manufacturers, oil companies and refiners, and food producers and some environmental groups. A national movement is growing and calling for the end of the ethanol mandates that, according to the WSJ, have “drained the Treasury of almost $40 billion” since the first gasohol subsides were enacted in 1978. Realize the word “Treasury,” used here,

having a serious, even lifethreatening, problem: a heart attack, heart failure, pneumonia, a blood clot in the lungs (pulmonary embolism) or an asthma attack. Before you call your doctor for shortness of breath, be prepared to answer the following questions. They will help your doctor assess the urgency of your situation. If your doctor doesn’t ask these questions, volunteer the information: (1) Is there chest pain, and what does it feel like? Is it a sharp and stabbing pain? Or does it feel more like a dull pressure? Does it travel anywhere (like into your neck, jaw, shoulder, arm or back)? (2) Are you sweating profusely?

really means “taxpayer.” On Nov. 15, the EPA gave a nod toward market and technological realities and, for the first time, proposed a reduction in the renewable volume obligations — below 2012 and 2013 levels. The EPA’s decision is lauded by AAA President and CEO Bob Darbelnet: “The EPA has finally put consumers first.” He said the targets in the 2007 law are “unreachable without putting motorists and their vehicles at risk.” Ethanol has been dealt a blow.

See NOON, Page A5

(3) Do you have trouble breathing when you lie down? (4) Are your legs or ankles swollen? (5) Do you have a cough or fever? (6) How fast are you breathing? You don’t want to get terrified every time you have a potentially serious symptom. But you also don’t want to miss an early signal that something serious m a y b e w r o n g . Yo u n e e d t o know when, and when not, to worry. (Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. To send questions, go to AskDoctorK.com, or write: Ask Doctor K, 10 Shattuck St., S e c o n d F l o o r, B o s t o n , M A 02115.)


OPINION/LOCAL/REGION

A5

Another year, the oil patch is still going strong Roswell Daily Record

TYLER GRAHAM LOVINGTON LEADER

LOVINGTON — Another year down and the oil and gas industry is still going strong here in Lea County and as a result, the area has seen unprecedented growth over the last few years. Trucks are hauling, rigs are pumping, and pipe is being laid all around and that makes for a booming local economy that has everyone feeling good. While Lea County’s current unemployment rate of 4.5 percent isn’t quite the 2 percent that it was before the Great Recession, it ain’t bad either. The rest of the

country is still in recovery mode, with unemployment hovering just over 7 percent. New Mexico as a whole is slightly below the national average at 6.8 percent, which shows just how well southeaster n New Mexico is doing. Of course the reality of an oil field economy is the potential for a big bust to follow a boom like the one we’re riding now. According to economists from the Federal Reserve, however, Lea County and the rest of the oil patch communities around the country are looking to continue riding high into the foreseeable future, thanks to sustainably high oil prices.

At an economic conference hosted by the Federal Reserve in Hobbs earlier this year, New Mexico State professor of Economics and International Business Jim Peach dismissed the notion that the area surrounding Lovington would be running short on oil anytime in the near future. He said that in 2000 there were an estimated 715 million barrels of reserves in the state and over the next decade 700 million barrels were pulled out of the ground, which should have just about depleted the oil supply. Instead, the reserve is now estimated to hold at least 823 million barrels. Thankfully, lawmakers in

Health changes to strain Colorado dentist shortage DENVER (AP) — New dental care benefits are coming to hundreds of thousands of Colorado residents next year because of health care changes at the state and federal level. But Colorado is short on dentists, especially those serving Medicaid patients. The dentist crunch has prompted a new statewide campaign by the Colorado Dental Association to get more dentists to treat the needy, The Denver Post reported. The number of new patients will rise after the state Legislature approved a new dental benefit this year for adults currently covered by Medicaid and as eligibility for Medicaid and pediatric benefits increase under the federal health law. About 335,000 adults with Medicaid will gain access to dental care in the spring. Tens of thousands more will join the rolls as Medicaid is expanded under the Affordable Care Act. Added to them will be potentially thousands of privately insured children with dental care included under “essential benefits” minimums of the state health exchange. Colorado has about 3,600 dentists. Nine counties have no dentists at all. The state has only about 1,000 dentists actively enrolled as Medicaid providers. And of that 1,000, only about 690 take enough Medicaid patients to bill more than $10,000 in claims in a year, a threshold for assessing participation. Even if only 20 to 25 percent of those eligible start taking advantage of dental benefits, “that’s 95,000 people seeking care,” said Karen Cody Carlson, executive director of the nonprofit Oral Health Colorado. “Having the benefit is a great positive step, but it’s creating an access problem as

well.” The dental association is asking each dentist in the state to accept at least five Medicaid patients or families in the coming year. Lakewood’s Dr. Jef f Hurst will be a prime target of the persuaders. He is open to rejoining Medicaid and helped push for the changes, but he has been out of the program for decades because of infinitesimal reimbursement and maddening paperwork. “It’s very daunting for a lot of dentists to see a packet of 40 pages to fill out (when trying to join Medicaid),” said Dr. Carol Morrow, a Walsh dentist working on state committees and with southeastern Colorado colleagues to expand public care. Medicaid has pledged to work with the dental community to speed signups and reimbursement, while also raising payment rates per procedure. Legislation passed earlier this year sets a Medicaid adult benefit by at least April. It will be paid for with the state’s unclaimedproperty fund, matched by federal dollars available for certain optional expansions of Medicaid benefits. Many adults covered by Medicaid haven’t seen dentists for years, and abscesses, infections and disease lead to crisis. Mouth bacteria have even been shown as factors in heart disease, stroke and maternal health. “I can track in my small area how many people go to the emergency rooms and how much that costs — it’s insane,” said Morrow, whose practice treats people from Colorado, southwestern Kansas and the Oklahoma Panhandle.

Federal budget cuts threaten snowpack monitoring

FOR T COLLINS, Colo. (AP) — For the first time in nearly a century, several snowpack monitoring sites in Colorado’s mountains may be abandoned this winter due to federal budget cuts. The Natural Resources Conservation Service announced in late October that it might eliminate 47 of its 72 Colorado “snow course” sites, where scientists trek to measure snow, The Coloradoan reported Wednesday. Since the early 1900s, the NRCS has kept records of snow depth and weight to help predict spring runoff. The estimates are used by reservoir managers, water conservation districts and far mers across the state. The budget for the NRCS Snow Survey Program in the West — which spans from New Mexico to Montana and from Colorado to California — has been cut by 15 percent since 2011, forcing the agency to cut staff. Some of the Colorado monitoring sites that could be closed have records dating back to 1936. “The short of it is, the snow program as a whole

has taken budget cuts over the past few years, and yeah, I mean those cuts are very real,” said Mage Hultstrand, an assistant snow survey supervisor. “I think this year we are talking another 8 percent.” The decision to abandon more than half of the snow measuring sites inspired a group of 100 water conservation districts and farmers across the state to save them, possibly by paying for monitoring themselves. The Norther n Colorado Water Conservancy District, one member of the group, uses 23 of the NRCS snow measuring sites, four of which are on the elimination list, said spokesman Brian Werner. “All four of those are on the Wester n Slope,” he said. “They are pretty critical for the forecast.” Since the 1930s, field officers have been measuring snow density across Colorado. In the 1970s NRCS began the SNOTEL program, which uses equipment to measure snow. SNOTEL updates are hourly and available on the Internet; that aspect of the program will not be cut, said B.J. Shoup, a soil sci-

entist with the program. In 2011, the snow monitoring program’s budget for the entire western United States was $10.9 million. In 2012, the budget dropped to $9.3 million, and this year it dropped to $8.56 million. The program, like other federal agencies, is being funded by a continuing resolution in the meantime. NRCS reduced its staff of 42 snow surveyors to 19 so it can continue to monitor the 47 Colorado sites in jeopardy. For 2014, it expects its budget for measuring Colorado sites to be $78,741. The details of a potential arrangement with stakeholders to pay for surveying have not yet been worked out, Hultstrand said. The Colorado of fice, which monitors Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and southern Wyoming, has a staff of six, with two vacant positions, said Hultstrand. The Colorado program hopes that employees of other agencies can start monitoring the sites at their own cost. “This data is very important to a lot of people,” Hultstrand said.

LAS VEGAS, Nev. (AP) — The landmark hotel off U.S. 93 near Hoover Dam and Lake Mead will soon have a different look.

the 300-room Hacienda Hotel & Casino, renovating the property, and renaming it the Hoover Dam Lodge. The hotel is just outside of Boulder City, and a 15 minute drive from the dam.

rant Services Inc. is expected to be finalized in the coming weeks, after state gambling regulators and local officials approve the deal.

HACIENDA ON 93 TO REOPEN AS HOOVER DAM LODGE

The owner of a chain of “Dotty’s” storefront slot machine taverns is buying

The sale to Nevada Restau-

The 17-story Hacienda has 370 rooms and a 19,000square-foot casino.

Santa Fe have recently taken some steps to help oil and gas production rather than hurt it. A relaxation of some of the infamous “Pit Rule” requirements are a step in the right direction when it comes to keeping the state a business friendly environment for its most lucrative tax base. The state has also done well with its lease sales and royalty collections. So far in 2013, the state has sold leasing rights to more than 25,000 acres for almost $46 million. The fourth and final lease sale of the year is coming up later this November and will surely bolster that number, but

Paw Prints

Saturday, November 30, 2013

probably not enough to match the $104 million the state brought in last year. Royalties from those leases are also highly lucrative for the state. In the last fiscal year the Land Of fice brought in a total of $494 million on oil and gas royalties. The uptick in production has industry experts looking to move up in the world oil production rankings. In October, PIRA Energy Group indicated that they believe the United States has surpassed Saudi Arabia in 2013 at the world’s top oil producer when natural gas liquids and biofuels are added to crude oil numbers. The U.S. has

been projected to produce an average of 12.1 million barrels of liquids per day this year while Saudi Arabia falls about 300,000 barrels behind that place. It’s no secret that the resurgence in oilfield activity around Lovington over the last several years is a direct result of the advancements made in hydraulic fracturing of shale formations and horizontal drilling. In fact, according to the New Mexico Oil and Gas Association, without fracking nearly all oil production in the state would cease.

Courtesy Photo

Meet Toby, left, and Twiggy. These cute puppies are 5-month-old female Chihuahua and poodle mixes, currently residing at The Roswell Humane Society, 703 E. McGaffey St. However, they’re on the lookout for a warm home to call their own this season! For more information about either puppy or any other adoptable pet, visit the Humane Society, or call them at 622-8950.

Noon

Continued from Page A4

Solar

While the ethanol mandate hasn’t been eliminated, the administration has wavered and has given a nod toward “market and technological reality.” Likewise, those of us who oppose government mandates and subsidies were handed a small victory in Arizona. On November 14, the Arizona Corporation Commission set a new direction for solar energy policy by adding a monthly fee (approximately $5 per residential customer) onto the utility bills of new solar customers for power grid connection and maintenance. While the ACC decision didn’t make national headlines, as the EPA decision did, it has huge national implications. There are a number of other state commissions currently reviewing similar policies. The issue is net-metering — a policy that currently allows customers with solar panels to receive full retail credit for power they deliver to the grid. Supporters believe that ending it “would kill their business.” Opponents believe it “unfairly shifts costs from solar homes to non-solar homes.” In a 3-2 vote, the ACC vote kept the net-metering program, but added a small fee. However, the two “no” votes each believed the fee should be higher — meaning all five commissioners wanted a fee added. The fee is only in place until the next rate case that will be filed in June of 2015 and a clause was added that allows the commission to adjust the charge annually. The ACC’s process pointed out the customers’ savings, $170 million in cash incentives got them, could be “largely or entirely wiped out” with a small $5 fee. It solidified that there is cost-shifting taking place — which the solar industry has denied. And, it set up larger fees and potential credit adjustments in the near future. Renewable energy has suffered a setback in both the EPA ethanol decision and the ACC solar decision. Shouldn’t wind be next?

Wind

On Nov. 14, fifty-two Congressmen signed a letter, organized by Rep. Mike

Pompeo (R-KS), calling for the end of the wind production tax credit (PTC). They point out that the PTC, which was scheduled to end on December 31, 2012, was extended “during the closing hours of the last Congress,” as a part of the American Taxpayer Relief Act. Not only was it extended, but it was enhanced by modifying the eligibility criteria. Originally, wind turbines needed to be “placed in service” by the end of the expiration of the PTC to qualify for the tax credit. Under ATRA, they need only to be “under construction” to qualify.

The letter points out: “If a wind project developer merely places a 5% deposit on a project initiated in 2013, it will have at least until 2015 and possibly 2016 to place the project in service and obtain the PTC. That means that a wind project that ‘begins construction’ in 2013 could receive subsidies until 2026.”

Like ethanol and solar, “the growth in wind is driven not by market demand, but by a combination of state renewable portfolio standards and a tax credit that is now more valuable than the price of the electricity the plants actually generate.” The EPA finally saw some sense when it announced the reduction in the amount of ethanol that refiners are required to blend into gasoline in 2014. The ACC signaled a change in ratepayer compensation for solar energy. Will Congress show similar wisdom and allow the wind tax credit to expire at the end of 2013? These mandates and tax credits are remnants of an outdated energy policy. America’s energy paradigm has changed and our energy policies need to keep up and be revised to fit our new reality.

The author of Energy Freedom, Marita Noon serves as the executive director for Energy Makes America Great Inc. and the companion educational organization, the Citizens’ Alliance for Responsible Energy (CARE). Together they work to educate the public and influence policy makers regarding energy, its role in freedom, and the American way of life. Combining energy, news, politics, and, the environment through public events, speaking engagements, and media, the organizations’ combined efforts serve as America’s voice for energy.

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CHURCH DEVOTIONAL

A6 Saturday, November 30, 2013

CHURCH

AND DIRECTORY

Roswell Daily Record

This Devotional & Directory is made possible by those businesses who encourage all of us to attend worship services. QUALITY MEDICAL CARE Roswell MediCo

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Morning and Evening Prayer

"Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transcends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus." Philippians 4:6$7 Prayer can be unplanned and spontaneous, and sometimes the spontaneous prayer that flows out of an abundance of spirit is exactly the right prayer for the moment. But, more often than not, it is best to have a prayer routine. People who take their spirituality seriously usually have set times when they pray. Morning and Evening prayer are perhaps the most common times, but many also add a midday prayer. Praying shortly after arising in the morning and shortly before going to bed "bookends" our day with the sacred. It also helps to have a prayer book or some systematic way to pray. If you have never done this, invest in a prayer book and try it for a month or two. Most prayer regimens are fairly simple and need not be very time-consuming. Five or ten minutes each morning and evening will be time well-spent. So, perhaps you could check out your local Christian bookstore or ask your Pastor for guidance with this. You will be amazed at how regular prayer will improve the qualityof your life ANGLICAN

ST. STEPHEN’S 101 S. Lea; 910-9706; Fr. Bob Tally, Min; W.S. 9:00 a.m.

ASSEMBLY OF GOD

Shaun Ryan, Manager 601 S. Main Street Roswell, New Mexico 88203 Phone (575) 623-2090 • Fax (575) 623-5516 www.forresttire.net

Keeping you rollin’ since 1944

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD, 1224 W. Country Club, 622-2171, Melvin Suttle, Min. W.S. 8:30am S.S.10:00am 11:00am Contemporary Service MIDWAY ASSEMBLY OF GOD 63 Yakima Rd., 3475309, S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10:15 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m TEMPLO BETAL ASSEMBLY OF GOD 221 E. Jefferson, 623-6852, Paul & Toni Herrera, Mins. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 5 p.m. Tues. & Wed. 6 p.m. TEMPLO LA HERMOSA FIRST SPANISH ASSEMBLY OF GOD 1305 South Garden, 625-0885, Oscar Guerrero, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 5 p.m. Tues. & Wed. 7 p.m.

Harvard Petroleum Company, LLC

200 East Second Street P.O. Box 936 Roswell, NM 88202-0936 575-623-1581 Fax 575-622-8006

BAPTIST

ADVENTURE BIBLE CHURCH 1905 S. Main St., Butch Neal & Tim Arlet, Mins. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m.

GALILEE BAPTIST 513 E. Matthews St., 6628534, W.W. Green, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. HIGHLAND BAPTIST 2001 S. Lea, 622-9980, Rev. Wayne Brazil, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6:00 p.m. Wed. 6:00 p.m.

IGLESIA BAUTISTA EL CALVARIO 600 E. Tilden, 623-8135, Roberto Mancillas, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m. MIDWAY BAPTIST 134 Yakima Rd., Leo Pennington, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 7 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

BETHEL BAPTIST N. Garden & East Country Club Rd., 6228182 Richard Grisham, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:40 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m. BYKOTA BAPTIST 2106 E. Pine Lodge Rd., 622-3399 Don Johnson, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

CALVARY BAPTIST 1009 W. Alameda, Chris Mullennix, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST 500 N. Pennsylvania, 623-2640; S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11:00 a.m.

TABERNACLE BAPTIST 115 W. 11th, 622-7912, S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

IMMACULATE CONCEPTION PARISH Dexter, Deacon Jesus Herrera, Min. Sat. Mass 6 p.m., Sun. Mass 1 p.m.

VICTORY BAPTIST 1601 W. McGaffey, 622-0114, Dan Holt, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

WASHINGTON AVE. BAPTIST 1400 North Washington Ave., 840-1144, Randy Reeves, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

(575)625-9145 2210 East Pinelodge Rd.

www.heartfeltmanor.com Marybeth Lawrence

ph 575-627-8070 fax 575-627-8072

1301 West Country Club Road Roswell, NM 88201 www.PeachtreeRET.com

IMMANUEL CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST 1000 N. Union, 622-6352, Louis Accardi, Min., S.S. 10:30 a.m.; OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE W.S. 11:30 a.m.; Lake Arthur, Sun. Mass 8 a.m. Wed. 6 p.m.

ST. CATHERINE’S Hagerman, ST. PAUL CHURCH OF GOD Sun. Mass 9:30 a.m. IN CHRIST 321 E. McGaffey, ST. JOHN’S CATHOLIC 623-1568, Joe L. Dawson, 506 S. Lincoln, 622-3531, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. Fr. Gonzalo Moreno, O.F.M. 11 a.m., Tues. & Fri. 8 p.m. Pastor; Communion Service

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST 1500 S. Elm, 622-4675; John Early Cannon, Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 6 p.m.

EPISCOPAL

ST. ANDREW’S EPISCOPAL 505 N. Penn., 622-1353, Father Dale Plummer, Min.; Principal Service. 9 a.m. 11:00 a.m.; in church Wed. 7 a.m. in the prayer garden.

WAL#MART STORES, INC. 4500 N. Main Roswell, NM

575-623-2062 • FAX 575-623-8704

JEHOVAH’S WITNESSES Kingdom Halls 205 W. Gayle

Mesa Park Cong. CHURCH OF CHRIST 1512 Sun. 10 a.m.; Tues. 7 p.m. South Main St., 622-4426 S.S. Buena Visa Cong. (Spanish) 10:30 a.m.; W.S. 9 a.m., Sun. 1:30 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF CHRIST 700 W. Country Club Road, 622-1350, Doug Austin, Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; THE FRIENDSHIP MISSIONW.S. 10 a.m. & 5 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m. ARY BAPTIST 1220 Johnson St., 623-6484, Michael K. CHURCH OF CHRIST West Shelton, Sr., Min.S.S. Alameda & Balsam, 622-5562 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., 2nd Wed.7 p.m. Sun. 1:30 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m. TRINIDAD COMMUNITY BAPTIST 1707 W. Juniper. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. Wed. 6 p.m.

• Elderly Care • Assisted Living

CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST

ST. PETER CATHOLIC 805 S. Main, 622-5092, Fr. Charlie Martinez, O.F.M. Min.; MT. GILEAD MISSIONARY Sat. Mass 6 p.m. Sun. BAPTIST 700 E. Summit, 623Mass 8 a..m. & 11 a.m. 0292 Pastor Allen. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11:00a.m.

WARE TABERNACLE FIRST BAPTIST - HAGERMAN MISSIONARY BAPTIST 900 211 N. Cambridge, Hagerman, E. Deming, 622-0546, Richard Gorham, Min. S.S. 9 a.m.; Herb Gage, Min.; S.S. 9:45 W.S. 10 & 11 a.m., a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. Wed. 6 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m. FIRST BAPTIST OF DEXTER 101 W. 3rd St., Dexter, 7345673, Jackie Thomas, Min., S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 5:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

ASSUMPTION CATHOLIC 2808 N. Kentucky, 622-9895, Joe Pacquing, Min. Masses: Sat. Mass 9:30 a.m. & 5:30 p.m.; Sun. Mass 9 a.m. & 11 a.m.; Mon-Fri Mass 12:10 p.m.;

S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 5 p.m. Wed. 6:00 p.m.

