Page 1

Roswell Daily Record THE VOICE OF THE PECOS VALLEY

Vol. 122, No. 259 75¢ Daily / $1.25 Sunday

October 29, 2013

NMMI, Association conclude first arguments www.rdrnews.com

caused confusion with alumni and permanent harm to the school, during the two-day hearing that started Oct. 15 and resumed Monday. “We’ve been using the marks continuously for over 100 years,” said NMMI attorney Parker Folse, with the law firm Hinkle, Hensley, Shanor and Martin. “Whether it’s registered or not, is a red herring.” NMMI attorneys stuck to the facts throughout the hearing that pointed to the Association’s Memorandum of Agreement, signed March 30, 2012. In this contract, the Association agreed to discontinue using the names, marks and logos if ties were severed. NMMI’s Board of Regents cut ties with the Association, voiding the agreement, in April, following a failed negotiation over financial

JILL MCLAUGHLIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

New Mexico Military Institute finished arguments Monday asking a judge to immediately order its former Alumni Association to stop using the school’s name and logos. Eddy County District Court Judge Jane Shuler -Grey will decide in the next week or two whether to place a restraining order against the Association for continuing to use “NMMI” logos, crests, name and images. NMMI asked the judge to hear this part of its lawsuit immediately as the Association’s continued use of the school’s name and logos was causing “irreparable harm.” The Institute was tasked with providing testimony that the Association’s use of its name and logos

issues. Per the agreement and after the Association voted to stop working things out with the school, the group was kicked off campus in April. But, the Association regrouped and continued fundraising and using NMMI’s insignias. Shuler-Grey asked whether the Association could rename itself and continue to raise money to give to students. “No,” Folse said. “The Institute will no longer do business with them. In order for a state agency to receive those funds, there has to be a written agreement. That agreement has been terminated.” The non-profit is now located at a hotel nearby and maintains more than $5 million in funds that are also in dispute.

TUESDAY

NMMI has asked the judge to seize the $5 million in earmarked funds, meant for cadet scholarships, and an additional account the Association uses to operate. That issue will need to be heard at a later time, said NMMI attorney Richard Olson. A fracture began within the Association following its banishment from school property and decision to fight the Institute. Some alumni continue to side with new Association President John Phinizy and its board, and others have pledged to remain loyal to NMMI. Phinizy has spearheaded the defense in what he has called a “fight” against NMMI, in the Institute’s lawsuit. The Association’s attorney, Jeffrey Dahl, argued that NMMI’s case

was not warranted, and “harsh.”

“There really is no evidence here or irreparable injury,” Dahl told the court. “They are basing their case on the premise that they own this name, they own their trademarks and logos. They make the claim, they’ve been using it longer.”

Dahl said the judge needed to find a balance of equities and move forward to hear the entire case.

Shuler -Grey said it was her understanding that every university’s alumni group raises money to flow into the school, not to give back to its alumni organization. “Frankly, with alumni relationships, the money really only flows one way,” Shuler-Grey told Dahl. “Really everything is going to hinge on that Memorandum of Agreement.”

History haunts Lantern Tours at Fort Stanton City opts for in-house attorney JILL MCLAUGHLIN RECORD STAFF WRITER

Josh Judy does woodworking at the barracks at Fort Stanton during the Lantern Tours, Saturday evening.

TESS TOWNSEND RECORD STAFF WRITER

“Halt, who comes there?” asks a guard with a rifle resting on his shoulder. Tony Davis, a volunteer guide at Fort Stanton, explains to the guard that he is bringing a tour

group through the premises. Though the year is 2013 in the rest of the world, at Fort Stanton’s Lantern Tours on Saturday evening it was still the 19th century. The tours have been an annual tradition for the past half-decade. Fort manager Larry Pope said this

was the first year when visitors could enter buildings as part of the tour. The tour included six vignettes spanning the beginning of the Civil War and progressing into the American Indian Wars of the 1880s. Skits change every year, but always convey a piece of fort

Mark Wilson Photo

history. The fort was built in 1855. It was first used as a base of operations against the Mescalero Apache Indians. Since then, it has functioned as a tuberculosis See TOURS, Page A3

The city will start searching to hire a city attorney, possibly this week, following a council decision last week to stop paying for outside legal counsel, Mayor Del Jurney said Monday. City councilors held a special meeting Thursday to decide if the city should continue contracting with attorney Barbara Patterson or hire an in-house lawyer. “There was a very positive discussion about the pros and cons of each philosophical direction,” Jur ney said. “There are certainly advantages and disadvantages on each.” Councilors Steve Henderson, Art Sandoval and Jason Perry voted to continue operating with outside legal services. The council decided in September to temporarily extend outside attor ney Barbara Patterson’s contract for legal services until Dec. 31. The contract calls for paying her firm $12,784.92

Europe mulls sanctions against US over spying Person of interest in

AP Photo

In this Jan. 17 file photo, a man speaks on a cell phone in the business district of Madrid. A Spanish newspaper published a document Monday that it said shows the U.S. National Security Agency spied on more than 60 million phone calls in Spain in one month alone — the latest revelation about alleged massive U.S. spying on allies.

BERLIN (AP) — The United States could lose access to an important law enforcement tool used to track terrorist money flows, German officials said Monday, as Europe weighed a response to allegations that the Americans spied on their closest European allies.

In Washington, Senate Intelligence Committee Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein called for a “total review” of all U.S. intelligence programs in response to the allegations — activity the California Democrat said she wasn’t told about. Feinstein said that while her commit-

HIGH 86 LOW 46

TODAY’S FORECAST

tee was informed of the National Security Agency’s collection of phone records under a secret court order, it “was not satisfactorily informed” that “certain surveillance activities have been in effect for more than a decade” — including eavesdropping on German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s own cell phone. She said President Barack Obama was also not told that Merkel’s communications were being collected since 2002. “With respect to NSA collection of intelligence on leaders of U.S. allies— including France, Spain, Mexico and Germany—let me state unequivocally: I am totally opposed,” Feinstein said in a statement Monday. “Unless the United States is engaged in hostilities against a country or there is an emergency need for this type of surveillance, I do not believe the United States should be collecting phone calls or emails of friendly presidents and prime ministers,” Feinstein said. “The president should be required to approve any collection of this sort.” Spain became the latest U.S. ally to demand answers after a Spanish newspaper reported that the NSA monitored more than 60 million phone calls in that

• CALVIN LEE ROBERTS JR. (PETE) • GEORGE SALCIDO • STOARMY J. (MILLER) VARGAS

explosives case arrested JESSICA PALMER RECORD STAFF WRITER

David Baca, 34, who was listed as a person of interest in the Roswell explosives case, was apprehended near Odessa, Texas, on Friday, following a shootout with authorities. Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms spokesDavid Baca man Sgt. Raphael Martinez confirmed that Baca was arrested by the Texas Department of Public Safety and Ector County Sheriff’s Department. Baca and another unnamed person from Roswell became involved in an exchange of gunfire after stealing a vehicle. The Ector County Sheriff’s Department reported that two people were injured during the gun fight See BACA, Page A3

See SPYING, Page A3

TODAY’S OBITUARIES • PAGE A6

See ATTORNEY, Page A3

CLASSIFIEDS ..........B6 COMICS .................B4 ENTERTAINMENT .....B5 FINANCIAL ..............B5

INDEX GENERAL ...............A2 HOROSCOPES .........B5 LOTTERIES .............A2 NATION ..................A6

SPORTS .................B1

WEATHER ..............A8 OPINION .................A4


A2 Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Apprehended

GENERAL

White House gives green light to limited waiver on health care penalty

Courtesy Photo

Roswell’s Most Wanted Wayne Lamorder, who was wanted on charges of aggravated battery of a household member following an incident that occurred on Oct. 10, was arrested around 5:30 p.m. Saturday at the Roswell Police Station.

CORRECTION

received $320,000 in approved funds in fiscal year 2013 and ENMMC received $4 million, not the reverse as was stated in the original article.

An article in Saturday’s paper titled, “Providers to see less uncompensated claims coverage” incorrectly stated the amount of Indigent Health Care Services funding approved for Lovelace Health System and Eastern New Mexico Medical Center in Chaves County. Lovelace

The Roswell Daily Record regrets the error.

WA S H I N G T O N ( A P ) — With website woes ongoing, the Obama administration Monday granted a six-week extension until March 31 for Americans to sign up for coverage next year and avoid new tax penalties under the pr esident’s health car e overhaul law. The move had been expected since White House spokesman Jay Car ney pr omised quick action last week to resolve a “disconnect” in the implementation of the law. It comes as technical problems continue to trouble the website designed as the main enrollment portal for people who don’t get health care at work. As a consequence, Republican lawmakers, and some Democrats as well, are calling for a oneyear delay in the penalties most Americans will face starting next year if they remain uninsured. Monday’s action by the administration stops well short of that, and amounts only to a limited adjustment. Under the latest policy change, people who sign up by the end of open

Police investigate officer-involved shooting The New Mexico State Police is investigating another of ficer -involved shooting that occurred in Lea County on Sunday.

Roswell NMSP Dispatch were contacted. around 6 p.m., about Amy Reyna who had several federal warrants in Texas and New Mexico. The Denver City,

LOTTERY NUMBERS

Texas, Police Department and the Yoakum County Sheriff’s Department pursued the vehicle in which Reyna was a passenger, after a Yoakum County deputy stopped it and recognized her.

The driver of the vehicle fled and was arrested after a short foot pursuit. Reyna,

Roadrunner Cash 3-13-18-28-33 Pick 3 4-4-8

Roswell Daily Record

35, got into the driver’s seat and continued driving toward New Mexico.

YCSD and DCPD asked for assistance from Lea County Sherif f’s Of fice. Once inside the State borders, Reyna veered off State Road 132 near mile marker 9, about 15 miles north of Hobbs, and entered pas-

ture land. Reyna abandoned the vehicle.

The combined law enforcement agencies surrounded her. Officers discharged their weapons. She died as result of the gunshot wounds she received at the scene.

News & Business Telephone 622-7710 Circulation Telephone 622-7730 Charles Fischer Publisher

cfischer@rdrnews.com R. Cory Beck Publisher (1987-2006)

Jim Dishman .....................................................Circulation Director jdishman@rdrnews.com

Published daily except Monday at 2301 N. Main St., Roswell, N.M. 88201. Copyright Notice The entire contents of the Roswell Daily Record, including its flag on Page 1, are fully protected by copyright and registry and cannot be reproduced in any form for any purpose without written permission from the Daily Record.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES by carrier delivery in Roswell: $10 per month, payable in advance. Prices may vary in some areas.

MAIL SUBSCRIPTION RATES: ALL NEW MEXICO 882 ZIP CODES, $12 ONE MONTH, $36 THREE MONTHS, $72 SIX MONTHS, $144 ONE YEAR. All other New Mexico zip codes, $13 one month, $39 three months, $78 six months, $156 one year. All other states in USA, $18 one month, $54 three months, $108 six months, $216 one year. Periodical-postage paid at Roswell, N.M. Postmaster: Please mail change of address to Roswell Daily Record, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202-1897. All postal subscriptions will stop at expiration unless payment is made prior to expiration.

enrollment season March 31 will not face a penalty. That means procrastinators get a grace period. Previously you had to sign up by the middle of February, guaranteeing that your coverage would take effect March 1, in or der to avoid fines for being uninsured. The extension — granted for 2014 only — addresses confusion that was created when the administration set the first open enrollment period under the law from Oct. 1-March 31. The problem was that health insurance coverage typically starts on the first day of a given month, and it takes up to 15 days to process applications. So somebody signing up March 16 — well within the open enrollment period — wouldn’t get coverage until April 1, thereby risking a penalty for being uninsured part of the year. The administration “has determined that it would be unfair to require individuals in this situation to make a (penalty) payment,” the Health and Human Services department said in guidance issued Monday evening.

As a result, the department is creating a special one-time hardship exemption for people who get covered by March 31. And they won’t have to file additional paperwork to apply for the exemption. The mandate to carry health insurance is the most unpopular requirement of the health care law. It’s meant to nudge as many people as possible into the insurance pool. That would help keep premiums in check, since the law also forbids insurers from turning away people with health problems. Mindful of the need to sign up lots of healthy uninsured people, the administration released an analysis Monday that concludes nearly half of uninsured single young adults could buy a “bronze” level plan for $50 or less a month, after tax credits to of fset the cost of premiums. The inconsistency between the law’s coverage requirements and the administration’s schedule for the initial open enrollment season was first pointed out by the Jackson Hewitt tax preparation company.

TRAIN IN CARLSBAD HIT BY VANDALISM

CARLSBAD (AP) — A Carlsbad retiree who helps care for a nearly century-old railroad locomotive is disappointed by recent vandalism to the artifact. According to the Carlsbad Current-Argus, vandals recently targeted the engine with paint guns, damaged wood around window areas and took a smokestack lid. The missing lid is black. It has a thick band around it and a ball-hitch attached to the top. ROSWELL DAILY RECORD

CALL 622-7710

SHOOTING VICTIM NAME REVEALED

On Monday, police released the name of Friday night’s shooting victim as Stoarmy Vargas, 22. Police responded to a shots fired call around 7:30 p.m. Friday to the area of Cherry Street and Edgewood Avenue. When officers arrived at the scene, they discovered Vargas had been shot and killed. The investigation is ongoing and there is no further information being released at this time. “Real Estate Corner”

USPS No 471-200

Roswell Daily Record

“MOVING FOR BUSINESS”

By Connie DeNio of Roswell 622-7191 or 626-7948

A business relocation requires expert assistance in two fields: taxes and real estate. In addition to providing information on deductible moving expenses and capital gains ramifications, a tax professional can keep you abreast of complicated, constantly changing IRS regulations. Your tax situation will impact how much house

you can afford, and that’s where a real estate professional comes in. While working to sell your present home he or she can connect with a Realtor in your new town. You will receive up-do-date information on neighbors, prices, schools and other criteria as well as on specific homes before you even visit the community Call Me Today!©

Ritter and Company PRESENTS THE

28th Annual

PECOS VALLEY ROUNDUP

BRUCE RITTER MEMORIAL RUN A benefit for Youth Challenge

20K-10K Run • 2 Mile Run 2 Mile Walk • 10K Walk

Saturday, November 2, 2013


GENERAL

Roswell Daily Record

Tours

Continued from Page A1

hospital, internment site for German soldiers during World War II and other purposes. Pope said the timing of the tour only incidentally falls around Halloween, but that the proximity of the holiday is still appropriate. “We’re kind of like showing ghosts,” Pope said. He described how the actors speak to each other as though no one is watching, much as ghosts would. Davis insists that the group is “mule skinners and teamsters, all.” He leads them by candle light into the barracks. The next stop after the barracks is the officer’s quarters, where a mother discusses finishing school with her 13year-old daughter. In the 19th century, wealthy families frequently sent their teenage daughters to finishing school to prepare them for marriage. The actresses are Pope’s wife and daughter. Pope’s daughter Emily complains that she won’t be able to ride horses when she is shipped off to Atlanta, Georgia. “There’s just some things young ladies have to give up and riding your horses is one of them,” mother Sena says. The Pope family has been involved in reenactment for decades, as have many other volunteers on set Saturday. After the officer’s quarters comes the home of the commanding officer. The officer and his wife receive news of the outbreak of the Civil War. A buffalo soldier is stationed at the penultimate stop on the tour. The term “buffalo solider” originally refers to members of the all-black U.S. 10th Cavalry Regiment established in 1866, which fought against American Indian tribes. In early-1880s the scene, Linus Hinton of Tucson, Ariz., portrays a soldier who must go in search of Apache Indian Chief Victorio. The chief has left the Apache reservation without permission from the U.S. government. “Saddle up Goldy, here. We’re gonna go out and bring him in,” says Hinton. Hinton said he’s performed in reenactments as a hobby for 22 years. His friend Shifra Boehelje of Concho, Arizona, who portrayed the soldier’s wife, said she’s been performing more than 40 years. The last stop on the tour is the artillery, where cavalry and infantry soldiers perform a drill. Pat Pillar of Ruidoso participated in a tour Saturday with her husband. She said she and her spouse make frequent visits to the fort and that they attended the first annual lantern tour about five years ago. “It was so incredible the first time,” Pillar said. “We just love what they’re doing to the fort and how they’re rebuilding it.”

S u p p o r t t h e U n i t e d Wa y

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

A3

Spying

Attorney

country during one month alone. The report Monday in the daily El Mundo came on the heels of allegations of massive NSA spying in France and Germany. With European leaders dissatisfied with the U.S. response so far, officials have been casting about for a way to pressure Washington to provide details of past surveillance and assurances that the practice will be curbed. The challenge is to send a strong message to Washington against wholesale spying on European citizens and institutions without further damage to the overall trans-Atlantic relationship. As possible leverage, German authorities cited last week’s non-binding resolution by the European Parliament to suspend a post-9/11 agreement allowing the Americans access to bank transfer data to track the flow of terrorist money. German Justice Minister Sabine Leutheusser-Schnarrenberger said Monday she believed the Americans were using the information to gather economic intelligence apart from terrorism and that the deal, popularly known as the SWIFT agreement, should be suspended. That would represent a sharp rebuke to the United States from some of its closest partners. “It really isn’t enough to be outraged,” she told rbbInforadio. “This would be a signal that something can happen and make clear to the Americans that the (EU’s) policy is changing.” Suspending the agreement, officially known as the Terrorist Finance Tracking Program, would require approval by an overwhelming majority of the 28 European Union countries. The agreement allows access to funds transferred through the private, Belgium-based Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication, which handles the movement of money between banks worldwide. Asked Monday if the NSA intelligence gathering had been used not only to protect national security but American economic interests as well, White House spokesman Jay Carney said: “We do not use our intelligence capabilities for that purpose. We use it for security purposes.” Still, he acknowledged the tensions with allies over the eavesdropping disclosures and said the White House was “working to allay those concerns,” though he refused to discuss any specific reports or provide details of internal White House discussions. The German justice minister’s comments follow days of vocal indignation in Berlin after German news weekly Der Spiegel reported the NSA had kept tabs on Merkel’s phone calls since as early as 2002, three years before she became chancellor. Merkel said Friday that she was open to the idea of suspending the SWIFT agreement, saying she “needed to look at this again more closely” and weigh “what we will lose for the security of our citizens and what we don’t.” Germany and other European governments have made clear they don’t favor suspending the U.S.-EU trade talks which began last summer because both sides stand to gain so much through the proposed deal, especially against competition from China and other emerging markets.

per month, plus incidentals. The board held a workshop later that month and invited Mike Stone, in-house attorney for the City of Hobbs, to share his expertise and background knowledge with them. Roswell is currently paying $240,000 a year for outside legal services, according to City Manager Larry Fry. Stone’s department’s entire budget is $450,000 to $500,000, he said. His salary is $125,000 plus benefits, and he works with an assistant city attorney. Another attorney was just hired, he said. Hobbs is a city of some 45,000 residents, compared to Roswell’s 48,000, and with 450 city employees. The City of Roswell employs some 600. One advantage to Stone’s position, is that he is able to also act as the assistant city manager, he told Roswell city councilors in September. But, it would be difficult to find a quality city attorney, Stone said. “We did talk about that,” Jurney said Monday. “Another thing Stone discussed, was that communities were budgeting more for attorneys than Roswell’s budget.” Councilors considered many factors during their discussion when deciding which direction they thought was best, Jurney said. “I thought the overall discussion was very positive,” Jurney said. “I think the council took the responsibility of making that decision to heart.” The city’s intent is to have a new attorney hired by Jan. 1. If not, councilors can decide whether to continue Patterson’s contract, Jurney said.

Continued from Page A1

Continued from Page A1

Baca

Continued from Page A1

and said the case had been turned over to the Texas Rangers. Martinez said the ATF has issued a warrant for Baca’s arrest in connection with the explosives case.

Baca became a person of interest after explosive devices were found in the 3000 block of Encanto Drive, Tuesday, when members of the New Mexico State Police, the ATF and the Federal Bureau of Investigation where called in to search the residence. The search resulted as Roswell Police detectives were following leads from a shooting that occurred a little before midnight the previous night in the 300

block of Oakwood. Police were called to Eastern New Mexico Medical Center to talk to a man who had been shot multiple times. The victim reportedly went to a residence on Oakwood to collect money owed on a debt. The resident pulled a gun on him and shot him. During the search on Encanto Drive, Tuesday, neighbors were evacuated and the area from Delicado to Futura and Encanto to Vista Parkway was blocked for nearly two days. In a release issued on Oct. 24, it was revealed that the NMSP Bomb Squad discovered multiple commercially manufactured explosives, some commercially manufactured fireworks, two improvised explosive devices, along with components and other materials to manu-

STUDENTS ACHIEVED EXCELLENCE IN A PIANO COMPETITION HELD RECENTLY IN HOBBS

Students of Mike Lively competed recently in the Jane Falk Piano Competition held at the First Methodist Church in Hobbs. Students from Roswell, Artesia, Carlsbad, Lovington and Hobbs participated. Critique sheets, ribbons and medals were awarded. A winner’s recital was presented after the contest. 1ST PLACES:

Angelo Apostol, 10th grade

Son of Mr. & Mrs Lope Apostol

Makylah Apostol, 5th grade

Daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Lope Apostol

Malykah Apostol, 3rd grade

Daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Lope Apostol

Angelo Apostol

Makylah Apostol

Malykah Apostol

Elijah Baltazar

Elijah Baltazar, 7th grade

Son of Mr. & Mrs. Don Baltazar

Matthew Elwell, 8th grade

Son of Mr. & Mrs. Darrel Elwell

Nicholas Elwell, 6th grade

Son of Mr. & Mrs. Darrel Elwell

Laci Fuller, 3rd grade

Daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Tim Fuller

Matthew Kelly, 7th grade

Son of Mr. & Mrs. Mark Kelly

Matthew Elwell

Nicholas Elwell

Laci Fuller

Matthew Kelly

Timothy Kelly, 5th grade

Son of Mr. & Mrs. Mark Kelly

Erynn McKelvy, 3rd grade

Daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Ian McKelvy

Raylene Moore, 8th grade

Daughter of Ms. Jenny Moore

Lupita Ortega, 10th grade

Daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Juan Ortega

Noor Osmani, 10th grade

Daughter of Dr. & Mrs. Omar Osmani

Timothy Kelly

Erynn McKelvy

Jaylene Moore

Lupita Ortega

Kathryn Paulos, 7th grade

Daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Clay Pauloa

Joshua Theimer, 3rd grade

Son of Mr. & Mrs. Moses Theimer

Kayla Theimer, 4th grade

Daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Moses Theimer 2ND PLACES:

Mikayla Fuller, 10th grade

Daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Tim Fuller

Noor Osmani

Kathryn Paulos

Joshua Theimer

Kayla Theimer

Nicole Lopez, 5th grade

Daughter of Dr. & Mrs. Sebastian Lopez

Jaylene Moore, 6th grade

Daughter of Ms. Jenny Moore


A4 Tuesday, October 29, 2013

OPINION

Think tank rethinks NM’s economic development SHERRY ROBINSON ALL SHE WROTE

When Think New Mexico speaks, a lot of us pay attention because its common-sense proposals often become law. Past successes include full-day kindergarten for all children, removing the gross receipts tax on food, and, most recently, increasing qualifications for Public Service Commissioners. Now the nonpartisan think tank has tackled jobs. How can we not pay attention? The “Results-Oriented Think Tank Serving New Mexicans,” as it calls itself, interviewed a wide variety of business people, bankers and economic developers to understand what works and what doesn’t work. “At Think New Mexico we care a lot more about whether an idea works than whether it is left or right,” says executive director Fred Nathan in his report. After the nation’s latest logjam, those are refreshing sentiments.

EDITORIAL

SHERRY ROBINSON

ALL SHE WROTE

What isn’t working, it says, is our hodgepodge of economic development incentives and our labyrinthine regulatory system. Economic development in New Mexico and other states has amounted to handing money directly to companies; the results aren’t always what we want, according to the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, which studies entrepreneurship. I have to confess here that in the past I’ve supported these incentives, thinking poor old New Mexico needed all the help it could get to create jobs. Now the Kauffman Founda-

tion and Think New Mexico want to steer us toward creating a more hospitable business climate and rethinking incentives. The think tank has come up with three proposals: • Increase the supply of entrepreneurs by bringing more foreign students to our state universities. The carrot would be scholarships for foreign students in business, science and technology programs. • Create a one-stop business portal to reduce headaches for existing businesses. • Shift tax incentives to “post-performance” rewards. The first proposal makes sense. The second has come up before but never becomes a reality. Maybe Think New Mexico, given its track record, can make it happen. The third is worth discussing. New Mexico has never had a coherent, long-term economic development strategy, says an executive quoted in the report. (In fact, it has, but any plan developed in

Roswell Daily Record

one administration is ignored by succeeding administrations.) The Legislative Finance Committee said last year that the state doesn’t know the costs or benefits of its incentives. In some cases, we don’t even know what jobs were created. The report lapses into political speak in saying the incentives “pick winners and losers,” an expression that’s become tiresome and meaningless. The implication is that the state has sprinkled dollars on some companies to create winners. What actually happens is that economic developers may identify sectors or industries they want to attract, which is normal and healthy, and the Legislature creates tax credits. What also happens is that Acme Industries shows up on our doorstep, announces that it would like to relocate here, but our gross receipts tax would make the company uncompetitive. So the Legislature passes an exemption. The elephant in the room, of course, is the gross receipts tax,

and until we undertake real tax reform, everything else is window dressing. Think New Mexico wants to introduce us to another kind of incentive, the post-performance incentive used by our smart neighbor, Utah. It works by giving existing and new businesses a rebate of up to 30 percent of new sales taxes, corporate income taxes and withholding taxes AFTER they increase new, betterpaying jobs and expand operations. In other words, Utah offers no bait to lure companies there but does share rewards after the fact. Think New Mexico also offers a way to pay for its reforms by eliminating tax breaks for Tax Increment Development Districts (TIDDS), ATVS and RVs, the cigarette stamp tax discount, racetrack purses, professional fighting, rental storage units, and web hosting. I predict that taking away these gimmes will generate a bigger fight than the reforms.

