Page 1

AMANDA MARTIN


CONTENTS 4 Horsing Around Caulfield Racecoarse

8

Furniture Homage

10

The Rock Lawn Area

12

Embodying home through shelter Rachel Whiteread

26 Reading Room Caulfield

30 The Veil PerformaĆ&#x;ve Architecture

34 The Ruin PerformaĆ&#x;ve Architecture - Utopic surface

42 Service Framework Monash Berrick Service Centre


04 05

HORSING AROUND.

PRIVATE SPACE PUBLIC SPACE 1. ENTRY 2. GRASS AREA 3. PRIVATE BOX 10 PEOPLE 4. PRIVATE BOX 6 PEOPLE 5. PRIVATE BOX 2 PEOPLE

6. PRIVATE FUNCTION AREA 7. BAR 8. BALCONY 9. INFORMATION AREA/ ON-LINE BETTING 10. SERVICE BAR 11. PICNIC RUG COLLECTION

In this project I designed a new space for the 2030’s age group in an existing stand at the Caulfield Racecourse. My concept was to design the space on the day to day life of a horse. Begining with the private boxes which resembled a stable. I designed these boxes to be 1500 high allowing the occupants to have privacy when they are seated or to stand and watch the race. Grass area surrounds the private boxes and this acts as a public space for all users of the racecourse. The grass signifies a horse on race day. The bar and function area had mainly exposed materials and the bar was designed as a horse’s trough. To complete the project I placed a large plaster horse on the balcony of the private function area.


06 07


08 09

TAKAHARU + YUI TEZUKA


This furniture piece was paying homage to a particular house designed by Tezuka called ‘House to catch the forest’. I decided to use this basic irregular shape of the house design and use this as the basis for my furniture design. Every part of my design only uses this shape to create the table and chairs.


10 11

ROCK In this project I chose to use corrugated cardboard as my material and I was required to test the use of this material for another purpose by changing its physical properties. I soaked the corrugated cardboard which became extremely malleable so that I could mould an object and leave it to dry resulting in a hard moulded form of the object. I chose to mould a series of rocks and placed them on a grass landscape surface in a line to create a visual perception of dividing the open space creating a visual barrier.


12 13

EMBODYING HOME THROUGH SHELTER


14 15

RACHEL WHITEREAD Rachel Whiteread is best known for her sculptures, which typically take the form of casts. She make’s casts of ordinary domestic objects. Her major emphasis is on the space that objects do not inhabit (ie. negative space). She makes casts of everyday things, she materialises emptiness and opens up, a metaphysical third space between reality and immagination, the public and private, stillness and activity. She produces a solid cast of where the space within a container would be like parts of rooms, or area underneath furniture. She casts to capture a moment in time and the residue of years and years. Whiteread uses wax, resin, plaster or concrete as her casting material because it solidifes the space and the inverse structure of the space. The space becomes an undifferentiated uniform material mass separated from life by its surface texture. The surface, remains attached to the original mould through the markings and imprints left by the mould stuck to the cast. Whiteread looked at the domestic objects in terms of relationships, relationships with people and the relationships people have with their homes and their furniture. Through working with casts Whiteread embodies space by trapping traces of space, and the casts embody the compression and congealing of life and meaning. The cast of an object traps it in time, displaying its own past and the past of the object it replicates.

Untitled (Book Corridors) 1997 - 98

Untitled (Upstairs) 2000 - 2001


House (1993)


16 17

SHELTERS From researching Whiteread I decided that I wanted to embody space through her technique of casting. Instead of looking at negative, empty space the inverse, i decided to cast a typical iconic form. I looked at what was important to me growing up as a child and the happy memories I had. Most of my happy memories related back to living in my ‘home’ and the feelings of happiness, safety, security and belonging. I researched the psychological feeling’s a person has around the concept of ‘safety’. Psychiatrist Abraham Maslow (1908 - 1970) was one of the pioneers in the humanistic psychology movement. He believed that for a person to become ‘self actualising’ ie. reaching his or her highest potential they need to satisfy or gratify various needs. One of these basic needs is the need for ‘safety, security’. One of the simplest representation and our earliest perception of the safety need is our ‘home’, ‘house’, ‘ultimately our shelter’. Most children are brought up in some sort of shelter. This shelter embodies many memories and experiences in a person’s life. But most important it gives us a sense of safety. If you ask a child to draw their family. Most will draw their family and a picture of a house.

