Issuu on Google+

SHINICHI OGAWA & ASSOCIATES . ATELIER BOW-WOW . KATSUTOSHI SASAKI + ASSOCIATES . IKIMONO ARCHITECTS . D.I.G ARCHITECTS

EN.ES.PT

20€ PORTUGAL and SPAIN 30€ EUROPE 40€ REST OF THE WORLD (price may very per country)


A.MAG �� ���� DECEMBER . ���� JANUARY . FEBRUARY issue frequency QUARTERLY run number ���� COPIES editorial direction ANA LEAL . JUAN RODRIGUEZ editor assistent PAULA CICUTO printing WWW.LUSOIMPRESS.COM

A.MAG DISTRIBUTION PORTUGAL info@adotmag.com SPAIN LIBRERIA FORMATOS formatos@libreriaformatos.com REST OF THE WORLD IDEA BOOKS idea@idea.nl A.MAG SUBSCRIPTIONS subscriptions@adotmag.com

issn I����-���X erc registration ��� ��� legal deposit xxxx owner AMAG EDITORIAL SL nif B ��������

CONTACT info@adotmag.com FOLLOW US TROUGHT www.adotmag.com www.facebook.com/adotmag


PANORAMAH! the MINIMAL FRAME SYSTEM conceived to be PERFECT. High technology system, that explores glass self-supporting characteristics, allowing a combination of large glass area with aluminum minimal profiles, into a unique approach to nature, that stimulates one continue and close relationship between interior and exterior without any visual limit disruption. PANORAMAH! offers several possibilities of combinations, fitting to each project in an individualized way, thanks to its technical and aesthetic specificities. Polyamides combined with aluminium profiles guarantee excellent thermal and acoustic performances. Profiles from only 20 to 50 mm thickness, ensure the perfect operation of glass panes till a maximum surface of 18m2, weighing more than 1 ton. Some 6 m height elements can be carried out without any difficulty. This slenderness of the profiles, associated with extreme dimensions of glasses, offers an exceptional transparency and luminosity to projects in which PANORAMAH! is integrated. The extraordinary flexibility of sliding windows PANORAMAH! becomes obvious when one considers the possibility of opening of angles without residual structural elements, or when one considers vertical systems of opening (guillotine) or swivelling. Our teams are disposable to offer the best personalized support, developed tand reach the Perfect Solution for each Project. Chalenge us!


201210_amag.indd 1


HIDRA design José A. Gandía-Blasco

www.gan-rugs.com GANDIA BLASCO PORTO Rua Dr. Melo Leote 20 4100 – 341 Porto T. +351 22 618 1355 F. +351 22 616 1540 gbporto@gandiablasco.com GANDIA BLASCO LISBOA Largo Vitorino Damasio, 2 F/G 1249-012 Lisboa T. +351 21 396 23 38 F. +351 21 396 33 04 gblisboa@gandiablasco.com

is a brand of

01/08/2012 14:36:19


SPAIN

PROJECT OVIEDO FINE ARTS MUSEUM

ARCHITECTURE

PERFORMED WORK DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF VENTILATED FACADE IN ALUMINUM GLAZIND AND FLATS ON STEEL STRUCTURE


5 10004 7 

1106579 

1071278 

1118971 

1089277 

1102366 

1020541 

1104105 

1106588 

1001279 

1110673 

1106150 

1123457 

1101896 

1015612 

1093117 

1169954 

1034567 

1128498 

1 09568 0 

1085023 

1103997 

1 08549 4 

1126116 

1099491 

1 11153 4 

1106276 

1003803 

5100389 

1 08371 5 

1096225 

1104019 

1165416 

1117017 

1131166 

1102367 

1101957 

1035384 

1048792 

1081783 

1085083 

1170307 

1068155 

1101389 

1101995 

1103729 

1167633 

1055766 

1130809 

1127725 

1106285 

1176577 

1102618 

1 10345 4 

5100155 

1 06878 1 

1141664 

1116943 

1109250 

1105604 

1 07066 9 

1106724 

1102349 

1092689 

1164867 

5100399 

1 09962 8 

1104939 

1104265 

1009329 

1103838 

1085027 

1170625 


1103 5 36 

1 127 738 

11 276 77 

11 19 880 

1 121423 

1131849 

111147 5 

1 12 7 660 

1089 3 58 

10 99206 

1 096137 

1118327 

113116 2 

1 00 2 803 

11316 35 

11 01218 

1 072062 

1003339 

5 100358 

1121 4 87 

1 083 010 

10 88 6 50 

11 06 828 

1 092688 

1 125597 

112486 8 

1097834 

11 08980 

1121 4 28 

1 131120 

10 926 97 

11 05919 

1 104014 

1115761 

1095963 

1127202 

1106965 

1103 9 88 

1 104 362 

10 879 00 

11 01896 

1 096099 

1 096607 

1106294 

1095357 

10 85205 

1 1 05922 

1128 483 

11 277 80 

1116166 

1 108429 

1126489 

1107191 

1127 6 23 

1 105 126 

10 034 30 

51 00 015 

1 099469 

1099628 

1132377 

10 85796 

1 0 78 5 36 

11324 88 

1117879 

11244 60 

1103397 

1084337 

1121 175 

1109 811 

1126127 

1 120573 

1116760 

1101881 

10 80681 

1127815 

WWW.ARCHITONIC.COM www.architonic.com/PRODUCT CODE 1 0 87 5 69 

1127 782 

1105604 

1131359 

1132 525 


003

josé manuel pedreirinho ARCHITECTURES - OTHERS

009 015 019 025 031 037 045

shinichi ogawa & associates HORIZON HOUSE WHITE COURT HOUSE WORLD OF CALVIN KLEIN . THE HOUSE 36M HOUSE WAREHOUSE MINIMALIST HOUSE HORIZON ROOF HOUSE

053 057 061

FOREST VIEW HOUSE K HOUSING LIBRARY HOUSE

069 081 091 103

atelier bow-wow TREAD MACHIYA TOWER MACHIYA SPLIT MACHIYA IZU BOOK CAFÉ

119 129 141 153

katsutoshi sasaki + associates OGAKI HOUSE OSHIKAMO HOUSE AMA HOUSE UNOU HOUSE

165

ikimono architects STATIC QUARRY

177

d.i.g architects K HOUSE

D ARCH .I.G ITECT S

and NO AR CHITE CTS mo A.MrAeGprojects at X

IKIMO

S 03

001


josé manuel pedreirinho ARCHITECTURES - OTHERS lisbon . december . 2012

In these times of accelerated globalization of tastes, ideas and concepts, we often look for the understanding of what may be forms of inter-culturality – or should we call them crossculturality – capable to generate units of concepts which allow us to understand some of the desperately uniform tastes in which we submerge ourselves. At the same time, it also seems clearer the need to understand the differences and specificities which also command us. Even if it is for the great diversity of ways to reflect and understand that same reality, or for the infinite variety in which we can express it. We live in a permanent confrontation between a centripetal and a centrifugal movement that somehow complement each other in the diversity of ways to express our contemporaneity, where the constant call to individual choice crashes into a reality where a globalized “progress” is heavily imposed to us. In other words, a reality where – as Baudrillard had long referred – the supremacy of the medium (whether it’s the market, the internet or information highways) has neutralized and annulled the message. Away from global speeches, we are more and more confronted with the need of choices which Eduardo Lourenço would designate as “heterodox”, i.e., with “the humble purpose to not accept a path by the mere fact that it presents itself as the only path, nor to refuse them all only for not knowing in absolute which one is, actually, the best of paths” . This concerns the works of the five Japanese architect teams presented here. Shinishi Ogawa, the oldest (born in 1955), and the one among all who works in a more urban scale; Atelier Bow-Wow, established in 1992 by Yoshiharu Tsukamoto and Momoyo Kajima; D.I.G. Architects, established in 2005 by Akinori Yoshimura and Maki Yoshimura, both studios with a practice where small housing projects prevail; Ikimono Architects, led by Takashi Fujino; and Katsutoshi Sasaki. Not yet famous outside the Japanese cultural environment, in spite of them all having had professional experiences in several universities, whether in the United States or in Europe, and also being published in several monographs and magazines, they are all representative of this architecture-

003

other that after consecutive cycles of isolation always comes to us fragmented, making it difficult for us to understand its framing in Japanese social and cultural overall. However, and in spite of us knowing we’re almost always fatally “lost in translation”, we have been long attracted to the Japanese cultural manifestations and architecture. We are fascinated, for instance, by the way they organize small minimum spaces; how they submit them to the rigours of geometric tracing or the delicate ways they work the materials. The way they blend philosophic and almost esoteric concepts into their daily professional practice, or yet, the way they connect indoor and outdoor spaces. Edward T. Hall has taught us over 50 years ago that we live in different sensory worlds and, despite all the superficial approximations we continue to live in very different cultural worlds. We consume the same products, for sure, but we continue to have great difficulty to comprehend the structural concepts to our ways to understanding the world. Our concepts for space, or qualities of that same space, or the life that unfolds inside it, continue to be diametrically distinct, or sometimes opposite, and the way we feel privacy or even distance, are completely different. We spare the pleasure to the formal solutions what we often lack in mutual cultural understanding. We all know that the interest to what we designate as the Orient isn’t from just now. Not to look further (and even taking the risk to be unfair by not framing here all the importance of the early contacts made by the Portuguese, even in the fifteenth century; or not to refer a figure like Venceslau de Morais who, a century ago, transmitted us precious information about this culture), it’s enough to recall the determining importance of the arrival of some Japanese prints to Europe – yet in late nineteenth century – to the development of new aesthetic concepts of western art, reflecting also in architecture as well, with prominence to Wright’s case. Nowadays, it is mostly the shortage of space and many of the solutions to address it that capture our attention to multifunctional games, or the proximities that although crossing

our privacy limits, or multiple transparencies; or the rigour of geometries that individualise and integrate them in nearly autistic ways into complex and disconnected surroundings. A rigour of geometrical exercises appearing here or there, also tempered with ecological concerns, always present in fringes of this society, or that blend with the mystical-philosophical dictates so characteristic to this culture. The evident shortage of urban spaces at ground level also leads to a systematic game of height interrelations that establish connections between the several life spaces and that often extend to roofing areas, used as living areas. An interconnection between all interior spaces that, again, recalls us to sensory forms of experience very different from the ones we know, and contrast with the way buildings – especially houses – often shut in itself or into tiny lighting and ventilation spaces, usually very interior and with which they try to alienate from unappealing urban contexts. Therefore, the surroundings are sent behind the created scenery, apparently forgotten, for disinteresting, or is it by choice of an individual culture and a time that is the present time. Constructively, the contrasts are mainly the ones who result from the mixture of ways to use and handle some more traditional materials (especially wood, which uses the persistence to our days of a high quality craftsmanship), with a large variety of industrial market materials, from which masonry is nearly absent. The slenderness which many of these materials are used, that guesses its limit for resistance skills, is also related to the easily we culturally accept and live with a short time which is the life of every work. Comprehending the way our cultural differences express in these works is much more than an intellectual or academic exercise, it is a necessity to our adjustment to the chaos of this liquid and fluid world where we evolve. It’s much of this reality-other that we find in these architects’ experiences.