Crisis over, a to-do list for Congress

For all the talk of impending doom, the more than two-week shutdown of the federal government that came to its conclusion on Thursday turned out to be a decidedly unremarkable affair. Sure, there was some cheap theater on both sides — from Sen. Ted Cruz’s speech of more than 21 hours on the floor of the Senate to the Obama administration’s gratuitous closure of landmarks like the World War II Memorial on the National Mall — but on the day after the shutdown ended, the country looked remarkably similar to the day before it began. The final result of 16 days of bipartisan brinkmanship: An agreement that funds the government through January 15 (at existing, post-sequester levels) and raises the debt ceiling until February 7. In addition, new steps will be taken to verify Obamacare applicants’ eligibility for subsidies, and a bicameral committee led by Democratic Sen. Patty Murray and Republican Congressman Paul Ryan will work to provide long-term budget recommendations to Congress by mid-December. Those are remarkably modest outcomes given the fevered pitch at which this debate was held. No one in the nation’s capital came out of this debacle looking like a winner. Congressional Republicans often seemed obstructionist and directionless. For his part, President Obama came across as petty and partisan. It is doubtful, however, that either side will face any long-term consequences for their actions. Governing by crisis has become such a regular feature of Washington in recent years that the vast majority of the public simply treats it as background noise. Politicians can only cry “wolf” so many times before the public stops responding. We hope that both parties have learned a lesson from this essentially pointless exercise. Republicans need to acknowledge that there are limits to what can be achieved in divided government — and that ignoring them wastes the public’s time. Democrats should understand that their sainted federal government — which was partially shuttered for half a month with virtually no significant consequences — isn’t nearly as essential to daily life as they imagine. As Congress gets back to work, we encourage them to take on the handful of issues where there’s a realistic prospect of both sides working together to productive purpose. That means revisiting immigration reform, taking on changes to the tax code that could make the nation more productive, and refashioning the spending cuts from the sequester to be less of a blunt instrument. It should also include repealing Obamacare’s medical device tax, which, unfortunately, was spared from the deal that ended the shutdown. Both Republicans and Democrats spent the past few weeks indulging in a very public primal scream. Now that that’s out of their system, we’d appreciate it if they got back to doing the people’s business.

Will the Christie Juggernaut roll over Cruz and Paul?

BY JOE CONASON With his impending re-election in “Blue Jersey” evidently assured and his national profile rising, Chris Christie is a formidable presidential hopeful. If not always a voice of reason, the blustering governor usually sounds sane in a Republican Party where conspiracy, paranoia and extremism reign. His decision to abandon the state’s legal appeal against gay marriage exemplified the canny pragmatism that worries Democratic strategists looking forward to 2016. But for those enjoying the current civil war within the

Doonesbury

GOP as a spectator sport, the prospect of a Christie presidential candidacy is promising indeed. Moving toward the center, he is plainly preparing for combat with the herd of politicians -- mostly legislators like Rand Paul, Ted Cruz and Paul R yan -whose aspirations depend on mobilizing the tea party base. And there will be nothing “moderate” about Christie when he sets to work taking those opponents apart. His surrender on marriage equality was only the latest in a series of efforts by the governor to distinguish himself from the right-wing fringe that dominates his party on

issues ranging from gun control, religious freedom and climate change to the government shutdown, which he excoriated as “by definition, a failure.” Sounding sane and commonsensical, he said, “You know, I don’t think it’s ever good to keep the government closed when your job is to run the government.” Or, as he might bark in a less polite mood, “duh.” Those remarks not only aligned Christie with the party’s congressional and corporate leadership, but they also emphasized the bipartisan credentials he has touted in his re-election campaign. Further bolstering that

campaign theme is the friendly attitude he has repeatedly displayed toward certain popular Democrats, notably including President Obama and Sen.-elect Cory Booker, who got along fine with Christie while serving as Newark’s mayor. Embracing prominent African-American Democrats provides a happy optical contrast with the reliable outbursts of racial ugliness from the Republican right. None of this will endear Christie to the tea party and fundamentalist factions that presently dominate the

See CONASON, Page A5

The Orange County Register

DEAR DOCTOR K: I’ve always worried a lot. I saw a psychologist, but she said I didn’t have anxiety disorder, so she couldn’t help. I can’t believe there’s nothing to do. Can you help? DEAR READER: I don’t agree with your doctor. I’ve talked before in this space about how doctors typically define diseases by how they appear in their most extreme form. I call it the “tip of the iceberg” phenomenon. Doctors have certain criteria for what constitutes an anxiety disorder. I assume your doctor has checked those criteria and decided that you don’t have enough of them to “qualify” for the diagnosis. You may not have an anxiety disorder, but it sounds as though the nagging, worrisome thoughts in your mind may be distracting you from the positive, enjoyable

experiences all around you. If so, there are ways to help you. There’s a newly emerging term for this gray zone that falls between “normal” anxiety and a full-blown anxiety disorder. It’s called “almost anxiety.” In their illuminating new book, “Almost Anxious,” my Harvard Medical School colleague Dr. Luana Marques with Eric Metcalf explore the idea of almost anxiety and introduce a set of skills you can use to keep it at bay. (You can find out more about the book on my website, AskDoctorK.com.) As discussed in “Almost Anxious,” the first needs that usually go unanswered when people are stressed are the things that actually keep anxiety at bay. These include proper nutrition, sleep and exercise. You may see how these things could be good for

ASK DR. K UNITED MEDIA SYNDICATE

your health in general, yet doubt that they could affect anxiety. You shouldn’t doubt it: They can help. Let’s start with nutrition. People who are a little anxious tend to reach for unhealthy “comfort” food. Or they completely avoid food, skipping meals or even fasting. The healthier road — and one that will also help tame your anxiety — is to eat wholesome

foods on a regular schedule. How does nutrition help fight “almost anxiety”? It may be as simple as this: An unhealthy diet contributes to feeling unwell — and then worrying that you may have a serious disease, such as an undiagnosed cancer. Next on the list is sleep. Being sleep-deprived can significantly raise your anxiety level. But there’s good scientific evidence that good sleep can help control anxiety. If you have trouble falling or staying asleep, try the following: — Use your bed for sleep and sex only. — Get out of bed if you can’t fall asleep after 20 minutes. — Go to bed and wake up at the same time every day. — Don’t nap during the day. — Don’t drink alcohol close to

bedtime. Finally, get regular exercise. Simply moving at a moderate pace has a big effect on anxiety. Aim for 30 minutes of moderateintensity exercise five days a week. We don’t understand just how it is that regular exercise reduces anxiety, but there is good scientific evidence that it does. Just deciding to take action to deal with your anxious feelings is itself therapeutic. Being “almost anxious” can interfere with your life, but there are simple and natural (and inexpensive) ways to treat the condition. (Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. To send questions, go to AskDoctorK.com, or write: Ask Doctor K, 10 Shattuck St., Second Floor, Boston, MA 02115.)


LOCAL

A5

Learn about science fiction at the Roswell Public Library Roswell Daily Record

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Wednesday is the 75th anniversary of “The War of the Worlds” radio broadcast. On Sunday, Oct. 30, 1938, the night before Halloween, long known as Mischief Night, the voice of a panicked announcer broke into the dance music on CBS Radio with a news bulletin reporting that strange explosions were taking place on the planet Mars. This was followed minutes later by a report that Martians had landed in the tiny town of Grover's Mill, New Jersey. Millions of Americans listened to an unusual dramatization based on H. G. Wells’ War of the Worlds novel, performed by 23-year-old Orson Welles and his Mercury Theater on the air. Although most listeners understood that the program was a radio drama, thousands of others were plunged into panic, convinced that America was under a deadly Martian attack. The genre of science fiction and fantasy sparks the imagination and includes time travel, alternate universes, genetic engineering, life on other planets, wars between worlds, etc. H. G. Wells (18661946) was a prolific writer of both fiction and non-fiction, but is most often remembered for his science fiction novels, including “The War of the Worlds,” first published in 1898. His books are still popular and many of his titles are available at the Roswell Public Library, 301 N. Pennsylvania. In addition, there are adaptations to his “War of the Worlds” novel, such as a comic book edition, global dispatches as imagined by various authors interviewing important people, or updated from London to

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Pearce thank you

Dear Editor: Hats off to Congressman Steve Pearce for consistently acting with New Mexicans in mind, even while Washington is obsessed with name-calling and finger pointing. Congressman Pearce voted to make sure ALL our troops still get their paychecks through the shutdown, including the National Guard and Reserve. Pearce voted

Conason

Upcoming technology classes are scheduled for learning to use library resources. An E-reader Bootcamp will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 5, at 6 p.m. A class on accessing Ancestry.com and HeritageQuest will be held on Saturday, Nov. 9, at 10 a.m. Please register for these classes in advance at the Reference Desk or by telephone.

mental images of your lazy kitty actually doing something productive with its life, instead of you know … just being a cat.

LORETTA CLARK ROSWELL PUBLIC LIBRARY

What’s happening? contemporary America, as well as the DVD of the 1953 movie that won the Oscar for its special effects. For more information on any of the library’s resources, services and on-line catalog, visit the library, 622-7101, or go to roswellpubliclibrary.org. Reference librarians are available to assist in locating information, books and other materials.

Book talk

Amanda Davis, reference librarian, suggests taking a break from the hubbub of Halloween and the upcoming holidays by enjoying a good book. J.R.R. Tolkien (18921973) is best known for his classic fantasy works. “The Hobbit” and “The Lord of the Rings” series are among the most popular books in the world, as the languages, cultures, and characters make his books as engaging today as they were fifty years ago. Readers who enjoy immersing themselves into the world of fantasy or adventure and exploring secret societies will enjoy the e-book, “The Unofficial Hobbit Handbook: Everything I Need to Know about Life I Learned from Tolkien” by Peter Archer, Scott Francis and Jeff Gerke. There are facts and insights into the inner workings of Hobbit society as written by elders of The Shire. Hobbits, both young and old, use this book as a guide to good and sensible conduct, no matter what the occasion or chalto fund key government programs that keep Americans safe, like FEMA, the FAA, and the FDA. Pearce has voted to keep funding programs through the shutdown that are vital to New Mexicans like Headstart programs for low-income kids, and nutrition assistance for struggling families. He voted to make sure New Mexico’s veterans still get the benefits and services they earned while

Continued from Page A4

Republican Party, but, like the legendary honey badger, he just doesn’t care -- and as a strategic matter, he doesn’t need to. Drawing parallels with the last two presidential cycles, Christie and his advisors can easily imagine him triumphing over a divided gaggle of right-wing clowns, just as John McCain and Mitt Romney did. And then, somewhat less easily, they must imagine that he will transcend the limitations of those candidates to win in November. Certainly, Christie is open to attack on many fronts; his record on women’s rights and reproductive health, his attitude toward the poor and vulnerable in his own state, his misuse of state resources to benefit himself while slashing vital budget lines -- are all deeply troubling. Like Rudolph Giuliani, he could find that his bullying

As part of Halloween fun, kids may jump out yelling Boo, then they laugh at the person who is surprised. Boo! Ha, Ha is the theme of the 10 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Wednesday story times featuring fun stories that might be a teensy weensy bit scary. The books presented could include “Just Say Boo,” “The Vanishing Pumpkin,” “Bugs That Go Bump in the Night,” “Halloween Forest,” “A Dark Dark Tale” or “Who Will You Meet on Scary Street?” Children attending the story segment of the program are invited to be creative with Halloween crafts. These could include folding and decorating a “Boo” box, decorating a Halloween door knob hanger or assembling a glow-in-the-dark bead necklace. The stories and crafts may vary between programs and the quantities of some craft items may be limited. All ages are invited to drop by between 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday and create crafts inspired by Day of the Dead traditions. In Mexican tradition, the Day of the Dead is when departed souls are remembered, not in mourning but with a spirit of friendliness and good humor. The craft projects will illustrate the various cultural traditions and feature symbolic activities such as designing tissue paper flowers, assembling a paper skeleton, beautifying a small jar for a votive candle, decorating a wooden plaque or coloring a skull coloring sheet. The quantities of some craft items may be limited.

lenge. Lessons on making life simpler and enjoyable include eat heartily, but healthily and incorporate more structure to your dining with second breakfasts and elevenses. To deal with the troubles you may encounter, employ the daring tactics of running away, hiding and disappearing. There is enough lore from the books and Tolkien himself, but the authors’ own additions are wellplaced and make for an absolutely charming read. The holidays are coming and we all want to look our best. For cat lovers, it is also time to worry about how your cat is going to look. A humorous diet-guide parody is Dena Harris’ “Does This Collar Make My Butt Look Big? A Diet Book for Cats.” This book will show “extra furry” cats how to get svelte with kitty-specific versions of popular weight-loss and fitness regimes and has all the wisdom you and your furry feline friend will need to make sure they are looking their best. Catty Craig and Weight Stalkers are compared so that you can choose which one works best for your cat’s lifestyle. The metapurrlism can vary greatly between individual cats so Psycho Kitty Workouts can be a great addition to a routine, unlike the silly Crossfit training that the humans are putting themselves through. The artwork interspersed through the book is adorable and perfect for creating the hilarious bravely serving our nation. But shockingly, the Senate has blocked ALL of these bills, including Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich.

cans who are working to make sure the government stays running, while the Democrats in the Senate and the White House are blocking their progress at every turn?

Nancy Pelosi has tried to spin this partial government shutdown as the work of some crazy tea partiers who hate the government and wanted to shut it down all along. But the truth tells another story. Isn’t it ironic that it is those radical anti-government Republi-

style becomes stale and grating. His constant blather about public employees may leave voters wondering whether he has anything else to say. And to put it bluntly, nobody who looks like him has been elected president since the departure of William Howard Taft a century ago. His right-wing detractors will hardly let him escape the primaries unscathed, if he somehow contrives to win the nomination. Yet in the months to come, should he choose to pursue the presidency, Christie can serve a significant role in his party and his country, rallying the forlorn Republicans who reject the nihilism of his opponents. He will tell it like it is about Rand Paul and Ted Cruz -- and they won’t like it at all. To find out more about Joe Conason, visit the Creators Syndicate website at creators.com. COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM

Apparently Democrats only like government so long as it suits their own interest to keep it running. The truth always comes out in times of crisis and Congressman Pearce supported veterans, poor

Books Again

The Books Again used book store, 404 W. Second, is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Tuesday through Saturday. For the best selections of “whodunits,” mystery lovers have three more days to buy mysteries for $1 each. November marks the 4th anniversary of Books Again and the store is celebrating by offering even greater bargains. From November 1 to 16, shoppers may buy a plastic bag for $5 and fill it to the brim with any item in the store. There is no limit to the number of bags that may be purchased, for instance, two bags will cost $10, three bags will sell for $15, etc. The shelves are full of hardback and paperback titles for all ages, from toddlers to older children; from teens to adults. There are fiction books in a variety of genres, non-fiction books from every section of the Dewey Decimal system, talking books on CD and audio cassette, CDs of music, DVDs and video cassettes of movies. Come shop for your personal library or to give as gifts. Books Again is operated by Friends of the Library volunteers and all proceeds are used to benefit the library. Parking is located behind the store. families and the safety of New Mexicans all along. Congressman Steve Pearce has voted for them every single time even as New Mexico’s senators have turned a blind eye. Thank you Congressman Steve Pearce for looking out for New Mexicans and our nation. Respectfully Submitted: Alice Eppers Roswell

IT’S WHAT YOU’VE BEEN WAITING FOR

OFFER EXTENDED

High-Speed Internet

Don’t miss out!

35/mo.

$

*

for 50Mbps for the first 3 months

HIGH SPEED YOU CAN RELY ON. No contract. No bundle. No data plans with overage fees. At 50 Mbps fast, Cable ONE High-Speed Internet gives you the blazing speed you need for the best streaming of all your movies and videos. In fact, it’s 10X faster than Internet from the phone company for about the same price.**

*Regular price $50/mo.

CALL C ALL TODAY! TODAY!

1-855-692-4122 1 -855- 692-4122 cableone.net c ableone.net *Offer expires November 30, 30, 2013. 2013. Promotional rate rate quoted good for the fifirst rst three months when customers subscribe to our 50 Mbps Internet se service. rvice. After 3 months the promotional rate rate increases to the regular a la carte rrate ate in effect at at that that time. time. Equipment Equipment,, taxes and fees are not included included in above rate. rate. In compliance with the Fair Fair Credit Reporting Act, Act, you may be required to authorize and aagree gree th that at Cable ONE may obtain a consumer report about you from a consumer reporting aagency gency in order to verify your eligibility to receive this and other offers as well as determining deposits and install fees required, required, if any. any. Full discounted install installation ation could require enrolling in our Cable ONE Easy Pay Pay program. program. Customers are required to purchase or lease an approved approved eMTA eMTA capable capable of DOCSIS 3.0 in order to receive the full benefit of Internet services services listed. listed. Other levels of service service are available. available. Cable ONE manages manages bandwidth consumption of Internet services services to provide the best experience for all customers. customers. PPeak eak speed 50 Mbps. Mbps. Speeds may vary. vary. Speed comparison of Cable ONE Standard Internet service service to 1.5 Mbps speed from DSL competitors competitors.. Call for details. details. Please visit http://www.cableone.net/Pages/internetaup.aspx http://www.cableone.net/Pages/internetaup.aspx for Internet plan specifics specifics by reading our Acceptable Use Policy. Policy. Additional information information can also be found at at http://support.cableone.net. http://support.cableone.net. All se services rvices are not aavailable vailable in all areas areas.. Money-back guarantee guarantee:: May only be used within the fifirst rst 30 days of new se service rvice and only once for a particular se service rvice by any any custome customer.r. Refunds will consist of the money paid for the service(s) service(s) cancelled as well as applicable applicable taxes and fees but does not include include pay per view purchases or long distance phone charges charges.. Offer not available available to current Cable ONE Internet customers. customers. Restrictions aapply. pply. **When compared with 1.5 Mbps se service rvice offered by AT&T AT&T U-verse and Centu CenturyLink. ryLink.


A6 Tuesday, October 29, 2013 OBITUARIES

NATION/OBITUARIES baseball, lettering in both sports at Roswell High for 1 year. Then he moved to Spearman, TX, where he played football and graduated from Spearman High School. Pete worked at Lumber Jack in St. Clair, MI, for 16 years until he became too ill to work any longer. He was cremated per his wishes and a memorial will be held at a later date.

Calvin Lee Roberts Jr. (Pete)

Went home to be with Jesus from his home in St. Clair, Michigan, on Friday, October 11, 2013, after being ill for six months. He was 53 years old. He was born on November 3, 1959, in Hobbs, NM. Left to mourn his passing are: His parents, Calvin and Betty Roberts, of Roswell, his wife Tammi, of St. Clair, his daughters Candi Owens, of MI, Cherie Webb, of N. Carolina, sons Lee and Richard, of MI, stepdaughters Jessica Darval and Courtney Swinson, of MI, twelve grandchildren, whom he loved dearly. Brother Tim Roberts (Maritza), of Roswell, sisters Darrie Frances (Andy), of TX, DeeDee Davis (Steve), of CA, and several nieces and nephews. Pete played football and

Stoarmy J. (Miller) Vargas

Our beloved Stoarmy J. (Miller) Vargas was called to be with the Lord and taken from our hearts on Friday, October 25, 2013. Stoarmy was born to Aileen Miller and Joel Vargas on July 13, 1991, in Roswell NM. A rosary will be recited at 7 p.m. Wednesday, October 30, 2013, at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church.

Funeral services will be at 10 a.m., Thursday, October 31, 2013, at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church with Deacon Ernesto Martinez officiating. Burial will follow at South Park Cemetery. Stoarmy was preceded in death by his mater nal grandfather, Frank Miller and his paternal grandfather, Genaro Vargas Sr.

Our love is survived by his mother Aileen Miller; father Joel Vargas; sister Rainy Miller; guardianship parents, Joe and Angie Nevarez; grandmothers, Bertha Vargas and Dolores Miller; fiancée Destinee Salayandia; aunts and uncles, Rosa Rodriguez (children: Erika Najera, Joe, and Roger Rodriguez); Paz Vargas (children: Mayra Rodriguez, Roxanna, and Jose Vaquera); Ramona Her nandez (children: Marisol Vargas, Bertha and Ramiro Hernandez); Griselda Olivas (children: Joeanna Talamantes, Johnny, Luis Olivas, Samantha Carey, Brandon Janow); Vicente Vargas; Genaro Vargas (children: Aydelin Vargas); Frank Miller Jr. (Israel, Krystal and Jade Miller); Angie and Joe Nevarez (children: Deborah Gonzales and Angelo Hidalgo); Pete Miller (children: Dominic, Jeremy, and Jaylen Miller); Michael Miller (children: Brittany and Nicholas Miller). He is

After Sandy, only a lucky few getting buyouts

NEW YORK (AP) — The forces of nature had been threatening the Staten Island’s Oakwood Beach neighborhood for years, flooding the streets every time it rained, sending crabs skittering into bungalows and swamping basements so regularly that it was just accepted as part of life. But after Superstorm Sandy swept in with 20-foot waves that crashed over roofs and killed three people, those who have lived here for generations decided it was time to go. Soon, the state will buy some 400 homes, bulldoze them and never again allow anything to be built here. Oakwood Beach will finally surrender to the sea. “The heartache of losing my home, the heartache of losing my memories, the blood and sweat and tears that I put into this home, is going to be healed by seeing trees and nature come back to that spot right there,” said Joe Monte, a construction worker who had built his dream house overlooking the ocean. “And that’s going to make me feel better.” The neighborhood is the first — and so far only — New York City community to be totally bought out under a state program that promises to turn wrecked neighborhoods into perpetual green space. “The chances of us being able to sell this house at a later date and move on really were slim,” said Danielle Mancuso, who is being bought out of the attached duplex she lives in with her husband and three young children. “Who could afford to pay the flood insurance premium? Because we’re all attached, we could not elevate. We would really just be sitting ducks.” The state of New York plans to spend up to $400 million buying out and

knocking down homes in Sandy-affected communities in the city and on Long Island, offering residents the pre-storm value of their houses. In New Jersey, the state is planning to spend about $300 million to buy about 1,000 damaged homes. Getting a buyout is the equivalent of winning the lottery for homeowners who lost everything during the storm, although not all residents want to be bought out. On New York City’s Rockaway peninsula, for example, homeowners are determined to stay put and rebuild. Much of the clamor for buyouts is coming from Staten Island, where waves slammed against third-floor windows and 23 people drowned, most of them trapped inside their own homes. Although Oakwood Beach’s buyout push has been a success, the future is far less certain for hundreds of people who have signed petitions demanding the same deal in nearly every other devastated shorefront community on Staten Island: New Dorp Beach, Midland Beach, Ocean Breeze and Tottenville, among others. Right now, those areas are only eligible for a city program that buys individual properties for redevelopment — a program that so far has purchased only one home. But because many have yet to receive a dime from the city’s Sandy aid programs, they’re skeptical. In Ocean Breeze, a neighborhood that remains mostly deserted since the storm, about half of the 120 homeowners have signed a petition requesting a buyout from the governor’s office. “We’re below sea level,” said Frank Moszczynski, who lives on a creekfront block where one house floated

across the street and several others were demolished. “We’re in a bowl that was created at the end of the ice age.” State officials say they chose to buy out Oakwood Beach after analyzing historical flooding data and the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s scientific flood maps. The other crucial factor was quick mobilization: residents began marshaling resources for a buyout the day after Sandy hit. Among them was Patti Snyder, who grew up on the block and never left. Her brother, Leonard Montalto, lived down the street. Two days after the storm, when his body was found amid the ruins of his home, Snyder knew it was over. “That’s when we knew we weren’t going to rebuild at that point,” she said. “It just took everything out of us.” Monte was standing in the middle of his flooded home the day after Sandy, ankledeep in toxic sludge, when he realized his house was beyond saving. He walked out and hasn’t gone back in since. He still can’t bring himself to approach the side of the house where his good friend, John Filipowicz, used to show up with a six-pack of beers and burgers to grill after work. Filipowicz died, along with his son, in the basement of their home. “I am not the person that I was because of what happened,” Monte said. “I have trouble with everything. ... I have trouble with just being a person.” The residents of Oakwood Beach are still working out the details of their buyouts but rest easier knowing they’ll receive the pre-Sandy value of their homes — enough to set up somewhere far from shore.

Roswell Daily Record

also survived by his nephews David Espinoza and Romeo Hidalgo and numerous cousins whom he loved very much. Stoar my was a recent employee of City of Roswell at South Park Cemetery, he was so full of life, was a very kind and generous person and there is no one he wouldn’t try to help out or do something nice for. He grew up helping out at the Boys & Girls Club hoping to steer other kids in the right direction. Stoarmy was a very talented person and had a passion for music. His favorite hobbies included playing basketball, hanging out with the boys, and writing music. Stoar my was an active member of St. John’s Catholic Church. Pallbearers will be Ramiro Hernandez, Angelo Hidalgo, David Vega, Juan Rivera, Tony Prudencio (Prudy), Michael Peyton, Martin Villalobos, and Chris Lopez. These are the boys that Stoarmy grew up with since childhood. Honorary pallbearers will be Vicente Vargas, Luis Olivas, Johnny Olivas, Jose Vaquera, Eric Martinez, Eric Vega, Rosendo Dimas, Dominic Miller, Pete Miller, Jeremy Miller, Michael Miller, Jeremy Luna, Sonny Luna, Adrian Mendoza and Chris Cleas. Special thanks to Oshanna and Andreas Garcia. We

would also like to thank all his friends and family who have contributed and helped us through this hardship. Stoarmy, you will always be remembered in our hearts. We love you and will always miss you. Please take a moment to shar e your thoughts and memories with the family in the online registry at andersonbethany.com. Services are under the direction of AndersonBethany Funeral Home and Crematory.

Be not burdened with time of sorrow, I wish for you the sunshine of tomorrow. My Life’s been full, I savored much. Good friends, good times, a loved one touched.

Perhaps my time seemed all too brief Don’t lengthen it now with undue grief. Lift up your heart and share with me. God wanted me now; He set me free.

I’m Free Don’t grieve for me, for now I’m free I am following the path God laid for me. I took His hand when I heard Him call, I turned my back and left it all.

I could not stay another day to laugh, to love, to work or play. Tasks left undone must stay that way. I found that peace at the close of the day.