This representation of a house becomes more concrete as they make cubby houses and play with dolls houses. So this need for shelter and security is embedded in us from childhood.


18 19

22


20 21

So I decided to cast a simple iconic form of shelter being a home, with a pitched roof, windows, chimney and a door. When you go inside this space it embodies a typcial house, home or shelter giving a person a subconcious sense of ‘safety’. Our subconscious psychological need for ‘safety’ draws us to any structure or space that is in a form of a ‘shelter’. I believe that once a person is in this space their memories of saftey, belonging and security will emerge. We then finally embody that space.

FORM, MOULDING, CASTING PROCESS


22 23

Textures of roof and wall and indented windows and door of house cast


I decided to place this form/cast of a shelter in the desert ie. an open area so that once a person sees this form of shelter they walk in and will subconciously embody the space of being ‘home’ being ‘safe’. Home is the “mythical point of orgin” that represents a crucial component in the constitution of identity. It represents a point of return. The point of reference for spatial awareness that guides our differentiation between interiority and exterioirty. Our subconscious psychological need for ‘safety’ draws us to any structure or space that is in a form of a ‘shelter’. I believe that once a person is in this space their memories of saftey, belonging and security will emerge. We then finally embody that space.


24 25


26 27

T H E READING R O OM

This project is called the reading room. My concept was to create an environment where a person can chose a book then continue to a chosen themed room to immerse themselves whilst reading their book surrounded by nature. I designed a series of rectangular boxes creating a labrinyth of rooms with diverse interiors. The interiors were a cushion, roman garden, timber slats, open air garden, glass and a pitch black room. There was also a series of private and group study rooms.


28 29


30 31

THE VEIL Most human beings put on a mask to the world so that they can fit into society’s norms. Once this mask is dropped their true self is revealed exposing ones strange

behavioural

instincts

which

can come in conlfict with others. Trying to adapt and find ones true identity is a difficult process. Once your true self evolves you are a liberated human.


A

A

D1

PLAN scale: 1/50

D2

SECTION A scale: 1/50

Cable Ties 300 X 4.8mm PVC Pipe 20mm

White Fabric 500 X500mm

PVC elbows 15mm

DETAIL 1 scale: 1/5

White Fabric 500 X500mm

PVC Pipe 20mm

Cable Tie 300 X 4.8mm

PVC elbow 15mm

DETAIL 2 - fixing scale: 1/2


32 33


34 35

THE RUIN


The dome is a structure of security, safety and efficiency. Historically, the dome can be traced back to the prehistoric age of existence, providing the quintessential shelter. In a religious context, the dome represents the divine, the heavens and the unattainable of a perfect world. This proposal has been constructed by the performers and the audience to create this perfect utopian world. Yet, the very same people that created it also destruct it to dystopia. The dome aims to be a Utopian environment, but in the reality it cannot exist. The addition of human interaction and influence makes the design flawed.The surface manifests into six configurations of the transgression from the Utopic to Dystopic; construct to destruct.


36 37

pocket plan scale 1:50

BOWL

CRUMBLE


detail

sarking circle double sided sewed together size: 500mm diameter

timber or foam frame 25mm width timber 25mm width foam both 350mm length

staples 3mm length connection for frames

sewn channel 30mm wide one inner triangle three outer lines black cable ties 4mm width

metal plates 20mm x 50mm detail D1 scale 1:5


38 39


daytime shoot - oval


40 41


42 43

SERVICE FRAMEWORK


I

n this project i re-designed the Monash Berrick Campus service centre. My project was called Service Framework. I remodelled the space to maximise its potential starting with using the condition of the cube around the campus and site, to test the idea of a grid as a three dimensional habitable space. In my design I created an engaging spatial experience for the university students through the interlocking distorted grid system structure which changes the spatial experience and directs you through the space. The colours on the roof of the centre are a representation of the campus unity and faculties. Plywood was the only material I used within the design. The material of plywood creates warmth and sensual perception through the floor, seats and structure.


44 45

D3


5

8

6 7

4 2

3

1

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

ENTRANCE RECEPTION DESK SOCIAL SPACE PIN-UP SPACE PRIVATE OFFICE AND CONSULATION SPACE

6. STAFF ROOM 7. SECURE AREA 8. STORAGE

PLAN SCALE 1:100


46 47


48 40 41 49


ARMARTIN043@GMAIL.COM


Portfolio  

Portfolio of works

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you