BERRENDO BAPTIST 400 W. ROSWELL BAPTIST Berrendo Rd., 622-1372, Troy Grant, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; TEMPLE 700 E. Berrendo, Bill W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 5:30 p.m. Whitehead, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 am. & 6 pm Wed. 7 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

“Where Love is Felt”

NEW COVENANT FELLOWSHIP CHURCH OF GOD 2200 N. Garden, 624-1958,S.S. 9:30 a.m. W.S. 10:45 a.m. & 5:30 p.m.

CATHOLIC

MORNING STAR BAPTIST 1513 Mulberry Ave., W.F. Mon 5:30 pm; Daily Mass Wagoner, Min. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; Tues-Fri 5:30 pm Sat. English W.S. 11 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. Mass 5:30 p.m., Spanish Wed. 7:30 p.m. Mass 7 p.m.; Sun. English MOUNTAIN VIEW BAPTIST Mass 10 a.m., Spanish Mass 8 a.m. & 12 Noon. 206 E. Charleston, 622-1019,

PRIMERA BAPTIST 417 East Wildy, 623-5420 S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. & 5 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

n

n

Manor, Inc.

CHURCH OF CHRIST 200 S. Union, Suite C, 347-2628; S.S. 10 a.m.;W.S. 11 a.m. & 5 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. IGLESIA DE CRISTO 801 N. Washington, Horario de Servicios: domingo 9:30 & 11:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., miercoles 6 p.m. SPANISH CHURCH OF CHRIST Mulberry & Buena Vista, W.S. 9:30 a.m. & 6 p.m., Wed. 6 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD

HOPE FAMILY CHURCH OF GOD 2600 S. Union, Raye Miller, Min., W.S. 10:30 a.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m., Thurs. Youth 6 p.m.

1718 N. Atkinson

Mountain View Cong Sun. 1 p.m.; Wed. 7:30 p.m. Spring River Cong. Sun. 10 a.m.; Tues 7:30 p.m.

1421 S. Garden

In-Home Care for Seniors 624-9999

Rio Pecos Cong. Sun. 10 am; Thurs. 7 p.m.

Dexter- 411 S. Lincoln

Dexter Cong. Sun. 10 a.m.; Thurs. 7 p.m.

JEWISH CONGREGATIONAL B’NAI ISRAEL 712 N. Washington, 622-7295, W.S. 2nd & 4th Fri. 7 p.m.

LUTHERAN IMMANUEL LUTHERAN 1405 N. Sycamore at College, 622-2853 Daniel Praeuner, Min., S.S. 10:20 a.m.; 111 W. Country Club W.S. 9 a.m. Roswell, NM 88201

For changes or corrections on church listings contact Sandra at 622-7710 Ext. 209 or email sandra@rdrnews.com

Ph. 622-6390 Fax 622-6383

Wakefield Oil Co., Inc. Wendell Wakefield

311 S. Virginia PO Box 1108 Roswell, NM 88202 1-800-657-6242 575-622-4160 Fax: 575-623-1456

We don’t want you to give us your business, we want the chance to earn your business.

Charles A. Shannon, RPh

700 N. Union Roswell, NM 88201

575-622-6571 Fax 575-623-3801 1-800-377-9881

Give thanks to the LORD, for he is good; his love endures forever. Psalm 107


CHURCH DEVOTIONAL CHURCH

Roswell Daily Record

AND DIRECTORY

Saturday, November 30, 2013

A7

This Devotional & Directory is made possible by those businesses who encourage all of us to attend worship services. LUTHERAN

REDEEMER LUTHERAN 2525 N. Spruce Ave., 627-7157; W.S. 10 a.m.

ST. MARK EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN 2911 N. Main St., 623-0519, Larry Sydow, Min.; S.S. 9:15 a.m.; W.S. 10:15 a.m.

METHODIST

ALDERSGATE UNITED METHODIST 915 W 19th St, 625-2855, Jim Bignell, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 9 a.m.

821 N. Main

Roswell, NM

575-623-3673 Service

575-623-1031

Central C entral V Valley alley E Electric lectric C Cooperative ooperative OOwned wned bbyy our members, memb m erss, to our communities comm o unities ccommitted ommitted to sinc ce 1937 19337 since 575-746-3571 AArtesia/Roswell/Dexter rtesia/RRoswell/Dexter 575-752-3366 Ha Hagerman agerman

www.cvecoop.org w ww.cvvecooop.org

Agave Energy Company 6263 N Main St Roswell, NM 88201 (575) 627-8398

DEXTER UNITED METHODIST 112 W. 3rd St., Dexter, 734-6529, Jim Bignell, Min. S.S. 9:30a.m.; W.S. 11:00 a.m.

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 2201 West Country Club Rd. First Ward: Phil Davis, Bishop 623-2777; W.S. 9 a.m.; S.S. 10:10 a.m. Second Ward: Jeff Savage, Bishop, 623-4492 W.S. 11 a.m.; S.S. 12:10 p.m.

NAZARENE

CENTRAL CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 901 E. Country Club, 420-2907 Randy Elftman, Min. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

FIRST CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 501 N. Sycamore, 624-2614; Dr. J. Vaughn Gossman, Min.; S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:45 a.m.; Sun. 6 p.m.; Wed. 6:30 p.m. THE NEIGHBORHOOD CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 1019 S Lea; 6230201; Hector Torres, Min.; S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m.; Spanish Service 12:30 p.m.; Wed. 6:30 p.m.

PENTECOSTAL

(575) 627-1145

APOSTOLIC FAMILY WORSHIP CENTER 1103 N Union; Joel Martinez, Min., 627-2258; W.S. 10 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. FIRST UNITED PENTECOSTAL 602 S. Mississippi, 347-2514, J.E. Shirley, Min. W.S. 11 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

GOD’S MESSENGER 108 S. Kansas; 625-0190; R. Dixon, Sr., Min.; S.S. 8:45 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m.; Wed. Noon HOUSE OF PRAYER 412 E. Matthews, 746-6699, Mike Valverde, Min. W.S. 5 p.m. Wed. & Fri. 7 p.m.

FIRST UNITED METHODIST 200 N. Pennsylvania, 6221881 IGLESIA DE DIOS Rev. W. Douglas Mills, PhD, 317 East Wildy, 627-6596, Min.; S.S.9:15 a.m.; Daniel Madrid, Min., domingos: W.S. 10:30 a.m. Escuela Dominical 10 a.m., Servicio Evg. 5 p.m. Martes: TRINITY UNITED Oracion y Estudio 7 p.m., METHODIST 1413 S. Union, jueves: servicio Dept. 7 p.m. 622-0119, Pastor Glenn Thyrion, Min.; S.S. 10 a.m.; LIFE MINISTRIES FOURSQUARE CHURCH 409 WS. 9 a.m. & 11 a.m. W. 16th, 622-3383; Wayne & Janice Snow, Mins.; W.S. 10:30 am, Wed. 7:00 p.m. MORMON

3ra Rama (en Español): Presidente Humberto Flores W.S. 2:15 p.m.; S.S. 12:15 p.m.

End-of-life care that provides dignity,compassion, and comfort. Our services are 100% paid by Medicare, Medicaid, and most commercial insurances.

APOSTOLIC BIBLE 2529 West Alameda, 625-8779, Rod Foster, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 6:30 p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

APOSTOLIC ASSEMBLY OF THE FAITH IN JESUS CHRIST 1721 N. Maryland, 624-2728, Ismael Chavarria, Min. S.S. 10 a.m.; W.S. 5 p.m. Thurs. 7 p.m.

NEW APOSTOLIC 813 N. Richardson, Ste. A, W.S. 10 a.m.

TRINITY APOSTOLIC FAITH N. Washington & 17th St., W.S. 11 a.m.

TRINITY HOUSE OF PRAISE

PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF GOD 510 S. Montana, 6232710, Bobby Barnett, Min.

W.S. 9:45 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m.

PRESBYTERIAN

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN 400 W. 3rd St., 622-4910, Rev. Kent Leydens, Min S.S. 8:30 a.m.; W.S. 10 a.m. 24-Hr Daily Inspiration Hotline 622-4923 REDEEMER CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP PCA 900 W. Berrendo, S.S. 9 a.m. W.S. 10:30 a.m.

IGLESIA PRESBITERIANA HISPANA 2801 W. 4th St., 622-0756, Adam Soliz, Min. W.S. 11 a.m.

WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN 2801 W. 4th St., 622-2801; Rev. Randy Nolen, Min.; S.S. 10:45 a.m.; W.S. 9:30 a.m.

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST

BEULAH SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST 106 S. Michigan Ave., 2436203; Alex Horton, Min. Sat. S.S. 9:30 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m. Wed. 6 p.m.

IGLESIA ADVENTISTA DEL SEPTIMO DIA 500 S. Cedar, 910-6527, Noel Dominguez, Min. Sat. S.S. 11 a.m.; W.S. 9:30 a.m. Wed. 7 p.m.

0000NARROW WAY 2200 N. Sycamore, 623-2511, Lyman Graham, Min. W.S. 2 p.m. NEW LIFE CHURCH OF ROSWELL

ROSWELL ENGLISH SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Jaffa & S. Union, 623-4636, Ken Davis,Min. Sat. S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 am.

Min.; S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11

OTHER

ORTHODOX BAHA’I FAITH

Wed. 7 p.m.

ADVENTURE BIBLE CHURCH 1905 S. Main St., Butch Neal & Tim Arlet, Mins. S.S. 9 a.m.; W.S. 10:30 a.m. ALBUQUERQUE/ ROSWELL FAMILY 501 Cagua S.E., 266-4468, Fritz Schneider, Min.

BEOD MOED HEBRAIC BIBLE CENTER 928 W. McGaffey, 840-6120, Sat. Hebraic Dance 1 p.m.; Torah Study 2 p.m.; Wed. Pray & Dance Practice 6 p.m. CALVARY CHAPEL OF ROSWELL 2901 W. 4th, 623-8072, W.S. 8:30 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m. CHRIST’S CHURCH 2200 N. Sycamore, 623-4110 S.S. 8:30 a.m.; W.S. 10:00 am.

1800 W. Bland, 622-2989, Barbara Norfor,

a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.

obfusa@rt66.com 622-5729 ROSWELL CHRISTIAN

OUTREACH MINISTRIES

101 S. Sunset; Joe Diaz, Min. W.S. 11 a.m.

Wed. & Fri. 7 p.m. ROSWELL PRAYER CENTER 622-4111/317-3867; Sat. 6

p.m. to 9 p.m.; Weekdays 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., 6 p..m. to 9 p.m. SALVATION ARMY

612 W. College, 622-8700

Beau & Mandy Perez, Mins. S.S. 9:30 a.m.;

W.S. 10:45 a.m.; Prayer Meeting,Tues. 7 p.m.

UNCHAINED HEARTS

CHRISTIAN COWBOY FELLOWSHIP 3103 W. Alameda John Sturza, 625-0255, 2nd and last Friday

CHURCH

914 W. McGaffey, 317-3354,

Sunday Fellowship 9:30 a.m.,

IGLESIA DE DIOS DE LA PROFECIA 2322 N. Sherman; 505-610-6094 505-507-1254 Ministros Nicolás & Yolanda Limón. Servicio dominical 11 a.m. miércoles y viernes 7 p.m.

CHURCH OF GOD 7TH DAY 1722 N. Kansas, 623-7295, Sat. W.S. 9:45 a.m. THE DOOR 129 E. 3rd St. 575-495-9813; David Solano, Min.; W.S. 10:30 am & 6 pm. Wed. 7 pm

Sunday Service 10:00 a.m

Bible Study 6 p.m Sunday THE UNITED CHURCH OF ROSWELL

417 E. Wildy Corner of Garden & Wildy 910-5845 W.S. 9 am Bob Maples, Pastor

UNITY OF ONE CHURCH

704 E. Mescalero, 622-1185, Seferino Chavez, Min.,

CHURCH ON THE MOVE 901 W. Brasher Rd., 6227011, Troy Smothermon, Min. SS 9 & 10:45am 12:30pm Wed. 7 p.m. GATEWAY 1900 Sycamore Ave., 623-8670, Rick Rapp, Min. W.S. 10:30 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m.

W.S. 10 am,

Bible Study Thurs. 7 p.m. WASHINGTON CHAPEL CHRISTIAN

110 S. Michigan St., 623-3511 Rev. Abukusumo, Min.; S.S. 9:45 a.m.; W.S. 11 a.m.;

GRACE COMMUNITY 935 W. Mescalero, 623-5438 Rick Hale, Min.; W.S. 9 a.m. & 10:45 a.m. H.I.S. HOUSE 300 W. 3rd, Dexter, 734-6873 Ron & Jeri Fuller, Mins. W.S. 10 a.m. Wed.6 p.m.

Wed. 7 p.m.

WAYMAKER

202 S. Sunset, 627-9190 Mike

& Twyla Knowlton, Mins.; W.S. 10 a.m.; J12 (8-12 yr. olds) 4

p.m.; Revolution Youth Service 6 p.m.; Wed. Core Home Groups 7 p.m.

Jones Witt & Ragsdale

Luke W. Ragsdale Roswell (575) 622-1900 Artesia (575) 746-1700 Fax (575) 625-1900 120 N. Garden, Roswell, NM 88203

Attorney at Law

207 North Washington (575)622-6722 Phone Post Office Box 3220 (575)622-6749 Fax Roswell, NM 88202 luke@ragsdalelawfirm.com

FRIDAY NIGHT

101 West Main Street Artesia, New Mexico (575)746-3551 "Serving Your Automotive Needs Since 1925"

ROCK N’ BOWL 10pm-1am $10 person

575-623-8557

DENNIS & PATTY JOHNSON, OWNERS 314 N. Main • Roswell, NM 88201 (575)622-1590 (800)222-1792 Fax (575)623-2307 www.barringersblossomshop.net

John’s

Out of this World Service in Roswell, NM

COMPUTERS & ACCESSORIES • SALES & SERVICE 1703 N. Garden Fax: 624-0147

575-625-9141

oasis@oasis-computers.net www.oasis-computers.net

CARR AUTOMOTIVE, INC. 316 E. McGaffey Roswell, NM 575-622-0909 Emergency Calls 625-9007


A8 Saturday, November 30, 2013

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Partly sunny

Sunday

Partly cloudy

Monday

Partly sunny

Tuesday

Times of clouds and sun

Sunny to partly cloudy

Wednesday

Mild with clouds and sun

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities

Thursday

Showers possible

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Mild with clouds and sun

High 68°

Low 38°

72°/33°

71°/36°

77°/44°

72°/44°

69°/41°

67°/17°

NW at 3-6 mph POP: 0%

NNW at 3-6 mph POP: 0%

VAR at 2-4 mph POP: 0%

SE at 6-12 mph POP: 0%

E at 6-12 mph POP: 0%

E at 6-12 mph POP: 25%

NW at 8-16 mph POP: 30%

W at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 8 p.m. Friday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 58°/29° Normal high/low ............... 59°/29° Record high ............... 80° in 2002 Record low ................... 4° in 1976 Humidity at noon .................. 49%

Farmington 48/25

Clayton 56/31

Raton 52/23

Precipitation 24 hours ending 8 p.m. Fri. .. 0.00" Month to date ....................... 0.45" Normal month to date .......... 0.56" Year to date .......................... 9.00" Normal year to date ........... 12.25"

Santa Fe 50/29

Gallup 51/23

Tucumcari 63/34

Albuquerque 54/36

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Clovis 62/36

Moderate Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading

Ruidoso 59/41

T or C 59/38

Source:Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Sun. The Moon Today Sun. New

Rise 6:43 a.m. 6:44 a.m. Rise 4:02 a.m. 5:07 a.m. First

Dec 2

Dec 9

Full

Dec 17

Set 4:50 p.m. 4:50 p.m. Set 3:10 p.m. 3:59 p.m.

Alamogordo 62/36

Silver City 61/39

ROSWELL 68/38 Carlsbad 69/42

Hobbs 69/42

Las Cruces 60/40

Last

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013

Dec 25

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2So-so; 1-Difficult

JACQUELINE BIGAR ARIES (March 21-April 19)

    Your intuition helps you land on your feet and deal with an unexpected. This situation could involve some travel or encourage a meeting with a YOUR HOROSCOPE very offbeat person. Know that you will have the control you need if you decide to head down that path. Tonight: A must appearance. TAURUS (April 20-May 20)  Others come to you before you even pick up the phone to call them. Try not to get uptight about all the invitations you receive. Something you have wished for could become a reality. Refuse to get caught in a war of wills. Tonight: Talk about your path and get feedback. GEMINI (May 21-June 20)  You might be back to the humdrum of your daily life, as you have so much on your plate that you need to complete. Work with a partner directly, but understand that this person could change direction at the drop of hat. You can’t control this person. Tonight: Watch a movie. CANCER (June 21-July 22)  Your naughtiness

Regional Cities Sun. Today Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

62/36/pc 54/36/pc 44/18/pc 68/44/pc 69/42/pc 46/21/pc 56/31/pc 53/26/pc 62/36/pc 62/37/pc 53/35/pc 48/25/pc 51/23/pc 69/42/pc 60/40/pc 56/28/pc 50/32/pc 57/32/pc 67/42/pc 63/36/pc 51/24/pc 52/23/pc 42/19/pc 68/38/pc 59/41/pc 50/29/pc 61/39/pc 59/38/pc 63/34/pc 51/33/pc

62/36/pc 55/34/pc 45/17/pc 72/38/pc 72/38/pc 43/21/pc 55/32/pc 55/25/pc 62/33/pc 66/31/pc 54/33/pc 50/25/pc 50/19/pc 70/41/pc 63/36/pc 53/30/pc 50/32/pc 57/31/pc 69/40/pc 64/33/pc 50/22/pc 53/23/s 42/17/pc 72/33/pc 61/39/pc 50/28/pc 62/37/pc 61/39/pc 62/34/pc 52/30/pc

14/4/s 50/38/pc 43/30/pc 33/30/pc 47/30/pc 43/28/pc 38/31/pc 61/50/pc 56/28/pc 38/30/pc 66/46/pc 83/72/sh 66/48/pc 44/28/pc 50/27/pc 63/47/s 76/55/pc 64/38/pc

20/5/s 55/42/pc 48/32/pc 46/37/c 51/37/pc 38/25/pc 40/33/c 66/47/c 58/33/s 40/29/c 68/40/pc 81/69/t 69/57/c 44/29/c 48/31/pc 64/49/s 82/57/s 65/35/pc

Today Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

Sun.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

80/68/pc 65/42/pc 38/21/pc 64/48/pc 38/36/pc 44/22/s 78/61/pc 42/34/pc 73/54/pc 41/28/pc 49/45/r 47/30/pc 52/34/pc 50/33/pc 71/56/pc 52/48/r 72/50/pc 42/32/pc

80/66/pc 67/40/s 33/24/c 67/51/pc 47/38/sh 44/26/s 80/62/pc 46/35/pc 75/54/pc 42/34/c 53/45/r 51/35/pc 49/32/c 50/36/s 74/55/pc 53/41/r 73/50/pc 48/34/pc

(For the 48 contiguous states)

State Extremes

High: 79° .... West Palm Beach, Fla. Low: -12° ................ Alamosa, Colo.

