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SUMMER 2019

UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA

THE

FACULTY OF PHARMACY AND PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES

the

Pharmer’s almanac A FORECAST FOR PHARMACY AND PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES

WEATHER OUTLOOK

GARDENING TIPS FOR GRADS

GROWING RURAL HEALTH CARE

HOMECOMING SEASON


ASPIRING TO NEW HEIGHTS

With your support, the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences continues to reach new heights and educate out-of-this-world pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists. To learn more about giving opportunities, please visit uab.ca/givetopharm or call 780-492-8084.


Dean: Dr. Neal M. Davies Assistant Dean, Advancement: Kieran Andrew MacIsaac Editor: Kalyna Hennig Editorial Assistant: Courtney Bettin Contributors: Courtney Bettin Julia Brown Photography Al Buterol Dr. Neal M. Davies Dr. Michael Doschak Rex Filler Kalyna Hennig Dr. Afsaneh Lavasanifar Dr. Raimar Loebenberg Kieran Andrew MacIsaac Brendan Middel Jyllian Park Dr. Arno Siraki Dr. Vijay Somayaji Design/Illustration: Curio Studio Editor’s Note: Pharmacy and the pharmaceutical sciences are a fertile field of opportunities to advance health care, diversify the economy, and, most importantly, save lives. In this eighth issue, let us paint a picture of both the historic roots and new growth that the Faculty has been a part of over the years and show our gratitude for the fertilizer that our alumni, students, staff, and faculty have been for this industry. The Mortar & Pestle is published twice per year to keep our community of alumni, students, and faculty connected and informed. As always, we welcome your comments, suggestions, and story pitches to guide future issues. phcomms@ualberta.ca ualberta.ca/pharmacy facebook.com/ualbertapharmacy @ualberta_pharmacy @UAlberta_Pharm

Contents 4

Dean’s Distillate

FEATURES

NEWS & NOTES 8

20 The Pharmer’s Almanac: A Forecast for Pharmaceutical Sciences by Region

New Book puts Patients at the Centre

10 Pharmer’s Word Search

Local pharmers weigh in on the future

11 Floating Pharmacy Alumna Sandy Hewitt journeys abroad as a pharmacist for Mercy Ships.

to students and better Alberta’s rural health care.

14 Gardening Tips for Grads 15 International Pharmaceuticals Assistant Dean International, Dr. Michael Doschak, reports on his trip to the inaugural Chiba-Alberta Symposium on Pharmaceutics in Japan.

modern medicine could be growing in your backyard?

33 Oh Canada! The Order of Canada is our country’s

17 The Vitality of Drug Discovery Dr. Vishwa Somayaji’s Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometer Facility is the university’s backbone for drug discovery.

highest honour, and three of our alumni have achieved it.

36 A Touch of Class The history of Class Gifts in our faculty

18 In-House Healing

began with the Class of 1955.

Dr. Kevin Morin combines pharmaceutical sciences and psychiatry to better patient outcomes.

her research.

Do you know which plants used in

30 The Pasutto Period

IN THE MORTAR

confidence in prescribing through

26 Backyard Pharmacy

LOOKING BACK

16 AFPC Conference 2019

working to grow pharmacy student

24 Growing Rural Health Care Alumnus Jerry Saik’s work to give back

SPOTLIGHT

Grad student, Cassandra Woit, is

forecast about regions like drug delivery, pharmacokinetics, and more.

13 Remembering Robert Dowling

19 Prescribing Student Success

of their disciplines in this long-range

FAST FACTS 38 Golden Graduates The Class of 1969 celebrates 50 years of pharmacy.

39 Hey Jude-y The Beatles aren’t the only ones that sing the praises of Hey Jude(y).

linkedin.com/school/ualberta-pharmacy THE MORTAR & PESTLE | ualberta.ca/pharmacy

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DEAN'S DISTILLATE

Dean’s Distillate

I

BEGAN MY DEANSHIP with confidence and conviction in our

progress requires relationship building, connecting, and communicating

collective capacity. During the History Book Tour for alumni

effectively. I have witnessed how much can be achieved when the

this past year, I told the stories of our heritage of achievement

collective will is in place and we band together. The culmination of hard

and reaffirmed our commitment to move our Faculty onward. We have

work, determination, and a united commitment is gratifying and, rest

grasped the torch which has passed from those who have left their legacy

assured, we have been achieving our goals and should be proud of our

and will further ascend this Faculty in proficiency and excellence.

barn raisings.