“Heterodoxies - 1”, Eduardo Lourenço, 1949 – reedited by FCGulbenkian, Lisbon, 2011.


josé manuel pedreirinho ARQUITECTURAS - OTRAS

004 En estos tiempos de acelerada globalización de gustos, de ideas y de conceptos se busca mucho el entender aquello que puedan ser formas de interculturalidad – o talvez debamos antes designarlas de transculturalidad - capaces de generar unidades de conceptos que nos permitan entender algunos de los gustos tan desesperadamente uniformes en que nos vamos sumergiendo. Al mismo tiempo, parece cada vez más evidente la necesidad de percibir las diferencias y especificidades que también nos guían. Aunque sea por la gran diversidad de modos con que reflejamos y entendemos esa misma realidad, o por la infinita variedad con que la podemos expresar. Vivimos en un permanente confronto entre un movimiento centrípeto y otro centrifugo que de algún modo se complementan en la diversidad de las formas con que se exprime nuestra contemporaneidad, donde el constante apelo a la elección individual contacta con una realidad donde un ‘progreso’ globalizado nos es pesadamente impuesto. O sea una realidad donde, como Baudrillard la refirió hace mucho, la supremacía del medium (sea el mercado, internet o las autopistas de la información) neutralizó y anuló el mensaje. Lejos de los discursos globales, estamos cada vez más confrontados con la necesidad de elecciones que Eduardo Lourenço designaría como “heterodoxas”, o sea, con “el humilde propósito de no aceptar un sólo camino por el sencillo hecho de presentarse a si propio como único camino, ni de recusarlos a todos sólo por el motivo de no saber en absoluto cuál de ellos es, en realidad, el mejor de los caminos” . Esto viene a propósito de la obra de los cuatro equipos de arquitectos japoneses que aquí se presentan. Shinishi Ogawa, el más viejo de todos (n. 1955) y de entre todos el que trabaja en una escala más urbana; el Atelier Bow-Wow, formado en 1992 por Yoshiharu Tsukamoto y por Momoyo Kaijima; el taller D.I.G. Architects, constituido en 2005 por Akinori Yoshimura y Maki Yoshimura, ambos talleres con una práctica donde predominan los proyectos de pequeñas viviendas; el taller Ikimono Architects liderado por Takashi Fujino; y Katsutoshi Sasaki. Todavía poco conocidos fuera del ambiente cultural japonés, pese que todos tienen ya experiencias profesionales en diversas universidades, ya sea en Estados Unidos o en Europa, y estar publicados en diversas monografías y revistas, son todos bien representativos de esta arquitectura-otra que tras sucesivos ciclos de aislamiento llega hasta nosotros siempre fragmentada, lo que nos dificulta su encuadramiento de la globalidad social y cultural japonesa. Pese a esto, y de saber casi siempre fatalmente ‘lost in translation’, somos desde hace mucho atraídos por las manifestaciones culturales y por la arquitectura japonesa. Nos encanta, por ejemplo, el modo como organizan espacios de dimensión mínima; como los someten a los rigores de los

trazados geométricos o la delicadeza con que trabajan los materiales. El modo como mezclan conceptos filosóficos y casi exotéricos en el cotidiano de su práctica profesional, o aún como relacionan interiores y exteriores. Edward T. Hall nos enseño hace ya más de 50 años que vivimos en mundos sensoriales diferentes y pese a todas las aproximaciones, superficiales, continuamos viviendo en mundos culturales muy distintos. Consumimos los mismos productos, es verdad, pero continuamos teniendo gran dificultad en percibir los conceptos que estructuran, nuestro modo de entender el mundo. Nuestros conceptos de espacio, o de calidad de ese espacio, o de la vida que en este se desarrolla continúan siendo diametralmente distintos, cuando aún no opuestos, y el modo como sentimos la privacidad o la distancia, son completamente diferentes. Nos sobra así en placer con las soluciones formales aquello que muchas veces nos falta de entendimiento cultural mutuo. Todos sabemos que el interés por lo que designamos como Oriente no es de ahora. Para no retroceder más, (y aún corriendo el riesgo de ser injustos no encuadrando aquí toda la importancia que tuvieron los primeros contactos hechos por los portugueses, aún en el siglo XV; o en no referir una figura como la de Venceslau de Morais que hace un siglo atrás nos transmitió preciosas informaciones de esta cultura), basta recordar la importancia determinante que tuvieron la llegada a Europa de algunas estampas japonesas - a final del siglo XIX – para el desarrollo de nuevos conceptos estéticos de arte occidental, con reflejos también en la propia arquitectura, con destaque para el caso de Wright. Actualmente es sobre todo la escasez de los espacios y muchas de las soluciones que nos cautivan la atención para juegos de multifuncionalidades o las proximidades que pese a pasar nuestros límites de privacidad, o en las múltiples transparencias; o el rigor de geometrías que las individualizan e integran de formas casi autistas en envolventes complejas y disconexas. Un rigor de ejercicios geométricos que aquí o allí surge también templado de preocupaciones ecológicas, siempre muy presentes en márgenes de esta sociedad, o que se mezclan con los dictámenes místicos – filosóficos tan característicos de esta cultura. La escasez de los espacios urbanos al nivel del suelo lleva también a un sistemático juego de interconexiones en altura que establecen conexiones entre los diversos espacios de vida y que muchas veces se alargan hasta las coberturas, estas aprovechadas como zonas de estar. Una interconexión entre todos los espacios interiores que, de nuevo, nos remiten para formas sensoriales de vivencia muy diferentes de las que conocemos, y contrasta con el modo como los edificios, sobre todo las viviendas, muchas veces se cierran sobre sí

mismas o para pequeñísimos espacios de iluminación y de ventilación generalmente muy interiorizados y con los cuales se buscaba el enajenar de contextos urbanos visualmente poco estimulantes. Las envolventes son así remetidas para tras del escenario creado, aparentemente olvidadas, por no tener interés, o será antes por opción de una cultura de individuos y de un tiempo que es el presente. Constructivamente, los contrastes son sobre todo los que resultan de la mezcla de los modos como son utilizados y trabajados algunos materiales más tradicionales, (sobre todo la madera, que aprovecha la persistencia hasta nuestros días de una artesanía de gran calidad) con una gran variedad de materiales industriales de mercado, de donde la albañilería está prácticamente ausente. La esbelteza con que muchos de estos materiales son utilizados, y que se adivinan en el límite de su capacidad de resistencia, tienen también que ver con la facilidad con que culturalmente se acepta y convive con un tiempo corto que es el de la vida de cada obra. Entendemos que el modo como nuestras diferencias culturales se exprimen en estas obras es mucho más que un ejercicio intelectual, o académico, es una necesidad para nuestra adaptación al caos de este mundo líquido y fluido por donde vamos evolucionando. Es mucha de esa realidad otra que encontraremos en las experiencias de estos arquitectos.

“Heterodoxias - 1”, Eduardo Lourenço, 1949 – reeditado por FCGulbenkian, Lisboa, 2011.


josé manuel pedreirinho ARQUITECTURAS - OUTRAS

Nestes tempos de acelerada globalização de gostos, de ideias e de conceitos procura-se muito o entendimento daquilo que possam ser formas de interculturalidade – ou devemos antes designá-las de transculturalidade - capazes de gerar unidades de conceitos que nos permitam entender alguns dos gostos tão desesperadamente uniformes em que nos vamos submergindo. Ao mesmo tempo parece também cada vez mais evidente a necessidade de percebermos as diferenças e especificidades que também nos rejem. Nem que seja pela grande diversidade de modos de reflectirmos e entendermos essa mesma realidade, ou pela infinita variedade com que a podemos exprimir. Vivemos num permanente confronto entre um movimento centripeto e outro centrifugo que de algum modo se complementam na diversidade das formas com que se exprime a nossa contemporanidade, onde o constante apelo à escolha individual esbarra numa realidade onde um ‘progresso’ globalizado nos é pesadamente imposto. Ou seja uma realidade onde, como Baudrillard há muito referia, a supremacia do medium (seja ele o mercado, a internet ou as auto estradas da informação) neutralizou e anulou a mensagem. Longe dos discursos globais, estamos cada vez mais confrontados com a necessidade de escolhas que Eduardo Lourenço designaria como “heterodoxas”, ou seja, com “o humilde própósito de não aceitar um só caminho pelo simples facto de ele se apresentar a si próprio como único caminho, nem de os recusar a todos só pelo motivo de não sabermos em absoluto qual deles é, na realidade, o melhor dos caminhos” . Vem isto a propósito da obra das quatro equipas de arquitectos japoneses que aqui se apresentam. Shinishi Ogawa, o mais velho de todos (n. 1955) e de entre todos o que trabalha numa escala mais urbana; o Atelier Bow-Wow, formado em 1992 por Yoshiharu Tsukamoto e por Momoyo Kaijima; o gabinete D.I.G, constituído em 2005 por Akinori Yoshimura e Maki Yoshimura, ambos os gabinetes com uma prática onde predominam os projectos de pequenas habitações; o gabinete Ikimono Architects liderado por Takashi Fujino; e Katsutoshi Sasaki. Ainda pouco conhecidos fora do ambiente cultural japonês, apesar de todos eles terem já experiências profissionais em diversas universidades quer nos Estados Unidos quer na Europa, e estarem publicados em diversas monografias e revistas, são todos eles bem representativos desta arquitectura-outra que após sucessivos ciclos de isolamento chega até nós sempre fragmentada o que nos dificulta o seu enquadramento da globalidade social e cultural japonesa. Apesar disso, e de nos sabermos quase sempre fatalmente ‘lost in translation’, somos desde há muito atraídos pelas

manifestações culturais e pela arquitectura japonesa. Fascina-nos por exemplo o modo como organizam espaços de dimensão mínima; como os submetem aos rigores dos traçados geometricos ou a delicadeza com que trabalham os materiais. O modo como misturam conceitos filosóficos e quase exotéricos no quotidiano da sua prática profissional, ou ainda como relacionam interiores e exteriores. Edward T. Hall ensinou-nos há já mais de 50 anos que vivemos em mundos sensoriais diferentes e apesar de todas as aproximações, superficiais, continuamos a viver em mundos culturais muito distintos. Consumimos os mesmos produtos, é certo, mas continuamos a ter grande dificuldade em percebermos os conceitos que estruturam, o nosso modo de entender o mundo. Os nossos conceitos de espaço, ou de qualidade desse mesmo espaço, ou da vida que nele se desenrola continuam a ser diametralmente distintos, quando não mesmo opostos, e o modo como sentimos a privacidade ou até a distância, são completamente diferentes. Sobra-nos assim em prazer para com as soluções formais aquilo que muitas vezes nos falta de entendimento cultural mútuo. Todos sabemos que o interesse para com aquilo que designamos como o Oriente não é de agora. Para não recuarmos mais, (e mesmo correndo o risco de ser injustos em não enquadrar aqui toda a importância que tiveram os primeiros contactos feitos pelos portugueses, ainda no século XV; ou em não referir uma figura como a de Venceslau de Morais que há um século atràs nos transmitiu preciosas informações desta cultura), basta recordar a importância determinante que tiveram a chegada à Europa de algumas estampas japonesas - ainda nos finais do seculo XIX – para o desenvolvimento de novos conceitos estéticos da arte ocidental, com reflexos também na própria arquitectura, com destaque para o caso de Wright. Actualmente é sobretudo a escassez dos espaços e muitas das soluções para o resolver que nos cativam a atenção para jogos de multfuncionalidades ou as proximidades que apesar de ultrapassarem os nossos limites da privacidade, ou nas multiplas transparências; ou o rigor de geometrias que as individualizam e integram de formas quase autistas em envolventes complexas e desconexas. Um rigor de exercícios geométricos que aqui ou ali surge também temperado de preocupações ecológicas, sempre muito presentes em franjas desta sociedade, ou que se mesclam com os ditâmes místico – filosóficos tão característicos desta cultura. A manifesta escassez dos espaços urbanos ao nível do solo leva também a um sistemático jogo de interligações em altura que estabelecem conexões entre os diversos espaços de vida e que muitas vezes se prolongam até às coberturas, elas próprias aproveitadas como zonas de estar. Uma interligação

entre todos os espaços interiores que, de novo, nos remetem 005 para formas sensoriais de vivência muito diferentes das que conhecemos, e contrasta com o modo como os edifícios, sobretudo as habitações, muitas vezes se fecham sobre si mesmas ou para pequeníssimos espaços de iluminação e de ventilação geralmente muito interiorizados e com os quais se procuram alhear de contextos urbanos visualmente pouco estimulantes. As envolventes são assim remetidas para trás do cenário criado, aparentemente esquecidas, porque desinteressantes, ou será antes por opção de uma cultura de individuos e de um tempo que é o do presente. Construtivamente os contrastes são sobretudo os que resultam da mistura dos modos como são utilizados e trabalhados alguns materiais mais tradicionais, (sobretudo a madeira, que aproveita a persistencia até aos nossos dias de uma artesania de grande qualidade) com uma grande variedade de materiais industriais de mercado, de onde a alvenaria está praticamente ausente. A esbelteza com que muitos destes materiais são utilizados, e que se adivinham no limite da sua capacidade de resistência, tem também a ver com a facilidade com que culturalmente se aceita e convive com um tempo curto que é o da vida de cada obra. Entendermos o modo como as nossas diferenças culturais se exprimem nestas obras é muito mais do que um exercicio intelectual, ou académico, é uma necessidade para a nossa adaptação ao caos deste mundo líquido e fluido por onde vamos evoluindo. É muito dessa realidade outra que vamos encontrar nas experiências destes arquitectos.