If my parting has left a void, Then fill it with remembered joy. A friendship shared, a laugh, a kiss Ah, these things I, too, will miss.

George Salcido

George Salcido, 11-221963 to 10-10-2013. Family of: Ralph dad and Connie mom, Adam, Ralph III, Gloria, Isabel, Dolores, Barbara, Mabel: sibs. He loved family, friends, cold beer, old cars, music, and his dogs. From all your friends we miss you more than you can know.

BIDEN TO DINE WITH FRESHMEN HOUSE DEMOCRATS WA S H I N G T O N ( A P ) — T h e W h i t e House says Vice President Joe Biden is heading to the Capitol to have dinner with first-term House Democrats.

House Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer of Maryland organized the event and plans to join the Monday night dinner.

Hoyer’s office and the White House wouldn’t say which freshman Democrats are attending or the purpose of the dinner. But it comes as the Obama administration is seeking to calm concerns among congressional Democrats

about problems with the rollout of President Barack Obama’s health care law.

A growing number of Democrats want to extend the enrollment deadline, increasing the pressure on the White House. Biden has also been active in recruiting Democratic candidates to run for House. Earlier this month Biden canceled a fundraiser for House Democrats due to the government shutdown.

Consider us

NEIGHBORS

INVESTED in this

COMMUNITY WE LIVE HERE, TOO.

At Xcel Energy, our communities are not just where we provide energy…they’re our hometowns. That’s why we invest in making them the best possible places in which to live and work. Visit xcelenergy.com for more information.

SUPPORT ROSWELL

RECYCLE

xcelenergy.com


BUSINESS REVIEW

With Merry Maids you can ‘Relax, it’s done!’ Celebrating 21 years in Roswell!

Roswell Daily Record

For a growing number of families, a cleaning service is the answer to keeping a beautiful home while enjoying a busy, worry-free lifestyle. When you’re considering an investment like this, you want to know that your home will be cared for by your cleaning service just as well as you would care for it yourself. You live a busy life with your job, the kids, to and from school, soccer practice, piano lessons, ballet, church, etc. Let Merry Maids take one big thing off your "to do" list. No, they won't take your kids to soccer practice, but they will take that huge chore of housecleaning off your hands. The dependable, professional Merry Maids staff will clean every room in your home just the way you want it. When they leave, your home will be clean and fresh-smelling, ready for you to relax in and enjoy. Owned by Complete Home Services LLC, the staff will work with the schedule you and they agree on - and you don't have to be home when the Merry Maids cleaners arrive. Owned and operated by Larry Knadle for the previous twenty years, Merry Maids was purchased by the new owners Complete Home Services LLC and is now operated by Bill Davis, Brad Davis, and Riley Armstrong. Riley works as the managing partner in the business. The new owners are excited about the opportunity to own and operate the Merry Maids franchise. Their primary focus is to grow the business and maintain long term relationships with current and new customers. Merry Maids Makes Cleaning A Breeze Wouldn't it be great if, after working all day, you could walk in your home and it would be spotlessly clean? Most homemakers have to clean during the evenings after work, or spend their weekends cleaning. But there is a better way:

The Merry Maids team arrives at your home "ready-toclean." All cleaning products and equipment come with them. Phone 623-5000 to find out more about Merry Maids. Then you can “Relax, itʼs done!” Merry Maids is a professional home cleaning business, represented in Roswell by franchise owner Complete Home Services, LLC. Merry Maids is: • Professional - Merry Maids carefully screens potential employees and checks references. Then they select the qualified applicants who enjoy cleaning. Merry Maids appreciates the trust you have in them by allowing them in your home, so they choose their employees with the same care you take in choosing a house cleaning service. • Guaranteed quality - Merry Maids wants you to know your house will be cleaned just the way you like it. And they will guarantee it - every time! If you are not completely satisfied, they'll happily come back

and reclean whatever it is in question at no additional charge. At Merry Maids, the job is only finished when you are completely satisfied. • Dependable - Go ahead and schedule that party. Plan to have your relatives come to visit. You can count on Merry Maids to be there to clean your home as scheduled every time. • Bonded and insured Merry Maids employees are very careful with your belongings, but it's nice to know you are protected against loss and breakage that may occur while they clean your home. And Merry Maids carries Worker's Comp insurance on all their employees. When you entrust Merry Maids with your house key, they use a proven lock box system to safeguard the security of your home. • Professionally trained - At

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Merry Maids, they take the time for a thorough training program. Each team mate is trained by an experienced supervisor in the techniques and quality standards of Merry Maids. Merry Maids uses the most complete video training library in the industry and work side-by-side with each trainee until they have mastered every skill necessary to provide the quality cleaning Merry Maids demands. • Merry Maids handles all the paperwork and taxes - They pay Social Security and federal, state and local taxes. When you hire Merry Maids, they handle it all so you, the customer, don't have to be concerned with tax forms and paperwork. • All cleaning products and equipment are provided - you don't have to remember all those expensive cleaners, scrub brushes and vacuum bags when you're shopping. Your Merry Maids team carries everything they need. You can be confident that their cleaning procedures are in compliance with OSHA regulations and that their products will clean your home effectively and safely. Why choose Merry Maids? Merry Maids was founded to assist two-income couples, busy singles and the elderly, with their housework. Merry Maids is successful because it fulfills two needs: 1 - It frees working women (and their husbands and kids, too) from the seemingly endless responsibility of keeping up a house. 2 - It helps people who are unable to do their own housework anymore - or choose not to. Homes That Sparkle - From People Who Shine How can Merry Maids be sure they'll clean your house better than anyone else? Easy, they hire the best people and give them the best training. Merry Maids offers:

A7

Merry Maids team members are dependable, professional, guaranteed quality: This is Merry Maids. Whatever your schedule, Merry Maids will work with you and will meet all your expectations. ∆ Customized cleaning services to meet your particular needs and budget; ∆ Bonded and insured employees; ∆ Thoroughly screened, trained employees; ∆ They bring their own equipment and supplies; and ∆ The Merry Maids Quality Service Guarantee. For customers on a regular schedule, Merry Maids 'deep cleans' one or two rooms on each visit. Now is the time to schedule cleaning service with the largest professional maid service in the country: Merry Maids. Merry Maids is larger than the next three professional cleaning services put together. Founded in 1979, Merry Maids is the largest home cleaning provider in the nation, providing customized residential cleaning services through over 1,350 franchises and branches in the United States. Give Merry Maids The Mother-in-law Test Call Merry Maids and they will give your house "a clean" even a mother-inlaw could love. The moment you walk in the door, you'll know Merry Maids has been there. The carpets are groomed, the

kitchen and bathrooms sparkle and there's that distinctive fragrance that says, "It's Merry Maids clean!" Merry Maids will meet all your expectations. Merry Maids will come clean your home on a regular, or on a one-time, basis. There is no cost or obligation for an in-home visit. For more information on residential cleaning, visit the Merry Maids web site at http://www.merrymaids.co m/ or call 1-800-MERRYMAIDS. Jerry McCormick works in the office as an office assistant. Irene Sanchez handles quality assurance. She will work with associates and home-owners to make sure everything goes as planned. Call Jerry McCormick at 623-5000 to obtain the services of the Merry Maids cleaning professionals. If no one is there when you call, just leave a message, and Jerry will respond to you as quickly as possible. Merry Maids really allows you to "Relax, it's done!"

Check out the featured business at www.rdrnews.com - Click on Business Review Custom Construction & Roofing LLC Your Roofing Specialist

Certified in Water Restoration

Harry Allison, Owner • Professional Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning • Carpet Repairs • Free Estimates • State of the Art Equipment • Tile Cleaning & Sealing

#4 Wool Bowl Circle Office: 575-623-1824 Cell: 575-420-5414 Fax: 575-627-0929

23 Yrs. Field Experience 625-2779

customconstructionnm.com

Brandon Arnold, Owner

Wanna’ Move Some Dirt

Rent It!

Davis RENTAL &

SUPPLY

1700 SE Main

623-5353

Business Review Spot OPEN HERE!!

CONSTRUCTION CO.

#7 Petro Drive Roswell NM 88201

Gordon Patton

New • Remodeling •Insurance Repair •Fasteel Foundation Repair •Slab Jacking

“Quality is Priority” General Contractor License #19958

575-622-1622

DESIGNER COMING NOVEMBER 9TH.

Call 622-7710

for more info!!

Residential • Commercial Sales • Installation Senior Discounts

Mon - Fri 9:00 am - 5:30 pm Sat 10 am - 6 pm 317 N. Main 622-5252

Service on all makes & models • Free Estimates Reliable Service • 24 Hour Emergency Service

Jim McClain 623-0105 or cell: 420-4626

Advertise in the Business Review! Call Today! 622-7710



ADULT PRIMARY CARE 75 Yakima Rd. Dexter NM

Located approximately 10 minutes south of Roswell adjacent to Midway Assembly of God Church

LEANDRA FINNEY, ACNP-BC

Primary Care provider for Adult Internal Medicine and DOT physicals 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. Open during lunch for your convenience.

DR. BOB PHILLIPS

Behavioral Health Consultant, by appointment only.

Welcoming new patients & walk-ins. All insurances accepted.

Please call 575-208-0106 to schedule an appointment. Quality medical care in a down home welcoming atmosphere.

Encore!

Flowers & Gifts

3107 N. Main St. • 627-6300 encoreflowersandgifts.com

See our SPOOKTACULAR selection of Halloween Bouquets at www.encoreflowersandgifts.com

Becky Neeley, Designer/Owner

For all your Plumbing, Heating & Air Conditioning needs.

Serving Roswell Since 1964

1600 W. 2nd 622-1600


A8 Tuesday, October 29, 2013

WEATHER

Roswell Seven-day forecast Today

Tonight

Times of clouds and sun

Partly cloudy

Wednesday

Clouds and sun; breezy

Thursday

Friday

Sunny and pleasant

Sunny and pleasant

Saturday

Nice with plenty of sun

Sunday

Times of clouds and sun

Roswell Daily Record

National Cities Monday

Warm with sunshine

High 86°

Low 46°

79°/40°

75°/40°

75°/38°

71°/40°

73°/49°

80°/42°

ESE at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

ENE at 3-6 mph POP: 15%

E at 4-8 mph POP: 5%

WNW at 7-14 mph POP: 5%

W at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

WNW at 6-12 mph POP: 5%

SE at 6-12 mph POP: 25%

S at 10-20 mph POP: 5%

POP: Probability of Precipitation

Almanac

New Mexico Weather

Roswell through 8 p.m. Monday

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Temperatures High/low ........................... 83°/42° Normal high/low ............... 72°/42° Record high ............... 89° in 1967 Record low ................. 21° in 1897 Humidity at noon .................. 18%

Farmington 58/30

Clayton 70/39

Raton 65/32

Precipitation 24 hours ending 8 p.m. Mon. 0.00" Month to date ....................... 0.21" Normal month to date ........... 1.13" Year to date .......................... 8.55" Normal year to date ............ 11.59"

Santa Fe 64/33

Gallup 57/27 Albuquerque 70/42

Air Quality Index Today’s Forecast

Tucumcari 78/45 Clovis 76/46

Good Yesterday’s A.Q.I. Reading

T or C 76/46

Source:Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

Ruidoso 67/47

Sun and Moon The Sun Today Wed. The Moon Today Wed. New

Nov 3

Rise 7:14 a.m. 7:15 a.m. Rise 2:20 a.m. 3:17 a.m. First

Full

Nov 9

Nov 17

Set 6:09 p.m. 6:08 p.m. Set 3:10 p.m. 3:43 p.m.

Carlsbad 89/56

Hobbs 83/55

Las Cruces 75/47

Last

Nov 25

Alamogordo 77/50

Silver City 72/42

ROSWELL 86/46

Regional Cities Today Wed. Alamogordo Albuquerque Angel Fire Artesia Carlsbad Chama Clayton Cloudcroft Clovis Deming Espanola Farmington Gallup Hobbs Las Cruces Las Vegas Los Alamos Los Lunas Lovington Portales Prewitt Raton Red River Roswell Ruidoso Santa Fe Silver City T or C Tucumcari White Rock

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

77/50/pc 70/42/pc 51/26/pc 87/56/pc 89/56/pc 47/28/pc 70/39/pc 58/37/pc 76/46/pc 78/41/s 69/41/pc 58/30/pc 57/27/pc 83/55/pc 75/47/s 64/33/pc 58/34/pc 71/40/pc 82/54/pc 78/46/pc 58/30/pc 65/32/pc 48/26/pc 86/46/pc 67/47/pc 64/33/pc 72/42/pc 76/46/pc 78/45/pc 61/36/pc

68/39/pc 57/35/pc 44/17/sn 81/44/pc 84/48/pc 44/19/sn 64/34/c 51/24/pc 68/40/pc 69/36/pc 56/34/pc 50/26/c 49/20/pc 77/43/pc 67/39/pc 55/29/pc 50/26/sn 62/34/pc 78/48/pc 71/40/pc 51/24/pc 57/26/c 42/15/sn 79/40/pc 59/40/pc 53/28/pc 62/35/pc 67/38/pc 71/36/pc 53/28/pc

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

Anchorage Atlanta Baltimore Boston Charlotte Chicago Cleveland Dallas Denver Detroit El Paso Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles Lubbock

Today

Wed.

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

46/35/pc 75/57/pc 60/41/s 49/37/s 74/51/pc 55/49/c 52/42/pc 80/69/c 52/31/c 51/41/pc 80/55/pc 85/70/pc 84/71/pc 60/51/t 66/60/r 62/47/pc 67/53/c 77/57/pc

42/33/r 76/59/pc 65/53/c 54/40/r 76/55/pc 63/57/sh 64/56/sh 79/66/t 52/33/c 58/53/sh 71/45/pc 86/71/pc 84/72/t 70/58/sh 70/49/t 65/48/s 71/55/s 75/46/sh

U.S. Extremes

Miami Midland Minneapolis New Orleans New York Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, OR Raleigh St. Louis Salt Lake City San Diego Seattle Tucson Washington, DC

86/75/s 82/64/pc 41/38/sn 82/66/s 53/45/s 57/54/r 84/66/s 56/45/s 72/51/pc 56/42/pc 55/34/s 72/52/pc 63/59/r 47/36/sh 65/55/c 52/38/s 77/45/s 62/48/s

84/75/s 80/57/c 55/44/r 84/71/pc 58/50/r 68/38/r 84/68/s 63/49/r 74/52/s 65/54/c 57/44/pc 75/57/pc 76/63/sh 52/37/pc 66/56/s 54/46/pc 72/43/s 67/57/c

State Extremes

High: 92° ............... Edinburg, Texas Low: 11° ................ Simpson, Mont.

High: 85° ..........................Carlsbad Low: 19° ......................... Angel Fire

National Cities

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Fronts Cold

Warm

Precipitation Stationary

Showers T-storms

Halloween Fall Festival -10s

-0s

0s

10s

20s

30s

40s

50s

Rain

60s

Flurries

70s

80s

Snow

Volunteer

Getting care at home. Covered.

$50 for pharmacy purchases

Traditional Healing

Care Coordination

Join us, and get these great benefits and more. Call 1-888-997-2583 and ask for UnitedHealthcare Community Plan. Proudly serving generations of New Mexicans.

© 2013 United Healthcare Services, Inc. New Mexico Centennial Care Program Services are funded in part under contract with the State of New Mexico. UnitedHealthcare Community Plan Centennial Care is offered by UnitedHealthcare Community Plan of New Mexico, Inc

Ice

90s 100s 110s

Thurs., Oct. 31 - Free - 624-6719 Convention Center 6:00-8:00pm

Leave your mark

Wed. Hi/Lo/W

(For the 48 contiguous states)

Friends of the Zoo & Roswell Parks & Rec. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013

Today Hi/Lo/W


SPORTS B Prep football: Shaking things up Tuesday, October 29, 2013 Phone: 575-622-7710, ext. 304

Section

Roswell Daily Record

KEVIN J. KELLER RECORD SPORTS EDITOR

I thought for sure I wouldn’t have to update my playoff predictions. I was wrong. With its loss to Artesia on Friday, Roswell moved from “playoff bound” to “outside looking in.” The Coyotes didn’t move from in to out because they don’t deserve to be there, they moved

Shawn Naranjo Photo

LEFT: Alejandro Ramos, left, throws a pass to Jessie Rodriguez during Hagerman’s win, Friday. The Bobcats dismantled third-ranked Fort Sumner to win the district title and lock up a playoff spot.

E-mail: sports@rdrnews.com

from in to out because of the bylaws of the NMAA. The bylaws state that no team can be seeded ahead of a team that finished better than them in the district standings. In years past, that rule hasn’t affected Roswell because Artesia is normally high in the seedings. However, this year, that’s not the case — Artesia is in danger of missing the playoffs and, at best, is one of the last teams in. Yes, I realize it seems like I’m talking in certainties. It’s not a certainty that Goddard will beat Artesia and Roswell, but it’s more likely to happen than not. And if it plays out like I’m expecting, Roswell will probably be left out in the cold for the first

time in three seasons despite its 6-4 record. Here’s how I see it: The six district winners who receive automatic bids are Farmington (District 1), Santa Fe (2), Deming (3), Goddard (4), Moriarty (5), Belen (6). Piedra Vista, Los Lunas, Centennial and Kirtland Central, all of which have six victories already, should all get at-large berths. That leaves just two at-large berths. If we assume Artesia beats Del Norte and gets an at-large bid with a 4-6 record, that leaves Roswell, Valencia and Del Norte

State soccer WORLD SERIES brackets out Red Sox victorious in Game 5, lead 3-2

ALBUQUERQUE — The New Mexico Activities Association released the 2013 Soccer State Championship brackets on Sunday and two area teams are in the field. The Roswell boys and Goddard girls, the winners of the District 4-4A titles, each received bids. The Coyotes (19-1) received the No. 2 seed and an opening-round bye. Roswell will square off with the winner of No. 7 Santa Teresa and No. 10 Artesia in the quarterfinals on Nov. 7 at 11:15 a.m. at the Albuquerque Public Schools Soccer Complex. Nationally-ranked Albuquerque Academy received the No. 1 seed in the boys bracket. Farmington is No. 3, Los Lunas is 4, Capital is 5, Los Alamos is 6, defending state champion Chaparral is 8, Miyamura is 9, Centennial is 11 and St. Pius X is 12. Goddard (12-8) received the No. 7 seed and will host a first-round game. The Rockets will host No. 10 Valencia on Friday at 4 p.m. at the GHS soccer complex. The winner then faces No. 2 Farmington on Nov. 7 at 6 p.m. in Albuquerque. Top-ranked St. Pius X got the No. 1 seed in the girls bracket. Aztec is No. 3, fivetime defending state champion Albuquerque Academy is 4, Los Lunas is 5, Los Alamos is 6, Belen is 8, Santa Teresa is 9, Piedra Vista is 11 and Santa Fe is 12.

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Jon Lester pitched the Boston Red Sox within a whisker of yet another World Series championship. Lester bested Adam Wainwright once again, journeyman David Ross hit a tiebreaking double in the seventh inning and the Red Sox downed the St. Louis Cardinals 3-1 Monday night to take a 3-2 Series edge. David Ortiz delivered his latest big hit, too, sending this bearded band of Red Sox back to Fenway Park with a chance to clinch their third crown in a decade. Not since 1918 has Boston won the title at its own ballpark. “The fact is we’re going home,” manager John Farrell said. “Going back to a place that our guys love to play in, in front of our fans.” “This atmosphere here, these three games, has been phenomenal. We know it’s going to be equal to that, if not better. And we’re excited about going home in the position we are,” he said.

See SOX, Page B3

Jon Lester throws a pitch during Game 5 of the World Series, Monday.

Game On Dude early Classic fave

LOCAL SCHEDULE — TUESDAY, OCT. 29 — • Hondo Valley at Clovis Chr., 4:30 p.m. • Capitan at Hagerman, 5 p.m. • Lake Arthur at Valley Chr., 5 p.m. • Dexter at Eunice, 6 p.m. • Vaughn at Gateway Chr., 6 p.m. • Artesia at Roswell, 7 p.m. PREP VOLLEYBALL

AP Photo

Seahawks escape with 14-9 win

AP Photo

ARCADIA, Calif. (AP) — Game On Dude was made the early 8-5 favorite in an impressive field of 12 for the $5 million Breeders’ Cup Classic, a race he has failed to win in two previous tries for trainer Bob Baffert. For the second straight year, the gelding will be running on his home track, where he is 8-1. Game On Dude’s only loss at Santa Anita came in last year’s 1 1⁄4-mile Classic, where he finished seventh behind winner Fort Larned. “I’m just hoping he runs like an 8-5 shot,” Baffert said Monday. Baffert is winless in the Classic, but he has trained Game On Dude to a 5-0 record this year heading into Saturday’s race. Joe

See WEEK 9, Page B3

Torre, the former Dodgers and Yankees manager, co-owns the gelding, which will be ridden by Mike Smith. The 48-year-old Hall of Fame jockey has mounts in 13 of 14 Breeders’ Cup races. Baffert sent Game On Dude out for his final workout Monday. “He’s not the same horse that ran here last year, thank God,” he said. “He’s bigger, he’s filled out and he’s a happy horse. I’ve spaced his races out and that’s allowed me to keep his weight on.” Fort Larned, who won last year’s Classic by three-quarters of a length over Mucho Macho Man, is back to defend his title. See CLASSIC, Page B3

ST. LOUIS (AP) — The Seattle Seahawks completed a lousy night for St. Louis sports fans. Russell Wilson threw two touchdown passes to Golden Tate, and the Seahawks made a dramatic goal-line stand in the final minute to preserve a 14-9 victory over the Rams on Monday night — less than an hour after the Cardinals lost to the Red Sox in the World Series just up the street. The Seahawks (7-1), riding the best start in franchise history, were clinging to the lead when they were forced to punt with just over 5 minutes left in the game. They managed to pin St. Louis at its own 3-yard line, but Kellen Clemens — starting at quarterback in place of the injured Sam Bradford — calmly marched the Rams (3-5) to the Seattle 1 as time wound down. Daryl Richardson was stuffed on third down, and Clemens threw a fade pass incomplete in the corner of the end zone on fourth down as time expired. “The defense did a tremendous job, coming up with a huge stop there,” Wilson said. The Seahawks won despite gaining just 135 yards of total offense, 80 of

SPOTLIGHT 1977 — Russell Erxleben of Texas kicks a 60-yard field goal in a 26-0 rout of Texas Tech for his third field goal of the season more than 60 yards, an NCAA record. 1984 — Orlando Pizzolato wins the New York Marathon in 2:14:53 and Grete Waitz captures the women’s title in 2:29:30. 1994 — Arnold Mickens rushes for more than 200 yards for the eighth consecutive game, breaking the

ON

AP Photo

Seattle’s Golden Tate, left, hauls in a pass over Janoris Jenkins during the Seahawks’ win over the Rams, Monday. Tate scored a touchdown on the reception.

it on Wilson’s second TD pass to Tate, the thirdfewest yards in a victory in franchise history. Wilson was sacked a career-high seven times by the Rams defense. “The defensive line, they were making plays,” Wilson

said. “We have to find a way to slow them down.” Clemens finished with 158 yards passing for the Rams, but he also threw two interceptions, one of them to Richard Sherman. Zac Stacy ran for a career -high 134 yards.

SPORTS

ON THIS DAY IN ... NCAA Division I-AA single-season rushing record as Butler beats Evansville 49-14. Mickens’ 244 yards gives him a total of 2,111, surpassing the record of 2,016 set by Towson State’s Tony Vinson. 2005 — Saint Liam comes through in the Breeders’ Cup Classic at Belmont Park with a stirring victory in America’s richest race. Taking the lead at the top of the stretch, Saint Liam holds off the challenge of Flower Alley and gives Hall of Fame jockey Jerry

Bailey his fifth win in the Classic and 15th victory in the Breeders’ Cup. 2006 — With a a 34-31 victory over Denver, Indianapolis is the first team to start 7-0 in consecutive seasons since the 1929-31 Green Bay Packers did it three straight times. 2011 — Joe Paterno breaks Eddie Robinson’s record for victories by a Division I coach with No. 409 in Penn State’s sloppy 10-7 win over Illinois.


B2 Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Final

T-28th +8 76 SCOREBOARD PLACE

THIS WEEK’S STOP: TAIWAN CHAMPIONSHIP

TOTAL TO PAR

ROUND SCORE

20; Duke 8; Minnesota 6; Mississippi 6; Nebraska 6; Ball State 4; Florida 4; Iowa 1. Pv 1 3 2 4 6 8 7 9 5 15 11 16 13 21 10 17 18 19 20 12 22 NR 23 NR NR

The AP Top 25 By The Associated Press The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Oct. 26, total points based on 25 points for a firstplace vote through one point for a 25thplace vote, and previous ranking: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Record Pts Pv 1. Alabama (55) . . . . . . . .8-0 1,495 1 2. Oregon (3) . . . . . . . . . .8-0 1,432 2 3. Florida St. (2) . . . . . . . .7-0 1,390 3 4. Ohio St. . . . . . . . . . . . .8-0 1,317 4 5. Baylor . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-0 1,223 6 6. Stanford . . . . . . . . . . . .7-1 1,189 8 7. Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-0 1,149 7 8. Auburn . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-1 1,022 11 9. Clemson . . . . . . . . . . . .7-1 1,007 9 10. Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . .7-1 873 5 11. LSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-2 818 13 12. Texas A&M . . . . . . . . .6-2 811 14 13. Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . .7-1 791 17 14. South Carolina . . . . . .6-2 701 20 15. Texas Tech . . . . . . . . .7-1 579 10 16. Fresno St. . . . . . . . . . .7-0 510 15 17. UCLA . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-2 489 12 18. Oklahoma St. . . . . . . .6-1 483 19 19. UCF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-1 464 21 20. Louisville . . . . . . . . . . .7-1 417 18 21. N. Illinois . . . . . . . . . . .8-0 290 23 22. Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . .5-2 262 22 23. Michigan . . . . . . . . . . .6-1 199 24 24. Michigan St. . . . . . . . .7-1 166 NR 25. Arizona St. . . . . . . . . . .5-2 133 NR

Others receiving votes: Notre Dame 132, Georgia 24, BYU 22, Texas 22, Mississippi 21, Virginia Tech 20, Oregon St. 17, Florida 14, Washington 6, Ball St. 4, Minnesota 4, Arizona 2, Duke 2.