High: 66° ........................Tucumcari Low: 2° ........................... Angel Fire

National Cities

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Fronts Cold

-10s

Warm

-0s

Precipitation Stationary

0s

10s

20s

Showers T-storms

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

Ice

90s 100s 110s

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)  Be discreet, especially if something bothers you. Choose to be an observer and gather more information. You might not be prepared to make a change or walk in a new direction just yet. Use caution with your spending. Tonight: Get some extra R and R. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)  Zero in on what you want. You might not feel as if your desires can be realized. Think positively so that you don’t jinx yourself. You might not realize just how many friends you have supporting you. Tonight: Where the gang is. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)  Listen and be more direct when dealing with an older friend who always wants to have it his or her way. When you are too busy to hang out, this person tends to throw tantrums. The time has come to clear the air. Remember to honor your needs first. Tonight: Till the wee hours. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)  You still might be trying to detach and understand a recent development in a relationship. Try imagining that you are the other party, and let go of your own inner chatter. You might need to set a stronger boundary between you and this person. Tonight: Try a new music spot.

seems to be contagious. News from a distance might persuade you to hop the next plane. You could find it difficult to change gears as quickly as you might want. A partner or dear friend might not see the situation as you do. Tonight: Let your hair down. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)  Realize that you might need a day off from the intense holiday pace that is starting to build. Lounging at home seems like a good day. You might need to handle a personal issue. Some of you might decide to take a stab at the holiday frivolity. Tonight: Order in. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)  Take news with a grain of salt, especially if it comes to you from a child or loved one. This person might have heard only what he or she wanted to. You could be surprised by the whole story, once it become readily available to you. Tonight: Partake in some eggnog with friends. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)  No one would say anything if you took off and indulged yourself instead of everyone else. Lose any feeling of guilt, and enjoy yourself. Meet a family member or friend for a late lunch. Do not orchestrate the whole day, just go with the flow. Tonight: Swap news with a friend. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)  Wherever you are, you shine. It is obvious that you are filled with confidence and are making excellent choices. Call home or check in with an older relative or parent. You might opt to adjust plans after having this conversation. Tonight: Do what pleases you.

Glover was run over by a personal watercraft on Lake Lanier, northeast of Atlanta. The 11-year-old boy died two weeks after being critically injured from the accident. Raymond says Usher will not attend the event because he’s out of the country filming the movie “Hands of Stone.” The Grammy-winning singer is playing the role of Sugar Ray Leonard in a film based on boxing great Roberto Duran.

Sun. Hi/Lo/W

U.S. Extremes

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

Usher’s ex-wife holds 5K run to honor son who died

ATLANTA (AP) — It’s been more than a year since the son of Usher’s ex-wife Tameka Raymond died in a boating accident on a Georgia lake. Raymond is working to keep the memory of son Kile Glover alive, honoring him with the first Give Thanks 5K run/walk Saturday morning in Atlanta. She is raising money for the Kile’s World Foundation’s art initiatives and upcoming camps.

Today Hi/Lo/W

Friday

BORN TODAY Former prime minister of Great Britain (1874), author Mark Twain (1835), TV/radio personality Dick Clark (1929)

Fo r Yo u r C o n ve n ie n c e

Be e r, Wi ne , & L iq u o r

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Goddard 35, Los Lunas 28

PREP FOOTBALL SCOREBOARD

SPORTS

B

Rockets survive rally, beat Tigers Saturday, November 30, 2013 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 304

Section

Roswell Daily Record

E-mail: sports@rdrnews.com

KEVIN J. KELLER RECORD SPORTS EDITOR

In last year’s state championship game, Cody Fr ench stepped in at quarterback late in the fourth quarter and led his team on a game-winning drive to beat Los Lunas. When the two teams met again on Friday in the state semifinals, Goddard coach Sam Jernigan again tasked French with calling the signals in what had become a tight game. And French again came thr ough for his team, leading two crucial drives down the stretch in the Rockets’ 35-28 win over the T igers at the Wool Bowl. “It was much like last year,” French said, “that’s why I told the kids in the huddle, ‘Remember, this is exactly what last year felt like, so why fail. Let’s make it happen again.’” And they made it happen thanks to their vaunted ground attack. When the Rockets (9-2) took over with 3:21 left in the game sitting on a 35-

Shawn Naranjo Photos

Goddard’s Cody French (10) looks for running room while Kelsay Cunningham, second from right, throws a block during the Rockets’ semifinal win over Los Lunas, Friday. 28 lead, that ground game went to work. They forced Los Lunas to use its final two timeouts after the drive’s first two plays and faced a third-and-1 at their own 42. French took the shotgun snap and plowed through

the middle of the offensive line for a 3-yard gain for a crucial conversion. French and Kelsey Cunningham combined for five more runs and one more first down after that to salt away the clock. “I just think Cody is a little bit faster and able to

LSU holds off Razorbacks 31-27

Goddard’s Kelsey Cunningham races down the sideline on a 75-yard reception, Friday.

BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Backup quarterback Anthony Jennings closed out LSU’s regular season by giving Tigers fans a big dose of hope for the future. The freshman replaced an injured Zach Mettenberger in the fourth quarter and lofted a 49-yard touchdown pass to Travin Dural with 1:15 left as No. 15 LSU pulled out a tense 31-27 victory over upset-minded Arkansas on Friday. Jennings entered the game after Mettenberger hurt his left leg in the fourth quarter, and the game came down to whether Jennings could drive the Tigers 99 yards in the final 3 minutes. He responded with a pair of clutch firstdown passes and a 21-yard scramble to set up his winning scoring strike that kept

get to the edge a little bit,” Jer nigan said about the switch to French at quarterback. “I thought (Los Lunas) was keying on him — at tailback that’s one thing, but when he goes to

NMMI wins 7th straight

See GHS, Page B3

The NMMI men’s basketball team won its seventh straight game on Friday by downing Trinidad State 97-63 at the Bronco Classic. Through the early portion of the first half, it was a see-saw affair, as the lead changed hands six times. NMMI took the lead for good on Dane Williams’ triple. By the end of the first half, NMMI had a 12-point lead and it never got close in the second half as the Broncos outscored Trinidad by 22 in the final 20 minutes. Sophomore Marcus Roper paced the Bronco offense with 25 points. Joseph Biron (22), Tariq Carey (15) and Dane Williams (10) also scored in double figures for NMMI (8-2). Weston Zeller led NMMI with nine rebounds, while Williams topped the Broncos with five assists.

See LSU, Page B3

AP Photo

RIGHT: LSU’s Anthony Jennings (10) throws a pass as Arkansas’ Trey Flowers rushes during their game, Friday.

Smart has 17, OSU No. 4 Arizona beats No. 6 Duke 72-66 beats Butler 69-67 LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. (AP) — Oklahoma State won for the second straight day after blowing a comfortable lead. Marcus Smart scored 17 points as the No. 5 Cowboys survived a major scare in a 69-67 win over Butler in an Old Spice Classic semifinal on Friday. “A great game,” Oklahoma State coach Travis Ford said. “It was very emotional and very high-level. It felt like an NCAA tournament-type game. Two teams that were wanting to win really badly.” Oklahoma State (7-0) again came out flat to start the second half, one day after the Cowboys saw a 23point halftime lead dwindle to four with 3 minutes to play before beating Purdue 97-87. “We’re not paying attention to details as much as we are in the first half,” Ford said. With the Cowboys holding a 68-67 lead in the final minute, Smart missed three free throws, including the front end of a 1-and-1. Butler’s Khyle Marshall was fouled with 8.4 seconds remaining, but missed both free throws. “It’s always tough to lose,” Butler coach Brandon Miller said. “When you lose, and it’s a one-point game or a two-point game, sometimes you can beat See OSU, Page B3

LOCAL SCHEDULE — SATURDAY, NOV. 30 — NMMI Bronco Classic At Cahoon Armory • Howard at Trinidad St., 2 p.m. • Eastern Arizona at NMMI, 4 p.m. MEN’S BASKETBALL

NMAA Class 2A semifinal • Hatch Valley at Dexter, 1 p.m. PREP FOOTBALL

NEW YORK (AP) — Nick Johnson scored all but two of his 15 points in the second half and No. 4 Arizona beat No. 6 Duke 72-66 on Friday night in the championship game of the NIT Season Tip-Off. The game was expected to be a matchup of two of the best freshmen in the country and, although Aaron Gordon of Arizona and Jabari Parker of Duke didn’t spend a lot of time covering each other, they were both key factors in the outcome. Gordon, the quiet forward, finished with 10 points and seven rebounds and came up big late with a dunk on an alley-oop pass and then fed Rondae Hollis-Jefferson for a dunk less than a minute later to give the Wildcats (7-0) a 61-51 lead with 3:59 to play. Parker, who had 19 points for his first game with fewer than 20 points this season,

struggled against Arizona’s physical defense and was 7 of 21 from the field. He came into the game shooting 60 percent from the field. The victory gave Arizona its fourth NIT Season Tip-Off title, tying Duke for the most ever. Johnson, the Wildcats’ leading scorer at 17.3 per game, shook off a quiet first half to become the focal point of Arizona’s offense. His 3-pointer with 11:07 to play tied the game at 45. He hit another 3 with 6:22 left to give Arizona a 57-48 lead. He was chosen the tournament MVP. The Wildcats, who finished with a 36-28 rebound advantage, had five players in double figures. AP Photo

RIGHT: Arizona's Rondae Hollis-Jefferson, right, drives against Duke's Josh Hairston during their game, Friday.

SPOTLIGHT 1941 — The Chicago Bears score 49 points in the second half to beat the Philadelphia Eagles 4913. 1979 — Sugar Ray Leonard wins the WBC welterweight title with 15th-round knockout of Wilfred Benitez in Las Vegas. 1987 — Bo Jackson, also an outfielder for the Kansas City Royals, rushes for 221 yards to lead the Los Angeles Raiders to a 37-14 rout of the

ON

SPORTS

ON THIS DAY IN ... Seattle Seahawks. 1991 — San Diego State’s Marshall Faulk becomes the first freshman to capture the national rushing and scoring titles after gaining 154 yards on 27 carries in a 39-12 loss to top-ranked Miami. Faulk finishes the season with 1,429 yards in nine games for a 158.7-yard rushing average. 2006 — Kobe Bryant scores 30 of his 52 points in the third quarter to lead Los Angeles to a 132-

102 victory over Utah. 2008 — Keith Tkachuk reaches 1,000 career points with the tying goal late in the second period in St. Louis’ 4-2 victory over Atlanta. 2008 — Oakland has only one catch by a wide receiver in its 20-13 loss to the Kansas City Chiefs, and that officially was for 0 yards by Ronald Curry on a hook-and-lateral play.


San Jose State stuns No. 16 Fresno State B2 Saturday, November 30, 2013

SPORTS

SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) — Derek Carr finally ran into a quarterback who could match his prolific production. That’s all it took to end Fresno State’s bid for a BCS bowl. David Fales threw for a schoolrecord 547 yards and six touchdowns in an entertaining showdown with Carr and San Jose State spoiled the 16th-ranked Bulldogs perfect season with a 62-52 victory Friday. “It’s hard,” Carr said. “Guys are torn up, as well they should be. If you like losing there’s something wrong with you.” Fales was every bit as good as the more heralded Carr, matching his six first-half touchdown passes in a near perfect performance that made the Spartans (6-6, 4-4 Mountain West) bowl eligible with their first win over a ranked opponent since 2000. Carr threw for 519 yards and six touchdowns, but also had a fourthquarter interception for the Bulldogs (10-1, 7-1). Davante Adams caught 13 passes for 264 yards and three scores. The loss ended Fresno State’s chances to beat out Northern Illinois for a spot in a prestigious BCS game. The Huskies are the only undefeated team from a non-automatic qualifying conference. “We wanted it bad,” Carr said. “If you don’t want do your very best, to play in a BCS bowl game then you shouldn’t be playing college football. That’s what you want to do but it’s so hard to do.” The Bulldogs will still play in the Mountain West title game next week against either Utah State or Boise State but had their chances

Prep football

Golf

Emirates Australian Open Scores By The Associated Press Friday At Royal Sydney Golf Club Sydney Purse: $1.15 million Yardage: 6,939; Par: 72 a-amateur Second Round Adam Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . .62-70 — Rory McIlroy . . . . . . . . . . . .69-65 — Richard Green . . . . . . . . . . .69-66 — Matthew Jones . . . . . . . . . .68-68 — Leigh McKechnie . . . . . . . . .73-65 — Alistair Presnell . . . . . . . . . .67-71 — Josh Younger . . . . . . . . . . . .69-69 — a-Brady Watt . . . . . . . . . . . .68-70 — Aron Price . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-69 — Max McCardle . . . . . . . . . . .68-71 — Scott Arnold . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-70 — Jamie Arnold . . . . . . . . . . . .72-68 — Ryan Yip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65-75 — Bryden MacPherson . . . . . .71-70 — John Senden . . . . . . . . . . .73-68 — Geoff Ogilvy . . . . . . . . . . . .75-66 — Rhein Gibson . . . . . . . . . . .71-70 — Nathan Holman . . . . . . . . . .69-72 — Aaron Baddeley . . . . . . . . .67-74 — Adam Bland . . . . . . . . . . . .69-72 — Jason Scrivener . . . . . . . . . .67-74 — Cameron Percy, . . . . . . . . . .71-70 — David McKenzie . . . . . . . . . .66-75 — James Nitties . . . . . . . . . . . .70-71 — Nick O’Hern . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-72 — Stuart Appleby . . . . . . . . . . .75-67 — Tom Bond . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69-73 — Steven Bowditch . . . . . . . . .68-74 — Ashley Hall . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-71 — Anthony Brown . . . . . . . . . .68-74 — Michael Long . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71 — Peter Lonard . . . . . . . . . . . .72-71 — Mahal Pearce . . . . . . . . . . .72-71 — Rod Pampling . . . . . . . . . . .75-68 — Jason Norris . . . . . . . . . . . .67-76 — Mathew Goggin . . . . . . . . . .70-73 — Ryan Haller . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-69 — Matthew Millar . . . . . . . . . . .70-73 — Kalem Richardson . . . . . . . .69-74 — Timothy Wood . . . . . . . . . . .73-70 — Scott Strange . . . . . . . . . . . .71-73 — Chan Shih-chang . . . . . . . . .76-68 — Adam Crawford . . . . . . . . . .71-73 — Marcus Cain . . . . . . . . . . . .71-73 — a-Ryan Ruffels . . . . . . . . . . .77-67 — Anthony Summers . . . . . . . .74-70 — Tim Wilkinson . . . . . . . . . . .73-71 — Leigh Deagan . . . . . . . . . . .71-73 — Choi Joon-woo . . . . . . . . . . .72-72 — Steven Jeffress . . . . . . . . . .75-69 — John Young Kim . . . . . . . . .65-79 — Jason Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-74 — Stephen Allan . . . . . . . . . . .75-70 — Matthew Griffin . . . . . . . . . .73-72 — Mark Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-70 — Ryan Lynch . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-72 — Steven Jones . . . . . . . . . . . .68-77 — Paul Spargo . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-71 — Lucas Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-75 — Wang Minghao . . . . . . . . . . .75-70 — Robert Allenby . . . . . . . . . . .72-73 —

TV SPORTSWATCH

at a big bowl payoff done in by a porous defense. “When your offense scores 40, 50 points you should never lose a game,” safety Derron Smith said. “I feel like the defense didn’t do a good enough job and let the team down.” Fales had his pick of targets with freshman Tyler Winston catching 10 passes for 164 yards and a score, Kyle Nunn having 10 for 160 yards and two touchdowns and

132 134 135 136 138 138 138 138 139 139 140 140 140 141 141 141 141 141 141 141 141 141 141 141 142 142 142 142 142 142 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 143 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 144 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Saturday, Nov. 30 BOXING 8:15 p.m. HBO — Champion Sergey Kovalev (22-0-1) vs. Ismayl Sillakh (21-1-0), for WBO light heavyweight title; champion Adonis Stevenson (22-1-0) vs. Tony Bellew (20-1-0) for WBC light heavyweight title, at Quebec City COLLEGE FOOTBALL 10 a.m. ABC — National coverage, Ohio St. at Michigan ESPN — Florida St. at Florida ESPN2 — Duke at North Carolina ESPNEWS — Temple at Memphis FS1 — Kansas St. at Kansas 12:30 p.m. FSN — North Texas at Tulsa NBC — FCS, Southern U. vs. Grambling St., at New Orleans

Missed cut Brad Shilton . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-72 Daniel Fox . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-72 Andrew Martin . . . . . . . . . . .77-69 Neven Basic . . . . . . . . . . . .70-76 Craig Parry . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-74 James McLean . . . . . . . . . .70-76 Rika Batibasaga . . . . . . . . .72-74 a-Cameron Davis . . . . . . . . .76-70 Scott Gardiner . . . . . . . . . . .75-71 Gareth Paddison . . . . . . . . .72-74 Terry Pilkadaris . . . . . . . . . .74-72 a-Zac Stolz . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-73 Kim Woo-hyun . . . . . . . . . . .73-73 Peter Cooke . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-74 Annop Tang’prasert . . . . . . .71-76 Tze Huang Choo . . . . . . . . .73-74 Marcus Fraser . . . . . . . . . . .75-72 Bronson La’Cassie . . . . . . .74-73 Kieran Pratt . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-72 David Bransdon . . . . . . . . . .71-76 Lee Jun-seok . . . . . . . . . . . .74-73 Aaron Pike . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-73 Kim Shi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71-76 Scott Laycock . . . . . . . . . . .68-79 Josh Geary . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-74 Peter O’Malley . . . . . . . . . . .73-74 Stephen Dartnall . . . . . . . . .73-74 Ryan Fox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-74 Bradley Lamb . . . . . . . . . . .73-74 Varut Chomchalum . . . . . . .71-76 David Klein . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-73 Thomas Petersson . . . . . . .76-72 Matthew Stieger . . . . . . . . . .81-67 Martin Dive . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-74 Michael Wright . . . . . . . . . . .71-77 Grant Thomas . . . . . . . . . . .77-71 Zhang Xinjun . . . . . . . . . . . .74-74 Brendan Smith . . . . . . . . . . .74-74 Stephen Leaney . . . . . . . . .73-75 Christopher Campbell . . . . .77-71 Jin Daxing . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-75 Rory Bourke . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-72 Clint Rice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72-76 Peter Wilson . . . . . . . . . . . .76-73 Cameron Smith . . . . . . . . . .75-74 Craig Hancock . . . . . . . . . . .76-73 Andre Stolz . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-76 Jeong Jin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73-76 Dimitrios Papadatos . . . . . .75-74 Troy Cox . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-73 Michael Moore . . . . . . . . . . .75-74 Son Joon-eob . . . . . . . . . . .73-76 Peter Fowler . . . . . . . . . . . .76-74 Eric Mina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-75 Rohan Blizard . . . . . . . . . . .71-79 Greg Chalmers . . . . . . . . . .78-73 Cao Yi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77-74 Andrew Tschudin . . . . . . . . .76-75 Andrew Kelly . . . . . . . . . . . .77-74 a-Dou Zecheng . . . . . . . . . .73-78 Park Hyo-won . . . . . . . . . . .72-79 Daniel Popovic . . . . . . . . . . .77-74 Liu Yuxiang . . . . . . . . . . . . .70-81 Brody Ninyette . . . . . . . . . . .77-75 Richard T. Lee . . . . . . . . . . .73-79 Kristopher Mueck . . . . . . . . .76-76 Matthew Giles . . . . . . . . . . .80-72 John Wade . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75-77 Matthew Ballard . . . . . . . . . .78-74 Li Xinyang . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-76 Toby Wilcox . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-76 Kim Geon-ha . . . . . . . . . . . .76-76 Garrett Sapp . . . . . . . . . . . .75-77 Wisut Artjanawat . . . . . . . . .75-78 Huang Wen-yi . . . . . . . . . . .78-76 Aaron Townsend . . . . . . . . .78-76 Pasavee Lertvilai . . . . . . . . .74-80 Ouyang Zheng . . . . . . . . . . .82-72 Richard Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . .76-78 Peter Senior . . . . . . . . . . . . .74-81 He Zeyu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78-77

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 149 149 149 149 149 149 149 149 149 150 150 150 151 151 151 151 151 151 151 151 152 152 152 152 152 152 152 152 152 152 153 154 154 154 154 154 155 155

1:30 p.m. ABC — Georgia at Georgia Tech CBS — National coverage, Alabama at Auburn ESPN — Penn St. at Wisconsin ESPN2 — Baylor at TCU 2 p.m. FS1 — Iowa St. at West Virginia 5 p.m. ESPN2 — Clemson at South Carolina FOX — Notre Dame at Stanford 5:45 p.m. ESPN — Texas A&M at Missouri 6:07 p.m. ABC — UCLA at Southern Cal 8:15 p.m. ESPN2 — New Mexico at Boise St. GOLF 3:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Alfred Dunhill Championship, third round, at Mpumalanga, South Africa MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 10 a.m. FSN — Lipscomb at Georgetown Noon

Chandler Jones finishing with eight for 146 yards and three TDs. “Our receivers were making good plays,” Fales said. “Playing an offense like that, field goals weren’t going to win the game. We needed touchdowns.” That entertaining performance has the Spartans hopeful of making a bowl game in consecutive seasons for the first time since 1986-87. The Mountain West has six bowl slots but could have eight

eligible teams if Colorado State and Wyoming win Saturday. After a back-and-forth first half that ended with San Jose State on top 42-41, Spartans coach Ron Caragher made a bold move to open the second half with a surprise onside kick. Kicker Harrison Waid chased down the slow roller and recovered it even though Fresno State’s warned the players about the possibility. The Spartans turned that extra possession into a

SCOREBOARD

NBA

National Basketball Association At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .6 9 .400 Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .7 11 .389 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .6 11 .353 Brooklyn . . . . . . . . . . .4 12 .250 New York . . . . . . . . . .3 12 .200 Southeast Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 3 .813 Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .9 8 .529 Charlotte . . . . . . . . . . .8 9 .471 Washington . . . . . . . . .7 9 .438 Orlando . . . . . . . . . . . .6 10 .375 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . .15 1 .938 Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .7 7 .500 Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 10 .375 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .4 12 .250 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . . .2 13 .133 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L San Antonio . . . . . . . .14 2 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .12 5 Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 7 Memphis . . . . . . . . . . .8 7 New Orleans . . . . . . . .7 8 Northwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Portland . . . . . . . . . . .13 3 Oklahoma City . . . . . .11 3 Denver . . . . . . . . . . . .9 6 Minnesota . . . . . . . . . .8 9 Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 15 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L L.A. Clippers . . . . . . .11 5 Phoenix . . . . . . . . . . . .9 7 L.A. Lakers . . . . . . . . .9 8 Golden State . . . . . . .9 8 Sacramento . . . . . . . .4 9

Pct .875 .706 .588 .533 .467

Philadelphia at Detroit, 1:30 p.m. Golden State at Sacramento, 4 p.m. Charlotte at Miami, 4 p.m. Minnesota at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. New Orleans at New York, 5:30 p.m. Portland at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m.