“Heterodoxias - 1”, Eduardo Lourenço, 1949 – reeditado pela FCGulbenkian, Lisboa, 2011.


007

SHINICHI OGAWA & ASSOCIATES

EN

Neutral and Abstract space is modest and rational (structurally, economically, and functionally), moreover it creates variety in architecture and quality of space. We believe that a “Good House” should be generous and accept contrasting characters like Natural and Artificial, Minimal and Maximal, not to limit how the inhabitants live. In our residential works the inhabitants and furniture are main, while the house plays the supporting role, adapting to the different and changing lifestyles. If you feel something oriental in our works, it may the “invisible design” that utilizes natural elements, or the emptiness for neutral architecture. Natural elements like sunlight, wind, sky, green, rain, etc., bring the sense of the seasons into the room. It is something I’ve learned from my childhood, because I was raised in a Japanese traditional house. The house also taught me that space can change infinitely, transforming the boundaries between rooms or indoor/outdoor, through sliding door system like ‘Shoji’. We consider that architectural elements like walls or window frames should be minimum and simple, in order not to appear unnecessary lines in the space. Our ‘invisible detail’ is not unreasonable, it doesn’t depend on special skills or high technology. Although we have evolved it below the surface introducing new materials or techniques, it’s the ‘invisible design’ that provides neutral and pure space.

ES

Espacio Neutro y Abstracto es modesto y racional (estructuralmente, económicamente, y funcionalmente), y además confiere variedad a la arquitectura y calidad espacial. Consideramos que Buenas viviendas deben ser generosas y aceptar características contrastantes, como Natural y Artificial, Minimal y Maximal, para no limitar las vivencias de sus habitantes. En nuestros proyectos residenciales los habitantes y los muebles son lo más importante, siendo que la casa sirve de soporte, adaptándose a los diferentes estilos de vida. Si se siente algo oriental en nuestros proyectos, será tal vez el “diseño invisible” que utiliza elementos naturales, o el vacio para crear espacios neutros. Elementos naturales como la luz solar, viento, cielo, vegetación, lluvia, etc., llevan las sensaciones de las estaciones del año para el espacio interior. Es algo que aprendí desde niño, porque crecí en una casa tradicional japonesa. La casa me enseño también que el espacio puede cambiar infinitamente, transformando los límites entre compartimientos o entre interior/exterior, a través de paneles de correr como el sistema “Shoji”. Consideramos que los elementos arquitectónicos como paredes o marcos deben ser minimalistas y sencillos, no debiendo existir líneas desnecesarias en el espacio. Nuestro “pormenor invisible” no es insensato, pues no depende de habilidades especiales o de alta tecnología. Aunque tengamos trabajado sobre la superficie con nuevos materiales o técnicas constructivas, es el “diseño invisible” que garantiza un espacio neutro y puro.

PT

Espaço Neutro e Abstracto é modesto e racional (estruturalmente, economicamente, e funcionalmente), e além disso confere variedade à arquitectura e qualidade espacial. Consideramos que a “Boa Habitação” deve ser generosa e aceitar características contrastantes, como Natural e Artificial, Minimal e Maximal, para não limitar as vivências dos seus habitantes. Nos nossos projectos residenciais os habitantes e o mobiliário são o mais importante, sendo que a casa serve de suporte, adaptando-se aos diferentes e mutáveis estilos de vida. Se se sente algo oriental nos nossos projectos, será talvez o “design invisível” que utiliza elementos naturais, ou o vazio para criar espaços neutros. Elementos naturais como a luz solar, vento, céu, vegetação, chuva, etc., levam as sensações das estações do ano para o espaço interior. É algo que aprendi desde criança, porque cresci numa casa tradicional japonesa. A casa ensinou-me também que o espaço pode mudar infinitamente, transformando os limites entre compartimentos ou entre interior/exterior, através de painéis de correr como o sistema “Shoji”. Consideramos que os elementos arquitectónicos como paredes ou caixilharias devem ser minimais e simples, não devendo existir linhas desnecessárias no espaço. A nossa “pormenorização invisível” não é insensata, pois não depende de habilidades especiais ou de alta tecnologia. Embora tenhamos trabalhado sob a superfície com novos materiais ou técnicas construtivas, é o “design invisível” que garante um espaço neutro e puro.


SHINISHI OGAWA & ASSOCIATES


2009 WAREHOUSE hiroshima . japan

031

EN

In a suburb of Hiroshima, the white box of 8m wide x 4m high x 21,5m long as a one-story house sits on the site surrounded by various low-rise houses. The long frosted glass wall cuts off views form the street, providing a sunny courtyard inside. The house is composed only of one big space, like a warehouse, partitioned by some boxes that function as furniture, rooms, and loft. All rooms/functions are connecting softly just being cut eye, and are linearly arranged in the large room. The difference of floor level also makes variety of space, even in a simple box of flat ceiling. We can walk from the entrance hall to living/dining/kitchen, to bathroom, to Japanese style room, to study room, and to master bedroom. The trussed steel frame as an inner structure of the Southern hanging-wall realizes the wide window of 21m, and the glazed sliding doors from end to end connect seamlessly the interior space with the courtyard.

ES

En un suburbio de Hiroshima, la caja blanca de 8m de ancho x 4m de altura x 21,5m de largo que conforma la vivienda de planta única posa en el terreno rodeada por edificios de habitación de baja densidad. A lo largo de la pared de cristal escarchado corta las vistas a partir de la calle, aunque mantiene el patio soleado en el interior. La vivienda está compuesta por un único y gran espacio, como un almacén, compartimentado por algunas cajas que funcionan como muebles, habitaciones, y loft. Todos las habitaciones/funciones se relacionan de forma delicada, sólo por un vislumbre, y están dispuestos de forma linear por el gran espacio. La diferencia del nivel del pavimento también confiere variedad espacial aún siendo una simple caja de techo plano. Podemos pasar desde la entrada para la zona de estar/comedor/cocina, para el bañador, para la sala japonesa, para la oficina, y para la habitación principal. La celosía de acero como estructura interior de la pared elevada en la fachada Sur permite crear una gran ventana con un alero de 21m de largura, y los paneles de correr a toda largura establecen una delicada y transparente conexión del espacio interior con el patio exterior.

PT

Num subúrbio de Hiroshima, a caixa branca de 8m de largura x 4m de altura x 21,5m de comprimento que conforma a habitação de piso único pousa no terreno rodeada por edifícios de habitação de baixa densidade. A longa parede de vidro fosco corta as vistas a partir da rua, embora mantendo o pátio solarengo no interior. A habitação é composta por um único e grande espaço, como um armazém, compartimentado por algumas caixas que funcionam como mobiliário, quartos, e loft. Todos os quartos/funções se relacionam de forma delicada, apenas por um vislumbre, e estão dispostos de forma linear pelo grande espaço. A diferença de nível do pavimento também confere variedade espacial mesmo numa simples caixa de tecto plano. Podemos passar desde o hall de entrada para a zona de estar/jantar/cozinha, para a casa de banho, para a sala japonesa, para o escritório, e para o quarto principal. A treliça de aço como estrutura interior da parede elevada na fachada Sul permite criar uma grande janela com um vão de 21m de comprimento, e os painéis de correr a todo o comprimento estabelecem uma delicada e transparente ligação do espaço interior com o pátio exterior.


SHINISHI OGAWA & ASSOCIATES

032


1:200

WAREHOUSE

033

mezzanine plan

ground floor plan

long section


SHINISHI OGAWA & ASSOCIATES

034

01. roof: waterproofing sheet 02. parapet: waterproofing sheet 03. plasterboard ceiling, EP white 04. plasterboard wall 05. ALC panel wall 06. plywood floor 07. eaves: calcium silicate board 08. plasterboard ceiling 09. floor: concrete metal trowel finished mortar water repelent 10. grass floor 11. wall: clear glass frosted film steel frame ��.

��.

��.

��.

��. ��. ��.

��. ��.

��.

��.

��.


WAREHOUSE

035


SHINISHI OGAWA & ASSOCIATES


2009 MINIMALIST HOUSE okinawa . japan

037

EN

This building is a courtyard house for a couple in Itoman-shi, Okinawa, Japan. The house is built on a 3m grid module in all XYZ directions, and it is composed of four vertical plates as exterior walls and one horizontal plate as a roof slab. The functional layout is created by inserting a void of 3m x 18m as the courtyard for the house and wall-like furniture into the concrete structure space, which dimensions are 3m (3x1) high x 9m (3x3) wide x 18m (3x6) long. The space composition is characterized by the division of the house into two areas by wall-like furniture. The first area is composed of living room, dining room, and bedroom as an interior space connected with the exterior courtyard, in a linear arrangement, while the other space is composed of kitchen, powder room, and study room, in a succession arrangement. The shower room, toilet, small courtyard, and several storage rooms are laid out in this wall-like unit, which also incorporates services; all spaces combined together create a lifestyle that minimizes the space division as much as possible. With regards for the natural light of Okinawa’s climate, the internal space connecting with the outside is designed with eaves in order to control the amount of direct sunlight coming inside the house. The exterior wall is designed to facilitate maintenance by applying photo catalyst paint. The functional counter unit incorporating the kitchen, powder room, and study room is integrally made of a solid surface of “DuPont Corian”. Consequently, this house is creating a habitation space that invites to a minimal, flexible and various lifestyle.

ES

Este edificio es una casa-patio para una pareja en Itoman-shi, Okinawa, Japón. La casa fue construida en una red modular de 3m en los tres ejes XYZ, siendo compuesta por cuatro láminas verticales como paredes exteriores y una lámina horizontal como losa de cobertura. El esquema funcional fue creado insertando un vacio de 3m x 18m que corresponde al patio que sirve la casa y espacio para muebles integrado en la estructura de hormigón con dimensiones de 3m (3x1) de altura x 9m (3x3) de ancho x 18m (3x6) de largura. La composición espacial se caracteriza por la división de la vivienda en dos áreas a través de los muebles. La primera área está compuesta por la sala de estar, comedor, y la habitación como un espacio interior en contacto con el patio exterior, en un esquema linear, mientras que el otro espacio está compuesto por la cocina, bañero, y una oficina, en un esquema de sucesión. El balneario, bañero, patio pequeño, y diversas guardillas son dispuestos en un módulo que también integra los servicios; articulando todos los espacios, creamos un estilo de vida que minimiza tanto cuanto posible la división del espacio. Considerando la luz natural característica del clima de Okinawa, el espacio interior que comunica con el exterior está diseñado con un alero de forma a controlar la cantidad de exposición solar directa que entra en la vivienda. La pared exterior fue diseñada de forma a facilitar la manutención aplicando tinta foto-catalizadora. El módulo de la meseta funcional que integra la cocina, bañador, y oficina está enteramente hecho de una superficie sólida de “DuPont Corian”. Consecuentemente, esta casa crea un espacio habitacional que invita a un estilo de vida minimalista, flexible y variado.