In a short span of time we have made strides in facility improvements,

No progress can occur without change. Our reality is that the status

rejuvenated research innovation and infrastructure, as well as

quo is never an option, nor has it ever been. Since 1914, the Faculty

professional pedagogy. My predecessors have all upheld the

has adapted, evolved, and advanced in pharmacy and pharmaceutical

responsibilities of our vision, mission, and values: academic excellence,

sciences through embracing and incorporating change. This is a fact

stimulating the research enterprise, and refining and developing

of life and an integral part of our daily routine. It’s a doctrine that has

programs. Leading the drive for innovation and improvement in more

guided our Faculty throughout its antiquity. Our almanacs show that

personal, relationship-based areas is crucial to our continued success.

there were challenges peppered throughout our history and yet

This includes things such as equity, diversity, inclusion, Truth and

wholesale curricular upgrades were still made. To that end, the

Reconciliation, the respectful workplace, an award winning student

Faculty launched campaigns for endowments, scholarships, and

experience (p. 8), professionalism, alumni relations, fundraising, and

infrastructure that we now have. Our drive remains alive and our

community service and engagement. Everywhere I turn the response has

goals still clearly in focus. At the end of the day, we are a first-class

been that our alumni, donors, industry, students, and other academics

educational program and a place where the next generation of

are engaging us because of our leadership, ideas, concepts, and drive

pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists receive state-of-the-art

forward. As a pharmacy educator, I have learned that making significant

training and emerge ready to lead our communities.

4

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | FALL 2019


DEAN'S DISTILLATE

The role of Dean of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at this

Once again, I would offer my gratitude to all of you for your role as

University of Alberta is indeed a stimulating enterprise. I cherish it daily.

advocates. Your germinating and resolute support is invigorating and

I wish only the best for our world-class Faculty and its incomparable

underscores the veneration it is to serve you. As Dean I am constantly

people, and alumni [see stories of the Floating Pharmacy, Growing

developing my abilities to build our team, learn, communicate

Rural Health Care, and In-House Healing (p. 11, 24, 18)]. I continue to

effectively, inspire and understand others, and refine institutional pride

look forward to travelling on this journey with you, and I thank all of

and engagement in our alma mater.

you for your support and engagement at the Faculty. I carry my duties with no small amount of alumni pride as I am continually awestruck

A new era of weeds, droughts, hail, locusts, and significant change

at the strides we continue to make. We are a championship team (like

lie ahead, but I am confident we will rise to the occasion again. Our

the Raptors!). This nexus not only describes our common educational

prospective achievements will stand as a commendation to those who

experience but our profession. It also describes the way we are trained

came before us.

and what we believe. It represents the conviction that our Faculty works optimally when we accept certain duties to assist one another and to

Thank you for having me as your Dean.

future generations of our graduates. When we realize that our future is dependent on the training of new generations, then we take an oath to our future as a calling to be the chamberlains of the next chapter in our evolution. NEAL M DAVIES BSc(Pharm), Ph.D., R.Ph. Dean and Professor

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | ualberta.ca/pharmacy

5


NEWS & NOTES

news & notes

DAY

NOTABLE DAYS FOR 2019-20 ACADEMIC YEAR MONTH

TIME

NOTABILITY

LOCATION

DETAILS

3

September

Varies

Back to School

University of Alberta

Classes begin for pharmacy students

13

September

4PM - 6:30PM

Welcome Back TGIF

Katz Atrium 1st Floor, Katz Group Centre for Pharmacy Research

Free pizza, wings, and $5 dollar drinks

19

September

6PM - 9PM

White Coat & Awards Ceremony

Shaw Conference Centre, tickets available soon

Class of 2023 joins the profession as they enter into their pharmacy education, Outstanding Pharmacy Alumnus Award presented