GB — 1⁄2 1 2 1⁄2 3

GB — 4 1⁄2 1 5 ⁄2 6 7

GB — 7 9 11 12 1⁄2

GB — 2 1⁄2 1 4 ⁄2 5 1⁄2 6 1⁄2

Pct GB .813 — .786 1 .600 3 1⁄2 1 .471 5 ⁄2 .118 11 1⁄2

Pct GB .688 — .563 2 .529 2 1⁄2 .529 2 1⁄2 .308 5 1⁄2

Thursday’s Games No games scheduled Friday’s Games San Antonio 109, Orlando 91 Charlotte 92, Milwaukee 76 Miami 90, Toronto 83 Boston 103, Cleveland 86 Atlanta 88, Dallas 87 L.A. Lakers 106, Detroit 102 Houston 114, Brooklyn 95 Oklahoma City 113, Golden State 112, OT New Orleans 121, Philadelphia 105 Indiana 93, Washington 73 Denver 97, New York 95 Phoenix 112, Utah 101 L.A. Clippers at Sacramento, 8 p.m. Saturday’s Games Atlanta at Washington, 5 p.m. Chicago at Cleveland, 5:30 p.m. Brooklyn at Memphis, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. Houston at San Antonio, 6:30 p.m. Utah at Phoenix, 7 p.m. Boston at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. Sunday’s Games Denver at Toronto, 11 a.m. Indiana at L.A. Clippers, 1:30 p.m.

NBCSN — Barclays Center Classic, doubleheader, third place game and championship, teams TBD, at Brooklyn, N.Y. 5 p.m. NBCSN — Battle 4 Atlantis, thirdplace game, teams TBD, at Paradise Island, Bahamas 7:30 p.m. NBCSN — Battle 4 Atlantis, championship, teams TBD, at Paradise Island, Bahamas NBA BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m. WGN — Chicago at Cleveland SOCCER 7:55 a.m. NBCSN — Premier League, Cardiff City vs. Arsenal 10:30 a.m. NBC — Premier League, West Bromwich at Newcastle WINTER SPORTS 10:30 a.m. NBCSN — USSA, Raptor World Cup, women’s super G, at Avon, Colo.

7-yard touchdown run by Thomas Tucker. “The way things were going, it becomes a matter of possessions with two offenses that were constantly scoring,” coach Ron Caragher said. “It was executed to perfection. A huge thing to gain this extra possession.” The teams then traded field goals, and then Fales drove the Spartans to their eighth touchdown on his 1-yard keeper that made it 59-44. Keith Smith helped seal the win with a leaping interception, ending Carr’s streak of 305 straight passes without throwing a pick. That set up a second field goal by Austin Lopez that made it 62-44 and led to chants of “Over-rated! Over-rated!” from the crowd. “Put the blame on me for the offense,” Carr said. “You guys want to praise me when it’s good — Heisman this and all this. Blame me for the loss. I need to do a better job to help my team win.” The tone for the game was set immediately. Fales set the school record for career completions on the fourth play when he found Winston for a 33-yard gain. Two plays later, Nunn leaped over Curtis Riley to come down with a 31yard score. Carr took two plays to match that score, connecting on a 46-yard deep ball to Adams on the first play followed by a 27-yard touchdown to Josh Harper, who left the game with an injured left leg after an impressive one-handed grab in the end zone.

AP Photo

San Jose State players celebrate with fans after their victory against Fresno State, Friday.

a-Anthony Murdaca . . . . . . .71-74 — 145 Matthew Guyatt . . . . . . . . . .71-74 — 145 Michael Choi . . . . . . . . . . . .70-75 — 145

Friday’s Scores By The Associated Press PREP FOOTBALL Semifinal Class 4A Goddard 35, Los Lunas 28 Class 3A Silver 41, Ruidoso 28 Class 2A Clayton 16, Santa Rosa 8

Roswell Daily Record

Morris leads Suns past Jazz

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Markieff Morris score 23 points on 8-of-13 shooting off the bench, and Goran Dragic added 19 points and nine assists to lead the hot-shooting Phoenix Suns to a 112-101 victory over the Utah Jazz on Friday night. Eric Bledsoe also scored 19 points off the bench and Miles Plumlee chipped in 15 points and 10 rebounds for the Suns, who beat the Jazz for the second time this month. Phoenix had no trouble getting into an offensive rhythm early, shooting 41-of-75 (54.7 percent) from the field. It kept Utah at a comfortable distance for much of the game despite a strong offensive outing for the Jazz. Marvin Williams had 18 points and Alec Burks added 16 off the bench to lead Utah, who lost despite shooting 40-of-83 (48.2 percent) from the field.

Westbrook’s 3-pointer beats Warriors in OT

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Russell Westbrook’s 3-pointer with 0.1 seconds left in overtime sent the Oklahoma City Thunder to a 113-112 victory over the Golden State Warriors on Friday night. The Thunder had plenty of chances to tie or take the lead in the final seconds but kept coming up empty — but getting more chances — before Westbrook drained the corner 3-pointer just before the buzzer. Westbrook scored a season-high 34 points on 10-of-25 shooting, Kevin Durant added 25 and the Thunder won their sixth consecutive game overall and ninth straight at home to start the season. Stephen Curry scored 32 for Golden State and Harrison Barnes had a careerhigh 26 points. Durant had a chance to win it in regulation but missed a fadeaway jumper just before the buzzer.

Holiday powers Pelicans in return to Philadelphia

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Jrue Holiday had 20 points and 13 assists in his first game as a visiting player against his former team, leading the New Orleans Pelicans to a 121-105 victory over the Philadelphia 76ers on Friday night. Eric Gordon scored 26 points and Holiday added seven rebounds as the Pelicans (7-8) snapped a four-game road skid. Holiday, an All-Star last season for the Sixers, was sent to New Orleans in a summer trade that netted Philadelphia No. 6 overall pick Nerlens Noel and a future firstrounder. Tony Wroten scored 24 points on 9-for13 shooting off the bench, and Spencer Hawes contributed 12 points and nine boards for Philadelphia. Wroten (lower back) and Hawes (knee) both played for the first time in three games, but the 76ers lost for the ninth time in their last 11.

George leads Pacers past Wizards 93-73

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Paul George scored 23 points and Roy Hibbert added 13 and eight rebounds to lead the surging Indiana Pacers past the injury hampered Washington Wizards 93-73 on Friday night. The Pacers won their sixth straight and extended their best start in franchise history to 15-1. Lance Stephenson flirted with his third triple-double before departing late and had seven points, 11 rebounds and 10 assists for Indiana, which shot 44 percent and forced 18 turnovers while limiting Washington to 40 percent shooting. The Wizards (7-9) trailed by as many as 25 in the fourth quarter and lost their 11th straight game in Indianapolis. Star point guard John Wall struggled badly, rarely attacked the rim and finished with eight points on 4-of-14 shooting.

Houston gets 4th straight win, 114-95 over Nets

HOUSTON (AP) — Chandler Parsons scored 21 points, making six 3-pointers, and the Houston Rockets picked up their fourth straight win, rolling to an easy 114-95 victory over the Brooklyn Nets on Friday night. The Rockets led by 26 points at halftime and Brooklyn coach Jason Kidd benched all his starters except Brook Lopez for the entire second half. Houston made 19 3-pointers, led by a perfect 6-of-6 effort from Parsons, who

scored all his points in the first three quarters. James Harden scored nine points with seven assists for the Rockets in his return after missing three games with a sore left foot. Lopez was also back after sitting out the last six games with a sprained left ankle. He started in place of Kevin Garnett and scored 16 points in about 21 minutes.

NFL

National Football League At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain AMERICAN CONFERENCE East . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct New England . . .8 3 0 .727 N.Y. Jets . . . . . . .5 6 0 .455 Miami . . . . . . . . .5 6 0 .455 Buffalo . . . . . . . . .4 7 0 .364 South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Indianapolis . . . . .7 4 0 .636 Tennessee . . . . .5 6 0 .455 Jacksonville . . . .2 9 0 .182 Houston . . . . . . .2 9 0 .182 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Cincinnati . . . . . .7 4 0 .636 Baltimore . . . . . . .6 6 0 .500 Pittsburgh . . . . . .5 7 0 .417 Cleveland . . . . . .4 7 0 .364 West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct Denver . . . . . . . .9 2 0 .818 Kansas City . . . .9 2 0 .818 San Diego . . . . . .5 6 0 .455 Oakland . . . . . . .4 8 0 .333

PF 429 270 269 237

PA 289 179 260 300

Pct .583 .545 .364 .273

PF 329 276 213 252

PA 303 260 280 338

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Dallas . . . . . . . . .7 5 0 Philadelphia . . . .6 5 0 N.Y. Giants . . . . .4 7 0 Washington . . . . .3 8 0 South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T New Orleans . . . .9 2 0 Carolina . . . . . . .8 3 0 Tampa Bay . . . . .3 8 0 Atlanta . . . . . . . . .2 9 0 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Detroit . . . . . . . . .7 5 0 Chicago . . . . . . . .6 5 0 Green Bay . . . . .5 6 1 Minnesota . . . . . .2 8 1 West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Seattle . . . . . . . .10 1 0 San Francisco . . .7 4 0 Arizona . . . . . . . .7 4 0 St. Louis . . . . . . .5 6 0

Pct .818 .727 .273 .182

Pct .583 .545 .458 .227

Pct .909 .636 .636 .455

PF 288 186 229 236

PF 263 250 142 199

PF 275 249 263 203

PF 305 258 211 227

PF 326 303 294 266

PF 306 274 254 266

PA 230 287 245 273

PA 260 245 324 289

PA 206 235 278 265

PA 196 151 258 309

PA 287 309 305 346

PA 179 184 223 255

Thursday’s Games Detroit 40, Green Bay 10 Dallas 31, Oakland 24 Baltimore 22, Pittsburgh 20 Sunday’s Games Chicago at Minnesota, 11 a.m. New England at Houston, 11 a.m. Tennessee at Indianapolis, 11 a.m. Jacksonville at Cleveland, 11 a.m. Tampa Bay at Carolina, 11 a.m. Arizona at Philadelphia, 11 a.m. Miami at N.Y. Jets, 11 a.m. St. Louis at San Francisco, 2:05 p.m. Atlanta vs. Buffalo at Toronto, 2:05 p.m. Cincinnati at San Diego, 2:25 p.m. Denver at Kansas City, 2:25 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Washington, 6:30 p.m. Monday’s Game New Orleans at Seattle, 6:40 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 5 Houston at Jacksonville, 6:25 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 8 Atlanta at Green Bay, 11 a.m. Minnesota at Baltimore, 11 a.m. Kansas City at Washington, 11 a.m. Buffalo at Tampa Bay, 11 a.m. Miami at Pittsburgh, 11 a.m. Detroit at Philadelphia, 11 a.m. Indianapolis at Cincinnati, 11 a.m. Cleveland at New England, 11 a.m. Oakland at N.Y. Jets, 11 a.m. Tennessee at Denver, 2:05 p.m. Seattle at San Francisco, 2:25 p.m. N.Y. Giants at San Diego, 2:25 p.m. St. Louis at Arizona, 2:25 p.m. Carolina at New Orleans, 6:30 p.m. Monday, Dec. 9 Dallas at Chicago, 6:40 p.m.

NHL

National Hockey League At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Boston . . . . .26 17 7 2 Tampa Bay . .26 16 9 1 Detroit . . . . .27 13 7 7 Montreal . . . .26 14 9 3 Toronto . . . . .26 14 9 3 Ottawa . . . . .26 10 12 4 Florida . . . . .26 7 14 5

Pts 36 33 33 31 31 24 19

GFGA 72 54 76 66 74 71 69 55 73 69 76 86 58 86

Buffalo . . . . .27 6 20 1 13 48 84 Metropolitan Division . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Pts GFGA Pittsburgh . . .27 17 9 1 35 81 63 Washington .26 13 11 2 28 79 76 N.Y. Rangers 26 13 13 0 26 55 64 New Jersey .26 10 11 5 25 58 64 Carolina . . . .26 10 11 5 25 55 75 Philadelphia .25 11 12 2 24 54 61 Columbus . . .26 10 13 3 23 66 77 N.Y. Islanders26 8 15 3 19 70 90

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Pts GFGA Chicago . . . .27 19 4 4 42 97 74 St. Louis . . . .25 18 4 3 39 89 57 Colorado . . .24 18 6 0 36 73 50 Minnesota . .27 15 8 4 34 66 64 Nashville . . .26 13 11 2 28 60 72 Winnipeg . . .28 12 12 4 28 73 80 Dallas . . . . . .24 12 9 3 27 68 70 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Pts GFGA San Jose . . .25 17 3 5 39 88 57 Anaheim . . . .28 18 7 3 39 88 73 Los Angeles .26 16 6 4 36 69 56 Phoenix . . . .25 15 6 4 34 83 79 Vancouver . .27 13 9 5 31 72 70 Calgary . . . . .25 8 13 4 20 68 92 Edmonton . . .27 8 17 2 18 70 93 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Thursday’s Games Vancouver 5, Ottawa 2 Edmonton 3, Nashville 0 Friday’s Games Washington 3, Montreal 2, SO Chicago 2, Dallas 1, SO Philadelphia 2, Winnipeg 1 Boston 3, N.Y. Rangers 2 Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 0 Detroit 5, N.Y. Islanders 0 Anaheim 5, Calgary 2 San Jose 6, St. Louis 3 Colorado 3, Minnesota 1 New Jersey 5, Carolina 2 Columbus 4, Edmonton 2 Buffalo 3, Toronto 2, OT Saturday’s Games Vancouver at N.Y. Rangers, noon Columbus at Boston, 5 p.m. Toronto at Montreal, 5 p.m. Pittsburgh at Florida, 5 p.m. Buffalo at New Jersey, 5 p.m. Washington at N.Y. Islanders, 5 p.m. Philadelphia at Nashville, 6 p.m. Chicago at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Colorado, 7 p.m. Calgary at Los Angeles, 8 p.m. Anaheim at San Jose, 8:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Vancouver at Carolina, 11 a.m. Detroit at Ottawa, 3:30 p.m. Edmonton at Dallas, 4 p.m.

Transactions

Friday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB — LHP Ted Lilly announced his retirement. American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Agreed to terms with senior vice president of baseball operatons/general manager Dayton Moore on a two-year contract extension. National League SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Agreed to terms with RHP Ryan Vogelsong on a oneyear contract. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL — Fined Pittsburgh CB William Gay $15,750, New Orleans DE Cam Jordan $10,000 and Detroit DT Ndamukong Suh, N.Y. Jets DT Kenrick Ellis and Chicago G Kyle Long $7,875 for their actions during last week’s games. CHICAGO BEARS — Signed S Sean Cattouse from the practice squad. Released DT Tracy Robertson. WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Signed CB Chase Minnifield from the practice squad. Women’s Indoor Football League PHILADELPHIA FREEZE — Named Mike Ochmanowicz coach and signed him to a three-year contract. HOCKEY National Hockey League COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Returned D Tim Erixon to Springfield (AHL). NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Activated D Anton Volchenkov from injured reserve. NEW YORK RANGERS — Reassigned Fs Michael St. Croix and Josh Nicholls from Hartford (AHL) to Greenville (ECHL). PHOENIX COYOTES — Recalled D Rostislav Klesla from Portland (AHL). Assigned F Chris Brown to Portland. TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS — Recalled F Carter Ashton from Toronto (AHL). American Hockey League HAMILTON BULLDOGS — Signed F Jordan Owens to a 25-game professional tryout contract. Assigned F Ben Duffy to Wheeling (ECHL). ECHL ECHL — Fined Evansville RW Josh Beaulieu and D Matt Krug and Guillaume Lepine and Gwinnett G Louis Domingue.


FINANCIAL/SPORTS

Roswell Daily Record

GHS

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quarterback, that’s a little bit dif ferent key for them.” When Fr ench plowed forwar d for 2 yar ds on the final play, it gave him 144 yards on 29 carries. He also had two rushing scores, a 33-yard receiving score and threw a 51yar d scoring strike to Adam Gomez. And Goddar d needed every one of those TDs. The Rockets ran off the game’s first 28 points and led 28-0 after a timeconsuming 10-play drive to start the second half that ate up 5 1/2 minutes. “That was good, it really was,” Jernigan said. “It gave us a chance to get in control and have a better idea what was going to happen in the second half.” What happened was a

LSU

Tiger run that had Rocket fans fearing the worst. On its first drive of the second half, after the long Rocket drive, Los Lunas — aided by a r oughing the passer penalty on a fourth-and18 — went 69 yards in 13 plays to make it 28-7. The T igers for ced a thr ee-and-out by Goddar d on the next drive and — again aided by a Rocket penalty on a fourth down that kept the drive alive — went 69 yards on nine plays to get within 28-14. The Tigers got another break on Goddard’s next possession when Cameron Neff fumbled at the end of a run. And for the thir d straight drive, Los Lunas went 69 yards to score, drawing to within 28-21 on a Darron Gallegos to Jalen Chavez 9-yar d score. French came in at QB on the next Goddar d

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LSU (9-3, 5-3 Southeastern Conference) alive for a fourth-straight 10-win campaign. Brandon Allen completed two touchdown passes to tight end Hunter Henry, the second giving Arkansas (3-9, 0-8) a 27-21 lead that stood most of the fourth quarter. But Jennings’ heroics extended the Razorbacks’ school-record losing streak to nine games and ensured Arkansas’ first winless record in the SEC since joining the conference in 1992. LSU’s defense sealed up the victory when cornerback Dwayne Thomas sacked and stripped Allen and defensive end Jermauria Rasco recovered in the final minute, allowing Jennings to take a cur-

OSU

Continued from Page B1

yourself up over one mistake here, one mistake there, especially at the end of the game. I think mistakes, or a lack of execution, or a missed shot at the end of the game sometimes gets highlighted more than what it should. “Basketball is a 40-minute game. We didn’t execute very well at the beginning of the

CATTLE/HOGS

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Dec 13 133.40 133.60 133.23 133.47 Feb 14 134.70 134.72 134.10 134.25 Apr 14 134.97 135.12 127.82 134.97 Jun 14 128.95 129.10 128.72 128.92 Aug 14 127.30 127.57 127.20 127.40 129.50 129.80 129.45 129.75 Oct 14 Dec 14 129.95 130.40 129.87 130.35 Feb 15 130.65 130.85 130.52 130.60 Apr 15 131.00 131.50 131.00 131.50 Last spot N/A Est. sales 25514. Wed’s Sales: 49,302 Wed’s open int: 335004, up +3570 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Jan 14 165.55 165.70 165.27 165.47 Mar 14 165.27 165.80 165.27 165.67 Apr 14 166.12 166.55 166.12 166.40 May 14 166.77 167.30 166.77 167.17 Aug 14 167.70 168.05 167.62 167.80 Sep 14 167.00 167.35 167.00 167.10 Oct 14 166.00 166.92 166.00 166.40 Nov 14 166.00 166.00 165.40 165.40 Last spot N/A Est. sales 3735. Wed’s Sales: 6,014 Wed’s open int: 37012, up +845 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. 85.65 85.72 85.10 85.67 Dec 13 90.47 90.75 82.45 90.57 Feb 14 Apr 14 93.75 94.00 93.10 93.90 97.85 98.45 97.85 98.45 May 14 Jun 14 100.00 100.45 99.65 100.42 Jul 14 98.40 98.95 98.12 98.92 Aug 14 96.05 96.40 95.82 96.15 Oct 14 81.97 82.10 80.00 82.10 Dec 14 78.00 78.20 77.92 77.92 Feb 15 79.25 79.35 79.05 79.05 Apr 15 80.25 Last spot N/A Est. sales 19722. Wed’s Sales: 35,141 Wed’s open int: 278031, up +1094y:

chg.