PT

Este edifício é uma casa-pátio para um casal em Itoman-shi, Okinawa, Japão. A casa foi construída numa grelha modular de 3m nos três eixos XYZ, sendo composta por quatro lâminas verticais como paredes exteriores e uma lâmina horizontal como laje de cobertura. O esquema funcional foi criado inserindo um vazio de 3m x 18m que corresponde ao pátio que serve a casa e espaço para mobiliário integrado na estrutura de betão com dimensões de 3m (3x1) de altura x 9m (3x3) de largura x 18m (3x6) de comprimento. A composição espacial é caracterizada pela divisão da habitação em duas áreas através do mobiliário. A primeira área é composta pela sala de estar, sala de jantar, e o quarto como um espaço interior em contacto com o pátio exterior, num esquema linear, enquanto que o outro espaço é composto pela cozinha, casa de banho, e um escritório, num esquema de sucessão. O balneário, casa de banho, pátio pequeno, e diversos arrumos são dispostos num módulo que também integra os serviços; articulando todos os espaços, criamos um estilo de vida que minimiza tanto quanto possível a divisão do espaço. Considerando a luz natural característica do clima de Okinawa, o espaço interior que comunica com o exterior é desenhado com um beirado de forma a controlar a quantidade de exposição solar directa que entra na habitação. A parede exterior foi desenhada de forma a facilitar a manutenção aplicando tinta foto-catalisadora. O módulo do balcão funcional que integra a cozinha, casa de banho, e escritório é inteiramente feito de uma superfície sólida de “DuPont Corian”. Consequentemente, esta casa cria um espaço habitacional que convida a um estilo de vida minimal, flexível e variado.


SHINISHI OGAWA & ASSOCIATES

038


MINIMALIST HOUSE

1:150 - 90%

039

ground floor plan

cross section


SHINISHI OGAWA & ASSOCIATES

042

EXTERIOR

��. ��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

INTERIOR ��.

��.

fixed window plan detail

fixed window plan detail

single swing door on both sides plan detail

��.

��. ��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

��. ��. INTERIOR

EXTERIOR ��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

fixed window section detail

steel sash section detail

single swing door on both sides section detail


MINIMALIST HOUSE

01. plastering mortar exterior water paint 02. structural sealant 03. flat bar 25x75 anti-corrosive pain (base coat) spacial acrylic acid resin field painting (finish) 04. clear glass 05. thumb turn lock 06. SUS-304 40x40x3 anti-corrosive paint (base coat) spacial acrylic acid resin field painting (finish) 07. floor hinge

08. plasterboard painted EP (emulsion paint) 09. hole In anchor 10. 30x30x3 (bolt and nut) 11. double calcium silicate board (breathable sheet on light gauge steel flame) joint repaired by putty exterior water paint flat finsh 12. artificial stone 600x600x20 13. l steel with anti-corrosive paint

043


SHINISHI OGAWA & ASSOCIATES

060


2012 LIBRARY HOUSE tochigi . japan

061

EN

The white one-story house is located in a calm residential area. The symmetric elevation is composed of a white cubic volume as Living/Dining space, and a lower volume that encloses the central cube. The Living/Dining space has a 6m high ceiling, and its Northern wall is a high and large book-shelf that will be completely filled with books. The opposite wall is opened to the Southern courtyard, and takes in various natural elements. Moreover, the top light makes it an impressive space giving sky view and natural light form the upper side. At the same time, the room realizes a comfortable environment, adjusting the quantity of light in accordance with the time of day or season by an exterior awning. The plan composition doesn’t have any corridor and it is possible to access all rooms from the central room. The large courtyard with a tree faces Living/Dining room, master bedroom, office, and the smaller one with a pool is for Living/ Dining room, bathroom and child room. It’s a house for a client who is a great reader. He can enjoy his reading time in this quiet but rich space, feeling the change of season thanks to the closed courtyards.

ES

La casa blanca de una única planta se sitúa en una calma área residencial. La elevación simétrica está compuesta por un volumen cúbico blanco como sala de estar/comedor y un volumen más bajo que entra en el cubo central. La sala de estar/comedor tiene 6m de altura, siendo la pared Norte formada por una alta y larga estantería que deberá ser totalmente rellenada con libros. La pared opuesta se abre para el patio Sur é integra varios elementos naturales. Además, la claraboya crea un espacio impresionante conformado por una vista del cielo y luz natural. Simultáneamente, la sala crea un ambiente cómodo, ajustando la cantidad de luz de acuerdo con el tiempo o la estación del año a través de un toldo exterior. La composición de la planta no tiene ningún pasillo de circulación y es posible acceder a todos los compartimientos a partir del espacio central. El amplio patio puntuado por un árbol hace frente a la sala de estar/comedor, habitación principal, oficina, y el patio menor con piscina tiene conexión con a sala de estar/comedor, bañeros y habitación de los niños. Es una casa para un cliente que es un ávido lector. El puede disfrutar de su tiempo de lectura en su tranquilo pero rico espacio, sintiendo el cambio de las estaciones gracias a los patios interiores.

PT

A casa branca de um único piso situa-se numa calma área residencial. O alçado simétrico é composto por um volume cúbico branco como sala de estar/jantar e um volume mais baixo que entra no cubo central. A sala de estar/jantar tem 6m de pé-direito, sendo a parede Norte formada por uma alta e larga estante que deverá ser totalmente preenchida com livros. A parede oposta abre-se para o pátio Sul e integra vários elementos naturais. Além disso, a clarabóia cria um espaço impressionante conformado por uma vista do céu e luz natural. Simultaneamente, a sala cria um ambiente confortável, ajustando a quantidade de luz de acordo com o tempo ou a estação do ano através de um toldo exterior. A composição da planta não tem nenhum corredor de circulação e é possível aceder a todos os compartimentos a partir do espaço central. O amplo pátio pontuado por uma árvore faz frente à sala de estar/jantar, quarto principal, escritório, e o pátio menor com piscina tem ligação com a sala de estar/jantar, casas de banho e quarto das crianças. É uma casa para um cliente que é um ávido leitor. Ele pode disfrutar do seu tempo de leitura no seu tranquilo mas rico espaço, sentindo a mudança das estações graças aos pátios interiores.


SHINISHI OGAWA & ASSOCIATES

062


1:150

LIBRARY HOUSE

063

ground floor plan

west-east section


067

ATELIER BOW-WOW

EN

Atelier Bow-Wow is a Tokyo-based firm founded in 1992 by Yoshiharu Tsukamoto and Momoyo Kaijima. The pair’s interest lies in diverse fields ranging from architectural design to urban research and the creation of public artworks, which are produced based on the theory called “behaviorology”. The practice has designed and built houses, public and commercial buildings, mainly in Tokyo, but also Europe and USA. Their urban research studies lead to experimental project ‘micro-public-space’, a new concept of public space, which has been exhibited across the world. Atelier Bow-Wow’s works are produced from the concept “architectural behaviorology”. The word “behavior” includes human behavior inside and outside of the building, physical phenomenon produced by different environmental elements such as light, air, heat, wind, and water in architecture, and building’s behavior in its surroundings. “Architectural behaviorology” aims to understand the behaviors of those different elements, and to synthesize them to optimize their performance in its specific context. It could be new definition of “what organic” in Architecture.

ES

Atelier Bow-Wow es una empresa con sede en Tokio, fundada por Yoshiharu Tsukamoto y Momoyo Kaijima en 1992. El interés de ambos reside en diversas áreas, desde el proyecto arquitectónico a la busca urbana, bien como la creación de obras de arte pública, producidas con base en los principios de la “ciencia de conducta”. El taller proyecta y construye viviendas, edificios públicos y comerciales, actuando sobre todo en Tokio, pero también en Europa y en EUA. Sus estudios de investigación urbana culminaron en el proyecto experimental “micro-espaciopúblico”, un nuevo concepto de espacio público, que se exhibe por todo el mundo. Los trabajos del Atelier Bow-Wow son producidos a partir del concepto de “ciencia de conducta arquitectónica”. La palabra “conducta” integra el impacto de la conducta humana dentro y fuera del edificio, de los fenómenos físicos producidos por diferentes elementos ambientales como luz, aire, calor, viento y agua en la arquitectura, bien como la conducta del edificio con su alrededor. La “ciencia de conducta arquitectónica” tiene como objetivo comprender los comportamientos de estos diferentes elementos y sintetizarlos para optimizar su desempeño en su contexto específico. Podría ser una nueva definición de “orgánico” en Arquitectura.

PT

Atelier Bow-Wow é uma empresa sediada em Tóquio, fundada por Yoshiharu Tsukamoto e Momoyo Kaijima em 1992. O interesse de ambos reside em diversas áreas, desde o projecto arquitectónico à pesquisa urbana, bem como a criação de obras de arte pública, produzidas com base nos princípios da “ciência comportamental”. O atelier tem projectado e construído habitações, edifícios públicos e comerciais, actuando sobretudo em Tóquio, mas também na Europa e nos EUA. Os seus estudos de investigação urbana culminaram no projecto experimental ���micro-espaço-público”, um novo conceito de espaço público, que tem sido exibido em todo o mundo. Os trabalhos do Atelier Bow-Wow são produzidos a partir do conceito de “ciência comportamental arquitectónica”. A palavra “comportamental” integra o impacto do comportamento humano dentro e fora do edifício, dos fenómenos físicos produzidos por diferentes elementos ambientais como luz, ar, calor, vento e água na arquitectura, bem como o comportamento do edifício com a sua envolvente. A “ciência comportamental arquitectónica” tem como objectivo compreender os comportamentos destes diferentes elementos e sintetizá-los para optimizar o seu desempenho no seu contexto específico. Poderia ser uma nova definição de “orgânico” em Arquitectura.


ATELIER BOW-WOW


2008 TREAD MACHIYA meguroku, tokyo . japan

069

EN

In a short and secluded street, bound by T- and L-junctions in south Tokyo, a peculiar pattern developed where the houses all spot a forward-facing pitched roof. Among them, one sticks out with its single oversized window, corrugated metal sheet facade, and large, protruding pitched roof. Even with these key deformations from the original type, Tread Machiya follows the rhythm of the street. The front window provides deep views straight through the house and all levels appear terraced, up and down; from here there is a sensation of being on stage in front of an audience. But why a “Machiya”? This merchant townhouse type developed an extremely deep and narrow shape as the result of tax regulations related to street frontage during the Edo period. During the era of modernization the townhouse became less and less relevant, with the detached-housewith-garden type gaining popularity. In contrast, due to the process of land subdivision in postwar Tokyo, many detached houses have increasingly begun to resemble townhouses – higher density areas and sites with elongated proportions. In both cases, these are typologies that have been refined and regulated due to economic pressures. In Tread Machiya, rather than a deep space as is seen traditionally, the house’s length is folded upon itself, resulting in a linear sequence of spaces that continuously climbs, as if the entire interior was an inhabitable staircase. This stair is front and centre, giving orientation and articulation to multiple landings, each with their own mode of occupancy. Especially important in such a small house, the steps also become places to sit down, spend time, and enjoy the changing views.

ES

En una pequeña y aislada calle rodeada por cruces en T y L en el sur de Tokio se desarrolló un patrón peculiar, donde todas las casas tienen tejado inclinado hacia adelante. Entre ellas, se destaca una con una gran ventana, fachada revestida con panel metálico ondulado y una grande y saliente cobertura. Aún con esas deformaciones de la tipología original, Tread Machiya sigue el ritmo de la calle. La ventana delantera ofrece vistas a lo largo de toda la profundidad de la casa y todas las plantas se desarrollan en plataformas, hacia arriba y hacia abajo, provocando la sensación de estar en un escenario delante del público. ¿Pero por que una “Machiya”? Este tipo de residencia tradicional desarrolla una implantación extremadamente profunda y estrecha, como resultado de reglamentos tributarios relacionados con la frente de la calle durante el periodo Edo. Durante la era da modernización esta habitación tradicional se volvió cada vez menos relevante, con la tipología de vivienda aislada con jardín ganando popularidad. Por otro lado, debido al proceso pos-guerra de división del suelo en Tokio, muchas casas aisladas se aproximaron cada vez más de las casas tradicionales, con áreas de mayor densidad y lotes con proporciones alargadas. En ambos casos, estas son tipologías que fueron refinadas y reglamentadas debido a presiones económicas. En la Tread Machiya, en vez de un espacio profundo como visto tradicionalmente, la largura de la casa se pliega sobre sí misma, lo que resulta en una secuencia linear de espacios continuamente escalonados, como si todo el interior fuese una escalera habitable. Esta escalera constituye frente y centro, permitiendo múltiples orientaciones y articulaciones, cada una con su propia forma de ocupación. Especialmente importante, en una casa tan pequeña, cada escalón también se vuelve un lugar para sentarse, pasar el tiempo y observar las vistas que están siempre cambiando.