USA Today Top 25 Poll The USA Today Top 25 football coaches poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Oct. 26, total points based on 25 points for first place through one point for 25th, and previous ranking: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Record Pts Pvs 1. Alabama (56) . . . . . . . .8-0 1,542 1 2. Oregon (6) . . . . . . . . . .8-0 1,483 2 3. Florida State . . . . . . . .7-0 1,419 3 4. Ohio State . . . . . . . . . .8-0 1,375 4 5. Baylor . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-0 1,293 5 6. Miami (Fla.) . . . . . . . . .7-0 1,190 6 7. Stanford . . . . . . . . . . . .7-1 1,182 8 8. Clemson . . . . . . . . . . . .7-1 1,064 10 9. Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . . .7-1 933 12 7 10. Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . .7-1 834 11. Auburn . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-1 804 17 12. Oklahoma State . . . . .6-1 803 t13 13. LSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7-2 802 t13 14. Texas A&M . . . . . . . . .6-2 758 15 9 15. Texas Tech . . . . . . . . .7-1 673 16. South Carolina . . . . . .6-2 627 20 17. Louisville . . . . . . . . . . .7-1 579 16 18. Fresno State . . . . . . . .7-0 542 18 19. UCLA . . . . . . . . . . . . .5-2 432 11 20. Northern Illinois . . . . . .8-0 373 22 21. Michigan . . . . . . . . . . .6-1 309 23 22. Central Florida . . . . . .6-1 300 25 23. Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . .5-2 253 24 24. Michigan State . . . . . .7-1 237 NR 25. Notre Dame . . . . . . . . .6-2 83 NR

Others receiving votes: Arizona State 57; Virginia Tech 53; Texas 31; Oregon State 22; Brigham Young 21; Houston 21; Georgia

Golf scores

Roswell Daily Record

Roswell native Gerina Piller on the LPGA Tour

College football

BCS Standings Oct. 27, 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Avg 1. Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..9937 2. Oregon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..9517 3. Florida St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..9211 4. Ohio St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..8840 5. Stanford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..7918 6. Baylor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..7645 7. Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..7560 8. Clemson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..6687 9. Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..6096 10. Oklahoma . . . . . . . . . . . . ..6064 11. Auburn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..6025 12. Texas A&M . . . . . . . . . . . ..4812 13. LSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..4630 14. South Carolina . . . . . . . . ..4486 15. Texas Tech . . . . . . . . . . . ..3749 16. Fresno St. . . . . . . . . . . . . ..3669 17. N. Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..3335 18. Oklahoma St. . . . . . . . . . . ..3113 19. Louisville . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..2599 20. UCLA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..2338 21. Michigan . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..1875 22. Michigan St. . . . . . . . . . . . ..1811 23. UCF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..1789 24. Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . . . ..0993 25. Notre Dame . . . . . . . . . . . ..0928

PILLER’S PROFESSION SPORTS

Penn State: 26 people get $59.7M over Sandusky

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Penn State said Monday it is paying $59.7 million to 26 young men over claims of child sexual abuse at the hands of former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, a man once revered as a university icon who is now serving what is effectively a life prison sentence. Nearly two years after the retired coach was first charged with child molestation, the school said 23 deals were fully signed and three were agreements in principle. It did not disclose the names of the recipients. The school faces six other claims, and the university says it believes some of those do not have merit while others may produce settlements. University president Rodney Erickson issued a statement calling the announcement a step forward for victims and the school. “We cannot undo what has been done, but we can and must do everything possible to learn from this and ensure it never happens again at Penn State,” said Erickson, who announced the day Sandusky was convicted in June 2012 that Penn State was determined to compensate his victims. The settlements have been unfolding since mid-August, when attorneys for the accusers began to disclose them. Penn State has not been confirming them, waiting instead to announce deals at once. Harrisburg lawyer Ben Andreozzi, who helped negotiate several of the settlements, said his clients were satisfied. “They felt that the university treated them fairly with the economic and noneconomic terms of the settlement,” said Andreozzi, who also represents some others who have come forward recently. Those new claims have not been presented to the university, he said. One client represented by St. Paul, Minn., attorney Jeff Anderson signed off on an agreement in the past week and the other is basically done, he said. Anderson counts his two clients as among the three that have been classified as agreements in principle, which Penn State said means final documentation is expected to be completed in the next few weeks. Anderson said his clients were focused on Penn State’s changes to prevent future abuse. “I have to applaud them, because they said ‘not until we’re satisfied that no one else will get hurt,”’ Anderson said. “The settlement of their cases in no way heals, in no way lessens the wound that remains open and the scars that are deep.” Penn State has spent more than $50 million on other costs related to the Sandusky scandal, including lawyers’ fees, public relations expenses, and adoption of new policies and procedures related to children and sexual abuse complaints. It said Monday that liability insurance is expected to cover the payments and legal defense, and expenses not covered should be paid from interest paid on loans by Penn State to its self-supporting units. Clifford Rieders, a Williamsport attorney who negotiated one of the settlements, said the average payout matched other cases involving child abuse in educational or religious settings. Rieders said the cases raised the specter of embarrassing revelations if they went to trial, and a university would have to consider the effect on the victims, its overall reputation, its ability to pay and its wider objectives. “There are many considerations whenever you resolve a high-profile case involving serious misconduct, and I’m sure all of those and more came into play here,” Rieders said. Sandusky, 69, has been pursuing appeals while he serves a 30- to 60-year sentence on 45 criminal counts.

LPGA

LPGA Money Leaders By The Associated Press Through Oct. 27 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Trn 1. Inbee Park . . . . . . . . . . .21 2. Suzann Pettersen . . . . .21 3. Stacy Lewis . . . . . . . . . .23 4. So Yeon Ryu . . . . . . . . .21 5. I.K. Kim . . . . . . . . . . . . .21

PGA/Asian Tour-CIMB Classic Scores By The Associated Press Monday At Kuala Lumpur Golf & Country Club, West Course Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Purse: $7 million Yardage: 6,924; Par: 72 (x-won on first playoff hole) Final x-Ryan Moore (500), $1,260,000 .........63-72-69-70 — 274 Gary Woodland (300), $756,000..........68-70-67-69 — 274 Kiradech Aphibarnrat, $406,000...........67-69-69-70 — 275 Chris Stroud (163), $406,000...............67-69-68-71 — 275 Aaron Baddeley (110), $280,000 .........73-67-70-66 — 276 Jimmy Walker (100), $252,000 ............74-68-67-68 — 277 Harris English (85), $218,167 ..............71-67-71-69 — 278 Charles Howell III (85), $218,167.........69-72-69-68 — 278 Graham DeLaet (85), $218,167 ...........72-67-68-71 — 278 Keegan Bradley (75), $189,000 ...........65-66-76-72 — 279 Stewart Cink (65), $161,000 ................70-68-69-73 — 280 Sergio Garcia (65), $161,000...............66-71-71-72 — 280 Billy Horschel (65), $161,000 ...............72-69-72-67 — 280 K.J. Choi (57), $129,500 ......................68-71-70-72 — 281 Bryce Molder (57), $129,500................73-69-67-72 — 281 Bill Haas (54), $112,000.......................72-67-71-72 — 282 Shiv Kapur, $112,000 ...........................69-70-71-72 — 282 Jeff Overton (54), $112,000..................73-67-72-70 — 282 Rickie Fowler (50), $81,900 .................71-72-73-67 — 283 Jerry Kelly (50), $81,900 ......................71-69-66-77 — 283 Phil Mickelson (50), $81,900................71-70-68-74 — 283 Kevin Stadler (50), $81,900 .................71-69-73-70 — 283 Kyle Stanley (50), $81,900...................73-67-68-75 — 283 Bo Van Pelt (50), $81,900 ....................72-77-69-65 — 283 Siddikur Rahman, $53,433...................75-70-69-70 — 284 Brendan Steele (44), $53,433 ..............74-70-72-68 — 284 Jonas Blixt (44), $53,433 .....................72-70-68-74 — 284 Kevin Chappell (44), $53,433...............73-71-72-68 — 284 Chris Kirk (44), $53,433 .......................67-71-72-74 — 284 Hideki Matsuyama (44), $53,433 .........70-68-72-74 — 284 Tim Clark (40), $44,450........................72-69-70-74 — 285 Bubba Watson (40), $44,450 ...............78-69-65-73 — 285 Gaganjeet Bhullar, $40,425..................72-70-71-73 — 286 Boo Weekley (38), $40,425..................67-74-72-73 — 286 Roberto Castro (34), $34,510 ..............74-70-70-73 — 287 Anirban Lahiri, $34,510 ........................74-70-75-68 — 287 Richard H. Lee (34), $34,510...............70-73-72-72 — 287 Michael Thompson (34), $34,510.........75-71-68-73 — 287 Nick Watney (34), $34,510...................75-69-70-73 — 287 Scott Hend, $28,000.............................74-72-71-71 — 288 Matt Jones (30), $28,000 .....................73-71-71-73 — 288 Patrick Reed (30), $28,000 ..................74-71-72-71 — 288 Nicholas Thompson (30), $28,000 .......69-71-76-72 — 288 Marc Leishman (26), $23,100 ..............72-65-77-75 — 289 Prayad Marksaeng, $23,100 ................74-71-71-73 — 289 Camilo Villegas (26), $23,100 ..............70-71-73-75 — 289 Ernie Els (22), $18,223 ........................76-71-69-74 — 290 Retief Goosen (22), $18,223................72-74-69-75 — 290 Matt Every (22), $18,223......................72-77-68-73 — 290

Money $2,335,460 $2,241,847 $1,764,236 $1,161,093 $1,089,699

6. Beatriz Recari . . . . . . . .23 $1,022,812 7. Shanshan Feng . . . . . . .17 $989,712 8. Lexi Thompson . . . . . . .22 $986,986 9. Na Yeon Choi . . . . . . . .23 $920,158 10. Hee Young Park . . . . . .24 $823,783 11. Paula Creamer . . . . . . .21 $818,160 12. Karrie Webb . . . . . . . . .19 $746,303 13. Angela Stanford . . . . . .20 $743,469 14. Caroline Hedwall . . . . .21 $741,207 15. Lizette Salas . . . . . . . . .22 $725,637 16. Karine Icher . . . . . . . . .23 $720,304 17. Amy Yang . . . . . . . . . . .20 $666,749 18. Cristie Kerr . . . . . . . . . .20 $654,814 19. Anna Nordqvist . . . . . . .24 $643,488 20. Catriona Matthew . . . . .18 $600,571 21. Chella Choi . . . . . . . . . .25 $596,661 22. Jiyai Shin . . . . . . . . . . .19 $581,089 23. Jessica Korda . . . . . . . .19 $575,567 24. Ilhee Lee . . . . . . . . . . .24 $552,490 25. Ai Miyazato . . . . . . . . . .19 $515,074 26. Jodi Ewart Shadoff . . . .22 $475,836 27. Morgan Pressel . . . . . .22 $475,041 28. Pornanong Phatlum . . .23 $456,379 29. Hee Kyung Seo . . . . . .21 $441,248 30. Jennifer Johnson . . . . .22 $440,269 31. Se Ri Pak . . . . . . . . . . .18 $440,162 32. Azahara Munoz . . . . . .24 $435,125 33. Brittany Lincicome . . . .20 $424,293 34. Gerina Piller . . . . . . . .23 $414,805 35. Haeji Kang . . . . . . . . . .24 $408,641 36. Yani Tseng . . . . . . . . . .23 $405,068 37. Mika Miyazato . . . . . . .19 $398,621 38. Sun Young Yoo . . . . . . .24 $339,510 39. Carlota Ciganda . . . . . .17 $337,227 40. Sandra Gal . . . . . . . . . .23 $332,841 41. Michelle Wie . . . . . . . . .24 $329,005 42. Eun-Hee Ji . . . . . . . . . .25 $321,160 43. Brittany Lang . . . . . . . .25 $315,476 44. Meena Lee . . . . . . . . . .24 $297,197 45. Mo Martin . . . . . . . . . . .23 $293,078 46. Jenny Shin . . . . . . . . . .24 $293,025 47. Caroline Masson . . . . .20 $281,265 48. Moriya Jutanugarn . . . .22 $274,277 49. Mina Harigae . . . . . . . .25 $272,027 50. Giulia Sergas . . . . . . . .23 $269,393

MLB

Postseason Baseball Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) American League All games televised by Fox Boston 4, Detroit 2 Oct. 12: Detroit 1, Boston 0 Oct. 13: Boston 6, Detroit 5 Oct. 15: Boston 1, Detroit 0 Oct. 16: Detroit 7, Boston 3 Oct. 17: Boston 4, Detroit 3 Oct. 19: Boston 5, Detroit 2

National League All games televised by TBS St. Louis 4, Los Angeles 2 Oct. 11: St. Louis 3, Los Angeles 2, 13 inn. Oct. 12: St. Louis 1, Los Angeles 0 Oct. 14: Los Angeles 3, St. Louis 0 Oct. 15: St. Louis 4, Los Angeles 2 Oct. 16: Los Angeles 6, St. Louis 4 Oct. 18: St. Louis 9, Los Angeles 0

WORLD SERIES (Best-of-7) All games televised by Fox Boston 3, St. Louis 2 Oct. 23: Boston 8, St. Louis 1 Oct. 24: St. Louis 4, Boston 2 Oct. 26: St. Louis 5, Boston 4 Oct. 27: Boston 4, St. Louis 2 Oct. 28: Boston 3, St. Louis 1 Oct. 30: St. Louis (Wacha 4-1) at Boston (Lackey 10-13), 6:07 p.m. x-Oct. 31: St. Louis at Boston, 6:07 p.m.

NBA

National Basketball Association At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Pct Boston . . . . . . . . . . . .0 0 .000 Brooklyn . . . . . . . . . . .0 0 .000 New York . . . . . . . . . .0 0 .000 Philadelphia . . . . . . . .0 0 .000 Toronto . . . . . . . . . . . .0 0 .000

Brian Gay (22), $18,223.......................72-72-74-72 Berry Henson, $18,223 ........................74-71-72-73 Scott Stallings (22), $18,223 ................73-70-78-69 Brendon de Jonge (15), $15,908 .........72-71-73-75 Charley Hoffman (15), $15,908............69-72-74-76 John Huh (15), $15,908 .......................71-74-69-77 Ryan Palmer (15), $15,908 ..................76-68-71-76 Rory Sabbatini (15), $15,908 ...............67-74-75-75 Kevin Streelman (15), $15,908 ............72-73-71-75 Daniel Summerhays (15), $15,908 ......75-69-73-74 Josh Teater (15), $15,908 ....................74-66-72-79 Russell Henley (10), $15,190...............71-74-72-75 Martin Laird (10), $15,190....................68-70-76-78 Nicholas Fung, $14,980 .......................74-78-71-70 Lucas Glover (6), $14,630....................71-75-75-74 David Lingmerth (6), $14,630...............73-78-73-71 David Lynn (6), $14,630 .......................75-70-71-79 John Merrick (6), $14,630 ....................77-75-69-74 Sang-Moon Bae (2), $14,070...............80-71-74-71 David Hearn (2), $14,070.....................72-70-73-81 Wade Ormsby, $14,070........................70-69-74-83 D.A. Points (2), $14,070.......................71-76-73-76 Scott Brown (1), $13,720 .....................77-72-75-74 Cameron Tringale (1), $13,580 ............79-77-71-75 Martin Flores (1), $13,440....................73-79-74-78 Brian Davis (1), $13,230 ......................79-75-74-78 Rashid Ismail, $13,230.........................73-76-80-77 Seuk-hyun Baek, $12,950 ....................80-72-82-75 John Rollins (1), $12,950 .....................74-76-77-82

LPGA-Taiwan Championship Scores By The Associated Press Sunday At Sunrise Golf and Country Club Course Yang Mei, Taiwan Purse: $2 million Yardage: 6,533; Par: 72 (a-amateur) Final Suzann Pettersen, $300,000................68-69-73-69 Azahara Munoz, $186,096 ...................73-72-69-70 Caroline Hedwall, $135,000 .................71-73-72-70 Eun-Hee Ji, $104,433...........................72-76-69-70 Mina Harigae, $70,132 .........................74-71-75-68 Irene Cho, $70,132...............................71-74-72-71 Se Ri Pak, $70,132 ..............................76-72-69-71 Mi Jung Hur, $45,680 ...........................75-71-72-71 Beatriz Recari, $45,680........................72-71-73-73 Sun Young Yoo, $45,680......................73-69-72-75 Moriya Jutanugarn, $30,986.................76-75-72-68 Chella Choi, $30,986............................72-72-76-71 Candie Kung, $30,986..........................73-73-74-71 Paula Creamer , $30,986 .....................72-74-73-72 Anna Nordqvist, $30,986......................77-71-71-72 Hee Kyung Seo, $30,986 .....................74-70-74-73 Na Yeon Choi, $30,986 ........................74-72-71-74 Carlota Ciganda, $30,986 ....................72-70-72-77 Mika Miyazato, $23,841 .......................75-75-70-72

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

290 290 290 291 291 291 291 291 291 291 291 292 292 293 295 295 295 295 296 296 296 296 298 302 304 306 306 309 309

279 284 286 287 288 288 288 289 289 289 291 291 291 291 291 291 291 291 292

GB — — — — —

Southeast Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Charlotte . . . . . . . . . . .0 Miami . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Orlando . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Washington . . . . . . . . .0 Central Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Chicago . . . . . . . . . . .0 Cleveland . . . . . . . . . .0 Detroit . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . .0 Milwaukee . . . . . . . . . .0

L 0 0 0 0 0

L 0 0 0 0 0

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Dallas . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 0 Houston . . . . . . . . . . .0 0 Memphis . . . . . . . . . . .0 0 New Orleans . . . . . . . .0 0 San Antonio . . . . . . . .0 0 Northwest Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Denver . . . . . . . . . . . .0 0 Minnesota . . . . . . . . . .0 0 Oklahoma City . . . . . .0 0 Portland . . . . . . . . . . .0 0 Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 0 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L Golden State . . . . . . .0 0 L.A. Clippers . . . . . . . .0 0 L.A. Lakers . . . . . . . . .0 0 Phoenix . . . . . . . . . . . .0 0 Sacramento . . . . . . . .0 0

Pct .000 .000 .000 .000 .000

GB — — — — —

Pct .000 .000 .000 .000 .000

GB — — — — —

Pct .000 .000 .000 .000 .000

GB — — — — —

Pct .000 .000 .000 .000 .000

Pct .000 .000 .000 .000 .000

Sunday’s Games No games scheduled Monday’s Games No games scheduled Tuesday’s Games Orlando at Indiana, 5 p.m. Chicago at Miami, 6 p.m. L.A. Clippers at L.A. Lakers, 8:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Miami at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Brooklyn at Cleveland, 5 p.m. Boston at Toronto, 5 p.m. Washington at Detroit, 5:30 p.m. Milwaukee at New York, 5:30 p.m. Orlando at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Charlotte at Houston, 6 p.m. Indiana at New Orleans, 6 p.m. Atlanta at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. Memphis at San Antonio, 6:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Utah, 7 p.m. Portland at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Denver at Sacramento, 8 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Golden State, 8:30 p.m.

GB — — — — —

GB — — — — —

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Dallas . . . . . . . . .4 4 0 Philadelphia . . . .3 5 0 Washington . . . . .2 5 0 N.Y. Giants . . . . .2 6 0

Pct .500 .375 .286 .250

PF 230 176 173 141

Lexi Thompson, $23,841......................74-74-70-74 Alison Walshe, $21,804........................71-73-79-70 Ilhee Lee, $21,804................................73-75-71-74 Pernilla Lindberg, $21,804 ...................75-71-72-75 Michelle Wie, $19,817 ..........................74-77-72-71 Catriona Matthew, $19,817 ..................75-72-74-73 Juli Inkster, $18,391 .............................75-74-72-74 Katherine Hull-Kirk, $18,391 ................73-70-77-75 Hee-Won Han, $15,399........................77-76-72-71 Haeji Kang, $15,399.............................77-73-73-73 Rebecca Lee-Bentham, $15,399..........73-78-71-74 Ai Miyazato, $15,399............................74-76-72-74 Julieta Granada, $15,399 .....................74-76-70-76 Gerina Piller, $15,399 .........................74-74-72-76 Belen Mozo, $15,399 ...........................72-77-70-77 Jennifer Johnson, $12,023 ...................75-75-74-73 Austin Ernst, $12,023 ...........................74-76-73-74 Jane Park, $12,023 ..............................75-75-72-75 Lindsey Wright, $12,023.......................75-74-73-75 Hee Young Park, $12,023 ....................74-74-71-78 Yani Tseng, $9,985...............................76-78-72-72 Karine Icher, $9,985 .............................71-79-73-75 Meena Lee, $9,985 ..............................74-77-72-75 Pornanong Phatlum, $9,985.................74-73-73-78 Vicky Hurst, $8,660 ..............................74-79-72-74 Brittany Lang, $8,660 ...........................77-74-73-75 Paola Moreno, $8,660 ..........................75-77-71-76 Mariajo Uribe, $8,049 ...........................72-76-78-74 a-Asuka Kashiwabara ..........................73-76-74-77 Sydnee Michaels, $7,590 .....................78-79-74-70 Lisa McCloskey, $7,590 .......................76-76-74-75 a-Supamas Sangchan..........................72-78-74-77 Sarah Jane Smith, $7,131....................80-73-73-76 Ji Young Oh, $6,623.............................76-76-76-75 Danielle Kang, $6,623 ..........................75-75-77-76 Mo Martin, $6,623 ................................75-75-76-77 Dewi Claire Schreefel, $6,623..............78-73-75-77 Ryann O’Toole, $6,011 .........................76-76-77-75 Thidapa Suwannapura, $6,011 ............77-77-72-78 Heather Bowie Young, $5,706..............75-80-78-73 Jacqui Concolino, $5,222 .....................80-78-76-74 Huei-Ju Shih, $5,222............................76-75-81-76 Hsiu-Feng Tseng, $5,222 .....................77-74-78-79 Kristy McPherson, $5,222 ....................77-76-72-83 Ya Huei Lu, $4,687...............................80-78-78-73 Jee Young Lee , $4,687 .......................78-77-77-77 Christina Kim, $4,687 ...........................76-75-79-79 Jennifer Rosales, $4,687......................77-77-74-81 Cindy LaCrosse, $4,687.......................76-74-75-84 Caroline Masson, $4,382 .....................78-78-73-82 Christel Boeljon, $4,278 .......................77-80-77-78 a-Jo-Hua Hung .....................................79-78-74-81 Yi-Chen Liu, $4,177..............................82-78-77-76 a-Yi-Ching Wu ......................................79-80-79-76 Moira Dunn, $4,076..............................77-82-77-78 a-Ssu-Chia Cheng................................78-85-76-76 a-Yu-Ju Chen .......................................81-82-80-79 Jenny Shin.................................................74-74-69

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Out 4 3 4 3 4 5 4 4 5 36 4 3 5 4 5 5 4 4 6 40

Eagles: 0 Birdies: 1 Fairways hit: 11 of 14

South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W New Orleans . . . .6 Carolina . . . . . . .4 Atlanta . . . . . . . . .2 Tampa Bay . . . . .0 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Green Bay . . . . .5 Detroit . . . . . . . . .5 Chicago . . . . . . . .4 Minnesota . . . . . .1 West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W Seattle . . . . . . . . .7 San Francisco . . .6 Arizona . . . . . . . .4 St. Louis . . . . . . .3

L 1 3 5 7

L 2 3 3 6

L 1 2 4 5

T 0 0 0 0

T 0 0 0 0

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .857 .571 .286 .000

Pct .714 .625 .571 .143

Pct .875 .750 .500 .375

PF 196 170 166 100

PF 212 217 213 163

PF 205 218 160 165

PA 120 96 184 163

PA 158 197 206 225

PA 125 145 174 198

Thursday’s Game Carolina 31, Tampa Bay 13 Sunday’s Games Kansas City 23, Cleveland 17 New Orleans 35, Buffalo 17 New England 27, Miami 17 Detroit 31, Dallas 30 N.Y. Giants 15, Philadelphia 7 San Francisco 42, Jacksonville 10 Oakland 21, Pittsburgh 18 Cincinnati 49, N.Y. Jets 9 Arizona 27, Atlanta 13 Denver 45, Washington 21 Green Bay 44, Minnesota 31 Open: Baltimore, Chicago, Houston, Indianapolis, San Diego, Tennessee Monday’s Game Seattle 14, St. Louis 9 Thursday, Oct. 31 Cincinnati at Miami, 6:25 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 3 Minnesota at Dallas, 1 p.m. Tennessee at St. Louis, 1 p.m. Atlanta at Carolina, 1 p.m. New Orleans at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. Kansas City at Buffalo, 1 p.m. San Diego at Washington, 1 p.m. Philadelphia at Oakland, 2:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Seattle, 2:05 p.m. Baltimore at Cleveland, 2:25 p.m. Pittsburgh at New England, 2:25 p.m. Indianapolis at Houston, 6:30 p.m. Open: Arizona, Denver, Detroit, Jacksonville, N.Y. Giants, San Francisco Monday, Nov. 4 Chicago at Green Bay, 6:40 p.m.