+.37 +.15 +.27 +.30 +.33 +.40 +.65 +.85 +1.00

+.15 +.52 +.40 +.37 +.43 +.85 +.40 +.15

-.13 +.10 +.10 +.25 +.27 +.05 +.10 +.12

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Dec 13 77.05 78.14 77.05 78.14 Mar 14 78.50 79.62 78.00 79.35 May 14 79.10 79.93 78.47 79.85 Jul 14 79.80 80.35 79.09 80.30 Oct 14 77.89 Dec 14 75.96 76.99 75.96 76.96 Mar 15 77.34 May 15 77.24 Jul 15 77.14 Oct 15 77.14 Dec 15 77.14 Mar 16 77.14 May 16 77.14 Jul 16 77.14 Oct 16 77.14 Last spot N/A Est. sales 12111. Wed’s Sales: 18,994 Wed’s open int: 157015, up +425

chg.

+1.39 +.91 +.90 +.80 +.81 +.82 +.82 +.82 +.82 +.82 +.82 +.82 +.82 +.82 +.82

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low

settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 13 655 657 650fl 655 Mar 14 668ø 670fl 665 668fl May 14 672 675 668 673fl Jul 14 666fl 671ü 664ø 670fl Sep 14 676ø 678fl 672ü 678ø Dec 14 685ü 689ü 682ü 688ø Mar 15 690 694fl 688 694ü

chg.

+3fl +5ü +5fl +6ü +6ü +6ü +6ü

drive and promptly broke the T iger run with his scoring strike to Gomez. Los Lunas (9-3) answer ed with an 81yar d scor e on the very next play, but couldn’t stop Goddar d on the game’s final drive. “I think the mood was just one of those things where ‘we’ve been here before. Don’t lose your nerve,’” Jer nigan said about the Los Lunas rally. “We gave them some opportunities we shouldn’t have, but, again, that’s the way games are played. “You just work pretty hard at not losing your composur e and stick (with it) all the way through. And it’s good to have a running game when you need it.” Both the running game and passing game were efficient for the Rockets. They ran for 246 yards on 44 tries and had 246 yards on five completions

tain call in kneeling on the ball to run out the clock. The Tigers’ first three scores all came on long runs. Terrence Magee had TDs of 29 and 23 yards in the first and Jeremy Hill broke loose for a 52-yarder in the third quarter. Hill finished with 145 yards on 20 carries. Junior receiver Jarvis Landry caught eight passes for 113 yards in what may have been his final game in Tiger Stadium, including an awkward, leaping circus catch from behind a defender to set up a field goal that cut Arkansas’ lead to 27-24 with about 5 minutes to go. The catch came on the 32-yard pass that Mettenberger delivered just as he was hit low and twisted underneath a defender and blocker. Mettenberger, a senior, finished 14 of 22 passing for 156 yards, becoming the third QB in LSU history to eclipse 3,000 yards

game. The first half of the game got us.” Le’Bryan Nash made it 69-67 by hitting 1 of 2 from the line before Butler’s Elijah Brown had his last-second 3-point shot blocked by Michael Cobbins. Nash added 15 points for the Cowboys, who will face the winner of the other semifinal between No. 21 Memphis and LSU in Sunday night’s championship game. “My first initial thought is Oklahoma State is a heck of a basketball team,” Miller said.

FUTURES

May 15 690 693fl 688 693fl +5fl Jul 15 686 686ø 680 686ü +4 Sep 15 688 692 688 692 +4 Dec 15 697ø 703ü 697ø 703ü +5fl Mar 16 701fl 707ø 701fl 707ø +5fl May 16 701fl 707ø 701fl 707ø +5fl Jul 16 685 692ø 685 692ø +5fl Last spot N/A Est. sales 68988. Wed’s Sales: 98,819 Wed’s open int: 386002, off -5822 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel 415ü -2 Dec 13 418fl 419ø 413 Mar 14 426ø 427 421fl 424ø -2 May 14 434 435ü 430 432fl -2 Jul 14 440 442ø 437 440 -1fl Sep 14 448 449 443fl 446ø -1fl Dec 14 455fl 456fl 451fl 454ü -1fl 465ü -1 Mar 15 466 466ü 463 471fl -ü May 15 471 472 471 474ø 475ø 473ü 475ø Jul 15 Sep 15 468ø 470 468ø 470 +1ø Dec 15 472ü 474fl 471 473ø +1fl Jul 16 481fl 483fl 481fl 483fl +2 Dec 16 465 467 465 467 +2 Last spot N/A Est. sales 135121. Wed’s Sales: 356,671 Wed’s open int: 1205765, off -27165 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 13 362 366fl 357fl 365ü +7ø Mar 14 327fl 334fl 327fl 331ø +2ü May 14 316fl 317ü 316fl 316fl -ø 315 315ø 313fl 313fl -1fl Jul 14 Sep 14 322 322 320ü 320ü -1fl Dec 14 318fl 320ø 318fl 320ø +1fl Mar 15 318fl 320ø 318fl 320ø +1fl May 15 318fl 320ø 318fl 320ø +1fl Jul 15 318fl 320ø 318fl 320ø +1fl Sep 15 318fl 320ø 318fl 320ø +1fl Jul 16 318fl 320ø 318fl 320ø +1fl Sep 16 318fl 320ø 318fl 320ø +1fl Last spot N/A Est. sales 206. Wed’s Sales: 873 Wed’s open int: 8483, up +103 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Jan 14 1328ø 1339ø 1327 1336ø +16ø Mar 14 1313 1321 1309fl 1317fl +11ø May 14 1295ü 1301 1291ü 1297fl +7fl Jul 14 1285 1292 1282ü 1288 +5fl Aug 14 1256ü 1261ü 1253ü 1259 +5fl Sep 14 1197ø 1200 1192ü 1196ø +4ü +1ü Nov 14 1148ø 1153 1145 1147 Jan 15 1151ø 1155 1150ü 1151ø +1ü Mar 15 1153fl 1154fl 1153fl 1154fl +1 May 15 1158fl 1160ø 1156ü 1157 +fl Jul 15 1167fl 1167fl 1161ø 1162 +ø Aug 15 1154 1154ø 1154 1154ø +ø Sep 15 1140ü 1141ü 1140ü 1141ü +1 Nov 15 1140 1140 1135ø 1137fl +2ü Jan 16 1138ø 1140ø 1138ø 1140ø +2 Mar 16 1138ü 1140ü 1138ü 1140ü +2 May 16 1136ø 1138ø 1136ø 1138ø +2 Jul 16 1132ü 1134ü 1132ü 1134ü +2 Aug 16 1134fl 1136fl 1134fl 1136fl +2 Sep 16 1134fl 1136fl 1134fl 1136fl +2 Nov 16 1109ü 1111ü 1109ü 1111ü +2 Jul 17 1116ø 1118ø 1116ø 1118ø +2 Nov 17 1108ø 1110ø 1108ø 1110ø +2 Last spot N/A Est. sales 117935. Wed’s Sales: 211,736 Wed’s open int: 611551, up +5543

OIL/GASOLINE/NG Open high

low

settle

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Jan 14 92.29 93.90 92.12 92.72 92.62 94.19 92.45 93.01 Feb 14 Mar 14 92.97 94.37 92.68 93.24 Apr 14 92.95 94.40 92.85 93.32 92.82 94.27 92.82 93.29 May 14 Jun 14 92.74 94.05 92.65 93.12 Jul 14 92.44 93.65 92.42 92.83 92.23 93.21 92.11 92.47 Aug 14 Sep 14 91.76 92.80 91.69 92.08 Oct 14 91.72 92.24 91.59 91.65 91.83 91.83 91.00 91.23 Nov 14 Dec 14 90.60 91.56 90.45 90.83 Jan 15 90.32 89.84 Feb 15 Mar 15 89.40 Apr 15 88.96 88.60 May 15 Jun 15 88.16 88.77 88.16 88.25 Jul 15 87.83 Aug 15 87.47 Sep 15 87.19 Oct 15 86.90 Nov 15 86.64 Dec 15 86.31 86.83 86.31 86.43 Jan 16 86.05 Last spot N/A Est. sales 222316. Wed’s Sales: 442,555 Wed’s open int: 1634946, off -1508 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Dec 13 2.6973 2.7072 2.6625 2.6841 Jan 14 2.6993 2.7045 2.6605 2.6628 Feb 14 2.7041 2.7139 2.6709 2.6732 Mar 14 2.7214 2.7362 2.6922 2.6937 Apr 14 2.8857 2.9062 2.8624 2.8639 May 14 2.8818 2.9040 2.8612 2.8624 Jun 14 2.8668 2.8815 2.8439 2.8453 Jul 14 2.8389 2.8450 2.8203 2.8203 Aug 14 2.8031 2.8036 2.7879 2.7879 Sep 14 2.7619 2.7749 2.7484 2.7484 Oct 14 2.6327 2.6327 2.6078 2.6078

chg.

+.42 +.38 +.36 +.37 +.37 +.36 +.34 +.33 +.32 +.31 +.31 +.31 +.30 +.29 +.28 +.27 +.26 +.25 +.24 +.24 +.24 +.24 +.23 +.23 +.23

-.0142 -.0318 -.0311 -.0300 -.0285 -.0277 -.0263 -.0248 -.0235 -.0217 -.0203

Shawn Naranjo Photo

RIGHT: Goddard’s Mitchell Weathers finishes off a run during the Rockets’ 35-28 win over Los Lunas, Friday.

in a season. Allen completed 19 of 29 passes for 178 yards. Arkansas, a more-than three-TD underdog, led 17-14 at halftime and increased its lead on Zach Hocker’s field goal in the third quarter, which was set up by Alan Turner’s interception of Mettenberger’s overthrow that was tipped by Landry. LSU regained the lead on Hill’s touchdown, but Arkansas responded with a 15play, 75-yard drive that ended with Henry’s second TD catch. Early in the fourth quarter, LSU was inside the Arkansas 20. But on fourthand-2, coach Les Miles kept the offense on the field instead of trying a field goal, and Mettenberger’s pass to Hill went for only 1 yard, leaving the Tigers’ deficit at six with 9:20 left. Early on, it looked like LSU was on its way to the type of romp odds makers

METALS

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS HERE CALL TODAY

575.622.7710

expected. The Tigers forced a quick punt on the Hogs’ opening drive, then marched 70 plays on their first possesion to take a 7-0 lead on Magee’s first score. The Razorbacks then exhibited their determination in the way they responded to Korliss Marshall’s 100-yard kickoff retur n being called back for holding. Arkansas had to start on its own 14, but drove 86 yards on eight plays to tie it on fullback Kiero Small’s 3-yard run on a direct snap. Magee’s second touchdown put LSU back up 14-7. But Arkansas once again answered with another eight-play, 86-yard drive, this one ending with Henry’s 9-yard catch. Late in the half, Braylon Mitchell sacked and stripped Mettenberger and Brandon Lewis recovered on the 28, setting up Hocker’s 20-yard field goal and the Hogs’ first lead.

between the teams since Butler beat Oklahoma State 49-26 on Feb. 12, 1934. Alex Barlow keyed Butler’s initial surge by connecting on a pair of 3-pointers to get the Bulldogs within 48-41 five minutes into the second half. Phil Fotre made two longrange jumpers and Smart had a couple driving baskets as Oklahoma State responded and grabbed a 66-57 lead with 6 1/2 minutes to play. Dunham and the Bulldogs made a final run, pulling within

2.5746 2.5813 2.5746 2.5813 Nov 14 Dec 14 2.5839 2.5839 2.5600 2.5679 Jan 15 2.5661 Feb 15 2.5732 Mar 15 2.5872 Apr 15 2.7197 May 15 2.7167 Jun 15 2.6972 Jul 15 2.6752 Aug 15 2.6522 Sep 15 2.6252 Oct 15 2.4932 Nov 15 2.4597 Dec 15 2.4362 2.4362 Jan 16 Feb 16 2.4382 Mar 16 2.4432 2.5432 Apr 16 May 16 2.5432 Jun 16 2.5332 2.5212 Jul 16 2.5082 Aug 16 Sep 16 2.4947 Oct 16 2.3947 2.3697 Nov 16 Last spot N/A Est. sales 37099. Wed’s Sales: 123,683 Wed’s open int: 228526, off -8503 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Jan 14 3.935 3.962 3.881 3.954 3.940 3.963 3.886 3.957 Feb 14 Mar 14 3.917 3.948 3.876 3.944 Apr 14 3.884 3.907 3.841 3.902 3.895 3.917 3.858 3.915 May 14 Jun 14 3.910 3.942 3.886 3.940 Jul 14 3.919 3.974 3.916 3.971 Aug 14 3.934 3.985 3.930 3.983 Sep 14 3.920 3.973 3.915 3.970 Oct 14 3.950 3.990 3.934 3.985 Nov 14 4.005 4.045 4.005 4.043 Dec 14 4.145 4.162 4.119 4.162 Jan 15 4.230 4.240 4.200 4.236 Feb 15 4.220 Mar 15 4.171 Apr 15 3.970 3.980 3.955 3.980 May 15 3.990 3.990 3.985 3.985 Last spot N/A Est. sales 161272. Wed’s Sales: 236,185 Wed’s open int: 1252000, up +11167

NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Fri. Aluminum -$0.7715 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.1695 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper -$3.2305 N.Y. Merc spot Fri. Lead - $2041.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.8382 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1245.25 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1250.60 troy oz., NY Merc spot Fri. Silver - $19.655 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $19.981 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri. Platinum -$1372.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1368.80 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised

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B3

for 492 total yards. Cameron Neff had 195 of those passing yards on 4-of-6 passing. The win put Rockets in the title game for the seventh time in eight seasons. They will face the winner of today’s other semifinal between No. 2 Far mington and No. 3 Belen. “I told them that they got a real good example of a team that showed a lot of heart and a lot of desir e to win a ball game,” Jer nigan said about what he told his team after the game, referencing the Tigers. “A lot of will to win out of those guys.” “Maybe we had just about a quarter of an inch more than them.” And seven more points.

“Obviously, very talented. When you have one of the best players, if not the best player in the country in Marcus Smart and the way he fights and leads his team, he sets the standard for his team.” Butler (5-1) got 15 points from Brown. Kellen Dunham, who set a tourney record with 32 points in Thursday’s 76-69 victory over Washington State, finished with nine, while Marshall, coming off a 30-point performance Thursday, had eight. This was the first meeting

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday:

Saturday, November 30, 2013

-.0164 -.0142 -.0118 -.0118 -.0118 -.0118 -.0118 -.0118 -.0118 -.0118 -.0118 -.0118 -.0118 -.0118 -.0118 -.0118 -.0118 -.0118 -.0118 -.0118 -.0118 -.0118 -.0118 -.0118 -.0118

+.059 +.058 +.053 +.047 +.045 +.044 +.042 +.041 +.040 +.040 +.038 +.038 +.038 +.037 +.037 +.029 +.029

NYSE

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last S&P500ETF462008181.00 Penney 452290 10.19 BkofAm 422562 15.82 iShEMkts 394536 42.35 MktVGold 205050 22.28

68-65 with three minutes remaining when the guard hit a 3 and then converted a threepoint play. Smart had the ball stolen by Erik Fromm on Oklahoma State’s next possession and Marshall got a rebound basket at the other end to make it 68-67. “In the second half, we weren’t scoring quite as much. We were taking some questionable shots that led for easy points for them,” Ford said.

MARKET SUMMARY

Chg -.12 +.11 -.01 +.43 +.47

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

AMEX

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) DocuSec 43075 Organovo 34127 NwGold g 19931 AlldNevG 18237 NovaGld g 10895

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows Volume

Name AT&T Inc Aetna BkofAm Boeing Chevron CocaCola Disney EOG Res EngyTsfr ExxonMbl FordM HewlettP HollyFront Intel IBM JohnJn

%Chg +13.3 +13.0 +10.6 +8.6 +8.5

Last 3.77 21.25 47.01 38.13 4.84

Chg +.09 -.02 +.52 +.53 +.30

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg -8.30 -12.0 MastchH s 17.65 -1.75 -9.0 Aetrium rs 8.40 -4.00 -.37 -11.0 PacBkrM g 3.76 -.24 -6.0 Net1UEPS 8.19 -3.34 -2.68 -9.9 SparkNet 5.60 -.27 -4.6 EltekLtd 2.73 -.46 -1.72 -9.1 CornstTR 5.76 -.24 -4.0 Fortinet 17.10 -2.54 -4.09 -8.9 FieldPnt 4.04 -.17 -4.0 WPCS rs 2.60 -.34

%Chg -32.3 -29.0 -14.4 -12.9 -11.6

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

1,657 1,333 127 3,117 220 15

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,515,334,093 Volume

52-Week High Low 16,120.25 12,765.32 7,260.99 5,023.73 537.86 439.79 10,226.34 8,074.25 2,471.19 2,186.97 4,045.81 2,935.88 1,808.42 1,385.43 19,217.10 14,510.69 1,141.52 798.51

Chg +.25 +.91 +.24 +.48 +.17

Vol (00) 292027 230077 223825 208217 202719

%Chg +169.2 +34.9 +27.6 +24.1 +23.8

DIARY

Last 2.13 7.90 2.50 6.03 2.18

Name SiriusXM Cisco Facebook Microsoft AriadP

Chg +4.06 +.96 +.94 +2.10 +.42

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE) Last 61.00 2.98 24.40 17.20 41.91

Chg +.25 -.30 +.26 +.14

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Last Chg %Chg Name ChiMYWnd 2.34 +.29 +14.1 DocuSec HarvNRes 3.82 +.43 +12.7 StrPathC n EKodak wt 11.90 +1.30 +12.3 WirelessT DirGMnBull 19.45 +2.11 +12.2 MAG Slv g PrisaB 2.34 +.24 +11.4 AskanoG g Name DirGMBear Renren DirSKBear W&T Off CSVLgBrnt

Last 2.13 8.88 5.33 3.32 2.34

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

DIARY

243 149 27 419 19 7

Name ZoomTch rs InterCld wt Aastrom rs OceraTh rs SinoGlob

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

INDEXES

Last 16,086.41 7,235.69 487.13 10,183.22 2,387.15 4,059.89 1,805.81 19,201.96 1,142.89

Net Chg -10.92 -19.31 -.03 +.23 +15.70 +15.14 -1.42 -8.49 +1.56

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

PE

Last

Chg

1.80 .80 .04 1.94 4.00 1.12 .75f .75 3.62f 2.52 .40 .58 1.20a .90 3.80 2.64

26 14 21 24 10 21 21 41 10 10 13 9 9 13 12 21

35.21 -.20 68.93 +.06 15.82 -.01 134.25 -.47 122.44 +.02 40.19 ... 70.54 -.23 165.00 -1.43 54.16 +.30 93.48 -.32 17.08 +.05 27.35 -.01 47.98 -1.32 23.84 -.06 179.68 +.71 94.66 -.32

DIARY

50,389,177 Volume

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Div

Last 6.46 3.71 4.35 10.80 2.18

YTD %Chg Name +4.4 +48.8 +36.3 +78.1 +13.2 +10.9 +41.7 +36.6 +26.2 +8.0 +31.9 +91.9 +3.1 +15.6 -6.2 +35.0

Merck Microsoft OneokPtrs PNM Res PepsiCo Pfizer Phillips66 SwstAirl TexInst TimeWarn TriContl VerizonCm WalMart WashFed WellsFargo XcelEngy

1,500 936 135 2,571 339 12Slv g

822,363,529 2

% Chg -.07 -.27 -.01 ... +.66 +.37 -.08 -.04 +.14

YTD 52-wk % Chg % Chg +22.76 +23.50 +36.35 +41.35 +7.51 +7.27 +20.60 +23.28 +1.34 -.52 +34.46 +34.87 +26.62 +27.51 +28.05 +29.32 +34.56 +39.05

Div

PE

Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

1.76f 1.12 2.90f .66 2.27 .96 1.56f .16 1.20 1.15 .70e 2.12f 1.88 .40f 1.20 1.12

30 14 23 18 20 17 12 21 28 16 ... 70 16 16 12 15

49.83 38.13 53.56 23.27 84.46 31.73 69.61 18.59 43.00 65.71 19.49 49.62 81.01 23.39 44.02 28.02

... +.53 -.15 +.06 +.04 -.15 -.51 -.36 +.48 +.07 -.04 -.31 +.08 -.23 -.25 -.03

+21.7 +42.8 -.8 +13.5 +23.4 +26.5 +31.1 +81.5 +39.2 +37.4 +21.4 +14.7 +18.7 +38.6 +28.8 +4.9

If you would like your stock to been seen here please contact editor@rdrnews.com


B4 Saturday, November 30, 2013

OBITUARY/WORLD

Roswell Daily Record

Top US commander apologizes for Afghan airstrike KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The top U.S. commander in Afghanistan apologized to President Hamid Karzai for a drone strike that killed a child and NATO promised an investigation Friday as rising tensions threatened ef forts to persuade the Afghan leader to sign a long-delayed security agreement. Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford called Karzai late Thursday to express “deep regrets for the incident and any civilian casualties,” the commander’s spokesman said.