PT

Numa pequena e isolada rua rodeada por entroncamentos em T e L no sul de Tóquio desenvolveu-se um padrão peculiar, onde todas as casas possuem telhado inclinado para a frente. Entre elas, uma se destaca com um janelão de grandes dimensões, fachada revestida com painel metálico ondulado e uma grande e saliente cobertura. Mesmo com essas deformações da tipologia original, Tread Machiya segue o ritmo da rua. A janela da frente oferece vistas ao longo de toda a profundidade da casa e todos os pisos desenvolvemse em plataformas, para cima e para baixo, provocando a sensação de estar num palco em frente de uma plateia. Mas porquê uma “Machiya”? Este tipo de residência tradicional desenvolveu uma implantação extremamente profunda e estreita, como resultado de regulamentos tributários relacionados com a frente de rua durante o período Edo. Durante a era da modernização esta habitação tradicional tornou-se cada vez menos relevante, com a tipologia de moradia isolada com jardim a ganhar popularidade. Por outro lado, devido ao processo pós-guerra de parcelamento do solo em Tóquio, muitas casas isoladas têm-se aproximado cada vez mais das moradias tradicionais, com áreas de maior densidade e lotes com proporções alongadas. Em ambos os casos, estas são tipologias que foram refinadas e regulamentadas devido a pressões económicas. Na Tread Machiya, em vez de um espaço profundo como visto tradicionalmente, o comprimento da casa dobra-se sobre si mesmo, o que resulta numa sequência linear de espaços continuamente escalonados, como se todo o interior fosse uma escadaria habitável. Esta escada constitui frente e centro, permitindo orientações e articulações múltiplas, cada uma com sua própria forma de ocupação. Especialmente importante, numa casa tão pequena, os degraus também tornam-se lugares para sentar, passar o tempo e apreciar as vistas sempre em mudança.


ATELIER BOW-WOW

070


1:150

TREAD MACHIYA

071

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

GROUND FLOOR PLAN


ATELIER BOW-WOW

072


1:150

TREAD MACHIYA

073

LONG SECTION


ATELIER BOW-WOW

��.

��.

��. ��.

��.

078

��.

��.

01. roof: bent galvanized steel plate asphalt layer speciallist underlay plate waterproof plywood rafter 15×30mm waterproof plywood rigid insulation foam 02. exterior cieling: galvanized steel plate water proof plasterboad 03. interior cieling: lauan plywood SHOJI 04. wall: lauan plywood bees wax finish 05. mirror 06. handrail: steel-pipe 20mm urethan paint finish 07. floor: lauan plywood bees wax finish structural plywood 08. exposed concrete 09. ground floor: trowel mortar water-repellent paint finish concrete rigid urethan foam 10. flashing: steel-plate urethan paint finish 11. dining table: lauan plywood urethan paint finish (clear color) 12. flashing: bent galvanized steel plate 13. gravel paving

��. ��.

��.

��.

��.

��.


TREAD MACHIYA

��.

��.

079 ��.

��. ��.

��. ��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

��. ��.


ATELIER BOW-WOW


2010 SPLIT MACHIYA shinjuku, tokyo . japan

091

EN

The new generation “Machiya” (town house) is located in a typical long and narrow plot in Tokyo. The property was higher than street level. The house is split in two, one part is three stories high, from street level, with a retaining wall; the other is two stories, at higher level, with the courtyard between two. A series of openings in the gable roof walls allows the view to penetrate from back to front, toward the street. The angle of the gable roof is defined by the height limit line from the Northern boundary. Repetition of exposed beams and columns introduces a fine rhythm in the interior space, short side walls (North-South wall) finishing with mortar plaster stucco, copper sheets and two stairs are inserted to change the sequence. The bathroom on the street side and the kitchen in the back work together to complete the house. The courtyard is the core part of circulation, with various kinds of plants and trees, and a long bench connecting two houses as the corridor. The chimney on the roof is for gravitational ventilation, but also for the watchtower, connecting this house to Tokyo Tower. “Machiya” in Kyoto and Kanazawa has “Tsuboniwa”, a very small courtyard where the sun, wind, and tree are invited to behave in their own ways. “Split Machiya” s courtyard expects to receive not only these natural behaviors but also human behaviors in a specific way. This new “Machiya” doesn’t stop the phenomenon of over land subdivision in residential areas, but looks for an excellent urban space within the metabolism of the principle of urban space in Tokyo.

ES

La nueva generación “Machiya” (habitación tradicional urbana construida de madera) está situada en un terreno largo y estrecho, en Tokio. La propiedad era más alta que el nivel de la calle. La casa está dividida en dos volúmenes – el primero se desarrolló en tres plantas arriba del nivel de la calle, apoyado en un muro de contención; el segundo se desarrolló en dos plantas, a un nivel más elevado, con un patio central de articulación entre los dos. Una sucesión de aberturas en las paredes transversales de soporte de la cobertura permite crear un eje visual que cruza el interior de la casa, desde el volumen cejado en dirección a la calle. El ángulo de la cobertura de dos aguas está definido por la cuota existente en el límite Norte del terreno. La repetición de pilares y vigas aparentes introduce un ritmo propio al espacio interior. Las paredes laterales menores (pared Norte-Sur) tiene un acabado con yeso proyectado, hojas de cobre y dos escaleras son insertadas para alterar la secuencia. El bañero hacia el lado de la calle y la cocina al fondo trabajan juntos para completar la casa. El patio es el centro de la circulación con varias especies de plantas y árboles, y un gran banco que conecta los dos volúmenes definiendo un pasillo. La chimenea en la cobertura se destina a la ventilación gravitacional, pero también como mirador de conexión a la Torre de Tokio. “Machiya” en Quioto y Kanazawa tienen “TSUBONIWA”, un patio muy pequeño donde el sol, el viento, y los árboles son invitados a comportarse de manera propia. El patio de “SPLIT MACHIYA” espera recibir no apenas esos comportamientos naturales, pero también los comportamientos humanos de una forma específica. Esta nueva “Machiya” no hace parar el fenómeno de híper-edificación en áreas residenciales, pero busca un excelente espacio urbano dentro del concepto de espacio urbano en Tokio.

PT

A nova geração “Machiya” (habitação tradicional urbana construída em madeira) está situada num terreno longo e estreito, em Tóquio. A propriedade era mais alta do que o nível da rua. A casa é dividida em dois volumes – o primeiro desenvolve-se em três andares acima do nível da rua, apoiado num murro de contenção; o segundo desenvolve-se em dois andares, a um nível mais elevado, com um pátio central de articulação entre os dois. Uma sucessão de aberturas nas paredes transversais de suporte da cobertura permite criar um eixo visual que atravessa o interior da casa, desde o volume recuado em direcção à rua. O ângulo da cobertura de duas águas é definido pela cota existente no limite Norte do terreno. A repetição de pilares e vigas aparentes introduz um ritmo próprio ao espaço interior. As paredes laterais menores (parede Norte-Sul) possuem acabamento com gesso projectado, folhas de cobre e duas escadas são inseridas para alterar a sequência. A casa de banho do lado da rua e a cozinha nos fundos trabalham juntas para completar a casa. O pátio é o centro da circulação com várias espécies de plantas e árvores, e um grande banco que liga os dois volumes definindo um corredor. A chaminé na cobertura destina-se a ventilação gravitacional, mas também como miradouro de ligação à Torre de Tóquio. “Machiya” em Quioto e Kanazawa possuem “TSUBONIWA”, um pátio muito pequeno onde o sol, o vento, e a árvore são convidados a comportar-se de maneira própria. O pátio da “SPLIT MACHIYA” espera receber não apenas esses comportamentos naturais, mas também os comportamentos humanos de uma forma específica. Esta nova “Machiya” não faz parar o fenómeno de híper-loteamento em áreas residenciais, mas procura um excelente espaço urbano dentro do conceito de espaço urbano em Tóquio.


ATELIER BOW-WOW

092


SPLIT MACHIYA

1:150

093

second floor plan

first floor plan

ground floor plan


ATELIER BOW-WOW

096


SPLIT MACHIYA

097


ATELIER BOW-WOW

��.

100

��. ��.

��. ��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

��. ��.

��.

��.

01. roof: asphalt layer speciallist underlay waterproof plywood rafter rigid insulation foam vapor permeable waterproof membrane structural plywood 02. wall: pluster pluster board puttied cheeselath plywood glass-wool

03. floor: lauan plywood bees wax finish structural plywood 04. kitchen wall: melamine laminate pluster board plywood 05. dormer window 06. interior wall: copper sheet plywood structural plywood 07. wall and ceiling:

wooden structure exposed bees wax finish 08. floor: lauan plywood needlepanched carpet structural plywood 09. ceiling: linden perforated plywood acrylic emulsion paint finish 10. floor: trowel mortar water-repellent paint finish (under-floor heating pipe embedded) rigid urethan foam

concrete 11. flashing 12. window: timber flame window double glazing 13. vegetation net 14. reinforced glass roof 15. big bench: steel pipe serangan batu deck 16. watchtower: lauan plywood t=9mm acrylic emulsion paint finish 17. stairs:

steel plate urethan paint finish 18. ceiling: elastic paint finish fiber-reinforced cement board 19. wall: fiberglass-reinforced plastic plywood 20. floor: trowel mortar urethan paint finish concrete 21. wall and ceiling: exposed concrete

22. eave: asphalt layer speciallist underlay plate steel plate urethan paint finsh 23. exterior wall: ceramic siding board t=14 acrylic resin paint finish vertical furring strips 45×21mm vapor permeable waterproof membrane structural plywood


SPLIT MACHIYA

��.

��.

101 ��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

��.


117

KATSUTOSHI SASAKI + ASSOCIATES

EN

What are the potentials, such as those hidden in time, locality, and environments? What will be left after removing the meanings they possess? We conduct “observations” from the viewpoints of both existence and absence. Architectural planning is the process to configure the words and notions that surface from various questionings. To transect unconsciousness in the light of deductive processes. To question in what condition architecture “exists” after beginning its operation. In other words, not to allow exclusions of realities in architecture. In that sense, we always have to consider architecture and communication. Communication in architecture means commencements of harmonious motions based on their on-going interdependences between factors such as: nature and architecture, location and architecture, architecture and people, and among people. Harmony exists outside the verbal world and thus cannot be verbalized. The “depth of harmony” that cannot be verbalized becomes one of the criticism standards in architecture. We intend to express the “depth of harmony” that is yet to be seen.

ES

¿Cuáles son los potenciales, tales como los elegidos en el tiempo, en el local, y en el ambiente? ¿Qué se dejará tras la remoción de los significados que poseen? Realizamos “observaciones” de los puntos de vista tanto de la existencia como de la ausencia. El plan arquitectónico es el proceso para configurar las palabras y nociones que surgen a partir de diversas interrogaciones. Romper transversalmente el inconsciente a la luz de los procesos deductivos. Cuestionar en que condición la arquitectura “existe” tras el inicio de su funcionamiento. Por otras palabras, no permitir exclusiones de realidades en arquitectura. En este sentido, tenemos siempre que considerar arquitectura y comunicación. Comunicación en arquitectura significa el inicio de movimientos harmoniosos con base en las interdependencias que transcurren de hechos como: naturaleza y arquitectura, ubicación y arquitectura, arquitectura y las personas, y entre personas. Harmonía existe fuera del mundo verbal y, por lo tanto, no puede ser verbalizada. La “profundidad de la harmonía” que no puede ser verbalizada se vuelve uno de los patrones críticos en arquitectura. Tenemos la intención de expresar la “profundidad de la harmonía” que aún se verá.