PA 144 211 167 213

PA 131 146 194 264

PA 144 148 179 153

PA 98 218 144 150 PA 186 211 229 223

292 293 293 293 294 294 295 295 296 296 296 296 296 296 296 297 297 297 297 297 298 298 298 298 299 299 299 300 300 301 301 301 302 303 303 303 303 304 304 306 308 308 308 308 309 309 309 309 309 311 312 312 313 314 314 315 322 WD

National Hockey League At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Tampa Bay . .11 8 3 0 Toronto . . . . .12 8 4 0 Boston . . . . .10 7 3 0 Montreal . . . .12 7 5 0 Detroit . . . . .12 6 4 2 Ottawa . . . . .11 4 5 2 Florida . . . . .12 3 7 2 Buffalo . . . . .14 2 11 1 Metropolitan Division . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Pittsburgh . . .12 8 4 0 N.Y. Islanders11 4 4 3 Carolina . . . .12 4 5 3 Columbus . . .11 5 6 0 Washington .12 5 7 0 New Jersey .11 2 5 4 Philadelphia .10 3 7 0 N.Y. Rangers 10 3 7 0

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 In Total 4 3 4 5 4 4 3 4 5 36 72 4 4 3 5 4 4 3 4 5 36 76

Pars: 12 Bogeys: 5 Greens hit: 10 of 18

NHL

NFL

National Football League At A Glance By The Associated Press All Times Mountain AMERICAN CONFERENCE East . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct PF New England . . .6 2 0 .750 179 N.Y. Jets . . . . . . .4 4 0 .500 143 Miami . . . . . . . . .3 4 0 .429 152 Buffalo . . . . . . . . .3 5 0 .375 176 South . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct PF Indianapolis . . . . .5 2 0 .714 187 Tennessee . . . . .3 4 0 .429 145 Houston . . . . . . .2 5 0 .286 122 Jacksonville . . . .0 8 0 .000 86 North . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct PF Cincinnati . . . . . .6 2 0 .750 197 Baltimore . . . . . . .3 4 0 .429 150 Cleveland . . . . . .3 5 0 .375 148 Pittsburgh . . . . . .2 5 0 .286 125 West . . . . . . . . . . . . . .W L T Pct PF Kansas City . . . .8 0 0 1.000 192 Denver . . . . . . . .7 1 0 .875 343 San Diego . . . . . .4 3 0 .571 168 Oakland . . . . . . .3 4 0 .429 126

Hole Par Score

ROUND SCORECARD

Pts 16 16 14 14 14 10 8 5

Pts 16 11 11 10 10 8 6 6

GFGA 39 31 40 30 30 17 35 22 27 33 30 32 26 42 23 41

GFGA 38 29 35 36 26 36 31 29 34 38 24 36 18 27 15 35

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Pts GFGA Colorado . . . .11 10 1 0 20 35 16 Chicago . . . .12 7 2 3 17 39 33 Minnesota . .13 6 4 3 15 30 31 St. Louis . . . .9 6 1 2 14 35 23 Nashville . . .12 6 5 1 13 23 32 Winnipeg . . .13 5 6 2 12 32 37 Dallas . . . . . .11 5 5 1 11 30 34 Pacific Division . . . . . . . . . .GP W L OT Pts GFGA San Jose . . .12 10 1 1 21 48 20 Vancouver . .14 9 4 1 19 41 39 Anaheim . . . .12 9 3 0 18 39 31 Phoenix . . . .12 7 3 2 16 40 39 Los Angeles .12 8 4 0 16 35 30 Calgary . . . . .11 5 4 2 12 34 39 Edmonton . . .13 3 8 2 8 36 50 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss.

Sunday’s Games Tampa Bay 4, Florida 3, SO Los Angeles 2, Edmonton 1, SO San Jose 5, Ottawa 2 Anaheim 4, Columbus 3 Colorado 3, Winnipeg 2 Monday’s Games Dallas 4, Buffalo 3 Pittsburgh 3, Carolina 1 Montreal 2, N.Y. Rangers 0 Chicago 5, Minnesota 1 Vancouver 3, Washington 2 Tuesday’s Games N.Y. Rangers at N.Y. Islanders, 5 p.m. Anaheim at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Dallas at Montreal, 5 p.m. Tampa Bay at New Jersey, 5:30 p.m. Ottawa at Chicago, 6 p.m. Winnipeg at St. Louis, 6 p.m. Toronto at Edmonton, 7 p.m. Los Angeles at Phoenix, 8 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Boston at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Toronto at Calgary, 6 p.m. Detroit at Vancouver, 8:30 p.m. San Jose at Los Angeles, 8:30 p.m.

PGA

World Golf Ranking By The Associated Press Through Oct. 28 1. Tiger Woods . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 12.56 2. Adam Scott . . . . . . . . . . . . .AUS 8.94 3. Phil Mickelson . . . . . . . . . . .USA 8.06

TV SPORTSWATCH

TV SportsWatch By The Associated Press All times Mountain Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts. Tuesday, Oct. 29 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 5 p.m. ESPN2 — Gold Glove Awards, at Bristol, Conn. NBA BASKETBALL 6 p.m. TNT — Chicago at Miami 8:30 p.m. TNT — L.A. Clippers at L.A. Lakers NHL HOCKEY 5:30 p.m. NBCSN — Tampa Bay at New Jersey

Others: 0 Putts: 32

4. Henrik Stenson . . . . . . . . . .SWE 5. Justin Rose . . . . . . . . . . . . .ENG 6. Rory McIlroy . . . . . . . . . . . .NIR 7. Steve Stricker . . . . . . . . . . .USA 8. Matt Kuchar . . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 9. Brandt Snedeker . . . . . . . . .USA 10. Jason Dufner . . . . . . . . . . .USA 11. Zach Johnson . . . . . . . . . . .USA 12. Graeme McDowell . . . . . . .NIR 13. Jim Furyk . . . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 14. Luke Donald . . . . . . . . . . . .ENG 15. Keegan Bradley . . . . . . . . .USA 16. Webb Simpson . . . . . . . . . .USA 17. Jason Day . . . . . . . . . . . . .AUS 18. Charl Schwartzel . . . . . . . .SAF 19. Sergio Garcia . . . . . . . . . . .ESP 20. Jordan Spieth . . . . . . . . . . .USA 21. Lee Westwood . . . . . . . . . .ENG 22. Ian Poulter . . . . . . . . . . . . .ENG 23. Dustin Johnson . . . . . . . . .USA 24. Ernie Els . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SAF 25. Bill Haas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 26. Hunter Mahan . . . . . . . . . .USA 27. Nick Watney . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 28. Hideki Matsuyama . . . . . . .JPN 29. Bubba Watson . . . . . . . . . .USA 30. Louis Oosthuizen . . . . . . . .SAF 31. Ryan Moore . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 32. G. Fernandez-Castano . . . .ESP 33. Graham DeLaet . . . . . . . . .CAN 34. Matteo Manassero . . . . . . .ITA 35. Billy Horschel . . . . . . . . . . .USA 36. Rickie Fowler . . . . . . . . . . .USA 37. Francesco Molinari . . . . . . .ITA 38. Jonas Blixt . . . . . . . . . . . . .SWE 39. David Lynn . . . . . . . . . . . . .ENG 40. Jimmy Walker . . . . . . . . . . .USA 41. Martin Kaymer . . . . . . . . . .GER 42. Kevin Streelman . . . . . . . . .USA 43. Peter Hanson . . . . . . . . . . .SWE 44. Thomas Bjorn . . . . . . . . . . .DEN 45. Richard Sterne . . . . . . . . . .SAF 46. Scott Piercy . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 47. Jamie Donaldson . . . . . . . .WAL 48. Bo Van Pelt . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 49. Thongchai Jaidee . . . . . . . .THA 50. Branden Grace . . . . . . . . . .SAF 51. Miguel Angel Jimenez . . . .ESP 52. Boo Weekley . . . . . . . . . . .USA 53. Gary Woodland . . . . . . . . .USA 54. Bernd Wiesberger . . . . . . .AUT 55. Thorbjorn Olesen . . . . . . . .DEN 56. D.A. Points . . . . . . . . . . . . .USA 57. Angel Cabrera . . . . . . . . . .ARG 58. Nicolas Colsaerts . . . . . . . .BEL 59. Stephen Gallacher . . . . . . .SCO 60. Peter Uihlein . . . . . . . . . . .USA 61. Michael Thompson . . . . . . .USA 62. Joost Luiten . . . . . . . . . . . .NED 63. Robert Garrigus . . . . . . . . .USA 64. Roberto Castro . . . . . . . . . .USA 65. Harris English . . . . . . . . . . .USA 66. Kiradech Aphibarnrat . . . . .THA 67. Luke Guthrie . . . . . . . . . . .USA 68. Marc Leishman . . . . . . . . .AUS 69. Brendon de Jonge . . . . . . .ZIM 70. Patrick Reed . . . . . . . . . . .USA 71. Chris Wood . . . . . . . . . . . .ENG 72. Martin Laird . . . . . . . . . . . .SCO 73. Shane Lowry . . . . . . . . . . . .IRL 74. Brett Rumford . . . . . . . . . . .AUS 75. Carl Pettersson . . . . . . . . .SWE

Transactions

8.02 7.32 6.81 6.47 6.40 6.15 5.71 5.22 5.03 5.01 4.90 4.87 4.71 4.70 4.47 4.36 4.26 4.20 4.09 4.08 4.04 3.74 3.73 3.72 3.70 3.67 3.51 3.45 2.99 2.92 2.86 2.85 2.81 2.81 2.78 2.77 2.74 2.73 2.73 2.70 2.61 2.60 2.60 2.58 2.57 2.52 2.49 2.47 2.36 2.31 2.28 2.27 2.25 2.21 2.19 2.18 2.17 2.13 2.12 2.09 2.04 2.03 2.03 2.01 2.01 1.99 1.99 1.98 1.94 1.91 1.89 1.88

Monday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL National League SAN DIEGO PADRES — Announced LHP Clayton Richard elected free agency after clearing outright waivers. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA — Fined Memphis F Ed Davis $15,000 for making excessive and unnecessary contact with Houston F Donatas Motiejunas during Friday’s game. NEW YORK KNICKS — Exercised their fourth-year contract option on G Iman Shumpert. PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Signed F Brandon Davies. WASHINGTON WIZARDS — Waived G Shannon Brown, G Malcolm Lee and G Kendall Marshall. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL — Named Patrick Kerney vice president of player benefits and legends operations. BALTIMORE RAVENS — Signed RB Bernard Scott. CHICAGO BEARS — Signed LB Larry Grant and QB Jordan Palmer. Waived TE Steve Maneri. Waived CB C.J. Wilson and signed him to the practice squad after clearing waivers. Signed WR Terrence Toliver to the practice squad. Terminated the practice squad contract of WR Ricardo Lockette. CINCINNATI BENGALS — Announced they were granted an exemption through Nov. 1 for DE DeQuin Evans to participate in team activities without counting against the 53player roster. DALLAS COWBOYS — Signed G David Arkin to the practice squad. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Signed WR Griff Whalen from the practice squad. Re-signed C Thomas Austin to the practice squad. Canadian Football League EDMONTON ESKIMOS — Released RB Robbie Rouse. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL — Suspended Phoenix F Martin Hanzal two games for charging Edmonton D Jeff Petry during Saturday’s game. Fined Los Angeles F Kyle Clifford $2,756.41 for kneeing Edmonton F Ryan Nugent-Hopkins Sunday’s game. ANAHEIM DUCKS — Recalled C Richard Rakell from Norfolk (AHL). COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS — Reassigned F Ryan Craig to Springfield (AHL). DETROIT RED WINGS — Recalled C Luke Glendening from Grand Rapids (AHL). MONTREAL CANADIENS — Recalled D Greg Pateryn from Hamilton (AHL). NEW YORK RANGERS — Assigned RW Jesper Fast to Hartford (AHL). TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS — Recalled D John-Michael Liles from Toronto (AHL). LACROSSE National Lacrosse League COLORADO MAMMOTH — Signed D John Gallant and Chet Koneczny; Fs Colton Clark, Jordan McBride, Sean Pollock and Joel Dalgarno; Ts Jaeden Gastaldo and Mat MacLeod; and M John Orsen. Agreed to terms with Ts Cody McMahon and Jackson Decker and M Dom Sebastiani. SOCCER Major League Soccer SAN JOSE EARTHQUAKES — Purchased a PDL franchise. COLLEGE BIG EAST CONFERENCE — Named Tom Jernstedt senior adviser. MICHIGAN — Suspended sophomore TE A.J. Williams one game for an unspecified violation of team rules. NORTHWESTERN — Named Chris Quinn men’s basketball director of player development. PURDUE — Suspended men’s sophomore basketball C A.J. Hammons three games for violating team rules.


Roswell Daily Record

Sox

Continued from Page B1

John Lackey gets the first chance to win it Wednesday night against St. Louis rookie sensation Michael Wacha. A Cardinals victory would set up a most spooky proposition for both teams — Game 7 on Halloween night. Ortiz enjoyed even more success in Game 5 after moving up from cleanup to the third slot. He is 11 for 15 (.733) in this Series with two homers, six RBIs and four walks. He left after legging out a hit, and Farrell said the slugger is OK. Lester enhanced his reputation as an October ace with every pitch. He allowed one run and four hits in 7 2⁄3 innings, striking out seven without a walk. Nearly the same line he had in beating Wainwright in the opener.

“I think the biggest thing is me and Rossy have had a good rhythm,” Lester said. “Early on, we just went back to our game plan from Game 1 and just fell back on that and really just tried to make them swing the bats early, and we were able to do that.” The lefty who’s won all three of his career World Series starts had just one scary inning, when Matt Holliday homered in the fourth, Carlos Beltran flied out to the wall and Yadier Molina hit a liner. Other than that, Lester was sharp as a knife. “He’s just a stud,” said Ross, the backup catcher who gets paired with Lester. “We rely on him. That’s why he’s the ace of our staff, because he goes out and pitches like that.” Lester’s biggest brush with major trouble came well before his first pitch. He was getting

SPORTS

loose near the war ning track when a team of eight Clydesdales pulling a beer wagon came trotting by — it’s a Busch Stadium tradition and Lester stood aside to watch the horses. Koji Uehara got four outs for his second save. No crazy endings this time, either, following one night with an obstruction call and the next with Uehara’s gamefinishing pickoff. The Cardinals went quickly in the ninth, and now need two wins in Boston. They overcame a 3-2 deficit at home to beat Texas for the 2011 title. “The guys know what we have to do,” manager Mike Matheny said. “We have to play the game. They have to lock arms, trust each other and play the game the right way. Most of it is going to be the mentality of not buying into any kind of stats, any kind of predictions, any kind of odds. And go

Tuesday, October 29, 2013 out and play the game.” Ortiz put Boston ahead with an RBI double in the first, hitting the first pitch after Dustin Pedroia doubled on an 0-2 curve. Ortiz singled the next time up and tied the Series record by reaching base in nine straight plate appearances. Big Papi and the Red Sox took two of three at the NL park despite playing without a designated hitter. Ortiz became the first baseman, putting slugger Mike Napoli on the bench. The Red Sox lead the Series despite a .205 team batting average. Ortiz has 11 of the team’s 33 hits. Ross, a graybeard on a team led by scraggly veterans, broke a 1-all tie when he hooked a drive just inside the left-field line, and the ball bounced into the seats for a go-ahead double. “How about that? It’s nice to

B3

drive in runs,” Ross said. “I’ve got to credit the guys in front of me.” Jacoby Ellsbury later hit an RBI single, and Ross was thrown out at the plate trying to score on the play. A day after Ortiz delivered a stirring, in-game pep talk to rev up the Red Sox, the Cardinals could’ve used some inspiration themselves — perhaps a visit from the good-luck Rally Squirrel from their 2011 title run. The St. Louis hitters went quietly, a couple slinging their bats after routine popups and fly balls and others questioning the solid calls by plate umpire Bill Miller. Holliday shook St. Louis’ slumber and broke Lester’s string with his second home run of the Series. Lester had pitched 16 1⁄3 scoreless innings in his first three World Series starts before Holliday tagged him. That was all St. Louis got.

New looks and a familiar favorite in the NBA

Dwight Howard moved on and Derrick Rose came back, though Kobe Bryant won’t quite yet. Nine firsttime coaches are coming in and David Stern will soon head out. With different looks all around the NBA in 2013-14, one familiar sight remains: LeBron James and the Miami Heat are entering

another season as the team to beat. The two-time defending champions will collect their rings Tuesday night, then open against the Chicago Bulls, who with a healthy Rose might be the team that can unseat the Heat. Or maybe it’s San Antonio or Indiana, both a game away last year — actually,

the Spurs were just seconds away — from finishing off Miami. Perhaps it’s the Nets or Clippers, after both picked up pieces of the old Celtics that had the Heat’s respect but not their number. If someone does dethrone King James, it won’t be because he was satisfied with two titles and lost his

NFL: Bronco ‘D’ comes up big DENVER (AP) — In an unexpected twist, Peyton Manning was the one who needed some bailing out. On a day when the Denver Broncos quarterback threw three interceptions and lost a fumble, Von Miller and the defense stepped up in a 45-21 win over the Washington Redskins on Sunday. The much-maligned defensive unit — last in the league against the pass — harassed Robert Griffin III all afternoon. The Broncos (7-1) forced five tur novers and showed signs of rounding back into for m, with Miller recording his first sack since coming back from his six-game suspension a week ago. As they head into their bye week, Manning and his high-flying offense are having some issues. Hard to believe for an offense averaging 42.8 points — the most through eight games in NFL history. After the contest, Manning said he felt bad for putting his defense in a bind time after time against Washington (2-5). “We really put our team in a tough spot,” said Manning, who threw for 354 yards and four TDs. “I don’t think frustrated is the word. I think determined is the word, to overcome those mistakes.” The defense certainly made big plays to overcome them. Chris Harris, Rahim Moore, Shaun Phillips and Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie all

had interceptions. Rodgers-Cromartie capped the win when he picked of f a pass from backup Kirk Cousins and high-stepped his way into the end zone for a 75yard score to close Denver’s game-ending 38-0 run. The Broncos spoiled the homecoming of Redskins coach Mike Shanahan, who made his return to the place where he spent 14 seasons and led the Broncos to their only two Super Bowl titles. He was honored before the game with a video tribute and a warm ovation from the fans. The Redskins had a 217 lead early in the third quarter. Then, the fun was over for Denver’s excoach. “They kind of took control,” Shanahan said. “So, credit Denver for finding a way to play well after they were down 21-7. It’s disappointing we couldn’t get that rhythm going ourselves.”

Lions 31, Cowboys 30 DETROIT (AP) — Calvin Johnson and the Detroit Lions made the most of a few extra seconds. Johnson caught 14 passes for 329 yards, but like almost everyone else at Ford Field, he was a mere bystander when teammate Matthew Stafford lunged for a 1yard touchdown with 12 seconds left to give the Lions a 31-30 victory over the Dallas Cowboys on Sunday. “Our team has been

Classic

Continued from Page B1

Mucho Macho Man returns, too, with Gary Stevens in the saddle. Game On Dude drew the No. 9 post. “I didn’t want him to be buried on the inside,” Baffert said. “The field is strong. It’s so competitive. All these horses are back from last year.” Baffert also will saddle Paynter, who will start from the No. 2 post at 12-1 odds. Fort Larned drew the No. 7 post and was listed at 6-1 odds. “Seven’s a lucky number for me and looks good,” said Ian Wilkes, who trains Fort Larned. Mucho Macho Man will break from the No. 6 post at 5-1 odds. Hall of Fame trainer D. Wayne Lukas has Will Take Charge in the Classic. The Travers winner drew the No. 10 post and was listed at 12-1 odds. Belmont Stakes winner Palace Malice is 10-1 and drew the No. 8 post. The Irish father -son duo of trainer Aidan O’Brien and jockey Joseph O’Brien team up with 10-1 shot Decla-

resilient through a lot of things and we needed to be today,” Detroit coach Jim Schwartz said. “We certainly didn’t make it easy on ourselves.” Detroit’s final drive was aided by a Dallas penalty. The Cowboys had the ball and were trying to run down the clock when they were called for holding. Although the Lions declined the penalty, bringing up fourth down, clock stopped the because of the flag with just over a minute remaining. Dallas kicked a field goal to take a six-point lead, but the Lions drove 80 yards with no timeouts left. “Even our fans didn’t think we could pull this one out,” Johnson said. “They were leaving, but we knew we could do it.” Stafford caught seemingly everyone off guard when he scored the winning touchdown on a quarterback sneak. It looked like he was ready to spike the ball and set up another play. “I was just as fooled as the defense was,” Lions of fensive guard Larry Warford said. Johnson nearly set an NFL record, falling just short of Flipper Anderson’s mark of 336 yards receiving in a 1989 game. Anderson, who played for the Los Angeles Rams, needed overtime to reach that total. Johnson’s spectacular day became even more meaningful when the Lions won.

ration of War in the Classic. Reigning Horse of the Year Wise Dan drew post position eight in a field of 10 and was made the even-money favorite for the $2 million Mile, where the 6year-old gelding will try to improve to 60 on the turf this year. Wise Dan will be ridden by John Velazquez, who was aboard for the gelding’s only loss in his last nine starts earlier this month at Keeneland, where the race was moved from the turf to the synthetic surface. Wise Dan will face nine rivals in the 30th Breeders’ Cup. Cleburne and Havana — both 2-0 — will put their undefeated records on the line in the $2 million Juvenile, which drew a full field of 14. Velazquez will ride Havana, the 5-2 morning-line favorite; Cleburne was listed at 12-1. Stevens, who launched a successful comeback earlier this year at 50, has nine mounts over the two days of racing. The two-day, $25 million championships open Friday with five races, including the Distaff, which has reverted to its original name after being called the Ladies’ Classic since 2008.

edge. “When the hunger is gone, I’m going to give it up,” James said. “I’ve got a talent and I’m going to take full advantage of it. So I’m hungry. “I love the game. There’s nothing I would do more than play this game of basketball. So the championships are all great, but I’m playing for more than that. I’ve got a bigger calling than that.” If he means becoming the best ever, he might be on his way. With four MVP trophies and no noticeable weaknesses, the gap with his peers is getting larger and the one with the greats before him is shrinking. “He’s the best on the planet right now. I don’t know what you can do, but just hope that he misses,” said Nets coach Jason Kidd, one of the nine coaches getting his first opportunity. In total, 13 teams changed coaches. James did miss in the closing seconds of Game 6 of the NBA Finals, but the Heat got the rebound to set up Ray Allen’s tying 3-pointer, pulled it out in overtime and won Game 7 to deny the Spurs a fifth title. San Antonio may get another chance to finish the job, or may not even be the best team in Texas after Howard joined James Harden in Houston. Howard bolted after one

Week 9

Continued from Page B1

battling for the final playoff spot. In that scenario, I think Valencia gets the at-large bid. Both Valencia and Roswell have beaten Moriarty, so that’s a push when it comes to comparing teams. Both will finish third in their district, so that’s a push. Both have played Artesia, so common sense says we need to compare each team’s result against the Bulldogs. Artesia beat Valencia

unfulfilling season in Los Angeles, where he and Bryant never found a working partnership. The center already seems happier and healthier in Houston, where he and Harden can build a potent inside-outside tandem. As for Bryant, he’ll watch the Lakers’ opener, and who knows how much more, while he continues to rehab from a torn Achilles tendon. Questions over how well he can play at 35 after such a serious injury, along with Howard’s departure, created unusually low expectations for the Lakers. Instead, the buzz in Los Angeles is about the Clippers, who hired Doc Rivers to coach while Paul Pierce and Kevin Garnett went to Brooklyn after Boston’s breakup. That also could make both longtime losers not only the current kings of their cities, but also contenders to reach the NBA Finals — which are returning to the 2-2-1-1-1 format after 29 years of 2-3-2. Here are four other things to watch around the NBA this season: SITTING SPEEDSTERS: While Rose returns after sitting out last season with a torn ACL, Russell Westbrook and Rajon Rondo remain out recovering from knee surgeries. A healthy Westbrook makes Oklahoma City a title contender while Rondo could help the 20-14 at the Bulldog Bowl and beat Roswell 41-7 at the Wool Bowl. Advantage Valencia. And if Artesia doesn’t beat Del Norte and finishes with just three wins, both the Bulldogs and the Coyotes are most certainly out of the playoffs.

Bobcat beatdown

I’ve said all season that Hager man is the overwhelming favorite to win the 1A state title. Then I watched them systematically dismantle Fort Sumner, which beat Escalante just two weeks prior to that. So I’m left with this

Celtics exceed expectations — or perhaps become the next player they trade. UP AND COMERS: They’re not ready to contend for a title, but keep an eye on New Orleans, Washington and Cleveland, all with dynamite young players who may be good enough to carry their franchises back to the postseason. SUMMER STORIES: Business will really pick up after the next NBA champion is crowned. Kansas freshman Andrew Wiggins, should he decide to enter the draft, could become the most sought-after prospect in years. Free agency will then open on July 1 with James and Carmelo Anthony perhaps set to top the class. WHO WINS?: The Heat are the choice of everyone from odds makers to the executives who voted in the NBA.com GM survey. But they were enormous favorites last season after a 27-game winning streak during a 66-win regular season and almost fell. This time, there’s even more teams capable of finally knocking them off. “They are the favorites, but I don’t think they’re the heavy favorites,” Hall of Famer and TNT analyst Charles Barkley said. “Everybody’s picking the Heat right now, but there’s some teams, they’re going to have some stiff competition.”

conundrum — Is there an adjective that more clearly defines a team as a favorite than overwhelming? I can’t think of one. I consulted my thesaurus and found these words — enor mous, immense, inordinate, massive and huge. I guess they all work. To steal a phrase from Bobcat coach Casey Crandall that I heard on Friday night, “I don’t mean to yell, but ... “ the Bobcats are the favorites to win the state title. I can’t state it any more clearly than that.


B4 Tuesday, October 29, 2013 DEAR ABBY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

DEAR ABBY: I managed a retail store for 10 years, and I can relate to the shop owner who signed herself “Had It With Overindulged Kids” (June 28). She could turn things around by creating a designated play area and market to the children by taking any opened items and placing them there for a children’s testing ground. I had a “play table” with toys to keep them busy while their moms shopped. I put a gated area around it and a dads’ bench in front of it so they could watch the children. They are your customers. So

cater to them and be thankful the parents shop in your store. Learn the children’s names and suggest new age-appropriate products. If you don’t have the time, hire someone who loves children and has the patience to play with them in a controlled environment. JOYCE FROM MICHIGAN DEAR JOYCE: Thank you for the helpful advice. Customers and retailers alike shared their experiences. Many of them questioned whether the children always misbehaved this badly in public and blamed their behavior on today’s parenting skills — or lack thereof. Here’s a sampling: DEAR ABBY: I shopped at a local store for years, but gave up when the place seemed overrun by unruly children and distracted parents. Out of desperation, I took a job there and vowed to find a way to make the parents rein in their youngsters. One: I posted a sign that read,

COMICS

“IF YOU BREAK IT, YOU BOUGHT IT.” If they refused, I didn’t push the issue, but I did gesture upward. They would always look up, and when they did, I’d thank them for smiling at our cameras. Two: Any child found unaccompanied would be escorted to our customer service area and the parents paged repeatedly until they showed up. Since I instituted these policies, the condition of the store has improved, the morale of the employees has improved, sales have risen, and old customers who left due to the old circumstances are returning. SURVIVOR OF RETAIL HELL DEAR ABBY: I was in a shop where a sign behind the counter read: “Unattended Children Will Be Sold!” It was enough to get most parents’ (and kids’) attention while eliciting smiles at the same time. NONNA OF FIVE DEAR ABBY: You mentioned posting a sign at

The Wizard of Id

the cash register. No, Abby, it should be at the entrance, so parents see it at the time they walk in. Or how about a different sign: “Well-Behaved Children Will Win a Prize,” then rewarding such children with a small gift? It would be worth the expense of small tokens of appreciation compared to the cost of broken merchandise. I sympathize with “Had It.” Parents often take kids on outings, believing they’re spending quality time with them. But I see parents ignore their children and spend their time on electronic gadgets, leaving the unsupervised youngsters to run amok. Too bad for the children. GLORIA IN LAFAYETTE, CALIF.