Karzai condemned the attack, which also wounded two women earlier Thursday, and said all airstrikes and foreign raids on Afghan homes must stop if the United States expects him to sign the pact that would allow thousands of Americans to stay in the country beyond a 2014 withdrawal deadline.

“This attack shows that American forces do not respect the safety of the Afghan people in their homes,” Karzai said in a Dari-language statement on his website.

The two gover nments have agreed on a draft bilateral security agreement and it was approved by a consultative Afghan council known as a Loya Jirga. But Karzai shocked the assembly and the Americans when he announced he would not sign the deal but would instead leave that up to his successor following April 5 elections. The 2,500-member Loya Jirga had also demanded it be signed by the end of next month.

The Obama administration has been trying to persuade Karzai to change his mind and sign the deal by the end of the year in order to allow enough time to make preparations for a continuing presence after

the NATO and U.N. mandates for foreign troops in the country expires at the end of next year. In the phone call, Dunford talked to Karzai directly and “expressed deep regrets for the incident and any civilian casualties,” and assured Karzai that an investigation would be conducted into Thursday’s airstrike, which the Afghan president said was carried out by a drone in souther n Helmand province. “He talked to President Karzai directly, expressed deep regrets for the incident and any civilian casualties, and promised to convene an immediate joint investigation to determine all the facts of what happened,” Dunford’s spokesman Col. David Lapan said in an email. The coalition, known as the International Security Assistance Force, said the airstrike had killed an insurgent on a motorbike

in Helmand and also promised to investigate Karzai’s claims that it also killed a child and injured two women. Civilian deaths at the hands of U.S. and allied soldiers have been one of the main sources of contention in increasingly tense relations with Karzai over the years, although such killings have fallen off sharply in recent years following stricter NATO guidelines on the use of air power against ground targets. The Taliban and other insurgent groups are blamed for the overwhelming majority of civilian casualties, most of which are caused by roadside bombs targeting Afghan or foreign forces. Insurgents also have carried out attacks against government and elected officials as well as people working for the administration. In one such attack Fri-

AP Photo

In this Aug. 10, 2013, file photo, Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford, who commands the U.S.-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF), speaks during an interview at the ISAF headquarters in Kabul, Afghanistan.

day in Kabul, a suicide bomber with explosives hidden in his turban wounded a member of parliament at his home. The attacker pretended to be a constituent, then

blew himself up when he entered the home of Hamidullah Tokhi, a lawmaker from southern Zabul province, Kabul police chief Mohammad Zahir said.

China sends fighter planes to ID flights Egyptian Islamists oppose protest law

BEIJING (AP) — China said it launched two fighter planes Friday to investigate flights by a dozen U.S. and Japanese reconnaissance and military planes in its new maritime air defense zone over the East China Sea. It was the first time since proclaiming the zone on Nov. 23 that China said it sent planes there on the same day as foreign military flights, although it said it merely identified the foreign planes and took no further action. China announced last week that all aircraft entering the zone — a maritime area between China, Taiwan, South Korea and Japan — must notify Chinese authorities beforehand and that it would take unspecified defensive measures against those that don’t comply. Neighboring countries and the U.S. have said they will not honor the new zone — believed aimed at claiming disputed territory — and have said it unnecessarily raises tensions. The Ministry of Defense said the Chinese fighter jets identified and monitored the two U.S. reconnaissance aircraft and a mix of 10 Japanese early warning, reconnaissance and fighter planes during their flights through the zone early Friday.

its own.

AP Photo

In this Thursday, Oct. 13, 2011, file photo, Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force's P-3C Orion surveillance plane flies over the disputed islands in the East China Sea, called the Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China.

“China’s air force has faithfully carried out its mission and tasks, with China’s navy, since it was tasked with patrolling the East China Sea air defense identification zone. It monitored throughout the entire flights, made timely identification and ascertained the types,” ministry spokesman Col. Shen Jinke said in a statement on its website. In Washington, a Pentagon spokesman, Army Col. Steve Warren, said when asked about China’s statement, “The U.S. will continue to partner with our allies and will operate in the area as normal.” Japanese of ficials declined to confirm details of any flights, but said routine missions in the area

were continuing. “We are simply conducting our ordinary warning and surveillance activity like before. We have not encountered any abnormal instances so far, therefore we have not made any announcement,” Japanese Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera told reporters in Tokyo. The United States and other countries have warned that the new zone could boost chances for miscalculations, accidents and conflicts, though analysts believe Beijing’s move is not intended to spark any aerial confrontations but rather is a long-term strategy to solidify claims to disputed territory by simply marking the area as

June Teufel Dreyer, who specializes in security issues at the University of Miami, said the Chinese government — while backing down from strictly enforcing the zone to keep a lid on tensions — is walking a delicate line because it is faced with strong public opinion from nationalists at home. Sending up the fighter planes Friday was aimed at the domestic audience, and China is likely to send planes regularly when foreign aircraft enter the zone without notifying Chinese authorities, she said.

“They will be ‘escorting’ the intruding planes, but they are not going to shoot them,” she said.

The zone is seen primarily as China’s latest bid to bolster its claim over a string of uninhabited Japanese-controlled islands in the East China Sea known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China. Beijing has been ratcheting up its sovereignty claims since Tokyo’s nationalization of the islands last year. However, there are questions whether China has the technical ability to fully enforce the zone due to a shortage of early warning radar aircraft and in-flight refueling capability.

CAIRO (AP) — Egyptian security forces firing tear gas and water cannons on Friday broke up anti-government demonstrations by Islamists defying a draconian new law restricting protests. Authorities are seeking to put down unrest by both Islamists and secular activists as a government-appointed assembly tries to finish a final draft on an amended constitution by early next week. The draft has raised criticism from democracy advocates for increasing powers of the military and president. Since a popularly backed military coup ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in July, his supporters have been staging neardaily protests calling for his reinstatement. The rallies have often descended into street clashes with security forces or civilians. To quash pro-Morsi rallies, which have persisted despite a heavy security crackdown, the military-backed government issued the law Sunday banning protests without a police permit.

On Thursday, a student was killed when police put down a march by Islamists from Cairo University.

Instead, the law has sparked new protests by Egypt’s secular activists, who had been largely muted since the ouster of Morsi. They accuse the government of giving free rein to police abuses and military power that they had aimed to end with the 2011 uprising that toppled longtime autocrat Hosni Mubarak.

They say the law aims to silence all dissent — particularly ahead of a nationwide referendum on the amended constitution expected in January.

The past week, security forces have forcefully broken up several protests by secular activists in Cairo. Police also arrested one of the top secular activists, Alaa Abdel-Fattah, on Thursday for allegedly inciting protests in violation of the law. His wife, Manal Bahy Eldin, also an activist, said police beat her during the arrest.

Mayor of Toronto EU blames Russia for failure of Ukraine deal Ford and brother to host online show TORONTO (AP) — Toronto Mayor Rob Ford and his brother say they will host an online show so they can take their message straight to “Ford Nation,” the term they use for the embattled mayor’s conservative suburban supporters. Doug Ford, a city councilor, told The Associated Press on Friday that the show is meant to “get their message out and not have that message be twisted by the media.” After the mayor admitted to smoking crack in a “drunken stupor” and refused to resign, Toronto’s city council has stripped him of most of his powers. Rob Ford said he has “declared war” on the council after it acted in response to his drug use, public drunkenness and a series of outbursts that have made him an international media sensation, to the embarrassment of many Canadians. The new online show

follows last week’s airing of a single episode of a TV talk show hosted by the Fords that premiered on Sun News Network before it was cancelled. Network executives said “Ford Nation” was the highest rated program ever on the two-year-old cable channel, but said it was too costly to make.

The Fords co-hosted the hour -long TV program. The mayor used much of the prerecorded program to defend himself and talk about his re-election bid next year. Doug Ford said the new self-funded online series, also to be called “Ford Nation,” will be uploaded to YouTube before Christmas.

“Numerous people have approached us around the world about doing a show and since technology has changed, you can get your message out easily to a larger audience on your own,” Doug Ford said.

VILNIUS, Lithuania (AP) — EU leaders Friday revived Cold War rhetoric Friday, accusing Russia of bullying Ukraine into ditching a landmark deal so the for mer Soviet republic would stay locked in Moscow’s orbit. Ukraine President Viktor Yanukovych refused to sign the deal at the last minute, acknowledging that Moscow had him cornered. “I have been one-on-one with Russia for three and a half years under very unequal conditions,” Yanukovych told German Chancellor Angela Merkel during the two-day summit. The agreement sought to improve bilateral trade, streamline industry rules and bring about key democratic reforms in Ukraine. Yanukovych complained that the EU hadn’t offered enough in financial incentives to secure his signature. French President Francois Hollande ruled out more EU funds to sweeten the deal. Russia had worked aggressively to derail the deal by imposing painful trade sanctions and threatening Ukraine with giant

gas bills. And Ukraine knows what Russian pressure feels like. Moscow had previously cut off gas supplies during bitter pricing disputes to leave Ukrainians freezing in the depth of winter. Now, it is offering Ukraine muchneeded discounts for its natural gas in exchange for joining a Moscow-led Customs Union. Although the European Union extended its geopolitical reach eastward by initialing agreements with Georgia and Moldova during the two-day summit, Ukraine was a blow. “We may not give in to external pressure, not the least from Russia,” said EU President Her man Van Rompuy in unusually blunt ter ms after Yanukovych refused to put ink to paper. Yanukovych’s move sparked mass protests in the Ukranian capital on Friday. Such large demonstrations haven’t been seen since 2004 during what has become known as the Orange Revolution, which led to the overtur n of Yanukovych’s fraud-marred election victory and brought his pro-Western

opponent to power. Yanukovych is wary of a repeat. “Millions of Ukrainians don’t want to return to the Soviet past,” said Olga Shukshina, a 46-year-old doctor from the Western city of Lviv, close to the border with Poland. World boxing champion and opposition leader, Vitaly Klitshcko, called for more protests. “I am sure we will lead Ukraine into Europe even without Yanukovych,” Klitshcko said in Vilnius. “This is our task, the task of the opposition forces, and the task of every Ukrainian.” In Moscow, Sergei Naryshkin, the speaker of the Kremlin-controlled lower house of Russian parliament, harshly criticized the EU for sending special envoys to Ukraine as its parliament pondered closer ties with the West. “We have witnessed an unprecedented pressure on Ukraine from Wester n nations,” Naryshkin said. EU Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso complained about Russia’s trade threats and said “the times for limited sovereignty are over in Europe,”

alleging Russia still seemed to consider Ukraine as a subservient neighbor.

Such talk was rife in the decades after World War II when the West and the Soviet Union faced off and carved up central Europe in their own spheres of influence, robbing many east European nations of their full independence.

ORBAN WAGGONER Anderson-Bethany Funeral Home

Memorial Service Saturday, November 30, 10:00 AM


Roswell Daily Record

DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: We live near my wife’s sister “Bree” and her husband, “Joe.” We socialize often at one of our homes or at a restaurant. They have recently become good friends with another couple, the “Russells,” who are delightful. Bree and Joe sometimes invite us over when the Russells are there. The problem is, when I try to carry on a conversation with Mr. Russell, Joe gets bent out of shape. He interrupts and changes the subject or says something to make me look bad. If that doesn’t stop the discussion, Joe walks off in a huff. I think he’s acting

like an immature middle-schooler. (It also triggers memories I have of being bullied and excluded as a child.) I’d like to avoid these three-couple get-togethers, but I don’t know how many times I can do it without raising questions. An alternative would be to avoid the Russells and converse only with other guests who may be present. Either option, or mentioning it, risks making me look like the jealous 12-year-old instead of Joe. Any ideas? ODD MAN OUT IN KANSAS DEAR ODD MAN OUT: It appears that your brother-in-law is insecure, or he wouldn’t behave the way he is. How sad — for him. Start limiting the time you spend as a threesome. Ask your wife to find out in advance if the Russells will be visiting when you are. If Bree asks her why, your wife should tell her that Joe seems upset when you try to carry on a conversation with the husband and you don’t want to make him uncomfortable. Perhaps if she tells her husband to knock it off and grow up, he will. However, if the problem continues, explain to the Russells that as

COMICS

much as you enjoy their company, you’ll be seeing them less often, and why. It isn’t necessary to mention to any of them the grief you experienced in middle school because, frankly, it is none of their business. If it’s any comfort to you, it appears Joe had insecurities back then, too, but he never outgrew them. #####

I know I don’t want to be Casey’s girlfriend forever. I don’t want to waste my time if he’s not going to marry me, but I really want to be with him. Do you think he’ll change his mind again, or is it time for me to end things?

DEAR ABBY: I have been seeing my boyfriend, “Casey,” for a year. He has said throughout our courtship that we could get married in four to five years. Over the past couple of months, he has become distant and less romantic. I drive four hours to see him almost every week, and he seems fine then, but when we’re apart, he rarely texts me and seems disinterested. On one of my recent visits, Casey said he NEVER wants to get married! When I asked what had changed his mind, his response was that he has decided that marriage is a trap. When I asked if he still wanted to be with me, he said yes.

If you’re doing all of the four-hour commuting, you’re not only waiting and hoping, you are also doing most of the work in your relationship with Casey. From your description of his attention span, when you’re out of sight, you are not on his mind.

Family Circus

WAITING AND HOPING IN MARYLAND

DEAR WAITING AND HOPING:

You didn’t mention how old you both are, but it appears Casey has some growing up to do. Marriage isn’t a trap; it’s a partnership. And like any strong partnership there is commitment involved. If Casey isn’t up to making a commitment and marriage is what you’re after, you should save the wear and tear on your car and the expense of the gas and find a man who is less gun-shy.

The Wizard of Id

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

Blondie

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE Dear Readers: With Christmas just around the corner, many folks are putting up Christmas trees and decorations for the holidays. This can be a dangerous time for dogs and cats. Here are some Heloise hints to keep your CAT OR DOG SAFE:

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

* Don’t let animals drink the water that the tree is sitting in! * A real tree can be hazardous. Needles from real trees aren’t digested and may be mildly toxic or could even puncture the intestine. * If you have a cat, you know how it loves to play! Keep lights and ornaments off the lower branches, where a cat can reach them. If a pet bites the light cord, it can be shocked or its mouth burned. Broken ornaments can cause choking hazards or cuts. * Keep wrapped gifts with bows or ribbons out of reach for the same reason. Pets may be tempted to chew paper, ribbons or the gift itself. Heloise ##### Dear Readers: Regina Olsen, via email, sent in a picture of her cat, Stinker, posing for the camera by a vase of flowers. Regina rescued Stinker from the underside of a car and says she is now the queen of the house! To see Stinker’s picture, go to my website, www.Heloise.com, and click on “Pets.” Heloise

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

Garfield

P.S.: Readers, do you want to see your pet as the Pet Pal of the week? Send a photo and a short story about your pet to: Heloise/Pet Pal, P.O. Box 795000, San Antonio, TX 782795000, or email Heloise@Heloise.com. ##### Dear Heloise: I read in your column about a woman having trouble with wasps, bees and ants on her hummingbird feeder. I use a medium to light coat of petroleum jelly all the way around the feeding station, and no more wasps, bees or ants. The petroleum jelly is too sticky for the pests and does not harm or affect the birds. A Hummingbird Lover in Texas This sounds like a good idea, but several different hummingbird societies say NOT to use any petroleumbased products such as baby or cooking oil, as the oil may get into the birds’ feathers. They do recommend that if you are having an ant problem, use a moat or ant guard on the feeder. These, too, are easy solutions! Keep feeding those hummingbirds! Heloise P.S.: Living in San Antonio, a major flyway for hummingbirds, we have some hummers that hang around here during the winter. I’m lucky enough to see these little dive bombers all year long! ##### Dear Heloise: When my brother and I were younger, my stepmother started buying us Christmas ornaments each year. They were always beautiful keepsakes that she would find. I saved mine and kept them in a special box. The first year I put up my own Christmas tree, I already had a collection of ornaments for my tree. She still does it, and it has become a tradition that I look forward to. J.A. in San Antonio

Hagar the Horrible

Snuffy Smith

Zits

Saturday, November 30, 2013

B5


B6 Saturday, November 30, 2013

CLASSIFIEDS/SPORTS

Freshman Irvin scores 24, No. 22 Michigan rolls ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — With leading scorer Nik Stauskas out, No. 22 Michigan was looking for an offensive spark against Coppin State. Freshman Zak Irvin admirably filled the role. The 6-foot-6 Irvin came of f the bench to score a game-high 24 points in a 87-45 win Friday, making 9 of 13 shots from the floor, including 6 of 10 from 3point range. “With Nik being out, we needed somebody to step up today and I think our team was able to do that,” Irvin said. “My jumpshot was falling today and my teammates were able to find me open.” Michigan coach John Beilein said he was concer ned that missing the sharp-shooting Stauskas — who was resting a sore ankle — would leave a big hole against Coppin State’s zone defense. But Irvin hit a pair of long-distance shots early, matching his career-high of 10 points by the time Michigan took a 42-23 halftime lead, and brought the Crisler Center crowd to its feet by connecting on three consecutive 3-point baskets for a 63-31 lead with 13:24 left to play. “Even though their best shooter wasn’t there, I don’t think (Irvin) was too far from it,” Coppin State coach Ron “Fang” Mitchell said. “That may have been

their hidden secret.” In fact, Irvin has been rather hard to find so far this season. He was averaging 7.4 points and made just 37 percent of his 32 attempts from behind the arc this season. “I wouldn’t have been able to do that without my teammates. They kept telling me to keep my head up, stay confident out there and I’ll knock down the next one,” Irvin said. “It’s definitely a relief to finally see some shots go down. Hopefully I can continue to do this as the year goes on.” Beilein said he has encouraged Irvin to keep shooting. “When I see a guy who’s had as many attempts as he’s had, he must be a shooter. The coach isn’t stupid. He wouldn’t allow him to shoot that many times if he couldn’t shoot,” Beilein said. “I hope I’m not stupid. I see it in practice. I want him to shoot the ball when he’s open.” Caris LeVert added 15 points and Glenn Robinson III 14 points for Michigan. Dallas Gary came off the bench to score a team-high 11 points Coppin State (23). The Wolverines made 51.6 percent (32-62) of its shots and was 13 of 14 from the free throw line. Coppin State, which has lost to a nationally ranked non-conference opponent in 18 consecutive seasons,

made 34.8 percent (16 for 46) of its shots. Stauskas, averaging 20.3 points, was the Wolverines leading scorer in each of their last four games. He sprained his ankle during a 63-61 loss to Charlotte in the Puerto Rico T ip-Of f championship game. His status for Michigan’s trip to No. 6 Duke on Tuesday, Dec. 3, is unknown. “Until he’s practicing at 100 percent, he won’t go in there. He’s got to be pretty close to 100 percent,” Beilein said. “It will be a big focus for us to get him ready. He’ll be rehabbing like crazy for the next three days.” With Stauskas on the bench, Michigan did welcome a pair of familiar faces back to its starting lineup. Preseason All-America selection Mitch McGary and senior Jordan Morgan made their first starts of the season. McGary, who has been playing himself into game shape after a back injury kept him out of the team’s first two games of the season and much of the preseason, finished with six points, eight rebounds and three blocked shots. Morgan, who started 95 games in his first three seasons at Michigan, added six points and five rebounds. Those two post players helped Michigan dominate the glass. The Wolverines pulled down 17 offensive

Roswell Daily Record

AP Photo Michigan’s Mitch McGary (4) walks off the court with Zak Irvin during a time out against Coppin St., Friday. rebounds compared to Coppin State’s 14 defensive rebounds. Overall, Michigan held a 44-19 rebounding margin. Michigan was playing at home for the first time in

17 days following a four game stretch that included a loss at Iowa State and the runner-up finish in Puerto Rico. Once the win was assured, Wolverines fans

turned their attention to Saturday’s football rivalry game between Michigan and No. 3 Ohio State. A “Beat Ohio!” chant started with 3:44 left to play and Michigan leading 78-42.