PT

Quais são os potenciais, tais como os escondidos no tempo, no local, e no ambiente? O que será deixado após a remoção dos significados que possuem? Realizamos “observações” dos pontos de vista tanto da existência como da ausência. O planeamento arquitectónico é o processo para configurar as palavras e noções que surgem a partir de diversas interrogações. Romper transversalmente o inconsciente à luz dos processos dedutivos. Questionar em que condição a arquitectura “existe” após o início do seu funcionamento. Noutras palavras, não permitir exclusões de realidades em arquitectura. Neste sentido, temos sempre de considerar arquitectura e comunicação. Comunicação em arquitectura significa o início de movimentos harmoniosos com base nas interdependências decorrentes entre factores como: natureza e arquitectura, localização e arquitectura, arquitectura e as pessoas, e entre pessoas. Harmonia existe fora do mundo verbal e, portanto, não pode ser verbalizada. A “profundidade da harmonia” que não pode ser verbalizada torna-se um dos padrões críticos em arquitectura. Temos a intenção de expressar a “profundidade da harmonia” que ainda está para ser vista.


KATSUTOSHI SASAKI


2010-2011 AMA HOUSE aichi . japan

141

EN

As the site is surrounded by rice fields, we planned “a small house” with an idyllic atmosphere and landscape. The entire volume of the house was first divided into individual rooms, then each concept was linked together taking into account factors such as the connection between garden and room, light entrance, ventilation, flow of daily activities, etc. Also, to meet the demand for a guest parking area and family garden, we laid out the rooms across the site to secure two exterior spaces. Each room has different volume, finish, and openings. These differences were made to enhance a deeper experience with elements by presenting more than one viewpoint on each element; for example, when the light enters from a wide opening, it gives you a different impression than a thin ray of light in a dark place. These elements can be trees in the garden, wind, internal openness, nuance of shadows, and communications between family members. When opening the door, these rooms become “one single room with connections”. Although, unlike a general single room, we cannot get a view of whole room, one room is visually connected with others, and also connected by air. Communication is prompted among the viewable rooms by the strong connection of visual element, and with the rooms out of sight by the senses other than vision. Subsequently, the light and wind streaming into a room, as well as the act and the signs of the family are transmitted to the adjacent rooms and extended beyond. The rooms expanded in the site functions as a house that isn’t isolated (functionally and spatially). The important thing is that the rooms are connected. The “connection” is formed by people and nature, and is not limited within the structure and the diagram of architecture. I think that architecture is something that acts as a supplement of the “connected air”.

ES

Siendo el local cercado por campos de arroz, planeamos “una pequeña casa” con atmósfera y paisaje idílicos. El volumen total de la casa fue inicialmente dividido en espacios individuales, donde cada uno de los conceptos fueron conectados teniendo en cuenta factores como la relación entre el jardín y el salón, entrada de luz, ventilación, el flujo de las actividades diarias, etc. Además, para atender la demanda de un área de aparcamiento para huéspedes y un jardín para la familia, distribuimos los compartimientos por el terreno de forma a garantizar dos espacios exteriores. Cada espacio se caracteriza por volumen, acabado y aberturas diferentes. Esas diferencias fueron creadas para permitir una experiencia más profunda con los elementos, presentando varios puntos de vista sobre cada uno de ellos, por ejemplo, cuando la luz entra por una amplia abertura, resulta en una impresión diferente de un fino rayo de luz en un local oscuro. Esos elementos pueden ser los árboles en el jardín, el viento, aberturas internas, matices de sombras y las comunicaciones entre los miembros de la familia. Al abrir la puerta de la entrada, estos compartimientos se vuelven “un único espacio con conexiones”. Al revés de un espacio único convencional, aunque este no permita la visión de todos los compartimientos, un compartimiento es visualmente conectado a otros, compartiendo también la conexión a través del aire. La comunicación es directa entre los espacios que tienen fuerte conexión visual, ya los espacios menos visibles están conectados por otros sentidos además de la visión. Posteriormente, la luz y el viento que penetran en un espacio, bien como las acciones y las señales de la familia son transmitidos para los compartimientos adyacentes, extendiéndose a los demás. Los compartimientos distribuidos por el terreno permiten que la casa no esté aislada, ya sea a nivel funcional o espacial. Lo importante es que los espacios estén conectados. La “conexión” está formada por las personas y por la naturaleza, no estando limitada por la estructura ni por el diagrama de la arquitectura. Consideramos que la arquitectura es algo que actúa como un suplemento del “aire de conexión”.

PT

Sendo o local cercado por campos de arroz, planeámos “uma pequena casa” com atmosfera e paisagem idílicas. O volume total da casa foi inicialmente dividido em espaços individuais, onde cada um dos conceitos foram interligados tendo em conta factores como a relação entre o jardim e a sala, entrada de luz, ventilação, o fluxo das actividades diárias, etc. Além disso, para atender a demanda de uma área de estacionamento para hóspedes e um jardim para a família, distribuímos os compartimentos pelo terreno de forma a garantir dois espaços exteriores. Cada espaço é caracterizado por volume, acabamento e aberturas diferentes. Essas diferenças foram criadas para permitir uma experiência mais profunda com os elementos, apresentando vários pontos de vista sobre cada um deles, por exemplo, quando a luz entra por uma ampla abertura, resulta numa impressão diferente do que um fino raio de luz num local escuro. Esses elementos podem ser as árvores no jardim, o vento, aberturas internas, nuances de sombras e as comunicações entre os membros da família. Ao abrir a porta de entrada, estes compartimentos tornam-se “um único espaço com conexões”. Ao contrário de um espaço único convencional, embora este não permita a visão de todos os compartimentos, um compartimento é visualmente ligado a outros, partilhando também a conexão através do ar. A comunicação é directa entre os espaços que possuem forte ligação visual, já os espaços menos visíveis estão ligados por outros sentidos além da visão. Posteriormente, a luz e o vento que penetram num espaço, bem como as acções e os sinais da família são transmitidos para os compartimentos adjacentes, estendendo-se aos restantes. Os compartimentos distribuídos pelo terreno permitem que a casa não esteja isolada, quer a nível funcional ou espacial. O importante é que os espaços estejam interligados. A “ligação” é formada pelas pessoas e pela natureza, não estando limitada pela estrutura nem pelo diagrama da arquitectura. Consideramos que a arquitectura é algo que actua como um suplemento do “ar de interligação”.


KATSUTOSHI SASAKI

142


AMA HOUSE

1:150

SW NE

143

SW NE

GROUND FLOOR PLAN


KATSUTOSHI SASAKI

146


AMA HOUSE

147

north-east section


KATSUTOSHI SASAKI

148


AMA HOUSE

149


KATSUTOSHI SASAKI


2010-2012 UNOU HOUSE toyota aichi . japan

153

EN

As for the site’s surroundings, a residence stands in a row in the North-and-South side, and the East-and-West side is a place where a comparatively good field of view. For this site which has good view, we used two “frames”. One is a vertical frame at the East. The other is a horizontal frame at West. The space consists of connecting the two frames. It’s a space horizontally opened while reducing height gradually and a space vertically opened while reducing a plan gradually. The “one room” is expanding vertically and horizontally. We have an idea that the residence should be a one room. However, the monotonous one room which can see the whole house feels in many cases that there are few choices of an air and a life. So we have made “one room” which can connect the family without seeing directly. This time, we proposed preparing “the boundary of air” connecting good fields of view in the East-and-West and gaining depth and density to the space. Concretely, we use wooden frame structure which is also used auxiliary as window or door frame. We think wooden frame structure itself takes a part of specifying space boundary. It is distinguished as somewhere else at the same time the space before and behind that is connected because there is a wooden frame. It is constituted as space with moderate tolerance.

ES

Cuanto a su localización, la vivienda se desarrolla de forma linear en la parte Norte-Sur, siendo que la parte Este-Oeste tienen un campo visual relativamente agradable. Para este terreno, que tiene buenas vistas, utilizamos dos “molduras”: una es una estructura vertical a Este; la otra es una estructura horizontal a Oeste. El espacio resulta de la conexión entre las dos estructuras. Es un espacio horizontalmente abierto, que se reduce de forma gradual, y un espacio verticalmente abierto, que también se reduce de esta forma. El “espacio único” está expandido vertical y horizontalmente. Consideramos que la vivienda debería ser un espacio único. No obstante, el espacio único y monótono donde se puede ver todo lo que nos hace sentir, en muchos casos, que existen pocas opciones de aire y vida. Entonces proyectamos “un espacio único”, que puede relacionar la familia sin que haiga una conexión visual directa. En este caso, nos propusimos a definir el “límite de aire” al conectar los buenos campos visuales a Este-Oeste de forma a ganar profundidad y densidad para el espacio. Utilizamos estructuras de madera que funcionan de forma auxiliar como puertas o ventanas. Consideramos que las estructuras de madera tienen un papel particular en la delimitación del espacio. Se distingue la entrada en un espacio diferente estando al mismo tiempo conectado al espacio anterior por la existencia de una abertura en una estructura de madera. Se constituye como espacio de tolerancia moderada.

PT

Quanto à sua localização, a habitação desenvolve-se de forma linear na parte Norte-Sul, sendo que a parte Este-Oeste tem um campo visual relativamente agradável. Para este terreno, que possui boas vistas, utilizámos duas “molduras”: uma é uma estrutura vertical a Este; a outra é uma estrutura horizontal a Oeste. O espaço resulta da ligação entre as duas estruturas. É um espaço horizontalmente aberto, que é reduzido de forma gradual, e um espaço verticalmente aberto, que é também reduzido de forma gradual. O “espaço único” é expandido vertical e horizontalmente. Considerámos que a habitação deveria ser um espaço único. No entanto, o espaço único e monótono onde se pode ver o todo faz sentir, em muitos casos, que existem poucas opções de ar e vida. Então projectámos “um espaço único”, que pode relacionar a família sem que haja uma ligação visual directa. Neste caso, propusemo-nos definir o “limite de ar” ao conectar os bons campos visuais a Este-Oeste de forma a ganhar profundidade e densidade para o espaço. Utilizámos estruturas de madeira que funcionam de forma auxiliar como portas ou janelas. Consideramos que as estruturas de madeira em si mesmas têm um papel particular na delimitação do espaço. Distingue-se a entrada num espaço diferente estando ao mesmo tempo ligado ao espaço anterior pela existência de uma abertura numa estrutura de madeira. Constitui-se como espaço de tolerância moderada.


KATSUTOSHI SASAKI

154


UNOU HOUSE

1:150 155

first floor plan

ground floor plan


KATSUTOSHI SASAKI

158


1:150

UNOU HOUSE

159

long section


KATSUTOSHI SASAKI

��.

160

��. ��. ��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

��.

��.


UNOU HOUSE

01. fascia board: red cedar + wood protective coating aeration furring strips moisture permeation trail tarp structural plywood 02. erave: spray painting calcium silicate board 03. handrail 04. FRP waterproofing floor 05. roof: galvanised stealseat (flat roofing) rubber-modified asphalt roofing structural plywood spray urethane foam

��.

��.

��.

06. spray painting top ceiling 07. upper floor: natural wood flooring + OS structural plywood 08. ceiling: beam structural plywood + OS 09. urethane resin paint handrail 10. ground floor: natural wood flooring + OS structural plywood styrofoam sleeper 90×90 11. foundation: mat foundation

leveling concrete polyethylene film broken stone 12. bent garvanised stealseat gutter 13. crushed stone 14. galvanized iron 15. rubber-modified asphalt roofing 16. structual plywood 17. red cedar + oil painting 18. ventilation furring 19. tarpaulin 20. cypress + oil painting 21. silica calcium board + spray painting

��. ��. ��.