Family Circus

DEAR ABBY: I like the sign a friend of mine put up in her store: “Unattended children will be given espresso and a puppy and returned to their parents.” MARJORY IN BLOWING ROCK, N.C.

HINTS

Beetle Bailey

Blondie

FROM HELOISE

KING FEATURES SYNDICATE

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

Dear Readers: How many times have you gone shopping and, as you pay for the purchases, been ASKED FOR YOUR ZIP CODE? Did you ever wonder WHY the retailers are asking you for this information? Do you have to give it to them? Not really, unless using a credit card where the issuer requests a ZIP code for security purposes. It’s all about marketing and getting more information about you. Asking the ZIP code gives a retailer easy access to your address, which helps it mail you advertisements, coupons and other junk mail from that store and maybe others if the retailer “shares” or sells its data. However, at a gas station, you may be asked for your ZIP code to prevent fraud. A thief probably would not know your ZIP code (unless he or she stole your purse or wallet with other identifying information in there). If you don’t want to give your ZIP code, just say “No.” However, be aware that just by shopping with a credit card or rewards card, most of your buying habits already are being collected! Heloise

Dilbert

For Better or For Worse

#####

Dear Heloise: How important is the “sell by” date? My food-storage shelves have boxes of dry goods — cereal, crackers, etc. I buy these when they are on sale, more than we can consume before that date is up. The taste seems to be the same. Claire A. in Maryland The sell-by date lets stores know when to take items off the shelves. You can eat the food safely beyond that date, but not years later! It all depends on the item. Crackers or cereal and other staples will be just fine after the sell-by date. However, when in doubt, throw it out! Heloise #####

Dear Heloise: A hint for keeping dust down while taking ashes (Heloise here: COLD ashes!) out of a wood-burning stove is to cut a piece of plywood slightly larger than the top of the metal ash bucket. Wet one side of the plywood and use it to cover the bucket. Lift one side and quickly deposit shovelfuls of ashes in the bucket and then lower the plywood. As dust whirls around in the bucket, it becomes lodged on the wet cover. This cuts down on the need to dust the room. Jane K. in Pennsylvania

Garfield

Hagar the Horrible

Snuffy Smith

Be absolutely sure that the ashes are COLD! Don’t take a chance of starting an accidental fire. Heloise #####

Dear Heloise: Here is a hint that I have made part of my cleaning routine: When vacuuming, I use the attachment to clean my computer keyboard and tower. Keeping these areas free of dust keeps the computer running smoothly. Tracey K., via email Dear Heloise: Whenever I go out, I store my earbuds in an old, hard-shelled eyeglass case to keep them safe. I even can get more than one set in a case when needed. Tracy F., via email

Zits

Roswell Daily Record


ENTERTAINMENT / FINANCIAL

Roswell Daily Record

The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult

ARIES (March 21-April 19) #### You will want to meld with others in order to accomplish a particular task. Sometimes this type of interpersonal cooperation can be difficult, as you are a very independent sign. You still manage to project a leadership profile, even when being docile. Tonight: Work off some tension. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ##### Open up to a more dynamic approach to a situation in your life. You might like the idea of this change, but to manifest it will prove to be more difficult. Thinking is important, but you will get nowhere unless you act. You have little to lose. Tonight: So what if it is only Tuesday? GEMINI (May 21-June 20) #### You have a desire not to be the town crier. You might be up for playing the role of recluse for a few days. Excuse yourself from commitments, and know where you are heading. Be smart, and refrain from speaking until you are sure of yourself. Tonight: All smiles. CANCER (June 21-July 22) #### Make the first move. You will get far more done than you thought was even possible, once you feel unburdened and free from a personal issue. A call could make all the difference in the outcome of your day. Tonight: Accept an invitation to join someone for munchies. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ### Be aware of the problems around you, and be direct in how you approach a situation, especially if it involves your finances. You can’t be

Country music star Kenny Rogers, left, is presented a plaque as Garth Brooks, right, looks on at the ceremony for the 2013 inductions into the Country Music Hall of Fame on Sunday in Nashville, Tenn. Bobby Bare, the late “Cowboy” Jack Clement

Rogers enters hall NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Kenny Rogers, Bobby Bare and the late “Cowboy” Jack Clement — three men whose influence still ripples across the surface of modern music — are now members of the Country Music Hall of Fame. The three were saluted by stars Garth Brooks, Kris Kristof ferson, Emmylou Harris, Barry Gibb, John Prine and others during a ceremony Sunday at the newly expanded Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum. Rogers helped push country music farther into

CATTLE/HOGS

NEW YORK(AP) - Cattle/hogs futures on the Chicago Merchantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Oct 13 132.92 133.40 132.80 133.15 Dec 13 133.37 134.05 133.27 133.80 Feb 14 134.15 134.70 134.02 134.57 Apr 14 134.50 134.75 127.82 134.60 Jun 14 128.55 129.20 128.50 128.90 Aug 14 127.65 128.15 127.27 128.07 Oct 14 130.22 130.22 129.80 130.20 Dec 14 131.70 131.70 131.10 131.70 Feb 15 131.80 131.80 131.75 131.80 Last spot N/A Est. sales 38788. Fri’s Sales: 77,415 Fri’s open int: 325687, up +2972 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Oct 13 165.85 166.05 165.72 165.97 Nov 13 167.05 167.35 166.77 167.07 Jan 14 166.75 167.12 166.15 166.92 Mar 14 165.97 166.00 165.97 165.97 Apr 14 167.02 167.05 166.05 167.02 May 14 167.00 167.22 166.42 167.20 Aug 14 167.57 168.02 167.05 168.00 Sep 14 167.00 Last spot N/A Est. sales 3818. Fri’s Sales: 4,482 Fri’s open int: 38534, off -37 HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Dec 13 90.25 92.10 90.05 91.95 Feb 14 92.47 94.55 82.45 94.55 Apr 14 93.85 96.45 93.85 96.40 May 14 97.85 99.80 97.85 99.80 Jun 14 99.65 102.12 99.57 102.07 Jul 14 97.90 99.45 97.90 99.40 Aug 14 95.25 97.05 95.25 97.02 Oct 14 82.05 82.80 80.00 82.80 Dec 14 78.50 78.50 78.50 78.50 Feb 15 80.10 80.10 80.10 80.10 Apr 15 79.90 79.90 79.90 79.90 Last spot N/A Est. sales 63396. Fri’s Sales: 44,551 Fri’s open int: 301969, up +4894

chg.

+.58 +.83 +.55 +.15 +.40 +.52 +.55 +.40 +.20

+.42 +.42 +.87 +.77 +.70 +.58 +.58

+1.53 +1.83 +2.60 +2.15 +2.22 +1.60 +1.52 +.80 +.20 +.35 +.15

COTTON

NEW YORK(AP) - Cotton No. 2 futures on the N.Y. Cotton Exchange Friday: Open high

low settle

COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Dec 13 78.90 79.49 78.52 78.65 Mar 14 80.56 81.19 80.26 80.45 May 14 81.26 81.56 81.00 81.16 Jul 14 81.95 82.37 81.60 81.74 Oct 14 78.02 Dec 14 78.11 78.12 77.32 77.35 Mar 15 77.63 May 15 77.53 Jul 15 77.43 Oct 15 77.43 Dec 15 77.43 Mar 16 77.43 May 16 77.43 Jul 16 77.43 Last spot N/A Est. sales 21715. Fri’s Sales: 28,214 Fri’s open int: 202563, up +2397

chg.

-.43 -.14 -.16 -.19 -.15 -.17 -.17 -.17 -.17 -.17 -.17 -.17 -.17 -.17

GRAINS

CHICAGO(AP) - Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Thursday: Open high

low

settle

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 13 690 691ü 680fl 681 Mar 14 700ü 701ø 691ø 692 May 14 705 707 697 697ø Jul 14 699ü 700ü 689fl 690 Sep 14 704 705 697ü 698ü Dec 14 719 719 707ø 707fl

chg.

-9fl -9fl -10 -11ø -11ü -11ü

pop music territory than it had ever been. He could go deep country with songs like “The Gambler,” “Ruby, Don’t Take Your Love to Town” and “Lucille,” but he also had crossover pop hits like “Islands in the Stream” and “Lady,” foreshadowing today’s more pop-friendly country sounds. Bare scored dozens of hits like “Dee-troit City” and “How I Got to Memphis,” mining the work of left-of-center Nashville songwriters like Tom T. Hall, Kris Kristofferson and Shel Silverstein.

Mar 15 724ø 724ø 713 713 May 15 723fl 723fl 713ø 713ø Jul 15 710 710ø 707ü 707ü Sep 15 719fl 719fl 711ü 711ü Dec 15 731ü 731ü 722fl 722fl Mar 16 732fl 732fl 726fl 726fl May 16 732fl 732fl 726fl 726fl Jul 16 719ø 719ø 713ø 713ø Last spot N/A Est. sales 69698. Fri’s Sales: 66,664 Fri’s open int: 368245, off -8331 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 13 439 440 430ü 430fl Mar 14 451 452 442ø 443ü May 14 459ø 460ø 451ü 452 Jul 14 466fl 468 459 459fl Sep 14 474 474ø 465fl 466fl Dec 14 482 482ø 474ü 475 Mar 15 490ü 490ø 484 484fl May 15 497fl 497fl 489 489fl Jul 15 500 500 492ø 493 Sep 15 495ü 495ü 487fl 487fl Dec 15 496 496 489ø 490ü Jul 16 509fl 509fl 503fl 503fl Dec 16 488 490ü 488 490ü Last spot N/A Est. sales 352044. Fri’s Sales: 215,991 Fri’s open int: 1294140, off -545 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 13 335ø 335ø 327fl 328ü Mar 14 312fl 314 308 309 May 14 313 313 307fl 308ø Jul 14 308 311 308 309 Sep 14 312ø 312ø 310ø 310ø Dec 14 316fl 316fl 314fl 314fl Mar 15 316fl 316fl 314fl 314fl May 15 316fl 316fl 314fl 314fl Jul 15 316fl 316fl 314fl 314fl Sep 15 316fl 316fl 314fl 314fl Jul 16 316fl 316fl 314fl 314fl Sep 16 316fl 316fl 314fl 314fl Last spot N/A Est. sales 1676. Fri’s Sales: 736 Fri’s open int: 10635, up +104 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Nov 13 1300 1301ü 1270ü 1271ü Jan 14 1293ü 1294ü 1267 1268 Mar 14 1270 1271ø 1249fl 1250fl May 14 1255 1255ø 1236 1237 Jul 14 1249 1250 1230 1231 Aug 14 1231 1231 1219ü 1219fl Sep 14 1190 1192 1182ø 1183fl Nov 14 1163ø 1164ø 1154ø 1157ü Jan 15 1163fl 1166 1160 1162ü Mar 15 1167 1167 1164fl 1164fl May 15 1174 1174 1167ø 1167ø Jul 15 1173ø 1173ø 1172 1172 Aug 15 1174 1174 1167ü 1167ü Sep 15 1161 1161 1155ü 1155ü Nov 15 1160 1160 1150 1154ü Jul 16 1152fl 1152fl 1149 1149 Nov 16 1128 1137 1126 1137 Last spot N/A Est. sales 355520. Fri’s Sales: 236,036 Fri’s open int: 627729, off -26530

too careful in how you approach this matter. Recognize that someone could be angry. Work this through with him or her. Tonight: Your treat. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) #### Assess whether it is a good idea to proceed as you have been. Listen to someone’s opinion, but know that you might need some more time to reflect on the main issue. Postpone signing off on agreements, at least for today. Tonight: Act as if you do not have a care in your world. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ### Your words make more of an impression than you might realize. At the same time, withholding your thoughts will have a similar effect. Others question themselves, especially when you become quiet. Use caution with any money arrangements. Tonight: Not to be found. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) #### Meetings take high priority, whether you like it or not. They also might help you initiate a new or different plan of action. Recognize where someone else’s anger is coming from, even if he or she can’t. Say very little about your perceptions for now. Tonight: Where your friends are. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ### You respond positively to pressure, especially if you feel as if you will be acknowledged for your efforts. An intense conflict exists within you between work and a domestic matter. You will need to channel your high energy and use it more positively. Tonight: Happy at home. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) #### Allow greater give-and-take between you and others. A friend could have difficulty opening up. Know that his or her attitude

-9ü -8fl -8fl -8ø -8ü -7fl -7fl -8ü -7ø -8 -6 -6 -4ü

-5 -5ü -4ø -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2

-28fl -25ø -21ü -18ø -18fl -17ü -12fl -7fl -7fl -7ü -6ø -6ü -6fl -5fl -7ø -3fl -5ø

B5

JACQUELINE BIGAR YOUR HOROSCOPE

could have little to do with you. Your willingness to adapt to various situations points you to the winners’ circle. Tonight: Tap into your imagination. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) #### Deal with a specific family member directly. You could feel pushed to your limit by a loved one whom you care a lot about. How you view situations could change radically as a result of an experience surrounding today’s events. Tonight: Chat and visit with a close friend. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) # # # You could be inspired by one other person to tackle a new goal or to move to a new level of accomplishment. You sometimes get confused by this person, yet at other times his or her influence gives you more confidence. Tonight: Whatever you do, just don’t be alone.

‘Bad Grandpa’ tops box office

LOS ANGELES (AP) — With theaters heavy in dramatic offerings, Johnny Knoxville’s silly stunts captivated weekend moviegoers. “Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa” stole the No.1 spot from three-week box-office champ, “Gravity,” with $32 million in ticket sales in its opening weekend, according to totals released Monday. “Gravity” sunk to second place, followed by “Captain Phillips.” Another drama, the star-studded “The Counselor,” debuted in fourth place with $7.8 million. The acclaimed “12 Years a Slave,” playing in just 123 locations, edged into the top 10 with an impressive $2.1 million and the highest per-theater average of any film this week. The top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters Friday through Monday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Monday by Rentrak, are: 1. “Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa,” Paramount, $32,055,177, 3,336 locations, $9,609 average, $32,055,177, 1 week. 2. “Gravity,” War ner Bros., $20,135,387, 3,707 locations, $5,432 average, $199,649,748, 4 weeks. 3. “Captain Phillips,” Sony, $11,642,040, 3,143 locations, $3,704 average, $69,916,083, 3 weeks. 4. “The Counselor,” 20th Century Fox, $7,842,930, 3,044 locations, $2,577 average, $7,842,930, 1 week. 5. “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2,” Sony, $6,275,325, 3,111 locations, $2,017 average,

FUTURES

-11ø -10ü -8fl -8ø -8ø -6 -6 -6

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

OIL/GASOLINE/NG

NEW YORK(AP) - Trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange Friday: Open high

low

settle

chg.

LIGHT SWEET CRUDE 1,000 bbl.- dollars per bbl. Dec 13 97.88 98.82 97.37 98.68 +.83 Jan 14 97.95 98.96 97.55 98.86 +.91 Feb 14 97.70 98.68 97.33 98.64 +1.00 Mar 14 96.96 98.15 96.78 98.09 +1.05 Apr 14 96.20 97.41 96.20 97.39 +1.03 May 14 95.64 96.71 95.60 96.69 +.99 Jun 14 95.13 96.10 94.92 96.03 +.93 Jul 14 94.52 95.35 94.38 95.34 +.88 Aug 14 93.94 95.00 93.76 94.66 +.83 Sep 14 93.39 94.14 93.04 94.00 +.78 Oct 14 92.93 93.37 92.62 93.34 +.72 Nov 14 92.36 92.75 92.36 92.75 +.66 Dec 14 91.81 92.44 91.44 92.22 +.61 Jan 15 91.58 +.56 Feb 15 90.99 +.52 Mar 15 90.24 90.74 90.24 90.41 +.48 Apr 15 89.82 +.44 May 15 89.29 +.40 Jun 15 88.41 89.05 88.41 88.81 +.37 Jul 15 88.26 +.35 Aug 15 87.77 +.34 Sep 15 87.38 +.32 Oct 15 87.02 +.30 Nov 15 86.70 +.28 Dec 15 86.30 86.70 86.06 86.43 +.26 Last spot N/A Est. sales 426162. Fri’s Sales: 390,150 Fri’s open int: 1776939, off -4670 NY HARBOR GAS BLEND 42,000 gallons- dollars per gallon Nov 13 2.5904 2.6463 2.5846 2.6309 +.0438 Dec 13 2.5768 2.6400 2.5650 2.6103 +.0429 Jan 14 2.5705 2.6237 2.5662 2.6121 +.0431 Feb 14 2.5779 2.6292 2.5736 2.6215 +.0436 Mar 14 2.5958 2.6450 2.5881 2.6366 +.0426 Apr 14 2.7534 2.8049 2.7534 2.7977 +.0399 May 14 2.7500 2.8020 2.7500 2.7934 +.0389 Jun 14 2.7342 2.7796 2.7327 2.7760 +.0391 Jul 14 2.7207 2.7544 2.7207 2.7527 +.0390 Aug 14 2.6972 2.7250 2.6972 2.7250 +.0380 Sep 14 2.6565 2.6928 2.6550 2.6928 +.0364

NEW YORK (AP) _ Spot nonferrous metal prices Mon. Aluminum -$0.8196 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.2321 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper -$3.2610 N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Lead - $2149.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.8593 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1361.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1352.00 troy oz., NY Merc spot Mon. Silver - $22.550 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $22.498 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. Platinum -$1465.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1470.10 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Mon. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised

GET NOTICED

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS HERE CALL TODAY

575.622.7710

$100,786,579, 5 weeks. 6. “Carrie,” Sony, $5,988,713, 3,157 locations, $1,897 average, $26,110,068, 2 weeks. 7. “Escape Plan,” Lionsgate, $4,558,239, 2,883 locations, $1,581 average, $17,641,821, 2 weeks. 8. “12 Years a Slave,” Fox Searchlight, $2,134,325, 123 locations, $17,352 average, $3,394,268, 2 weeks. 9. “Enough Said,” Fox Searchlight, $1,588,004, 835 locations, $1,902 average, $13,054,096, 6 weeks. 10. “Prisoners,” Warner Bros., $1,068,339, 1,347 locations, $793 average, $59,127,401, 6 weeks. 11. “Insidious Chapter 2,” FilmDistrict, $880,293, 1,229 locations, $716 average, $82,133,678, 7 weeks. 12. “Rush,” Universal, $700,695, 667 locations, $1,051 average, $25,856,534, 6 weeks. 13. “We’re The Millers,” Warner

Bros., $582,445, 786 locations, $741 average, $148,561,678, 12 weeks. 14. “Fifth Estate,” Disney, $570,890, 1,769 locations, $323 average, $2,848,356, 2 weeks. 15. “Runner Runner,” 20th Century Fox, $560,118, 969 locations, $578 average, $18,819,538, 4 weeks. 16. “Baggage Claim,” Fox Searchlight, $560,046, 594 locations, $943 average, $20,837,814, 5 weeks. 17. “I’m In Love With A Church Girl,” High Top Releasing, $506,315, 458 locations, $1,105 average, $1,716,487, 2 weeks. 18. “All Is Lost,” Roadside Attractions, $502,530, 81 locations, $6,204 average, $640,717, 2 weeks. 19. “Don Jon,” Relativity Media, $495,999, 540 locations, $919 average, $23,501,622, 5 weeks. 20. “Despicable Me 2,” Universal, $390,370, 379 locations, $1,030 average, $364,248,630, 17 weeks.

Brooks plans live CBS special The broadcast will be his final performance of the show, which has mostly been Brooks with just his guitar exploring his musical influences with fans. Brooks has mostly been out of music since 2001, when he became a stay-at-home dad. But fans remain fervent, helping to set a record viewership for the Academy of Country Music Awards earlier this year when Brooks performed with George Strait.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Garth Brooks is taking his one-man Las Vegas show to live television. A news release issued Monday says CBS will broadcast Brooks’ per for mance at the Wynn Las Vegas live on Nov. 29. Brooks came out of retirement in 2009 for a series of occasional gigs at Steve Wynn’s invitation. Brooks formally ended that run after three years, but has played occasionally since then.

Oct 14 2.5549 Nov 14 2.5230 2.5246 2.5230 2.5246 Dec 14 2.4732 2.5187 2.4732 2.5055 Jan 15 2.5015 Feb 15 2.5080 Mar 15 2.5190 Apr 15 2.6515 May 15 2.6515 Jun 15 2.6360 Jul 15 2.6180 Aug 15 2.5990 Sep 15 2.5760 Oct 15 2.4560 Nov 15 2.4260 Dec 15 2.4060 Last spot N/A Est. sales 107810. Fri’s Sales: 100,521 Fri’s open int: 227116, off -3480 NATURAL GAS 10,000 mm btu’s, $ per mm btu Nov 13 3.678 3.681 3.557 3.569 Dec 13 3.779 3.788 3.651 3.661 Jan 14 3.866 3.866 3.731 3.739 Feb 14 3.862 3.863 3.740 3.748 Mar 14 3.825 3.825 3.725 3.732 Apr 14 3.824 3.824 3.700 3.705 May 14 3.780 3.782 3.720 3.728 Jun 14 3.824 3.824 3.760 3.763 Jul 14 3.859 3.859 3.797 3.798 Aug 14 3.916 3.916 3.802 3.812 Sep 14 3.841 3.841 3.794 3.804 Oct 14 3.883 3.883 3.814 3.821 Nov 14 3.949 3.949 3.889 3.889 Dec 14 4.095 4.095 4.035 4.035 Jan 15 4.135 4.147 4.114 4.122 Feb 15 4.134 4.134 4.110 4.110 Mar 15 4.071 4.080 4.055 4.055 Apr 15 3.910 3.913 3.881 3.881 May 15 3.892 Jun 15 3.935 3.950 3.914 3.914 Jul 15 3.970 3.975 3.940 3.940 Aug 15 3.960 3.960 3.952 3.952 Sep 15 3.965 3.965 3.951 3.951 Oct 15 3.973 Nov 15 4.050 4.050 4.047 4.047 Dec 15 4.210 4.210 4.203 4.203 Jan 16 4.285 4.310 4.285 4.289 Last spot N/A Est. sales 277003. Fri’s Sales: 395,242 Fri’s open int: 1251246, off -6915

METALS

BORN TODAY Comedian Fanny Brice (1891), actor Richard Dreyfuss (1947), dramatist Jean Giraudoux (1882)

+.0343 +.0337 +.0337 +.0337 +.0337 +.0337 +.0337 +.0337 +.0337 +.0337 +.0337 +.0337 +.0337 +.0337 +.0337

-.138 -.151 -.147 -.143 -.137 -.123 -.121 -.119 -.118 -.117 -.116 -.115 -.113 -.111 -.111 -.107 -.102 -.082 -.082 -.082 -.082 -.082 -.082 -.083 -.080 -.077 -.074

NYSE

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

MARKET SUMMARY AMEX

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

Name Vol (00) Last Chg S&P500ETF735492176.23 +.28 BkofAm 599484 14.23 -.03 Penney 592350 7.39 +.60 Transocn 499470 48.60 -.90 Petrobras 448183 17.35 +1.44

Name Vol (00) NwGold g 55945 AlldNevG 31873 InovioPhm 25470 Organovo 23154 CheniereEn 13988

Name Blyth Fusion-io CSVInvNG GbX Gold rs Petrobras

Last 15.50 11.09 14.49 14.87 17.35

Chg +2.74 +1.55 +1.59 +1.25 +1.44

%Chg +21.5 +16.2 +12.3 +9.2 +9.1

Name Last Chg %Chg Name CT Ptrs 6.05 +.61 +11.2 AriadP TherapMD 4.98 +.45 +9.9 AcornEngy Neuralstem 2.47 +.18 +7.9 PacerIntl 2.61 +.19 +7.9 GulfRes Taseko InvCapHld 7.05 +.39 +5.9 GluMobile

Name NQ Mobile PhxNMda MillerEnR JinkoSolar CSVLgNGs

Last 8.80 9.06 6.91 20.16 14.86

Chg -1.83 -1.59 -.98 -2.84 -2.04

%Chg -17.2 -14.9 -12.4 -12.3 -12.1

Name Last Chg %Chg Name Last Chg %Chg SwedLC22 20.00 -3.45 -14.7 SyntaPhm 5.10 -1.30 -20.3 PacBkrM g 4.06 -.34 -7.7 Changyou 28.50 -7.21 -20.2 AltisrcAst 600.25-47.04 -7.3 DigitalAlly 9.15 -2.14 -19.0 BovieMed 2.60 -.16 -5.9 KongZhg 7.96 -1.80 -18.4 Pedevco rs 3.73 -.22 -5.6 ProspGR rs 2.46 -.50 -16.9

1,392 1,655 113 3,160 190 11

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

DIARY

Volume

Name AT&T Inc Aetna BkofAm Boeing Chevron CocaCola Disney EOG Res EngyTsfr ExxonMbl FordM HewlettP HollyFront Intel IBM JohnJn

Chg -.04 +.04 -.05 +.24 -.07

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name Dell Inc Facebook SiriusXM Intel Microsoft

DIARY

210 199 28 437 17 2

INDEXES

Last

Chg

Last 15,568.93 7,036.04 504.86 10,058.53 2,466.51 3,940.13 1,762.11 18,802.92 1,117.97

1.80 .80 .04 1.94 4.00 1.12 .75f .75 3.62f 2.52 .40 .58 1.20a .90 3.80 2.64

26 12 19 23 9 21 21 50 12 9 13 ... 6 13 12 21

35.57 +.38 61.78 -.04 14.23 -.03 129.88 -1.31 120.91 +.32 39.61 +.58 69.00 -.26 182.42 -1.02 53.33 -.80 88.23 +.26 17.57 -.03 23.86 -.14 44.41 +.35 24.36 +.13 177.35 +.50 92.39 +.30

YTD %Chg Name +5.5 +33.4 +22.6 +72.3 +11.8 +9.3 +38.6 +51.0 +24.2 +1.9 +35.7 +67.4 -4.6 +18.1 -7.4 +31.8

Merck Microsoft OneokPtrs PNM Res PepsiCo Pfizer Phillips66 SwstAirl TexInst TimeWarn TriContl VerizonCm WalMart WashFed WellsFargo XcelEngy

Last 13.83 50.23 3.73 24.36 35.57

Chg -.01 -1.72 -.02 +.13 -.16

Chg +.55 +.56 +1.01 +.29 +.41

%Chg +15.4 +14.0 +13.8 +13.2 +12.0

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Net Chg -1.35 +26.99 -1.71 +4.67 +9.89 -3.23 +2.34 +8.46 -.37

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST

PE

Last 4.11 4.56 8.32 2.49 3.83

DIARY

75,508,527 Volume

Name Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

Div

Vol (00) 851033 701800 655360 449597 373879

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

3,169,010,484 Volume

52-Week High Low 15,709.58 12,471.49 7,031.92 4,838.10 537.86 435.57 10,083.46 7,841.76 2,464.05 2,186.97 3,961.10 2,810.80 1,759.82 1,343.35 18,807.55 14,036.94 1,121.92 763.55

Last 6.26 4.51 1.95 7.00 38.93

NASDAQ

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE)

1,255 1,295 89 2,639 182 19

1,759,002,704

% Chg -.01 +.39 -.34 +.05 +.40 -.08 +.13 +.04 -.03

YTD % Chg +18.81 +32.59 +11.43 +19.13 +4.71 +30.49 +23.55 +25.39 +31.63

52-wk % Chg +18.78 +39.26 +6.18 +22.81 +3.84 +31.87 +24.80 +27.44 +37.47

Div

PE

Last

Chg

YTD %Chg

1.72 1.12f 2.90f .66 2.27 .96 1.56f .16 1.20 1.15 .70e 2.12f 1.88 .40f 1.20 1.12

25 13 22 19 20 16 9 20 27 19 ... 71 15 16 11 15

45.35 -1.19 35.57 -.16 54.03 -.46 24.16 -.03 84.61 +1.26 30.74 +.13 63.28 -.12 17.10 -.07 41.01 +.78 70.16 -.10 19.11 +.05 50.57 -.14 77.14 +1.06 23.24 +.29 42.83 -.03 29.08 -.02

+10.8 +33.2 +.1 +17.8 +23.6 +22.6 +19.2 +67.0 +32.8 +46.7 +19.1 +16.9 +13.1 +37.8 +25.3 +8.9

If you would like your stock to been seen here please contact editor@rdrnews.com


B6 Tuesday, October 29, 2013 GARAGE SALES

006. Southwest

YARD SALE Sat Nov 2, 7am. Baby gear, women’s and men’s clothes and shoes, various baby items, lia Sophia jewelry.