20-22

September

Varies

Alumni Weekend

University of Alberta

Campus-wide celebration attended by alumni

21

September

11AM - 3PM

The History Book Tour Finale at Alumni Weekend

University of Alberta, Medical Sciences Building 2-35

Join your fellow alumni for food, libations, tours of the faculty, and the finale to the History Book Tour

20

November

3PM

Fall Convocation

Northern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium

Includes BSc Pharm, PharmD, Masters, PhD students; tickets required

28

November

8AM - 4PM

Research Day

University of Alberta

Celebration of pharmacy research

1-31

March

Throughout

Pharmacist Awareness Month

Canada-wide

Celebration of what pharmacists do for health care

TBA

June

TBA

Spring Convocation

Northern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium

Class of 2020 convocates from pharmacy; tickets required

September 2 0 1 9 THE NINTH MONTH HATH 30 DAYS, MANY FILLED WITH SPECIAL EVENTS AND NOTABLE OCCURRENCES.

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THE MORTAR & PESTLE | FALL 2019

2019 FLU PHASES

SEPTEMBER 2019 GARDENING TIPS

Influenza season is coming! This contagious

Harvest. Return to the roots and gather.

respiratory disease is caused by a virus and

Clean, organize, and winterize as needed.

affects the nose, throat, and lungs. It most commonly affects Canadians during the

HOMECOMING

winter, typically from fall to early spring.

The University of Alberta’s first degrees

Did you know that in 2018 more than half

were awarded in 1912, and in just two years

of all flu vaccines in Alberta were administered

an association for Alumni was drafted. Over

by a pharmacist? Make sure you get the flu

100 years later, the season of familiarity and

vaccine as soon as it’s available!

nostalgia arrives this September. Alumni Weekend 2019 will return its patrons to their


NEWS & NOTES roots from September 20th to 22nd, with a special Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

WEATHER OUTLOOK

Annually, we achieve blizzard status, and our

S

many back-to-school events and activities will

Pharmaceutical Sciences is tight-knit, where

evere Storm Warning Season — Environment Canada advises citizens considering travel to their alma mater to devise an emergency plan in advance of their departure. Blizzard season can run from the beginning of September to the end of May.

students, alumni, and industry have a strong

Each September the Faculty of Pharmacy and

more notable days. This perfect storm of events

sense of team collaboration. In this ecosystem

Pharmaceutical Sciences enters into the start

would never happen were it not for our alumni,

the alumni network is an asset. It’s part of the

of a new academic year. We have a week of

students, donors, colleagues, and friends.

nutrients that nourish the Faculty, keeping

welcome and a flying, flurrying, perennial start

We stage many events, but they will not have

it current, responsive, and forward-looking.

accompanied by a couple months of a squall

meaning or purpose without participation. So

It makes the Faculty a home for learning,

white-out that doesn’t stop.

remember, everyone is invited to everything. 

Homecoming scheduled for September 21st. With a cohort of alumni that are tremendously engaged both in revisiting their old stomping grounds and discovering everything that is new about today’s facilities and innovations, the word homecoming rings true. The Faculty of Pharmacy and

disappear like the proverbial tempest, seeding our academic year. As the leaves start changing colour and the winter approaches we look forward to maintaining this great momentum. It is our aspiration that you join us and enjoy this September at Homecoming, the White Coat and Awards Ceremony, Convocation, and

research, and community service. Through Homecoming and other efforts, the Faculty ecosystem builds a sense of awareness and community that goes far beyond just gathering with friends. It’s all part of building and strengthening our collective bonds to foster the growth of the club ties that make this troupe so remarkable and rare and creating a healthier future for the world. Dean, Dr. Neal Davies, says this season of homecoming is his favourite. “I look forward to further building, strengthening, and enhancing the relationships we have. It is my hope that all alumni will look back fondly to this place — our place — and that when you think of the Faculty, you will think of a warm and welcoming learning and social environment, a place we hope you will always consider as something that is yours,” says Dr. Davies. Please join us on September 21st, 2019 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. for the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences special Alumni Weekend event: The Indispensable History Finale. This event marks the final stop on the History Book Tour for Dr. Davies’ The Indispensable History of the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences 1914-2018, and you’re invited to celebrate over lunch, libations, tours of the faculty facilities, and a final presentation! Invitations coming soon.