��. ��. ��. ��.

��. ��. ��. ��.

161


163

IKIMONO ARCHITECTS

EN

Ikimono Architects is an architecture office in Tkasaki, Japan. The name is mixture of “a living thing” and “architecture”. We have been living as a part of miraculous, multiple and complex society of creatures that breaks if it loses one of those creatures. We think of architecture as a trigger to find a variety of things, from big things like universe and distant countries over the night sky, to smaller things like tiny raindrops and butterfly’s wings. We consider that architecture should allow us to feel the world that surrounds us.

ES

Ikimono Architects es un taller con sede en Tkasaki, Japón. El nombre del taller es una mezcla de “una cosa viva” y “arquitectura”. Consideran que vivimos como parte de una milagrosa, múltiple y compleja sociedad de criaturas que entra en desequilibrio si se pierde una de ellas. Piensan en arquitectura como un elemento motivador para encontrar una variedad de cosas, desde cosas grandes como universales y distantes países sobre el cielo nocturno, a pequeñas cosas como minúsculas gotas da lluvia y alas de mariposas. Consideran que la arquitectura debe permitirnos sentir el mundo que nos rodea.

PT

Ikimono Architects é um atelier sediado em Tkasaki, Japão. O nome do atelier á uma mistura de “ uma coisa viva” e “arquitectura”. Consideram que vivemos como parte de uma miraculosa, múltipla a complexa sociedade de criaturas que entra em desequilíbrio se perde uma dessas criaturas. Pensam a arquitectura como um elemento impulsionador para encontrar uma variedade de coisas, desde coisas grandes como universais e distantes países sobre o céu nocturno, a pequenas coisas como minúsculas gotas da chuva e asas de borboletas. Consideram que a arquitectura deve permitir-nos sentir o mundo que nos rodeia.


IKIMONO ARCHITECTS


2009-2011 STATIC QUARRY takasaki, gunma . japan

165

EN

The neighbor is one of the environments. We intended to make a building like a small city. Originally, the human being is a creature living in the crowd. Nevertheless it’s considered that most family types in present Japan are single life households. The individual keeps balance while going back and forth in a personal domain like the house and the state of the crowd like the society. Can the apartment (considering that there is society in the immediate neighbor of a personal domain) become city life in microcosm? In the tenement house of eight households, some holes become vacant like a stone pit. At floor level, where there are several contact points with the roof terrace, the outside is larger than the rooms and the inside and outside are complicated in a dwelling unit. The several outside spaces are exclusive to personal use, not having a clearly defined function. The outside is filled with elements of the private life, like furniture, light or plants. It’s as if these elements have clung to a lump of quiet concrete. We designed a courtyard where the window of each dwelling unit face, a place like a sanctuary, putting the collective space in the center of the building, establishing a distance to all dwelling units. The waterfall of rainy days, the whisper of leaves shaking in the wind, the upheaval of gravel, a natural change - these are the dynamic elements of internal and external relations, reflecting not only humans but the weather and season in the same scenery. Various people live daily in the mass of the building and the void of outdoor spaces, for we hope they enjoy each other’s presence like a natural phenomenon and, though the gap in the RC wall, we want that presence to melt around. The void for the central courtyard excavated from the concrete mass allows this space to be perceived from the outside neighbors. Each void possesses electricity and running water for exclusive use. There is also space to park a car, facing the car as an expansion element to the function of the house in the existence of a future Smart-Grid. We chose to use wall-type RC for acoustic concerns regarding sound transmission and vibrations to the floor slab and also to avoid mixing eye sights

ES

El barrio es uno de los ambientes. Pretendíamos hacer un edificio como una pequeña ciudad. Originalmente, el ser humano es una criatura que vive en colectividad. No obstante, se considera que la mayoría de las tipologías familiares en Japón en los días de hoy está compuesta por apenas una persona, que vive sola, independiente. La persona mantiene el equilibrio deambulando hacia atrás y hacia adelante entre un dominio personal como la casa y un dominio colectivo como la sociedad. ¿Puede el apartamento (considerando que existe una sociedad en el vecino más próximo del dominio personal), transformar la vida citadina en un microcosmos? En el piso donde viven ocho familias, un conjunto de vacios crea una especie de pozo de piedra. En la planta terrea, donde se crean puntos de contacto con las terrazas de la cobertura, el espacio exterior es más ancho que los compartimientos, existiendo una compleja dinámica de relación entre interior y exterior. Los inúmeros espacios exteriores son espacios exclusivos de apropiación personal, no teniendo una función claramente definida. El exterior es rellenado con elementos de la vida privada, como muebles, iluminación, o plantas. Es como si estos elementos se agarrasen a un bloque de hormigón. Dibujamos un patio sobre el cual se vuelcan las ventanas de cada vivienda como si fuese un santuario, colocando el espacio colectivo en el centro del edificio, garantizando algún distanciamiento de las viviendas. El caer del agua en los días de lluvia, el susurro de las hojas de los árboles al viento, el agitar de la grava, el cambio de la naturaleza – estos son los elementos dinámicos de las relaciones entre interiorexterior, reflejando las personas pero también el tiempo y las estaciones del año en el mismo escenario. Diferentes personas viven diariamente entre el edificio y el vacio de los espacios exteriores, por lo que esperamos que disfruten de la presencia de todos como un fenómeno natural y, a través de la luz en la pared estructural de hormigón, pretendemos que esa presencia se diluya en el espacio. El vacio del patio central escavado en el hormigón permite que el ambiente de este espacio sea percibido por los vecinos

PT

O bairro é um dos ambientes. Pretendíamos fazer um edifício como uma pequena cidade. Originalmente, o ser humano é uma criatura que vive em colectividade. No entanto, considera-se que a maioria das tipologias familiares no Japão dos dias de hoje é composta por apenas uma pessoa, que vive sozinha, independente. A pessoa mantém o equilíbrio deambulando para trás e para a frente entre um domínio pessoal como a casa e um domínio colectivo como a sociedade. Pode o apartamento (considerando que existe uma sociedade no vizinho mais próximo do domínio pessoal), transformar a vida citadina num microcosmos? No prédio onde vivem oito famílias, um conjunto de vazios cria uma espécie de poço de pedra. No piso térreo, onde se criam pontos de contacto com os terraços da cobertura, o espaço exterior é mais largo do que os compartimentos, existindo uma complexa dinâmica de relação entre interior e exterior. Os inúmeros espaços exteriores são espaços exclusivos de apropriação pessoal, não tendo uma função claramente definida. O exterior é preenchido com elementos da vida privada, como mobiliário, iluminação, ou plantas. É como se estes elementos se agarrassem a um bloco de betão. Desenhámos um pátio sobre o qual se viram as janelas de cada unidade de habitação como se fosse um santuário, colocando o espaço colectivo no centro do edifício, garantindo um certo distanciamento das habitações. O cair da água nos dias de chuva, o sussurro das folhas das árvores ao vento, o agitar da gravilha, a mudança da natureza – estes são os elementos dinâmicos das relações entre interior-exterior, reflectindo não só as pessoas mas também o tempo e as estações do ano num mesmo cenário. Diferentes pessoas vivem diariamente entre o maciço do edifício e o vazio dos espaços exteriores, pelo que esperamos que disfrutem da presença uns dos outros como um fenómeno natural e, através do vão na parede estrutural de betão, pretendemos que essa presença se dilua no espaço. O vazio do pátio central escavado no maciço de betão permite que o ambiente deste espaço seja percebido pela vizinhança no exterior. Cada vazio possui electricidade e abastecimento


IKIMONO ARCHITECTS

between the dwelling units. We chose the white strong beat in both inside and outside, so it becomes a natural phenomenon and the background for the signs of life.

166

en el exterior. Cada vacio tiene electricidad y suministro de agua para uso exclusivo de cada vivienda. Existe espacio para aparcamiento de vehículos, encarando el coche como elemento de expansión del funcionamiento de la vivienda en la existencia de una futura Smart-Grid. Elegimos utilizar paredes estructurales de hormigón armado por cuestiones acústicas de transmisión sonora y de vibraciones a través de la losa y para evitar el cruce de miradas entre las diferentes viviendas. Optamos por una fuerte utilización del blanco tanto en el exterior como en el interior, de forma a volverse un fenómeno natural y el escenario para las señales de la vida.

de água para uso exclusivo de cada unidade de habitação. Existe espaço para estacionamento de viaturas, encarando o carro como elemento de expansão do funcionamento da habitação na existência de uma futura Smart-Grid. Escolhemos utilizar paredes estruturais de betão armado por questões acústicas de transmissão sonora e de vibrações através da laje e para evitar o cruzamento de olhares entre as diferentes habitações. Optámos por uma forte utilização do branco tanto no exterior como no interior, de forma a tornar-se um fenómeno natural e o cenário para os sinais da vida.


STATIC QUARRY

167

roof top plan


IKIMONO ARCHITECTS

170


STATIC QUARRY

171

north courtyard

east-west section


175

D.I.G. ARCHITECTS

EN

D.I.G Architects is an architecture office based in Nagoya-city in Japan. It’s a small office, composed only by a few people and led by Akinori Yoshimura and Maki Yoshimura, with projects built from the dialog between the two lead architects. They usually start a project with finding subtle characteristic elements of the site or the clients’ demands, and so on. The initial trigger doesn’t have to be something big. Unique elements like, for instance, a hard cliff, a very narrow site, or an extremely low cost budget. We think those elements aren’t negative situations, but necessary condition for the creative work. In most cases, those conditions are based on the natural environment or urban structure. To these architects, the most exciting part of the design exists in the moment that the subtle uniqueness turns into drastic form of space. This is the context-oriented way of D.I.G Architects.

ES

D.I.G. Architects es un taller con sede en Nagoya, Japón. Se trata de un taller muy pequeño con pocas personas, liderado por Akinori Yoshimura y Maki Yoshimura, siendo los proyectos construidos a partir del dialogo entre los dos. Generalmente inician un trabajo con la busca de los elementos característicos y sutiles del local o de las exigencias de los clientes y otras cosas más. El elemento de arranque del proyecto no tiene que ser algo grande, pueden ser elementos únicos como, por ejemplo, un empinado peñasco, un terreno particularmente estrecho, o un presupuesto extremadamente apretado, etc. Se considera que esos elementos no son situaciones negativas, pero condición necesaria para el trabajo creativo. En la mayoría de los casos, las referidas condiciones son basadas en el ambiente natural o en la estructura urbana. Para estos arquitectos, la parte más interesante del proyecto existe en el momento en que la sutil singularidad se transforma en forma drástica de espacio. Esta es la metodología orientada para el contexto de D.I.G Architects.

PT

D.I.G. Architects é um atelier sediado em Nagoya, no Japão. Trata-se de um atelier muito pequeno e composto por poucas pessoas, liderado por Akinori Yoshimura e Maki Yoshimura, sendo os projectos construídos a partir do diálogo entre os dois. Geralmente iniciam um trabalho com a procura dos elementos característicos e subtis do local ou das exigências dos clientes e assim por diante. O elemento impulsionador do projecto não tem que ser algo grande. Elementos únicos como, por exemplo, um íngreme penhasco, um terreno particularmente estreito, ou um orçamento extremamente apertado, etc. Considera-se que esses elementos não são situações negativas, mas condição necessária para o trabalho criativo. Na maioria dos casos, as referidas condições são baseadas no ambiente natural ou na estrutura urbana. Para estes arquitectos, a parte mais interessante do projecto existe no momento em que a subtil singularidade se transforma em forma drástica de espaço. Este é a metodologia orientada para o contexto do atelier D.I.G Architects.