008. Northwest ESTATE SALE Lots of furniture and household ítems. Enchanted Hills 2706 Highland Rd. Please call 505-577-7172 or 319-541-8764 for an appointment

ANNOUNCEMENTS 025. Lost and Found

FOUND PITBULL Brindle, in East Roswell, Call to describe. 575-626-4388

LOST CAT, black & white, answers to “Tuxedo”, $50 reward. Call 914-774-3109.

025. Lost and Found

045. Employment Opportunities

FOUND BY Quail Village/North Springs area behind North Farmers Country Market, Female Dachshund Chihuahua mix, Call 910-1061

THOUGHT OF driving Big Rigs the oil fields are going strong and Companies are looking for CDL Drivers. In less than 2 months you can have your Class A License and making the money you deserve. Classes are forming now. Artesia Training Academy is VA approved, you can call Artesia Training Academy for more information. Or visit our web site. Phone # 575-748-9766 or 1-888-586-0144 Web site: www.artesiatraining.com Check us out on Facebook

FOUND BAG of new clothes for teenage girl on Deming St near St. Peter’s Church. Please call 575-910-7856. LOST WHITE boxer with left black eye, female. Reward offered. 623-1177

INSTRUCTION

EMPLOYMENT

CARDIOLOGY CLINIC Office Manager

045. Employment Opportunities

Our core values and large network of cardiologists make this practice a unique and desirable opportunity for a results-driven healthcare leader. This position is responsible for overseeing office operations, including activities encompassed in the delivery of care and services provided to all NMHI patients, and efficient daily operation of each assigned functional area. Requirements: 5 years’ experience as a leader in the medical field; Bachelors degree required. Email your qualified resume to resumes@nmhi.com

PUT GRAPHICS IN YOUR AD! ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET, YOUR HOUSE, YOUR CAR, YOUR COMPANY’S LOGO!

E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Publish October 29, November 5, 12, 2013

NOTICE is hereby given that on October 7, 2013, Estate of J.A. Nieto and Margarita Nieto, c/o Joseph C. Nieto (Personal Representative of the Estate of Joe Nieto), c/o Richard C. Cibak, Atkins Engineering Associates, Inc., P.O. Box 3156, Roswell, New Mexico 88202-3156 filed application No. RA-3544 into RA-637-B & RA-10675 with the STATE ENGINEER for permit to change location of well and place of use of 15.0 acre-feet per annum, plus carriage allowance, of artesian groundwater by ceasing the diversion of said waters from artesian well No. RA-3544 located in NE1/4NW1/4SE1/4 of Section 3, Township 11 South, Range 24 East, N.M.P.M. by severing said water right from the irrigation of 5.0 acres of land described as below: SECTION 03

TOWNSHIP 11 S.

RANGE 24 E.

ACRES 15.0

The applicant proposes to commence the diversion of said 15.0 acre-feet per annum, plus carriage allowance, of artesian groundwater from the following artesian wells: WELLS RA-637-B RA-10675

SUBDIVISION SECTION NW1/4SW1/4NW1/4 25 NW1/4NW1/4SW1/4 13

TOWNSHIP 14 S. 14 S.

for the stack irrigation of 641.3 acres of land described below:

SECTION SUBDIVISION 25 Part of N1/2 and Part of SW1/4 Part of S1/2 and Part of SW1/4NE1/4 13

TOWNSHIP 14 S. 14 S.

045. Employment Opportunities

IMMEDIATE OPENING for an all around handy man. The more verified skills, the higher the pay. Apply in person ONLY at 2803 W 2nd ST.

SERVICE COORDINATOR

HDFS had an immediate opening for a Services Coordinator to manage a caseload of 20+ consumers in the Roswell community. Responsibilities include support and supervision of providers, and customer service to consumers, providers, guardians and case managers. The Service Coordinator will oversee the implementation of ISP, provide pre-service and in-service training. Home visits are required to evaluate quality of service, monitor documentation and participate in quality assurance activities, such as, Incident Management, Health and Safety and/or Human Rights committees and unit utilization. Bachelor's degree and 1 year direct experience in DD preferred. Must be highly organized and posses excellent writing and communication skills. Salary of $28 K and excellent benefit package including 3 weeks of vacation and health benefits included. Send cover letter and resume to asalmon@highdesertfs.com

Legals

SUBDIVISION Pt. of N1/2SE1/4

CLASSIFIEDS

RANGE 25 E. 25 E.

RANGE 25 E.) 25 E.)

ACRES

Up to 641.3 (Stack)

The aforesaid move-to lands presently have water rights appurtenant to them under State Engineer Files RA-1132; RA-637-B & RA-1204-Comb.; RA-281 into RA-10675 and RA-525, RA-233-S & RA-1955-Comb into RA-647-B & RA-10675 (T).

The above described move-from point of diversion and places of use are located near the intersection of E. Bland Street and Meadowbrook Road in Roswell, Chaves County, New Mexico.

The above described move-to points of diversion and places of use are located near the intersection of Choctaw Road and Vineyard Road, south west of the Town of Hagerman and near the intersection of Navajo Street, Comox Road and Vineyard Road, south west of the Town of Hagerman. Both are located in Chaves County, New Mexico.

Any person, firm or corporation or other entity having standing to file objections or protests shall do so in writing (legible, signed, and include the writer's complete name and mailing address). The objection to the approval of the application must be based on: (1) Impairment; if impairment you must specifically identify your water rights; and/or (2) Public welfare/conservation of water; if public welfare or conservation of water within the state of New Mexico, you must show you will be substantially affected. The written protest must be filed, in triplicate, with Scott A.Verhines, P.E., State Engineer, 1900 West Second Street, Roswell, New Mexico 88201, within ten (10) days after the date of last publication of this Notice. Facsimiles (fax) will be accepted as a valid protest as long as the hard copy is sent within 24-hours of the facsimile. Mailing postmark will be used to validate the 24-hour period. Protest can be faxed to Office of the State Engineer, (575) 623-8559. If no valid protest or objection is filed, the State Engineer will evaluate the application in accordance with Sections 72-2-16, 72-5-6, and 72-12-3.

NOW TAKING applications for server/cashier & kitchen help. Please apply in person at Zen Asian Diner, 107 E. Country Club Rd.

045. Employment Opportunities

ADVANCED PRACTICE PROVIDER (NP, PA, CNS) Our core values and large network of cardiologists make this practice a unique and desirable opportunity for a results-driven healthcare provider. This position provides care to patients in their specialized area of training and collaborates as necessary with an NMHI physician and/or other members of the healthcare team when the needs of the patient are beyond their scope of practice. Requirements: Degree from an accredited NP, CNS or PA school and licensed to practice in NM. To be considered, email your resume to resumes@nmhi.com

Direct Service Employee All Shifts/Full or PT We are currently seeking employees to provide care for individuals with developmental disabilities. Must pass a background check, possess a HS diploma/GED and a valid NMDL. Salary DOE starts $8.50 - $9.50 hour. Training will be provided. Benefits including medical, dental and vision are available. Please email

asalmon@highdesertfs.com

or apply at 1601 Second Street, Roswell, NM 88201

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish October 29, 2013 CHAVES COUNTY PLANNING & ZONING COMMISSION NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:

That a public hearing will be held by the Chaves County Planning and Zoning Commission on Tuesday, November 12, 2013, beginning at 6:00PM in the Commissioners' Chambers of the Chaves County Administrative Center-Joseph R. Skeen Building, #1 St. Mary's Place, to offer the public an opportunity to comment on the agenda items below:

Case Z 2013-6: Renewal of a Special Use Permit to allow a wireless communications facility on property described as S: 4 T: 11S R: 23E, Lot 53, parcel # 4130062183024, the address being 6102 W. 2nd Street, Roswell, NM 88203.

Members of the public having protest and/or comments to offer must submit such protest and/or comments in writing at least one (1) day prior to the Planning and Zoning Commission hearing to the Chaves County Planning and Zoning Department, PO Box 1817, Roswell, NM 88202. Providing your comments at least eight (8) days before the first hearing allows your comments to be included within the written report.

The Chaves County Commissioners will consider the recommendation of the Planning and Zoning Commission and take final action on these agenda items at their monthly meeting, to be held on Thursday, November 21, 2013, beginning at 9:00AM in the Chaves County Commissioners' Chambers of the Chaves County Administrative Center-Joseph R. Skeen Building, # 1 St. Mary's Place. The Commissioners will also consider any other business brought before them at this hearing.

If you are an individual with a disability who is in need of a reader, amplifier, qualified sign language interpreter, or any other form of auxiliary aid or service to attend or participate in the hearing or meeting, please contact the Planning & Zoning Department at 624-6606 at least one week prior to the meeting or as soon as possible. Public documents, including the agenda and minutes can be provided in various accessible formats. Please contact the Planning & Zoning Department at 624-6606 if a summary or other type of accessible format is needed.

Roswell Daily Record 045. Employment Opportunities

VIVINT IS looking for a Journeyman Electrician for the Hobbs or Roswell area. Vivint is a leader in Home Security and Home Automation. Full time position offered, work for a great company with full benefits available. Apply under the field service openings at vivintcareers.com IMMEDIATE OPENING for (CMA) certified medical assistant. Position is part-time initially with anticipated full time potential. Please submit resume to Renal Medicine Associates, 313 W. Country Club, Suite 12, fax to 575-627-5835, Attention: Susan or email to susan.d@renalmed.com FULL TIME opening for Warehouse Supervisor. Must work Saturdays. 2 years retail experience required. Come to 612 West College.

NEW SALON & Day Spa now open, has opening for licensed cosmetologist and licensed massage therapists. Come by 2727 SE Main or call 575-622-0016 ROSWELL JOB Corps is currently accepting resumes for: Security Officer – security officer will be responsible for the safety of students, property and equipment. Qualifications – HS diploma or GED plus one year of security experience. Valid Drivers license and good driving record. Recreation Assistant – individual will assist Recreation Manager in planning and conducting the recreation/avocation program. Qualifications – HS diploma or GED plus two years experience in recreation; valid class “D” drivers license with good driving record. Please submit your current resume to iaranda@jobcorps.org, or fax to 575-347-7492, or drop off at 57 G. Street – Attn: I. Aranda

045. Employment Opportunities

CAR RENTAL company looking for dependable customer service and sales associate who is self motivated and team oriented for evening shift. Must have outstanding customer service and sales experience. Application available at Avis Counter inside airport. Come be part of the Elite Team! Elite Gymnastics Academy now accepting applications for coaching positions. Experience preferred or athletic background, train in-house. Apply in person, 4pm-7pm, Monday-Friday at 1315 N. Virginia. 575-622-1511

BANK OF the Southwest is seeking a qualified candidate to fill a fulltime Teller position for our Main branch. Primary duties include, but not limited to: understanding and promoting bank products and services, cash handling and customer service. Requirements: Must have a good attitude and basic computer skills. Must be detail oriented with excellent time management and people skills. Previous bank experience is preferred. Bank offers excellent work environment, salary and benefits. Pre-employment drug test and background screen required. Apply in person with Lisa at the Bank of the Southwest, 226 N Main, Roswell, NM, by October 30, 2013. . Drug-Free Workplace and EOE/AA L&F DISTRIBUTORS Class A CDL Drivers For Roswell, NM Area Qualified applicant must have good driving record. Current commercial license preferable. Previous(575)622-0380 experience delivering product a plus. Good communication and customer service skills. Interested applicants apply at: L&F Distributors 2200 North Atkinson Roswell, NM 88201 575-622-0380 An Equal Opportunity Employer

Legals

-----------------------------------------------------------------------Publish October 29, 2013 THE NEW MEXICO DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

NOTICE OF ADDITIONAL PUBLIC HEARING

The New Mexico Department of Transportation (NMDOT) will hold an additional public hearing for the purpose of receiving oral and written public comment on Rule Number 18.21.5 NMAC, New Mexico Department of Transportation Outdoor Advertising Requirements. The purpose of the proposed rule change is to establish procedures and standards for all off-premises outdoor advertising in New Mexico, including the use of changeable electronic variable message signs, to amend the current fee structure, to update and clarify the rule where necessary, including definitions and permit-related processes, to correct inconsistencies with federal regulations, and to make formatting, organizational and language changes throughout the rule to conform to New Mexico rulemaking requirements. Two prior hearings were held on October 18, 2013 in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and on October 21, 2013 in Las Cruces, New Mexico. A third hearing is scheduled for December 2, 2013 from 10:00 am to 12:00 p.m. at the New Mexico Department of Transportation, General Office, Training Room 1, located at 1120 Cerrillos Road, Santa Fe, New Mexico. The hearing will be held before Elias Archuleta, NMDOT Acting Chief Engineer. Please contact Michael Otero, Outdoor Advertising Program Manager, New Mexico Department of Transportation, P.O. Box 1149, SB 4, 2nd Floor, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87504-1149, Telephone (505) 827-5460, to request a copy of the rule. Any individual with a disability who is in need of an auxiliary aid or service to attend or participate in the hearing, or who needs copies of the proposed rule in an accessible form may contact Michael Otero at (505) 827-5460 at least ten (10) days before the scheduled hearing.

045. Employment Opportunities

BELL RINGERS wanted. Seasonal minimum wage. Must be honest, well groomed, friendly and dependable. Bring 2 forms of id for I-9 paperwork. 612 West College ADMIRAL BEVERAGE is currently hiring Class A CDL drivers. Position must be filled immediately. Local delivery, excellent pay, hourly and overtime, 4 day work week, affordable health insurance. Great opportunity for someone looking for long term employment. www.admiralbeverage.com Dexter Consolidated Schools Notice of Vacancy

Bus Maintenance Tech Accepting Applications until filled

Applications are available from Human Resources, PO Box 159, Dexter, NM 88230 or on our website www.dexterdemons.org. Preliminary screening will be made on the basis of information received. Selected applicants will be invited to interview. The Dexter Consolidated School District is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, national origin, religion, age, sex, marital status or disability in compliance with federal and state laws. 575-734-5420 #319 Journeyman Electrician needed. Must have valid NM Journeyman License and valid driver’s license. Send resume to Mountain State Electric, PO Box 1152, Roswell, NM 88202-1152. AMERIPRIDE LINEN Requisition#106705 Production Employee October 25, 2013 to November 1, 2013

Production Employee needed: High School diploma or GED. Must be able to pass drug test. Application must be filled out on-line. No walk-ins or phone calls will be accepted. Go to ameripride.com. Click on about us and select careers. AA/EEO EMPLOYEE M/F/D/V NEED JOB? We have them! Entry level, no experience needed, up to $1600 for a company policy. 575-578-4817 ADVERTISE YOUR DRIVER JOBS in 33 New Mexico newspapers for only $100. Your 25-word classified ad will reach more than 288,000 readers. Call this newspaper to place your ad or log onto www.nmpress.org for more information. HELP WANTED-TRUCK DRIVERSOTR Drivers to run Mid-west to West Coast, late model equipment, scheduled hometime, travel allowance, paid vacation. Call Chuck or Tim 800-645-3748 $1500 SIGN-ON Bonus for experienced CDL-A drivers. Get home often & earn 38 cpm. Excellent benefits & CSA friendly equipment. Call 855-430-8869. Paid training for CDL-A school recent grads and drivers with limited experience. Apply online at AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer.


Roswell Daily Record 045. Employment Opportunities

045. Employment Opportunities

NEED CASH? Be your own boss & build your business at Blairs Monterey indoor market at 1400 W. 2nd. Booths start at $75 mo Call 623-0136 ROAD MAINTENANCE I Chaves County is accepting applications to establish a six month pool of applicants for current and future openings for the position of Road Maintenance I (light road equipment operator). Entry level salary range: $9.80 $11.21/hr D.O.Q. Chaves County offers a competitive benefit package consisting of paid vacation and sick leave, holiday pay, medical, life, disability, vision and dental insurances plus a retirement plan. Position requires 2 years experience operating road construction equipment and a valid Class A CDL. Applicant will not be considered if they have been convicted of DWI within the past three years or do not currently possess a valid Class A CDL. Normal work hours are Monday-Thursday, 6:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Chaves County is a drug free employer. All applicants for this position will be required to pass a background check and will be subject to pre-employment, post-offer drug and physical testing. Required Application forms are available at the County's Job Posting Board located in the west wing of the County Administrative Center, #1 St. Mary's PL, Roswell, NM 88203 or by accessing the County's Web Site at www.co.chaves.nm.us. Applications may be returned to Human Resources, PO Box 1817, Roswell, NM 88202. Applications will be accepted until filled. EOE.

SAFE AND STABLE FAMILIES SUPERVISOR Turquoise Health and Wellness, Inc. is seeking to fill a full-time position as a Safe and Stable Families Supervisor. If you are an energetic person and want a rewarding career in the mental health field, come be a part of our team. This is an in-home service program working with families to improve parenting, life skills, and access to community resources. Master's degree in Social Work, Human Services, Education or related field is required. Must have 7 years experience working with families and 2 of those years must be in a supervisor role. An EOE. Bilingual (English/Spanish) a plus. Pleas send resume to: Turquoise Health and Wellness Attention: Samantha Reed 110 E. Mescalor Rd Roswell, NM 88201 or sreed@thwnm.org

195. Elderly Care

LOVING CHRISTIAN care for the elderly, 575-291-4840 PRIVATE CARE Taker, assistance with meals, bathing, light house keeping, experienced, references 575-622-5922

200. Fencing

M.G. HORIZONS free estimates for installation. Chainlink, wood, metal & block. 575-623-1991 Rodriguez Construction FOR WOOD, metal, block, stucco fencing, Since 1974. Lic. 22689. 420-0100

SERVICES 080. Alterations ALTERATIONS & MISC. SEWING - 840-8065.

140. Cleaning JD CLEANING Service, Licensed and bonded. References. 623-4252

SUNSHINE WINDOW Services. Free estimates. 575-626-5153 or 626-5458

210. Firewood/Coal CORDOVA CHIMNEY Sweep. 575-623-5255 or 575-910-7552 MOUNTAIN WOOD for sale, Delivery available. 575-420-5124 SEASONED MOUNTAIN wood. (1) 4’Tx8’Lx1.6’W stack, split & delivered $120. 575-626-9803

220. Furniture Repair WE BUILD and repair furniture. 840-7849 or 626-8466

225. General Construction

Olaguez Construction: Free estimates, complete remodeling including plumbing, additions, tile, sheds, concrete, fence, roof, stucco, windows, painting, & doors. Guaranteed Work. 910-7035 Miguel.

CLASSIFIEDS

225. General Construction

Alpha Construction New Construction, remodels, additions, concrete & painting. Lic. & Bonded Call Adam 626-2050

229. Gutters

We power wash gutters and clean carpets (575) 973-1019

230. General Repair

NEED HOME repairs fixed before the “HOLIDAYS” D & B Property Maintance is the answer. Sheetrock, painting, landscaping, flooring, fencing, etc. NO JOB TOO SMALL, ONE CALL DOES IT ALL. Free estimates. Call 575-623-8922. 15% discount with mention of this ad.

232. Chimney Sweep

CHIMNEY SWEEP Have your woodstove, fireplace, or pellet stove inspected and cleaned. Dust free Guarantee. 39 yrs Exp., Licensed, Insured. Bulldog Janitorial Services 575-308-9988

235. Hauling

PROPERTY CLEANUPS Tear down old bldgs, barns, haul trash, old farm equip. 347-0142/317-7738 RWC. BACKHOE, skid steer, dump truck, bom lift, services. Insured. Call Hector 575-910-8397. www.rancheroswelding.com

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

Summer Clean-up rake leaves, tree trimming, weed eating, haul trash, property clean-up & much more. Call Joseph, 317-2242. Bòidheach Yards and Gardens. Property cleanup & hauling, year round maintenance, landscaping, tree management. You'll love our prices! 578-9404. Fall Clean-up rake leaves, tree trimming, weed eating, haul trash, property clean-up & much more. Call Joseph, 317-2242.

3 LINES OR LESS . . . ONLY $ 68 9 NO REFUNDS • Published 6 Consecutive Days

• Ads posted online at no extra cost

(includes tax)

MAIL AD WITH PAYMENT OR FAX WITH CREDIT CARD NUMBER Call (575)-622-7710 --- 625-0421 Fax 2301 N. Main TO BUY-SELL-RENT-TRADE ANY AND EVERYTHING

CLASSIFICATION

PUBLISH THIS AD STARTING DATE ENDING DATE

270. Landscape/ Lawnwork

LANDSCAPE, CUTTING grass, mowing, trimming, cut down trees. 910-2033 WE WORK All Yard work & hauling. Call Will at 317-7402 WW LAWN Service Property cleanup - Mowing - Shrub & hedge trimming & much more. Call Juan, 626-6121. “Big E’s” Landscaping & Yardwork mow, trim, prune property clean-up, sprinkler sys. senior disc. 914-6025 Mow Grass, Trim Bushes, Clean Ups, Hauling Trash Leaf Raking, flower beds, tree pruning, rock yards & rototilling, pick up pecans. Repair sprinklers & fences. 347-8156, 347-8157 Pedro

285. Miscellaneous Services

Professional !!!Holiday Lighting!!! Installation and Takedown (575) 973-1019 QUALITY RECYCLING Stop don’t do that we pay cash for that. Cans; 58 cents lb, batteries; $4.00 each, copper; up to $3.00 lb., Cadillac convertors; starting at $5.00 goes to $350.00. We buy all types of metal and tin. Open 7 days a week. 2662 Hwy 285. Old A-1 Septic Building. 1 mile past the By-pass on left side of the road. Call 575-937-2909. STRUGGLING WITH YOUR MORTGAGE AND WORRIED ABOUT FORECLOSURE? REDUCE YOUR MORTGAGE & SAVE MONEY. LEGAL LOAN MODIFICATION SERVICES. FREE CONSULTATION. CALL PREFERRED LAW 1-800-915-0432 WRAP UP your Holiday Shopping with 100% guaranteed, delivered–tothe-door Omaha Steaks! SAVE 67% PLUS 4 FREE Burgers - Many Gourmet Favorites ONLY $49.99. ORDER Today 1-800-773-3095 Use Code 49377DLY or www.OmahaSteaks.com/gifts69

OPERATIONS REPRESENTATIVE/SR Job ID 1622 Roswell, NM

NMGC has an immediate opening for an Operations Representative/SR to join our team in our Roswell office. This is a series post and successful candidate and position level will be based on experience. Successful candidate performs a wide variety of operations duties, not limited to one particular department or function. May perform meter-reading activities, credit & collection duties, customer service functions, field service work, line-locating requests, storekeeping and warehousing duties, distribution/transmission construction, maintenance, installation and emergency response. Must have high school diploma or GED and a valid NM driver’s license with acceptable driving record. To be considered go to the careers page of www.nmgco.com to review the position description. Then, register, upload a resume, apply and answer all posting questions. You must complete the online application process no later than October 29, 2013 New Mexico Gas Company is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer. Women, minorities, disabled individuals and veterans are encouraged to apply.