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | ualberta.ca/pharmacy

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NEWS & NOTES

AWARD-WINNING STUDENTS

Jessica Buhler (BSc Pharm 2019) received the Canadian Pharmacists Association Centennial Leadership Award. She was chosen from pharmacy student applicants across the country. Cassandra Cooper (PharmD 2019) is the second pharmacy student in the Faculty’s history to receive the Alberta Premier’s Silver Medal for attaining the highest academic standing throughout her undergraduate degree of all students in the Faculties of Law, Medicine and Dentistry, and Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Cooper also received the ACP Gold Medal for attaining the highest GPA in her graduating class (pictured left). Dillon Lee (PharmD 2020) received the ACP Leadership Development Award this spring for her professionalism, leadership, and citizenship as a student. Graduate Students Ahmed Darwesh Essa (MSc Pharm Sci 2015) and Sherif Shoeib (MSc Pharm Sci 2015) won the Alberta Innovates Award this year for their work as PhD candidates. Darwesh Essa’s focus is on providing new insights into the therapeutic potential of the novel epoxylipids of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids to improve cardiac function following ischemic injury by enhancing mitochondrial quality, with an overall goal of identifying new therapeutic strategies that limit cardiac injury after ischemic events. Shoeib’s research goal is to identify small molecules

CASSANDRA COOPER ADDRESSES HER FELLOW GRADUATES AT THE 2019 ACP BRUNCH AFTER RECEIVING THE ACP GOLD MEDAL.

New Book puts Patients at the Centre

that can be used for the treatment of heart failure, a condition that has few treatment options and may ultimately progress to sudden cardiac death. 

ALBERTA PHARMACISTS ARE playing a greater role in health care

professors from the Faculty — the book highlights the fundamentals of

than ever before, and Clinical Associate Professor Dr. Sherif Mahmoud

assessment for any practice setting and delves into more specialized

(PhD 2010) believes that making correct and confident decisions during

topics like infectious diseases and anemia. While other resources on the

patient assessment is key to providing great patient care. Implementing

topic exist, Dr. Mahmoud says his book is a place where practitioners

a patient care process is an invaluable skill for all pharmacists and is

can find all of the most current information in one place.

the inspiration behind Dr. Mahmoud’s new book, Patient Assessment in Clinical Pharmacy. “As medication experts, pharmacists’ interventions in patient care have been shown to improve patient outcomes and reduce health care costs in various practice settings,” says Dr. Mahmoud. Offering a uniquely Canadian perspective — including that of 15 other 8

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | FALL 2019

“This comprehensive guide is an indispensable resource for pharmacists and pharmacy students looking to learn or improve crucial patient assessment skills relevant to all pharmacy practice settings.” Dr. Mahmoud’s book was released in March of this year and is available for order as an eBook or in hard copy at Nature Springer, Amazon, and other online retailers. 


NEWS & NOTES

green shirt day

GRADUATES FROM THE Class of 2019 officially joined the pharmacy profession when they pledged the code of ethics at the ACP Graduation Brunch this June. Congratulations to our newest cohort of pharmacists! Keep up with the us on Instagram @ualberta_pharmacy

UAlberta Pharmacy students suited up for Green Shirt Day to honour the Humboldt Broncos, the Logan Boulet Effect, and raise awareness for organ and tissue donation on April 8th this year.

DONATE TODAY! uab.ca/givetopharm

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | ualberta.ca/pharmacy

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NEWS & NOTES

PHARMER'S WORD SEARCH What do pharmacists and actors both need in order to do their jobs? __ __ __ __ __ __ Find the six pharmacy-related words below to answer the riddle.