D.I.G ARCHITECTS


2011 K HOUSE nisshin, aichi . japan

177

EN

A small house located on a steep slanting slope. The client simply wanted a life with a blessing of nature nearby and the beautiful townscape in the distance. Left only with an extremely narrow flat area, which is barely enough for a car, the site was steeply sloped down, almost like a cliff. First, we had the idea to excavate the ground in order to create a living space. Corresponding to nature’s forms, heterogeneous and flexible space would retrieve the site’s enchantment. Not a house constructed on a cliff, but a habitat generated by the natural form of the cliff. A habitat like a pit or a shed posteriorly discovered in the terrains of the landscape. So, we dug the earth to make the “floor”. Then, a “sail” was set on that dent. The structural image of the generation of this “sail” is that the closed and self-contained systems, like a polyhedron or a sphere, came down to the site and were spread through anchoring to the earth. Now, we have a certain volume on a steeply slanting surface wrapped with a pitted earth and the sail-like tent on top. Then, we put a flat and straight deck bridging the vacant space. There’s no function assigned to this deck for the moment. However, it may allow moments in the life, surrounded and protected by the earth, where you may need a place detached from the ground. There are no partitions dividing the space, but some level differences between the deck and the pit that generate characteristics for the empty space. The uses aren’t regulated except for the bathroom. You think how to use the space while in use, through the direct feelings to your body.

ES

Una pequeña casa situada en una encuesta empinada. El cliente quería simplemente una vida con la bendición de la naturaleza envolvente y el bello paisaje urbano a distancia. Con apenas una zona plana muy estrecha, prácticamente suficiente para un coche, el terreno con un declive muy empinado, casi como un peñasco. Primero, tuvimos la idea de escavar el suelo para crear un espacio de estar. Correspondiendo a las formas de la naturaleza, un espacio heterogéneo y flexible recuperaría el encanto del terreno. No una casa construida en un peñasco, pero un hábitat generado por la forma natural de este. Un hábitat como un pozo o un pequeño pabellón posteriormente descubierto en los terrenos del paisaje. Así, escavamos el terreno para hacer el “piso”. En seguida, una “vela” fue erguida sobre este piso. La imagen estructural de la concepción de esta “vela” se basa en sistemas cerrados y autosuficientes, como un poliedro o una esfera, que posan sobre el local y se expanden a través del anclaje a la tierra. Ahora tenemos un volumen en una superficie abruptamente inclinada, envuelto por el terreno y una tienda tipo vela como cobertura. Entonces, colocamos una plataforma plana y recta colmatando el espacio libre. No hay ninguna función atribuida a esta plataforma hasta el momento. Pero esta puede permitir momentos en la vida, además de la cerca y protección de la tierra, en que necesite de un espacio que se destaque del suelo. No hay compartimientos dividiendo el espacio, pero sin diferencias de nivel entre la plataforma y el pavimento que generan características para el espacio libre. Los usos no son reglamentados, excepto el bañero. Se piensa como usar los espacios mientras estos están en uso, a través del sentimiento directo con su cuerpo.

PT

Uma pequena casa situada numa encosta íngreme. O cliente queria simplesmente uma vida com a bênção da natureza envolvente e a bela paisagem urbana à distância. Com apenas uma zona plana muito estreita, praticamente suficiente para um carro, o terreno possuía um declive muito íngreme, quase como um penhasco. Primeiro, tivemos a ideia de escavar o solo para criar um espaço de estar. Correspondendo às formas da natureza, um espaço heterogéneo e flexível recuperaria o encanto do terreno. Não uma casa construída num penhasco, mas um habitat gerado pela forma natural do penhasco. Um habitat como um poço ou um pequeno pavilhão posteriormente descoberto nos terrenos da paisagem. Assim, escavámos o terreno para fazer o “pavimento”. Em seguida, uma “vela” foi erguida sobre este pavimento. A imagem estrutural da concepção desta “vela” assenta em sistemas fechados e auto-suficientes, como um poliedro ou uma esfera, que pousam sobre o local e se expandem através da ancoragem à terra. Agora temos um volume numa superfície abruptamente inclinada, envolto pelo terreno e uma tenda tipo vela como cobertura. Então, colocamos uma plataforma plana e recta a colmatar o espaço livre. Não há nenhuma função atribuída a esta plataforma até o momento. Mas esta pode permitir momentos na vida, para além do cerco e protecção da terra, em que precise de um espaço que se destaque do chão. Não há compartimentações a dividir o espaço, mas sim diferenças de nível entre a plataforma e o pavimento que geram características para o espaço livre. Os usos não são regulamentados, excepto a casa de banho. Pensa-se como usar os espaços enquanto estes estão em uso, através do sentimento directo para com o seu corpo.


D.I.G ARCHITECTS

178


K HOUSE

179

ground flor plan

-1 lower plan


D.I.G ARCHITECTS

182

��. 01. Roof: Galvanized steel sheet asphalt roofing plywood urethane insulation form st-C rafter 100x50 02. ceilling: Plaster board emulsion paint 03. floor: plywood 04. wall: plywood 05. floor: red cedar 06. insulation board 07. floor: chestnut flooring

��.

��.

��.

��. ��.

��.

��. ��.


K HOUSE

183


image credits

184 COVER IMAGE Shinichi Ogawa & Associates MINIMALIST HOUSE © Shinichi Ogawa & associates INDEX IMAGE Atelier Bow-Wow IZU BOOK CAFÉ pg. 001 © Atelier Bow-Wow SHINICHI OGAWA & ASSOCIATES pg. 022, 023 © Hiroshi Kai pg. 030 © Toshiyuki Yano pg. 035, 038, 040 © Shigeo Ogawa pg. 047, 055 © Satoshi Shigeta pg. 056, 058 © Soichi Fukaya pg. 006, 008, 010, 013, 014, 017, 018, 021, 024, 026, 029, 032, 035, 043, 044, 048, 051, 052, 060, 062, 065 © Shinichi Ogawa & Associates ATELIER BOW-WOW pg. 066, 068, 070, 072, 074, 075, 076, 080, 082, 084, 086, 089, 090, 092, 094, 096, 097, 098, 102, 106, 108, 109, 110, 112 © Atelier Bow-Wow KATSUTOSHI SASAKI + ASSOCIATES pg. 118, 120, 122, 124, 125, 128, 130, 132, 135, 136, 137, 140, 142, 145, 146, 148, 149, 150, 151 © Toshiyuki Yano pg. 016, 152, 154, 156, 158 © katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates IKIMONO ARCHITECTS pg. 162, 164, 166, 170 © Ikimono Architects D.I.G ARCHITECTS pg. 174 © D.I.G Architects pg. 176, 178, 180, 183 © Tomohiro Sakashita ARCHITECTS PROFILE pg. 185 1. © Shinichi Ogawa & associates 2/3. © Atelier Bow-Wow 4. © katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates 5. © Ikimono Architects 6/7. © D.I.G Architects


shinichi ogawa & associates 1. Shinichi Ogawa 1955 Born in Yamaguchi, Japan 1978 Received B.F.A from Nihon University, College of Arts 1977 Awarded Exchange Student Scholarship Washington State University 1984 Awarded Japanese Goverment Fellowship to study abroad / New York 1984 Paul Rudolph office(New York) 1985 Arquitectonica(New York) 1986 Established Shinichi Ogawa & Associates 2008 - Professor , Kinki University School of Engineering Lecturer,Nihon University College of Art Visiting Professor,Edinburgh College of Art.School of Architecture. / U.K

1.

185

atelier bow-wow 2. Yoshiharu Tsukamoto Associate professor of Tokyo Institute of Technology, Dr.Eng. 1987 Graduate from Tokyo Institute of Technology 1987-88 Guest Student of L’ecole d’architecture, Paris, Bellville (U.P.8). 1992 Established Atelier Bow-Wow with Momoyo Kaijima in Tokyo 1994 Graduate from Post-graduate school of Tokyo Institute of Technology 2000- Associate professor of Tokyo Institute of Technology 2003, 07 Visiting faculty of Harvard GSD 2007, 08 Visiting associate professor of UCLA 2011-2012 Visiting professor of Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Architecture School 2011 Visiting professor of Barcelona Institute of Architecture

3. Momoyo Kaijima Associate professor of University of Tsukuba, M.Eng. 1991 Graduate from Japan Women’s University 1992 Established Atelier Bow-Wow with Yoshiharu Tsukamoto 1994 Graduate from Graduate school of Tokyo Institute of Technology 1996-97 Guest student of E.T.H 1999 Graduate from Post-graduate school of Tokyo Institute of Technology 2000-09 Assistant professor of University of Tsukuba 2003 Visiting faculty of Harvard GSD 2005-07 Visiting professor of E.T.H.Zurich 2009- Associate professor of University of Tsukuba 2011-2012 Visiting Professor of Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Architecture School

2.

3.

katsutoshi sasaki + associates 4. Katsutoshi Sasaki 1976 Born in Toyota-shi Aichi , Japan. 1999 Graduated from Kinki University. 2008 Established Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates .

4.

ikimono architects 5. Takashi Fujino 1975.12 Born in Gunma, Japan 1994.03 Graduated from Takasaki High school 1998.03 Graduated from Department of Architecture, Tohoku University 2000.03 Completed the Master Course of Architecture, Tohoku University 2000.04 Worked at SHIMIZU Corporation

2001.10 Worked at HARYU WOOD STUDIO 2006.01 Established IKIMONO ARCHITECTS 2009.10 Established IKUBYOBAKO 2012- Lecture at Tohoku University 2012- Lecture at Maebashi Institute of Technology

5.

d.i.g architects 6. Akinori Yoshimura 1975 Born in Aichi, Japan 2000 Graduated from Master course of Graduate school of Science and engineering, Waseda University 2000-2004 Ryoji Suzuki Architectural office 2005 Established D.I.G Architects Licensed architect

7. Maki Yoshimura 1975 Born in Tokyo, Japan 2000 Graduated from Master course of Graduate school of Science and engineering, Waseda University 2000-2004 FOBA architectural office 2005 Established D.I.G Architects Licensed architect

6.

7.


A.MAG subscriptions SUBSCRIBE A.MAG ONLINE AT WWW.ADOTMAG.COM AND RECEIVE 5 ISSUES AT THE COVER PRICE OF 4!

186 A.MAG XS A pocket selection carefully made from the contents of AMAG full edition. Portable and shipper, is the perfect format to an easy read and the right company to trip. 160x210mm 100 pages quarterly english and portuguese newsstands and bookstores 7.90€ pt.es 14.90€ europe 19.90€ world * A.MAG xs 01

A.MAG xs 02

A.MAG Full edition monograph book, made to last and keep at office or private library. A whim that every architects desire to achieve. 240x320mm 200 pages quarterly english, spanish and portuguese technical and specialized bookstores 20€ pt.es 30€ europe 40€ world *

A.MAG 01 OUT OF STOCK!

A.MAG 02

PROCEED THE PAYPAL PROCESS AND SEND US AN E-MAIL WITH THE BANKPROOF ORDER TO SUBSCRIPTIONS@ADOTMAG.COM CONFIRMING YOUR DELIVERY ADDRESS AND FIRST ISSUE * (price my vary per country) NUMBER.


A.MAG app Carefully developed to the Ipad format, regarding to maintain the same minimal and singular graphic identity of the paper format, taking advantage of the digital capabilities to share audio and video contents. Presents in every issue all the contents of the paper format of the full magazine, with additional contents that may vary between videos, interviews, images and new projects.

A.MAG app �� ADDITIONAL CONTENTS: AIRES MATEUS LECTURE AND PROJECT IMAGES QUARTERLY ENGLISH, SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE AVAILABLE AT APPLE STORE �.��€ (PROMO PRICE) A.MAG app ��

A.MAG app �� ADDITIONAL CONTENTS: NEW PROJECTS AND IMAGES QUARTERLY ENGLISH, SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE SOON AVAILABLE AT APPLE STORE A.MAG app �� COMING SOON!



A.MAG 03 online content selection