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

285. Miscellaneous Services

Dennis the Menace

B7

SAVE ON Cable TVInternet-Digital PhoneSatellite. You`ve Got A Choice! Options from ALL major service providers. Call us to learn more! CALL Today. 888-706-8846 SAVE $$$ on AUTO INSURANCE from the major names you know and trust. No forms. No hassle. No obligation. Call READY FOR MY QUOTE now! CALL 1-888-719-6435 Canada Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. Call today 1-800-661-3783, for $10.00 off your first prescription and free shipping.

310. Painting/ Decorating

TIME TO PAINT? Quality int./ext. painting. Call 637-9108. EXTERIOR/INTERIOR, INSURED. Call Hector 575-910-8397.

www.rancheroswelding.com

330. Plumbing

Plumber Needs Work. Steve’s Plumbing & Heating. 33yrs exp. 622-9326 GAS LINES and plumbing specials, best prices, licensed, 840-9105

345. Remodeling

BERRONES CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling, painting, ceramic tile, sheds, additions, fencing. Licensed, Bonded. Ray: 626-4153. NO JOB too small, repair, remodeling, etc. Reasonable rates, quality work. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const., Inc. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

Spruce Up and Winterize Your Home for the Holidays! We remodel, inside and out (575) 973-1019 Additions, bathroom, kitchen, facia, soffit, window, door replacement. Rodriguez Const. 420-0100

350. Roofing

395. Stucco Plastering

Stucco, Lath, synthetic, guaranteed work. Memo 575-637-1217 M. G. Horizons All types of Stucco and Wire lath. Free Estimates 623-1991 For stucco traditional or synthetic, also block, brick & stone work. Rodriguez Const. 420-0100 RWC Lath and Stucco. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397

www.rancheroswelding.com

405. TractorWork

Tractor work Lots mowed, discing, blading, post holes. 347-0142 or 317-7738

410. Tree Service

STUMP GRINDING. Big Stumps & back yard stumps. Tree and shrub work. Free estimates. 623-4185 TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL, free estimates, super clean up, 840-9105 Allen’s Tree Srvc. Trim top removal, good clean up. Free estimates. 626-1835

435. Welding

RWC On site repairs or fabrication. Insuranced.

5BR/3BA, 2 car garage, nestled away on Old Clovis Hwy, or could use as a 3br/3ba w/hobby rooms. Comes w/6 acres & water rights & many trees. Mobile home/RV hookup, outbuildings, sheds, $377k, $15k down. Owner financing available, 575-416-1454 or 575-622-6786 HOME FOR sale by owner, 216 W. McGaffey St.,Commercial/ Residential, zoned C-2. Priced to sale at $74,900.00; includes LR, / Gas Fireplace, Den, Dining area. 2br/2ba. Great area for business or family dwelling. Has 2-car detached garage, plus pation...... Living Space 1,260 sft. Set on 66’ X 132’ Lot stucco exterior with newly painted trim. Cash or conventional loan. Open House on Saturday November 2nd at 1pm. 2nd575-637-1985 or 575-637-1964 3BR/2BA, CARPORT, fenced, storage, carpet, $67,000. Owner financed, w/$4k down. 420-3637 or 622-6786

492. Homes for Sale/Rent

Hector (575) 910-8397

FINANCIAL

REAL ESTATE

490. Homes For Sale

Professional Roofing, Landscaping, Irrigation, Concrete and Fence Work (575) 973-1019

3BR, 1 3/4ba, north part of town, 3110 N. Bandolina, 1 car garage, all new carpet, paint & roof, 2 blks from swimming pool. Priced to sell, $108,000. Owner may finance w/large down payment. 622-5031 or 420-1022

www.rancheroswelding.com

2BR/1BA, CARPORT, storage sheds, $59k w/$3k down or trade for ?? 575-416-1454 or 575-622-6786, owner financing available.

www.rancheroswelding.com

Guaranteed Shingle Roof jobs. Locally owned. Licensed and bonded. 5-C Const. 626-4079 or 622-2552.

RWC SHINGLE Roofings. Insuranced. Hector (575)910-8397

490. Homes For Sale

BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY home on 5 acres, 5037 W. Berrendo Rd., pictures & information on forsalebyowner.com listing #23966971. Call 575-626-2280.

SELL OR RENT YOUR HOUSE FASTER! INCLUDE A PICTURE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

495. Acreages/ Farms/ Ranches/Sale

500 ACRES, $500 per acre OBO, must sell. 505-634-6301 or 575-416-1406 (in spanish). JUST OUT OF HOBBS — 137 ac. +/- w/1400 cow dairy, a 5 drm., 4 bath, two-story home (over 4,000 sq. ft.) & accompanying improvements. Seller will consider all offers including offers to the divide the property including the home & acreage and/or the dairy & acreage. Please look at our website for information of this property, other dairies, Oklahoma ranches located in a high rainfall area & NM ranches both large & small. www.scottlandcompany.com

SEND TO: Roswell Daily Record, Classified Department, P.O. Box 1897, Roswell, N.M. 88202 WE ACCEPT: 







EXPIRES ________

Card # __________________ 3 Digit # (ON BACK OF CARD)________ NAME ____________________________________________ ADDRESS _________________________________________ PHONE ___________________________________________

WORD AD DEADLINE To Place or Cancel an Ad

COMMERCIAL ACCOUNT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .NOON SUNDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM MONDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FRIDAY, 2:00 PM TUESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MONDAY, 2:00 PM WEDNESDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TUESDAY, 2:00 PM THURSDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .WEDNESDAY, 2:00 PM FRIDAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .THURSDAY, 2:00 PM POLICY FOR CLASSIFIED ADTAKING

Personal Advertising totaling less than $20 will not be billed on an open account, unless the advertiser already has a history of good credit with us. Visa, Master Card & Discover are accepted as prepayment. There will be no refunds or credit on prepaid cancellations. All individuals who are not in our retail trade zone must prepay their advertising. All new commercial accounts must have a standard application for credit on file. If we do not have an approved credit application on file, the advertising must be charged on a credit card until credit is approved. CORRECTING AN ERROR — You are responsible for checking your ad the first day it appears in the paper. In the event of an error, call the Classified Department immediately for correction. THE ROSWELL DAILY RECORD WILL ONLY ALLOW ONE ADDITIONAL DAY FOR INCORRECT INSERTIONS.

CLASS DISPLAY AND STYLE ADS

NOON - Two Days Prior To Publication. OPEN RATE $10.18 PCI NATIONAL RATE $11.26 PCI. _________________________________________ Contract Rates Available _________________________________________

LEGALS

11:00 AM Two Days Prior To Publication. _________________________________________ CONFIDENTIAL REPLY BOXES Replies Mailed $6.00 - Picked Up $3.50

www.rdrnews.com

Add 12 word count to word ad for approved addressing directions.

www.texascrp.com Ben G. Scott — Broker Krystal M. Nelson — NM Qualifying Broker 800-933-9698

TWO NEIGHBORING 20 acre ranches each just $12,900 or together for $24,000. Lender repossession. 1 hour 45 minutes southwest of Albuquerque. These ranches previously sold for 3x the new asking price. Remote, high dessert setting with good access and electric. Financing available. Call NMRS 1-888-676-6979.

505. Investment/ Commercial/ Business Property

EXCELLENT COMMERCIAL location. 6,000 Square Foot building with Offices, 2 Freezers and Cooler. Located on South Main St. across from the Chaves County Administration Offices. Excellent Visibility. Michelet Homestead Realty 575-623-8440

515. Mobile Homes - Sale

BEAUTIFUL NORTH senior park, water & yard care included, 3br/2ba, all appliances including washer/dryer, new roof, carport, enclosed deck, storage building, 317-6870. Lic#057


B8 Tuesday, October 29, 2013 520. Lots for Sale

FOR SALE by owner 5 acre lot, great location NW area, well, electric on site, wonderful community custom built homes, $55,000 OBO 760-716-0610 or 575-910-7969 Mobile Home Lots for sale: Lot size 50x134 $19,500. Owner financing w/ $4000 down. 50 lots to choose from. On Washington & Brasher. 420-1352.

RENTALS

535. Apartments Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331

540. Apartments Unfurnished

VALLE ENCANTADA YOUR BEST $ RENTAL VALUE! LARGE 1,2,3 BEDROOMS. FREE UTILITIES. unfurnished, laundry room, playground, pool, ample parking. 2001 South Sunset. 623-3722. ALL BILLS PAID 1BR $544, 2BR $653, 3br/2ba $753/mo., ref air, newly remodeled. 502 S. Wyoming. 622-4944 FIRST MONTH FREE 3br/2ba, $753, 1000 sqft, all bills paid, cold central AC, newly remodeled, 502 S. Wyoming, 622-4944. BETTER LIVING is within reach! 2br/1ba $592, 3br/2ba, $674, 5br/2ba $812, central H/C, fridge, stove, DW, GD, W/D hookups, 2 refreshing pools, Section 8 Vouchers accepted, 623-7711, Villas of Briar Ridge. Town Plaza Apartments NO HUD ACCEPTED ALL UTILITIES PAID Friendly managers. New Renovated EXTRA LARGE 1, 2, and 3 bedrooms. Each 2 & 3 bedroom is multi level, upstairs & downstairs w/ large closets, stove & refrigerator, private patios, and private parking. Complex has a pool, laundry room, and a quiet garden setting environment. Friendly managers on-site. Good credit? Pay less rent! 575-623-2735. 1&2Bd, 3 locations, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 1 or 2bd, furnished-unfurnished, no smoking/Hudpets all bills pd. 623-6281 EFF, 1 & 2br, wtr paid, No pets, laundry fac, stove/ref. Mirador Apts, 700 N. Missouri. 627-8348. PICK UP A LIST OF AVAILABLE RENTALS AT PRUDENTIAL ENCHANTED LANDS, REALTORS, 501 NORTH MAIN. EFF, 1BR, downtown, clean, wtr pd. Stove & frig. No Pets/HUD. 623-8377 Very nice 2br Apartment. 304 W. Mescalero, $625/mo wtr pd, $300/dep. 6 mo. lease, no HUD or pets, 420-4535. 2BR, No Pets, No HUD, 1702 E. 2nd St. 773-396-6618 (cell) REMODELED 2BR/2BA, all electric, w/d hookups, $650/mo, $500/dep. 910-0827 NORTH LARGE 2/2, remodeled wood floors, no pets, $700/$400 420-8797 ALL BILLS paid, 607-C Woody Dr., $575/mo, $250/dep, call 317-9647 or 910-8206 after 4pm. Roswell Apartment 1700 N. Pontiac Dr., 2br/1ba, stove & fridge, a/c, heating air, washer/dryer, water paid. 626-864-3461

545. Houses for Rent-Furnished

1&2Bd, util pd, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 3/2/1, with washer/dryer, excellent neighborhood, close to ENMC and Lovelace, schools & shopping, $1000/mo, $300/dep, Call 910-1605

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

34 H St., $550/mo, $550/dep, 2br/1ba, fenced yard, wtr pd, min. 1yr lease, 627-9942. 2&3Bd, 1&2Ba, pmt hist reqd, No Hud, No Pets, call M-Th 8a-4p 624-1331 305 W. Deming, 2br/1ba, utilities pd, ref. air, appliances included, $700/mo, $500/dep. No pets/HUD. 575-623-7678 2BR/1BA $460 call or text after 5pm, No HUD. 915-255-8335 TIRED OF Landlord Headaches? We can help! Prudential Enchanted Lands Realtors Property Management 575-624-2262

550. Houses for RentUnfurnished

3BR/ 1BA $500/mo, $500 dep + utilities, new carpet, paint, stove & ref. included. 306 E. Reed, 914-2641, No Pets or Hud. or 444-6175 AVAILABLE Nov. 1st, $850/mo, $750/dep, 3br/1.5ba, No HUD or pets, 575-420-5930 1618 N. Delaware 2br 1ba $600 dep. $600 mo. 575-317-3665

518 S. Fir Ave., 3br/1ba, 20x30 shop, fenced backyard, fridge & stove,washer & dryer, no HUD or pets, $650/mo, $350/dep, background ck, 575-626-5213 600 S. Lea, 3br/2ba, ref. air, w/d hookups, no HUD or pets, $750/mo, $600/dep, 914-5402.

GOOD, SAFE, quiet neighborhood, nice, clean, 3br, 1 3/4ba. Call 420-8706. 00151859305 S. Evergreen, 2br/1ba, coverd carport, shed, appliances, fenced yard, $750/$500 dep, dogs w/fee, no HUD or utilities pd. 575-405-0163 or kilok9s@gmail.com 2br/1ba, completely redone, ref. air, new carpet, fenced yard, close to park & grocery store, $750/mo, $750/dep. 575-317-4373

FOR RENT, 2 br/1ba. Livingroom, dining room, kitchen, small den, $1,100mo. Utilities paid up to $375. 1608 N. union. 575-444-6442

FOR RENT: Historic District, close to NMMI. 18 Sq. ft. 3 / 4 BR, 2 BA. LR has FP, Large country Kitchen/dining. $1350./mo. + utilities. 624-1975 Available Nov. 1

3107 RADCLIFF, 3br/1.5ba, washer & dryer, newly remodeled kitchen includes dishwasher, $775/mo + dep., no smoking or HUD, Call 915-6498 or 915-6490.

555. Mobile Homes for Rent QUIET COUNTRY 2bd, 10 miles East 2nd on River Rd. $550 mo, $550 dep. 575-513-5790 Country Doublewide, 2br/2ba, 575-840-4923.

Mobile homes for rent or rent to own, mobile home lots available, RVs welcome. Country Club Mobile Home Manor, 1200 E. Country Club, 623-6660

560. Sleeping Rooms ROOM FOR rent, nice quiet neighborhood, 505-506-7768

580. Office or Business Places FOR LEASE - Space in Sunwest Centre aka the Bank of America Building. Various size spaces available. Owner-paid utilities and janitorial. Suite customization available. Call Ed McClelland, Broker or come by Suite 606. Office 623-1652 or mobile 420-2546.

580. Office or Business Places SPACE FOR rent at 2001 N. Main St. For more information. Please call 622-0110.

GREAT DOWNTOWN local, 3 plus offices with full kitchen, wtr pd, 1419 sq. ft., $600mo. Please call American Realty & Mgmt at 575-623-9711

600. Wanted to Rent

LOOKING TO rent or lease purchase large older home in Roswell Hist. District 4br. 575-618-0221

MERCHANDISE

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

Pwr wheelchair, hospital bed, lift chair, Invacare patient lifter. 622-7638 Top Quality reconditioned appliances on sale. Many like new less than half the price! Washers, dryers $75 & up. Refrigerators, stoves from $100. Excellent selection, Camper’s Appliances, 300 E. McGaffey 623-0397. Everything guaranteed! Elevated toilet seat, crutches, walker, bath transfer bench. 622-7638 51” PHILLIP projection TV, $250, works good; 27” flat screen Plasma, $150; Presario desktop computer, 4gb, 500 ram, $250; glass cabinets, $75; 27” Magnavox TV, $60; white cast iron patio table & 2 chairs, $75. 575-625-0577 NEED FURNITURE Shop Blair’s for the best prices on used furniture, beds, dressers, table & chairs, living room sets, patio sets, bookshelves, appliances, antiques, collectibles, home decor & housewares, saddles, tools, movies, plus lots more. Open daily 9-5, closes Wed. 623-2033

THE TREASURE Chest Come see the best. Sofas, chests, antiques, trumpet. Christmas & Halloween, Fall decor. Man Land. New stock. 1204 W. Hobbs, 914-1855, Weds-Sat, 10-5. DIRECTV - Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Call Now! Triple savings! $636.00 in Savings, Free upgrade to Genie & 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free!! Start saving today! 1-800-264-0340 DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-315-7043 3 FLATBED trailers, dual axels, choice $2000; overhead camper $300; 5 prehung 30” doors, $45 ea.; antique windows $25 ea., furnaces $100, wallheaters $100; commodes, sinks, choice $25. 420-3637 or 622-6786 KING SIZE comfort select bed, headboard, bed frame, mattress cover, sheets. 624-2850

CLASSIFIEDS

605. Miscellaneous for Sale

3 CRANE vending machines, model #168 3000. Call 904-207-9531

615. Coins, Gold, Silver, Buy, Sell, Trade

U.S. & FOREIGN coins and currency, buy, sell or trade, gold and silver coins. 622-7239, 2513 W. 2nd

620. Wanted to Buy Miscellaneous

TOP PRICES paid for household items, furniture, appliances, antiques, collectibles, tools, saddles, plus anything else of value. We buy compete household & estates. 623-0136 or 910-6031

630. Auction Sales

AUCTION P & M Farm and Museum. Nov 2, 2013 at 9:30. Preview dates are Oct 31 and Nov 1. Starting at noon, sale of vintage cars, wagons, carriages, farm equip. 478 Jarales Rd., Jarales, NM, 4 miles N of Jarales post office.www.bentleysauction.c om. 505-344-1812.

635. Good things to Eat

GRAVES FARM Bell peppers, squash - 5 different kinds, sweet corn, onions, green beans & black-eyed peas (call for your bushel order), pinto beans, Armenian cucumbers, watermelons, cucumbers, peanuts, dried red chile pods & cantelopes. 622-1889, 8:30am-5:30pm, Mon-Sat, Sunday 1pm-5pm.

650. Washers & Dryers MATCHING WHIRL Pool washer & dryer, $150; Another washer for $75. 575-420-8333

700. Building Materials

METAL ROOFING, color blue. 575-653-4647

745. Pets for Sale

PUPPY LOVE Grooming & Boarding - Large Dogs Welcome, Cats also 575-420-6655 OLD ENGLISH Bulldogs, 2M, 1F left, $500 each. 575-347-8647

AKC Registered Golden Retrievers, 3 Males, 4 Females- $600, 8wks old and ready for a new home, current on immunization. Permit #2013-007 Please call, 575-420-1150. BOSTON TERRIER puppies for sale. 2M, 1F. Call 623-7985 or 937-1917

4x8 SORGUM bales $75 each and 4X8 alfalfa bales $225 each. Call Janet at 575-626-0159.

745. Pets for Sale

ADD A PICTURE OF YOUR PET FOR SALE FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

790. Autos for Sale

2001 FORD Explorer, automatic, low miles, $1000 down w/approved credit, 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 420-1352.

2011 LINCOLN MKZ, loaded, 17,700 miles, 1 owner, $24,500. 317-7778

2008 CHEVY Trail Blazer LS 4x4, 4dr, loaded excellent condition, $9,500. 420-1352.

RECREATIONAL

5TH WHEEL, 2009 Keystone Cougar $26,995. See at Desert Sun C-D-J at the “Y”

765. Guns & Ammunition

HUNT ON 7k acre private ranch, units 37. Hunt dates are November 3rd-7th. 3br mobile home provided. $1500 a gun, 4 gun maximum. 575-626-7488 BEAUTIFUL BLACK powder rifle, 50 cal., CVA Bobcat, 575-317-8387.

775. Motorcycles & Scooters

2009 YAMAHA V-Star classic, 650 cc fully loaded with original equipment, 4k miles, garaged, $4000. 622-3132 or 914-5051

780. RV’s & Campers Hauling

MAIN TRAILER Sales Inc. New & Used Travel Trailers & 5th Wheels. Parts & Service. 2900 W. 2nd St. 575-622-1751. Mon-Fri, 8-5:30, Sat. 9-2. maintrailersalesinc.com

TRANSPORTATION 790. Autos for Sale

SHOW US WHAT YOU’RE SELLING! INCLUDE A PICTURE IN YOUR AD FOR JUST $5! E-MAIL PICTURES TO: CLASSIFIEDS@ RDRNEWS.COM

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

1997 FORD Aerostar Minivan, 3rd seat, low miles, excellent cond., $1000 down w/approved credit, 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 420-1352.

2 FREE Kittens, 1yr old, spayed and neutered. Call 623-2224 or 840-8609

FREE KITTENS to good home. Call 575-840-7017.

790. Autos for Sale

2002 LANDROVER, 4whl drive, V8, leather interior, good tires & body, runs good, 2 moon roofs, 125k miles, $5900., 910-3326 in Artesia

2002 NISSAN Sentra, auto, 4 dr, 4 cyl., good tires, gas saver, runs good, 120k miles, $3500 OBO. 575-637-0304

715. Hay and Feed Sale

4x8 SORGUM bales $75 each and 4X8 alfalfa bales $225 each. Call Janet at 575-626-0159.

Roswell Daily Record

2002 CHEVY Silverado 4.8 motor, 1 owner 94k miles. 420-5503 BUCKET TRUCK, 144k miles, 2 man bucket, 600 lb capacity, 60 ft high lift, $7850, or for rent for $500/day. 626-7488 2008 FORD F150, ext cab, heavy duty 4x4, tow package, only 88k miles, $14,850. 420-1352

5TH WHEEL, 2006 Keystone Laredo $22,995. See at Desert Sun C-D-J at the “Y”

795. Pickups/ Trucks/Vans

2008 DODGE Ram, fire engine red, new wheels & tires (black XD wheels), 6.7 liter cummins diesel, HS performance chip, 118k miles, asking $25,900. Call 420-0173 for more info.

2006 FORD E350, 15 passenger van, 1 owner, dual air, excellent cond., $6850. 1401 Old Dexter Hwy, 420-1352. 2006 FORF F-150 Lariat 4x4, 4 dr, tan leather, 175k miles, $11,500 OBO. 575-637-0304

810. Auto Parts & Accessories

2.2 LITER Toyota 1989 engine/transaxle, air conditioner, everything complete. Excellent condition. Will sell or buy auto in which motor, etc will fit. 575-420-8240 , 420-0465 or 622-8162

CLASSIFIEDS INDEX

Announcements

005 Special Notice 010 Card of Thanks 015 Personals/Special 020 Transportation 025 Lost & Found

Instruction

030 Education 035 Music – Dance/Drama 040 Instructions Wanted

Employment

045 Employment Opportunities 050 Salesperson/Agents 055 Employment Agencies 060 Jobs Wanted – M & F

Services

070 Agricultural Analysis 075 Air Conditioning 080 Alterations 085 Appliance Repair 090 Auto Repair 100 Babysitting 105 Childcare 110 Blade Work 115 Bookkeeping 120 Carpentry 125 Carpet Cleaning 130 Carpeting 135 Ceramic Tile 140 Cleaning 145 Clock & Watch Repair 150 Concrete 155 Counseling 160 Crafts/Arts 165 Ditching 170 Drafting 175 Drapery 180 Drilling 185 Electrical 190 Engraving 195 Elderly Care 200 Fencing 205 Fertilizer 210 Firewood – Coal 215 Floor Covering 220 Furniture Repair 224 Garage Door Repair 225 General Construction 226 Waterwell 230 General Repair 232 Chimney Sweep 235 Hauling 240 Horseshoeing 245 House Wrecking 250 Insulation 255 Insurance 260 Ironing & Washing 265 Janitorial 269 Excavating 270 Landscape/Lawnwork 280 Masonry/Concrete 285 Miscellaneous Service 290 Mobile Home Service 293 Monuments 295 Musical 300 Oil Field Services 305 Computers 306 Rubber Stamps 310 Painting/Decorating 315 Pest Control 316 Pets 320 Photography 325 Piano Tuning 330 Plumbing 335 Printing 340 Radio/TV’s/Stereo’s 345 Remodeling 350 Roofing 355 Sand Blasting 356 Satellite 360 Screens/Shutters 365 Security 370 Sewer Service & Repair 375 Sewing Machine Service 380 Sharpening 385 Slenderizing 390 Steam Cleaning 395 Stucco Plastering 400 Tax Service 401 Telephone Service 405 Tractor Work 410 Tree Service 415 Typing Service 420 Upholstery 425 Vacuum Cleaners 426 Video/Recording 430 Wallpapering 435 Welding

440 Window Repair 441 Window Cleaning 445 Wrought Iron 450 Services Wanted

Financial

455 Money: Loan/Borrow 456 Credit Cards 460 Insurance Co. 465 Oil, Mineral, Water, Land Lease/Sale 470 Investment: Stocks/Sale 475 Mortgages for Sale 480 Mortgages Wanted 485 Business Opportunities

Real Estate

490 Homes for Sale 495 Acreage/Farm/Ranch 500 Business for Sale 505 Commercial Business Property 510 Resort Out of Town Property 515 Mobile Homes/Sale 520 Lots for Sale 525 Building Transfer 530 Real Estate Wanted

Rentals

535 Apartments, Furnished 540 Apartments, Unfurnished 545 Houses, Furnished 550 Houses, Unfurnished 555 Mobile Homes – Rental 560 Sleeping Rooms 565 Rest Homes 569 Mobile Home Lots/Space 570 Mobile Home Courts 571 RV Parks 575 Resort Homes 580 Office/Business Rentals 585 Warehouse & Storage 590 Farms/Acreage – Rent 595 Miscellaneous for Rent 600 Want to Rent

Merchandise

605 Miscellaneous for Sale 610 Garage Sales, Individuals 611 Garage Sales, Businesses 615 Coins/Gold/Silver 620 Want to Buy – Miscellaneous 625 Antiques 630 Auction Sales 635 Good Things to Eat 640 Household Goods 645 Sewing Machines 650 Washers & Dryers 652 Computers 655 TV’s & Radios 660 Stereos 665 Musical Merchandise 670 Industrial Equipment 675 Camera/Photography 680 Heating Equipment 685 Air Conditioning Equipment 690 Business/Office Equipment 695 Machinery 700 Building Materials 705 Lawn/Garden/Fertilizer 710 Plants/Flowers 715 Hay & Feed Sale 720 Livestock & Supplies 721 Boarding Stables 725 Livestock Wanted 730 Poultry & Supplies 735 Poultry Wanted 740 Show Fowl 745 Pets for Sale

Recreational

750 Sports Equipment 755 Bicycles for Sale 760 Hunting & Camping Equipment 765 Guns & Ammunition 770 Boats & Accessories 775 Motorcycles 780 RV’s/Campers 785 Trailers Wanted

Transportation

790 Automobiles for Sale 795 Trucks & Vans 796 SUV’s 800 Classic Automobiles 805 Imported Automobiles 810 Auto Parts & Accessories 815 Wanted – Autos

10 29 13 Roswell Daily Record  

10 29 13 Roswell Daily Record

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you