Scott holds 2nd-round lead at Australian Open SYDNEY (AP) — Adam Scott held a two-shot advantage over Rory McIlroy as the tournament’s star players moved to the top of the Australian Open leaderboard at Royal Sydney on Friday. Scott shot 2-under-par 70 for a two-round total of 12-under 132. McIlroy, playing in the morning and avoiding the rain and storms that later hit the course, had a 65. Scott and McIlroy will play together on Saturday in the third round.

Legals

“It was always going to be a day where you just had to hang on,” Scott said of the tough conditions. “He (McIlroy) is one of the best players in the world so I’m going to have to bring my best game.” Australian Richard Green shot 66 and was three strokes behind Scott, who is trying to add the Australian Open to his Australian PGA and Australian Masters titles to become the second player after Robert Allenby in 2005 to capture the Triple Crown of Australian

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish November 23, 30, December 7, 2013

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish November 23, 30, December 7, 2013

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

SUN WEST MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC.,

NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC,

Case No. D-504-CV-2013-00509

v.

Plaintiff,

THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, OR LEGATEES OF VIRGINIA M. PARMLEY, DECEASED, GARY F. PARMLEY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA BY AND THROUGH THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT AND THE STATE OF NEW MEXICO DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION & REVENUE, Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF SUIT

STATE OF New Mexico to the above-named Defendants The Unknown Heirs, Devisees, or Legatees of Virginia M. Parmley, deceased, if any. GREETINGS:

You are hereby notified that the above-named Plaintiff has filed a civil action against you in the above-entitled Court and cause, the general object thereof being to foreclose a mortgage on property located at 6004 Rincon Road, Roswell, NM 882010535, Chaves County, New Mexico, said property being more particularly described as: LOTS 9, 10, AND 11 IN BLOCK 7 OF GLEN ALTO NO. 2 SUBDIVISION, IN THE COUNTY OF CHAVES AND STATE OF NEW MEXICO, AS SHOWN ON THE OFFICIAL PLAT RECORDED MAY 9, 1955 IN PLAT BOOK C, PAGE 39, REAL PROPERTY RECORDS OF CHAVES COUNTY, NEW MEXICO. And all improvements, including but not limited to, the manufactured home attached thereto.

Unless you serve a pleading or motion in response to the complaint in said cause on or before 30 days after the last publication date, judgment by default will be entered against you. Respectfully Submitted, THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC

By: /s/ __Steven J. Lucero__ Electronically Filed Steven J. Lucero 20 First Plaza NW, Suite 602 Albuquerque, NM 87102 Telephone: (505) 848-9500 Fax: (505) 848-9516 Attorney for Plaintiff NM13-02629_FC01

majors. McIlroy felt lucky to have escaped the worsening conditions. “The weather wasn’t as bad as we thought it was going to be and the wind didn’t pick up,” he said. “So I knew we could take advantage of that, and the greens were a little bit softer as well.” Defending champion Peter Senior had an 81 Friday and did not make the cut. Kevin Streelman, who played with Matt Kuchar in the Ameri-

No. D-504-CV-2013-00079

v.

Plaintiff,

BARRON M. BROOMFIELD, MAGDALENE F. BROOMFIELD, IF LIVING, IF DECEASED, THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, OR LEGATEES OF MAGDALENE F. BROOMFIELD, DECEASED AND THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BARRON M. BROOMFIELD, IF ANY, Defendant(s).

NOTICE OF SUIT

STATE OF New Mexico to the above-named Defendants Magdalene F. Broomfield, if living, if deceased, The Unknown Heirs, Devisees, or Legatees of Magdalene F. Broomfield, deceased and The Unknown Spouse of Barron M. Broomfield, if any. GREETINGS:

You are hereby notified that the above-named Plaintiff has filed a civil action against you in the above-entitled Court and cause, the general object thereof being to foreclose a mortgage on property located at 60 Billy Mitchell PL, Roswell, NM 88203-8007, Chaves County, New Mexico, said property being more particularly described as: Lot 5 in Block 12 of PECOS VALLEY VILLAGE SUBDIVISION Together with an undivided 1/5 interest, in the City of Roswell, in Tract B County of Chaves and State of New Mexico, as shown on the official plat filed in the Chaves County Clerk's Office on August 13, 1980 and recorded in Book H of Plat Records, at Page 21.

Unless you serve a pleading or motion in response to the complaint in said cause on or before 30 days after the last publication date, judgment by default will be entered against you. Respectfully Submitted, THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC

By: /s/ __Steven J. Lucero__ Electronically Filed Steven J. Lucero 20 First Plaza NW, Suite 602 Albuquerque, NM 87102 Telephone: (505) 848-9500 Fax: (505) 848-9516 Attorney for Plaintiff NM12-03734_FC01

VISIT US ONLINE AT RDRNEWS.COM

Legals

can team at last week’s World Cup, retired on the fourth hole due to an eye infection. Playing for the first time in Australia, he was later taken to hospital for treatment. Streelman, playing with Scott and Jason Day, shot 70 in the opening round Thursday and began Friday’s round with a birdie. But as his eye condition worsened, he had a 5 on the par -3 third and a bogey on the par -4 fourth before deciding to retire.

---------------------------------Publish November 30, December 7, 2013

STATE OF NEW MEXCOUNTY OF ICO CHAVES FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT

006. Southwest

2804 S. Wyoming Sat. 7-12 Huge yard sale. Lots of misc. items.

008. Northwest

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT B. NUNEZ, JR., Deceased.

ESTATE SALE Ralph & Joe Boehms 1105 W. 7th 8:00 AM Sharp offered by Karen Hobbs Estate Sales

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

BACK YARD Sale, Many Christmas decorations, cheap, lights, X-mas tree. 1406 N. Washington, Fri, Sat & Sun. 8a-3p

No.PB-13-00062

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Co-Personal Representatives of the Estate of Robert B. Nunez, Jr. All persons having claims against the Estate are required to present their claims within two (2) months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned Co-Personal Representatives’ attorney at the address listed below, or filed with the District Court of Chaves County, New Mexico, located at 400 N. Virginia, Roswell, New Mexico 88201. Dates this 31st day of October 2013. /s/Robert Nunez

Co-Personal Representative

ANNOUNCEMENTS 025. Lost and Found

FOUND KEYS near Enchanted Lands Park, Call 420-4543 MISSING BLONDE Cocker Spaniel, near Barcelona and Mission Arch, any information contact 840-4763 FOUND HEELER dog, call to describe 622-77110 (Animal Control)

INSTRUCTION

EMPLOYMENT

045. Employment Opportunities

/s/Helen Montano

Co-Personal Representative

Submitted By: HENNIGHAUSEN OLSEN, L.L.P.

&

/s/Robert J. McCrea A.J. Olsen Attorneys for the CoPersonal Representatives P.O. Box 1415 Roswell, NM 88202-1415 (575)624-2463-telephone (575)624-2878-facsimile

GARAGE SALES

006. Southwest MOVING SALE, Fri-Sun, 7am-? Computers, clothes, electronics, antiques, fine China, jewelry, much more. 2104 Barnett Dr. Cash Only!

PUT GRAPHICS IN YOUR AD! ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET, YOUR HOUSE, YOUR CAR, YOUR COMPANY’S LOGO!

E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

NEED CASH? Be your own boss & build your business at Blairs Monterey indoor market at 1400 W. 2nd. Booths start at $75 mo Call 623-0136

“It’s pretty rough right now but we’ll see what we can do,” Streelman said. “The doctor said it was pretty badly infected. “I’ve been trying to do some drops but I started getting dizzy and it’s the first time I’ve ever (withdrawn) at a tournament ... I’m really sad to do it.” Streelman won the PGA Tour’s Tampa Bay Championship in March and finished second with Kuchar behind Day and Scott in the team event at the World Cup at Royal Melbourne.

045. Employment Opportunities

Part-time Sales/ Photography Mom365 has an opening for a sales & customer service oriented person to take babies’ first official photos at Lovelace Regional Hospital in Roswell, NM. Spanish is a plus. Apply online at careers@mom365.com EOE.

K-BOBS’ STEAKHOUSE opening soon! Be part of this exciting and dynamic team. Great opportunities for outstanding team members, Apply in person, monday thru friday 9am-5pm. at Sally Port Inn. SOS EMPLOYMENT GROUP is currently hiring for various positions throughout the community. To apply please visit our website at

sosemploymentgroup.com

or call the office at 575-625-1136. Looking to unite talent and opportunity.

ACCOUNTING AND Consulting Group is a regional CPA firm that offers audit, tax, accounting and business consulting services to companies, government institutions and individuals. We are currently seeking Staff and Senior level Accountants to join our team of dedicated professionals at our office in Roswell, NM. You will prepare tax returns and be involved with tax planning, research and compliance. Additionally you will complete audit, review and compilation engagements from start to finish for clients in a variety of industries. We require a Bachelor’s degree in Accounting, CPA license or CPA candidate and a minimum 2 years recent experience. We are proud to offer our employees top salaries and great benefits, including health, life, dental and vision insurance; a generous 401K plan, outstanding continuing education and tuition assistance; business casual dress; and paid time off. To be considered all applicants must apply via our website www.acgnm.com/careers

045. Employment Opportunities

DAIRY QUEEN North is now hiring assistant managers and crew. See Jackie, 1900 N. Main. ADMIRAL BEVERAGE is currently hiring Class A CDL drivers. Position must be filled immediately. Local delivery, excellent pay, hourly and overtime, 4 day work week, affordable health insurance. Great opportunity for someone looking for long term employment. www.admiralbeverage.com PERSONAL ASSISTANT, housekeeping and yard work. Able to pass background check. 415-336-4850 WELLHEAD RESTAURANT/BREWPUB, 332 W. Main Artesia, NM 88210. Currently seeking strong kitchen manager. Must be familiar with grill, fryer, prep work week. Mon thru Sat 60 plus hrs a must. Apply between 2-5 pm. Email address: wellhead@hdc-nm.com IOWA BASED Reefer Company hiring OTR Class “A” CDL semi drivers, late model equipment, scheduled home time, excellent miles. Call Chuck or Tim (800)645-3748 $1500 SIGN-ON Bonus for experienced CDL-A drivers. Get home often & earn 38 cpm. Excellent benefits & CSA friendly equipment. Call 855-430-8869. Paid training for CDL-A school recent grads and drivers with limited experience. Apply online at AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer. CONSTRUCTION NAVY RESERVE. Serve part-time. Elite training. Great pay & benefits. Sign-on bonus up to $20K. Retirement. Call Mon-Fri (800)354-9627 CLASS A CDL Driver needed for Roswell, NM terminal. 5 days per week. Guaranteed pay. Benefits include insurance plan, paid holidays, and paid vacation. Moderate regional travel involved. All out of town expenses paid. For more info please call 575-622-6228 or send resume to P.O. Box 5937 Roswell, NM 8202


CLASSIFIEDS

Roswell Daily Record

045. Employment Opportunities

FRONT DESK ATTENDANT Come Grow With Us! As we expand we are looking for front desk applicants who can work flexible schedules and have reliable transportation. Apply in-person @ 2803 W 2nd FALL RUSH we need 15 people to help with the fall rush, if you are looking for a flexible schedule, holiday bonuses, potential earning up to $1600 dollar per month per written agreement. Call us immediately for all departments, no experience required, 575-578-4817

SERVICES

140. Cleaning

045. Employment Opportunities COURT SECURITY OFFICER SHARED POSITION

MVM, Inc., a growing security government contractor, has a vacancy for a shared Court Security Officer (CSO) to work in the District of New Mexico at our Roswell, NM site. Position requires being available and flexible to accommodate unplanned security schedules and working an average of 20 hours a week.

The primary role of the CSO is to ensure the safety of all federal courts and court employees against unauthorized, illegal, and potentially life-threatening activities. Duties include: • Enforces the District's entry and identification system that includes operating security screening equipment for prohibited items; • Uses security equipment, such as metal detectors and hand-held metal detectors; ensures all equipment is set to USMS standard settings. • Manages and tests all alarms and control panels on a monthly basis. • Patrols court facilities and grounds of the facility in accordance with applicable post orders. • Works stationary posts as assigned and monitors closed circuit television, duress alarm systems and other security equipment, courtrooms, judge chambers, and jury rooms. (CSO does not monitor cellblocks or handle/escort prisoners.) • Provides armed escort services for judges, court personnel, jurors, and other designated individuals. • Directs traffic, controls lights on court facility properties, and monitors vehicles and pedestrians as defined in post orders. • Provides courtroom security as requested by US Marshal; ensures closed courtrooms are secure. • Turns over found “lost” articles to a designated court facility and completed a “Court Facility Incident Report” within 24 hours of the incident. • Prepares daily reports and records of labor hours worked, accidents, fire, bomb threats, or unusual incidents or unlawful acts. • Provides back-up support to Lead Court Security Officer as needed. QUALIFIED CANDIDATES WILL POSSESS THE FOLLOWING:

• Be a citizen of the United States of America. • Be at least 21 years of age. • Be a high graduate or possess a General Educational Development (GED) certificate. • Must undergo and pass USMS suitability and background investigation requirements. • Be able to read, write, and speak the English language fluently. • Must have at least 3 years in the past 7 years of verifiable experience as a certified law enforcement officer or its military equivalency as verified through the applicant's equivalency as verified on DO Form 214, Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty. • Must have completed or graduated from a certified Federal, state, county, local or military law enforcement training academy or program that provided instruction on the use of police powers in an armed capacity while dealing with the public. The certificate must be recognized by a Federal, state, county, local or military authority, and eligible for employment as a law enforcement officer. • Must not have any felony convictions or any conviction related to a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence. • Must pass the background investigation mandated by USMS for CSO applicants. MVM offers a comprehensive pay and benefits package. Hourly rate for this shared CSO position is $20.99. Qualified candidates should apply by sending their resume to: CSONewMexico@mvminc.com

EEO/AA: M/F/D/V

045. Employment Opportunities

THOUGHT OF driving Big Rigs the oil fields are going strong and Companies are looking for CDL Drivers. In less than 2 months you can have your Class A License and making the money you deserve. Classes are forming now. Artesia Training Academy is VA approved, you can call Artesia Training Academy for more information. Or visit our web site. Phone # 575-748-9766 or 1-888-586-0144 Web site: www.artesiatraining.com Check us out on Facebook HIV Prevention Educator Alianza is a local non-profit community based organization that provides services to individuals and families living with and affected by HIV in Southern New Mexico. To be considered for this position interested individuals should have a minimum of high school diploma and a valid NM driver’s license. The perfect candidate will have experience and be comfortable working with diverse cultures and communities; have some basic knowledge about HIV; be self-motivated; willing to travel; and have experience in direct client contact. This would be the perfect opportunity for anyone who wants to have fun, make a difference, and is interested in serving their community. Bilingual is a plus! Starting salary DOE; benefits include health insurance; sick and vacation leave; and paid holidays. Send resume or apply in person at 311 W. 2nd Street, Roswell, NM 88201, or send resume via email to jobs@alianzanm.org. Deadline to apply is May 20, 2013 or until position is filled. Alianza is an EEOE.

045. Employment Opportunities

Avon, Buy/Sell. Become Ind. Sales Rep $10 to start Sandy 317-5079 ISR

JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252 SUNSHINE WINDOW Services. Free estimates. 575-626-5153 or 626-5458

195. Elderly Care

EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER looking to do home health care, and, or house keeping. Have references. 575-317-6350

HOUSE OF Pain is looking for counter help. Customer skills a must. Call House of Pain at 622-6192

200. Fencing

FT/PT car wash help wanted for car rental company, clean driving record and drug free a must. Applications available at Avis Rent a Car inside airport.

ROSWELL ELKS Lodge is looking for experienced wait and/or bartender staff. Servers and bartenders must have a current New Mexico Alcohol & Gaming Division Server's Certificate. Hours vary by week and could include days or evenings and/or weekends. To apply bring or mail your resume to the Roswell Elks, 1720 Montana Ave N, Roswell NM 88201 Attn: Sergio.

M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991 Rodriguez Construction FOR WOOD, metal, block, stucco fencing, Since 1974. Lic. 22689. 420-0100

NEED PART time home health aid for a male quadriplegic. Call 575-420-1860 for interview. IF YOU need extra money, if you are ambitious, if you are available immediately, full time positions available set up and display, general labor, and management. Call for interview 575-578-4817

LINCOLN, NM Small irrigated livestock farm/ranch seeks top notch farm hand (prefer non-smoker/drinker) with strong skills in livestock (cattle and horse) management, barn management skills, welding, fencing and general mechanic. Must have valid NM Drivers license and two references. Housing available for right person/couple. Call 575-653-4041 WITH references for an interview.

210. Firewood/Coal SEASONED MOUNTAIN wood. (1) 4’Tx8’Lx1.6’W stack, split & delivered $120. 575-626-9803 CORDOVA CHIMNEY Sweep. 575-623-5255 or 575-910-7552 MOUNTAIN WOOD for sale, Delivery available. 575-420-5124 FIREWOOD, oak, pinon, cedar, fur, elm, well season, full or half cord, you pick up or delivered. Call Buz 575-420-9751 or Graves Farm 575-622-1889.

220. Furniture Repair WE BUILD and repair furniture. 840-7849 or 626-8466

225. General Construction

Alpha Construction New Construction, remodels, additions, concrete & painting. Lic. & Bonded Call Adam 626-2050

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575)-622-7710 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: 





229. Gutters

We power wash gutters and clean carpets (575) 973-1019

230. General Repair

I DO cement jobs as in driveways, sidewalks & footings. 420-9986 MINOR REPAIRS can make major changes in your home, Call Home Solutions 575-420-9183.

232. Chimney Sweep

CHIMNEY SWEEP Have your woodstove, fireplace, or pellet stove inspected and cleaned. Dust free Guarantee. 39 yrs Exp., Licensed, Insured. Bulldog Janitorial Services 575-308-9988

235. Hauling

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738 RWC. BACKHOE, skid steer, dump truck, bom lift, services. Insured. Call Hector 575-910-8397.

EXPIRES ________

Card # __________________ 3 Digit # (ON BACK OF CARD)________ NAME ____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ PHONE ___________________________________________

WORD AD DEADLINE To Place or Cancel an Ad

COMMERCIAL ACCOUNT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NOON SUNDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM MONDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM TUESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MONDAY, 2:00 PM WEDNESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TUESDAY, 2:00 PM THURSDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WEDNESDAY, 2:00 PM FRIDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .THURSDAY, 2:00 PM POLICY FOR CLASSIFIED ADTAKING

Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

CLASS DISPLAY AND STYLE ADS

NOON - Two Days Prior To Publication. OPEN RATE $10.18 PCI NATIONAL RATE $11.26 PCI. _________________________________________ Contract Rates Available _________________________________________

LEGALS

11:00 AM Two Days Prior To Publication. _________________________________________ CONFIDENTIAL REPLY BOXES Replies Mailed $6.00 - Picked Up $3.50

www.rdrnews.com

Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions.