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SCRIPT (S -PESTLE, C- CAPSULE, R – FORMULATE, I - PILL, P – DISPENSE, T – TRIPLICATE) 1. PESTLE, 2. CAPSULE, 3. FORMULATE, 4. PILL 5. DISPENSE, 6. TRIPLICATE

ANSWER KEY 10

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | FALL 2019


NEWS & NOTES

Floating Pharmacy

Sandy Hewitt

ALUMNA SANDY HEWITT JOURNEYS ABROAD AS A PHARMACIST FOR MERCY SHIPS BY COURTNEY BETTIN FEELING FULFILLED IN HER ROLE as a community pharmacist,

“The surgical hospital could not function without a reliable source of

Sandy Hewitt (BSc Pharm 1987) had no idea that an episode of 60

high-quality medications. Local supplies of medications run the risk of

Minutes would change her career path overnight. But a feature on Mercy

being counterfeit and not reliably stored or handled. As well, without the

Ships, an international organization that provides critical health care

pharmacy on board, the ship would be using local resources and taking

to developing countries via hospital ships, did just that. Two years later,

away from what is available in an already resource-poor country.”

Hewitt and her husband Larry, a biomedical technologist, would find themselves boarding the deck of Africa Mercy. Currently in Guinea, Hewitt has been to four countries with Mercy

Each pharmacist works weekdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and rotates being on call one week out of every three. On free weekends, Hewitt and her husband will take the opportunity to visit local beaches and

Ships where she acts as the senior pharmacist in charge of a three-person

markets, a welcome break from what can otherwise be an emotionally

team, coordinating efforts for both the on-board pharmacy and off-site

draining schedule.

dental and eye clinics. “As Canadians, many of us are unaware of how good our health care

Hewitt’s efforts on Mercy Ships are completely volunteer-based, and she is required to pay crew fees in order to live on board. This means

system actually is,” says Hewitt. “Five billion people do not have access

that while the ship is receiving maintenance over the summer, her and

to safe, timely, affordable surgery.”

Larry will travel across Canada providing informational talks on the

“(Mercy Ships) not only provide surgeries to those in need but build up the medical capacity of the nation where they serve, mentoring

organization in order to raise funds for their next year of service. However, Hewitt says the most challenging part has nothing to do

surgeons, nurses, anaesthesia providers, biomedical technicians,

with the work but with the relationships that are made along the way.

physiotherapists, and this year also a pharmacist.”

Volunteers arrive every weekend from across the globe, including several

Familiar tasks for Hewitt include providing medication for the hospital wards, completing chart reviews, and filling prescriptions from the crew physician. However, her role requires her to work extensively on international relations as well. In order to keep the pharmacy well stocked, Hewitt is responsible for coordinating with officials from various countries abroad. The ship imports all of the necessary medications from distributors

University of Alberta alumni, for a minimum of three months, and it’s often hard to say goodbye after sharing the experience together. Ultimately, Hewitt says the Mercy Ships have shaped the way she views her career in pharmacy. “After seeing the severity and complexity of many of our patient’s conditions, you can’t help but be changed,” says Hewitt. “My appreciation and advocacy for our excellent health care in Canada will

throughout the U.S. and Europe through their support centre in Texas.

affect all my future work, and working with the underprivileged will

Even when the process goes smoothly the shipments can take up to four

always be a priority.” 

months before they’re on the ship, requiring excellent organization and estimation. Then, Hewitt has to request a license from the Ministry of Health in their current country in order to have the medication processed through customs on time. Though not ideal, Hewitt says this

If you would like to learn more about Mercy Ships visit mercyships.ca or follow along with Sandy and Larry’s journey on their blog at larryandsandyhewitt.wordpress.com

model is integral to the ship’s overall mission.

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | ualberta.ca/pharmacy

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NEWS & NOTES

FACULTY NOTES Ms. Teri Charrois, Clinical Associate

Dr. Ayman El-Kadi took over the role of

Dr. Michael Doschak, Professor, has

Professor, received the student-nominated

Associate Dean of Research and Graduate

transitioned into an additional role as

Teaching Excellence Award.