345. Remodeling

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Fall Clean-up rake leaves, tree trimming, weed eating, haul trash, property clean-up & much more. Call Joseph, 317-2242. KEEP IT clean service, grass, mowing, trimming, pick up leaves, haul off trash, cut down trees 910-2033

285. Miscellaneous Services

WRAP UP your Holiday Shopping with 100% guaranteed, delivered–tothe-door Omaha Steaks! SAVE 67% PLUS 4 FREE Burgers - Many Gourmet Favorites ONLY $49.99. ORDER Today 1-800-773-3095 Use Code 49377DLY or www.OmahaSteaks.com/gifts69

Canada Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. Call today 1-800-661-3783, for $10.00 off your first prescription and free shipping. STRUGGLING WITH YOUR MORTGAGE AND WORRIED ABOUT FORECLOSURE? REDUCE YOUR MORTGAGE & SAVE MONEY. LEGAL LOAN MODIFICATION SERVICES. FREE CONSULTATION. CALL PREFERRED LAW 1-800-915-0432

Professional !!!Holiday Lighting!!! Installation and Takedown (575) 973-1019

310. Painting/ Decorating EXTERIOR/INTERIOR, INSURED. Call Hector 575-910-8397.

330. Plumbing

GAS LINES and plumbing specials, best prices, licensed, 840-9105

Dennis the Menace

B7

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 626-4153. CONCRETE, STUCCO, cabinets, floors, painting, drywall, welding. Call Gerry 575-420-3825

We remodel and make repairs inside and out (575) 973-1019 NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

350. Roofing

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552. RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397 www.rancheroswelding.com

www.rancheroswelding.com

www.rancheroswelding.com

PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE



Saturday, November 30, 2013

GENERAL CONTRACTOR Professional Roofing, Landscaping, Irrigation, Stucco, Tile, Painting, Concrete and Fence Work (575) 973-1019

395. Stucco Plastering

M. G. Horizons All types of Stucco and Wire lath. Free Estimates 623-1991 RWC Lath and Stucco. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397

www.rancheroswelding.com

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL, free estimates, super clean up, 840-9105 Allen’s Tree Srvc. Trim top removal, good clean up. Free estimates. 626-1835

435. Welding

RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insuranced.

www.rancheroswelding.com

Hector (575) 910-8397

FINANCIAL

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale 2BR/1BA, 503 S. Kansas, carport, storage sheds, $69k w/$5k down or trade for ?? 575-973-2353, owner financing available.

490. Homes For Sale 5BR/3BA, 2 car garage, nestled away on Old Clovis Hwy, or could use as a 3br/3ba w/hobby rooms. Comes w/6 acres & water rights & many trees. Mobile home/RV hookup, outbuildings, sheds, $377k, $35k down. Owner financing available, 575-416-1454 or 575-622-6786 3BR, 1 3/4ba, north part of town, 3110 N. Bandolina, 1 car garage, all new carpet, paint & roof, 2 blks from swimming pool. Priced to sell, $108,000. Owner may finance w/large down payment. 622-5031 or 420-1022 FSBO: CUTE, clean, remodeled 2br/1ba, large laundry room, all appliances, washer/dryer & dishwasher included, large fenced front & backyard, $35k OBO. 575-624-1627 for appointment.

FSBO: 1809 Western, fully renovated, 1470 sqft brick home on large corner lot, 3/2/carport, great buy at $109,500. For info, 575-914-1272. FSBO: Xnice 3br/1ba, with appliances, 1004 S. Plains Park, $78,500.

FSBO: 3/2/1, close to ENMMC & Lovelace, schools & shopping, $110,000. Call 910-1605.

2BR/1BA, LARGE living room w/laundry room, 409 W. Summit, 912 sqft, gross living area. 806-729-2383 JUST IN time for Christmas, house for sale by owner, MOVE IN READY, 216 W. McGaffy living room, dining, 3bd, laundry room, 2 ba, patio, 2 car garage and cart port, price reduced $74.9K. CASH. Zone residential or commercial, Call 575-637-1985 Connie or 575-637-1964 anytime for appt.

Immaculate custom home in Briar Ridge, 3yrs old, 3br/2ba, 81 Bent Tree Rd., $132,900. 831-915-0226

492. Homes for Sale/Rent

BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY home on 5 acres, 5037 W. Berrendo Rd., pictures & information on forsalebyowner.com listing #23966971. Call 575-626-2280. FSBO: 3/2/1, This home is unique because of its interior design & features. Fireplace, covered patio, separate cottage, private yards, plenty of storage space & more. It’s in very good condition & is energy efficient. Great home for relaxing or entertaining. Sorry no owner financing. $89,500. 700 S. Richardson Ave. Call for appt., 575-622-1204.

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

16 ACRES +/-, fenced, underground electricity, domestic water well (3 ac. ft. per year), well house, private entrance gate, excellent homesite/great views, 5037 1/2 W. Berrendo Rd. 575-626-2280 LENDER SALE. 20 acres $14,000 BORDERS STATE LAND! 2 hours east of Albuquerque, 2 miles to Sumner Lake. Good road access, power. Only one available! 1-888-676-6979 LENDER SALE. 20 acres $14,000 BORDERS STATE LAND! 2 hours east of Albuquerque, 2 miles to Sumner Lake. Good road access, power. Only one available! 1-888-676-6979

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

NORTH SENIOR Park beautiful 2bd/2ba spacious triple wide. 1500 sqft. All NEW flooring, fixtures & toilets. Appliances & NEW window coverings included. 626-5353

520. Lots for Sale

PREMIUM 5 acre tracts, good covenants (no mobile homes), Pecan Lands West on Brown Rd between Country Club & Berrendo. Owner will finance with 10% down. 622-3479, 624-9607, 626-6790, 626-6791, 626-3848. LOT FOR sale in Roswell, at RIAC on E. Wells, 100x100 clean lot, owner finance $7500, $1500dn, $200mo, 0% int. 575-361-3083. 74’x100’ RESIDENTIAL Lot, Southwest Roswell. $12k. (575) 910-5749 Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 50x134 $19,500. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. 420-1352.

RENTALS

SELL OR RENT YOUR HOUSE FASTER! INCLUDE A PICTURE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

HUMAN RESOURCES CLERK

Leprino Foods Company, the nation’s premier manufacturer of mozzarella cheese, is seeking a highly motivated individual with strong administrative skills to fill this entry-level position. The successful candidate will be responsible for providing part-time clerical support to the HR department with an emphasis on assisting the clerical needs of the plant’s training and development initiatives Qualifications: • Skilled in Microsoft Office Suite, SAP, Kronos, Groupwise, Print Shop, Internet etc. • Knowledge of office operations, i.e. knowledge of operating printer, copier, fax etc. • Ability to complete tasks in a timely manner. • High degree of detail orientation and accuracy. • Must have strong organizational and communication skills. • Must be able to work independently. • Must be able to work with a high degree of confidentiality and within HIPPA regulations.

Responsibilities/Duties • Hardcopy document filing (safety training, job training, personnel information, medical information & legal information) • Data input in the Learning Management System. • Creation and maintenance of various spreadsheets. • Special projects/requests as assigned by HR team. • Run job training and safety reports from the LMS. • This position serves as the backup for the Staff Management Secretary. If you meet the qualifications and are interested please apply online at www.leprinofoods.com. Leprino Foods is an equal opportunity employer supporting a drug and tobacco free workplace M/F/D/V

535. Apartments Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722.


B8 Saturday, November 30, 2013 540. Apartments Unfurnished

FIRST MONTH FREE 3br/2ba, $753, 1000 sqft, all bills paid, cold central AC, newly remodeled, 502 S. Wyoming, 622-4944. 1&2Bd, 3 locations, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN. EFF, 1 & 2br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. 1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281 HOLIDAY SPECIAL ON DEPOSITS!! Better living is within reach! 2br/1ba $592 deposit $200. 3br/2ba $674 deposit $250. 5br/2ba $812 deposit $425. Central H/C,fridge, stove, DW,GD,W/D hookups, 2 refreshing pools, Section 8 Vouchers accepted, Villas of Briar Ridge. 623-7711 EFF, 1,2 BR, downtown, clean, wtr pd. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD. 623-8377 Very nice condo 2br 1 bath duplex 1 car garage No Hud no pets or smoking, Avail. Jan.1st $675 mo. 575-200-9558 300 W. 9th, 2br/2ba, laundry room, 910-4225. Roswell Apartment 2br/1ba, stove & fridge, a/c, heating air, washer/dryer hookup, water paid. 1-626-864-3461 ALL BILLS PAID 1BR $544, 2BR $653, 3br/2ba $753/mo., ref air, newly remodeled. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944

FIRST MONTH FREE 3br/2ba, $753, 1000 sqft, all bills paid, cold central AC, newly remodeled, 502 S. Wyoming, 622-4944. 2br/1ba, stove & refrigerator. Call 840-4333 or 910-8170. Very nice 2br/1.5ba, Apartment. North location, garage, $800/mo, $400/dep, 1 yr lease, no HUD or pets, 420-4535.

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 WORKERS- NEED an extended stay rental, all bills paid? Furnished homes $990-$2550/month, pet yards, washers, dryers, BBQs. Credit cards, bi-weekly payment welcome! Call anytime (575) 624-3258, 626-4822. www.cozycowboy.com 2BR/2BA, 1 car garage, townhouse, fully furnished, close to Lovelace & ENMMC, secluded area. 575-910-1605

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished 409 N. Railroad. 3bd/1ba, stove, refrigerator, no pets, $550/mo, $300/dep. 910-9648.

2&3Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 1516 N. Pontiac, 2 br, 1 ba, near parks, new stove & new ref, W/D hookups, hardwood floors, completely remodeled, fenced yard, very clean and cute, $625 monthly, plus dep., No large dogs (small or medium okay), No HUD. References and Rental History required. Call 578-3034 3BR NEAR ENMU-R, #20 Murphy Place, HUD approved, w/garage, ldry rm, new carpet, very clean, $650/mo. 623-6999 or 317-2945 2br/1ba, centrally located, $540/mo + bills, call or text after 5pm, 915-255-8335 TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262 $850/MO, $750/DEP, 3br/1.5ba, No HUD or pets, 575-420-5930 2BR/1BA STOVE, refrigerator, wtr paid, credit and background check, adults preferred, not pets no HUD. Call for appt. 575-626-5791 307 E. Poe, 2br/1ba, $650/mo + dep, 575-626-9347. TWO FOUR bedroom homes available. Country living w/city conv. 4br/3ba, dbl car garage, fireplace, sunroom-drive by 1700 E. Mescalero. All appliances including washer & dryer, 3 car garage, great location at 1302 Sierra Blanca Circle. Call Sherlea Taylor, 575-420-1978 or 575-624-2219. 1BR, PREFER elderly couple or single person. Call 622-2670.

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished 609 S. Kentucky 4br/2ba, No HUD, $700/mo, $300/dep. Call 317-1371 2 BEDROOM house close to Lawrence Bros. 622-8697, call after 5pm 600 S. Lea, 3br/2ba, ref. air, w/d hookups, no HUD or pets, $750/mo, $600/dep, 914-5402.

305 N. Washington, $1400/mo, 4br/2ba; 213 N. Michigan, 2/1/1, $750/mo, wtr pd + $750/dep; 105 S. Ohio, 1br/1ba, $550/mo + $300/dep, utilities included. Call 840-6451. 2BR, 1BA, 606 A. S. Wyoming $550 mo., $400 dep. Call Julie 505-220-0617 or 575-840-4749 3107 RADCLIFF, 3br/1.5ba, washer & dryer, newly remodeled kitchen includes dishwasher, $775/mo + dep., no smoking or HUD, Call 915-6498 or 915-6490. OUR RETIREES call this fourplex home, we have won apt. Available for you, 2406 1/2 N. Grand D. 2 /2/1 extremely nice, and under rent market, at $600, wtr pd. For retiree 575-317-8854 34 H St., $550/mo, $550/dep, 2br/1ba, fenced yard, wtr pd, min. 1yr lease, 627-9942. 305 S. Evergreen, 2br/1ba, coverd carport, shed, appliances, fenced yard, $750/$500 dep, dogs w/fee, no HUD or utilities pd. 575-405-0163 or kilok9s@gmail.com

555. Mobile Homes for Rent

WHY RENT? Own 3br/2ba mobile home. 48 mon. with possible home owner financing. Upgraded-almost new, roof, heat pump, vinyl siding and plumbing, includes refrg., stove, dish washer, washer & dryer, in close debt, large carport, storage bldg. North senior adult park, 317 6870. #057

558. Roommates Wanted

ROOM FOR rent, cable, phone, washer/dryer, $350/mo. 575-578-7004

580. Office or Business Places 200 S. Union. Two suites, approximately 1200 sqft & 810 sqft. Great location. Will remodel to suit tenant. Call Jan at 625-2222. 1139 S. MAIN Over 2200 sqft, all new plumbing, electrical, ref. air, wired for individual offices. $2000/mo. 626-6765

FOR LEASE, space in Sunwest Centre Office Complex at 500 N. Main St. Various size spaces. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. High floor space available for larger tenants. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 575-623-1652 or mobile 575-420-2546

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

NEED FURNITURE Shop Blair’s for the best prices on used furniture, beds, dressers, table & chairs, living room sets, patio sets, bookshelves, appliances, antiques, collectibles, home decor & housewares, saddles, tools, movies, plus lots more. Open daily 9-5, closes Wed. 627-2033

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

FOR SALE, a private collection of 48 beautiful paintings by Ann Koziol. She has sold may paintings all around the world. You can buy 1 or more paintings. Also, agent wanted. Call 578-0805. Pwr wheelchair, hospital bed, lift chair, Invacare patient lifter. 622-7638 Contour chair recline & vibration, walker, elevated toilet seat, 622-7638. 4 REGULAR file cabinets $30 each, 2 fire proof file cabinets $100 each, small metal desk $50, queen mattress set $50, queen headboard $25, full mattress set $50, 1 chair with ottoman $75, Hover Round electric chair rebuilt never used $1000. misc. items.running boards for GMC ACADIA 575-623-7678. DIRECTV - Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Call Now! Triple savings! $636.00 in Savings, Free upgrade to Genie & 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free!! Start saving today! 1-800-264-0340 DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-315-7043 STANDARD 7 pieces dining pecan wood, $200 OBO. Call 575-291-2068

SPORTS SHOP Tammy’s Sports Shop, 1400 W. 2nd, has the largest selection of NFL logo items in SE NM. We have T-shirts, bedding, jewelry, purses, wallets, caps, signs, clocks, toys, baby items, cups & mugs, flags, game day items, plus lots more. Open everyday, 10-8, 623-0136.

STOP AND SHOP Blair’s Indoor market, 1400 W. 2nd. For great deals from A to Z. Large selection of NFL items, body jewelry, $1 jewelry & bows. Smoke pipes, hookahs, clothing, shoes, boots, caps, toys, antiques, collectibles, tools, stereos, herbs & remedies, Avon, plus a snack bar. Open everyday from 10-8, 575-623-0136. HEAVY DUTY flatbed trailer, 6 brand new tires, $3900. 622-6786 or 575-416-1454

INVENTORY SALE after closing my store, buy in bulk or by the piece, body jewelry (tongue, eyebrow, lip, belly, gauges and more) NFL items, collector signs, jewelry, hair accessories, knives and lighters, many alien items (shirt, totes, sun glasses, toys, mugs, and more) Some displays available, call 910-1536

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

TOP PRICES paid for household items, furniture, appliances, antiques, collectibles, tools, saddles, plus anything else of value. We buy compete household & estates. 623-0136 or 910-6031

CLASSIFIEDS

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

AH Nuts is buying pecans starting November 25th, Monday thru Friday 9am-11:30am, at 4402 N. Brown Road, 575-208-9575.

745. Pets for Sale

CHOCOLATE LAB puppies, 2 females, ready after Thanksgiving, $350, deposit $150, serious inquires only, 575-637-9407

RECREATIONAL 780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

630. Auction Sales

ADVERTISE YOUR AUCTION in 33 New Mexico newspapers for only $100. Your 25-word classified ad will reach more than 288,000 readers. Call this newspaper for more details. Or log onto www.nmpress.org for a list of participating newspapers.

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com HUNTER SPECIAL, clean 21ft fifth wheel, sleeps 4, new tires. 609 S. Cedar.

635. Good things to Eat

FROZEN GREEN Chile, dried red chile & chile powder, local pinto beans, peanuts & pecan, ristras, jams & jellies, fountain drinks, fresh eggs, Alfalfa Hay, Wheat, Sudan & Oat hay, small & large bales, we accept credit cards & EBT. GRAVES FARM 622-1889

705. Land/Gardening/ Fertilizer

QUALITY MOUNTAIN Top soil from Ruidoso now available to Roswell Residents. Please call Guardiola Construction at (575) 937-3015 for pricing and delivery options.

715. Hay and Feed Sale

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

ALFALFA BALES 4x8 $225, Sorgum bales 4x8 $75, Oat bales 4x8 $100. Call Janet at 575-626-0159

720. Livestock & Supplies

SHOW US WHAT YOU’RE SELLING! INCLUDE A PICTURE IN YOUR AD FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

1999 PLYMOUTH Breeze, runs great, $1000 down w/approved credit, 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 420-1352.

2003 OLDSMOBILE Alero, excellent cond., 4 cyl., $1500 down w/approved credit, 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 420-1352. 2001 FORD Explorer, automatic, low miles, $1000 down w/approved credit, 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 420-1352.

SADDLE & TACK AUCTION SAT. NOV. 30TH 2:30PM (AFTERNOON) CHAVES CTY. SHERIFF’S POSSE BLDG 1403 E. POE / ROSWELL. Great selection of Saddles! 1000’s of Tack items! Work & show gear, cowhides, decorative items and more! Bringing BIG savings to you for over 40 yrs! Saddle trade-ins welcome! (940) 365-3188

1999 PLYMOUTH Breeze, runs great, $1000 down w/approved credit, 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 420-1352. 2008 CHEVY Impala, 4dr, 6 cyl, excellent cond., $5850, 420-1352.

www.westernsuppliers.net

745. Pets for Sale

FOR SALE 2005 Lincoln Town car, low miles, great condition. Asking $14,000 Call 420-3151 after 5pm

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

‘97 CHEVY S-10 4x4 pickup, great 1st car, $1500 down w/approved credit, 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 420-1352. 1999 FORD Van, Handi-capped equipped. power lift, power drivers’ seat, hand controls. $7,500. Meg 575-317-8659

ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET FOR SALE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

2008 FORD F150, ext cab, heavy duty 4x4, tow package, only 88k miles, $14,850. 420-1352

DASCHUNDS, AKC registered, puppies, 2F, 3M, four very rare dapple colors, males $500, females $600 obo, 1st shots, ready by Christmas (8 wks). 575-626-1900 DESIGNER HYBRID Chotties (Scottys/Chi-X), 2F $125, also Chi-Pins (Min-Pin + Chi-X), 2M, 1F, 10 wks old w/1st shots. Call or text before 3pm, 575-910-8311

2008 F-350, V8 Auto, $7500 OBO. 575-420-4897 1996 CHEVI, 1 ton pickup 120,000 miles crew cab, goose nick hitch, good pickup. $7000. 626-4173

796. SUVS

2008 NISSAN Pathfinder LE, 4x4, 74,000 mi Fully loaded 575-910-1988 ‘01 FORD Expedition XLT, 4 wheel drive, excellent cond., $4350, 420-1352.

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CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Announcements

005 Special Notice 010 Card of Thanks 015 Personals/Special 020 Transportation 025 Lost & Found

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted

2008 FORD Crown Victoria, V8, low miles, excellent cond., $2500 down w/approved credit, 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 420-1352.

HAY GRAZER hay for sale, big square bales, $65/bale, in Elida. 575-760-0601

Roswell Daily Record

Roswell Daily Re

cord 575-622-7710 • RDRNEWS.COM

GARAGE & YARD SALE KITS To make your sale more successful!

Includes: • 3 Signs • Pricing Stickers + Tax • Yard Sale Tips Includes: • 6 Signs • Pricing Stickers + Tax • Yard Sale Tips

Employment

045 Employment Opportunities 050 Salesperson/Agents 055 Employment Agencies 060 Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

440 Window Repair 441 Window Cleaning 445 Wrought Iron 450 Services Wanted

Financial

455 Money: Loan/Borrow 456 Credit Cards 460 Insurance Co. 465 Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale 470 Investment: Stocks/Sale 475 Mortgages for Sale 480 Mortgages Wanted 485 Business Opportunities

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos

11 30 13 Roswell Daily Record  

11 30 13 Roswell Daily Record

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