Studies this spring, replacing Dr. Scot

Assistant Dean, International and is a

Simpson who served the faculty with gusto

welcome addition to the administrative team.

Dr. Nathan Beahm, Clinical Assistant

for five years. Dr. Afsaneh Lavasanifar, Professor, received

Professor, received the Canadian Pharmacists Journal's Best Paper of the Year

Dr. Sherif Mahmoud, Clinical Associate

a five year discovery grant from NSERC on

award this June.

Professor, graduated from Harvard University

“Development of stimuli deformable lipid/

Medical School's Global Clinical Scholars

polymer hybrid nano-materials for drug

Dr. Christine Hughes, Professor, is a co-

Research Training Program in June. He was

delivery applications”.

applicant on a successful CIHR team grant

also promoted from Assistant to Associate

called Testing, Reaching the Undiagnosed and

Clinical Professor.

The Pharmacy Student Services Team was named a University of Alberta Wellness

Linkages to Care: “REACHing” for Impact. This team grant is funded for $1.2 million a

Dr. Patrick Mayo took early retirement from

Champion this year. Students nominated

year for five years. One of the five projects in

his position this spring but will remain as an

Dallyce Bialowas, Dr. Dion Brocks, Anjela

the team grant (referred to as APPROACH

Adjunct Professor.

Dela Cruz, and Dr. Ravina Sanghera for their efforts in making the UAlberta community a

2.0) is scaling up and evaluating community pharmacy based testing for sexually-

Congratulations to Dr. Ravina Sanghera and

better place, connecting people, and building

transmitted and blood-borne infections within

her family as they welcomed their baby girl,

a supportive environment for students of the

existing infrastructure.

Rayna Kaur Sanghera Grewal, on May 16, 2019.

faculty. Congratulations!

Introducing FoamaDerm™ A novel base for better outcomes.

FoamaDerm™ is a propellant-free foam, which is designed to be used as a base for Diclofenac Sodium. It is a water-based formulation which provides a nongreasy feeling for patient after application and does not stain clothes. Learn more at rstherapeutics.com

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THE MORTAR & PESTLE | FALL 2019

Inspired by research done in the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Alberta!


NEWS & NOTES

IN MEMORIAM We honour those alumni who have passed. KEITH WILFRED DIXON BSc Pharm 1947 December 6, 2018

RAYMOND KEITH PRINGLE BSc Pharm 1955 December 29, 2018

NELSON CHI CHOY BSc Pharm 1991 November 8, 2018

ROBERT DOWLING BSc Pharm 1955 March 4, 2019

GORDON DALE SIMPSON BSc Pharm 1962 April 4, 2019

Remembering Robert Dowling SEPTEMBER 28, 1924 - MARCH 4, 2019

ROBERT “BOB” DOWLING graduated from the University of Alberta with a BSc(Pharm) in 1955 after serving his country as a pilot in the RCAF #418 Squadron from 1942 to 1945 and receiving a BA from the University of British Columbia. At the University of Alberta he was President of the pharmacy club from 1954 to 1955 and a member of the curling club. After graduation and following three years in Sexsmith, he settled in Jasper in 1958 where at one time he owned three stores: Cavell Drugs, Tekarra Drugs, and The Whistlers. He also owned one patent medical store in Valemount, BC. In 1969, Dowling was elected MLA for the Edson constituency. He won a hotly contested race, defeating three other candidates. He ran for a second term in office in the 1971 Alberta general election. He substantially increased his majority and was easily re-elected, defeating two other candidates. After the election, Premier Peter Lougheed appointed Dowling to his first cabinet as a Minister without Portfolio responsible for Tourism. He was shuffled to another portfolio in the middle of his term and became the Minister of Consumer Affairs. Dowling ran for a third term in the 1975 Alberta general election, his first time standing for re-election with ministerial advantage. His popular vote dropped slightly, but he was re-elected as the opposition vote collapsed. After the election he was shuffled to a similar cabinet post as his first one, becoming the Minister of Business Development and Tourism. He then served as an MLA from March 29, 1965, to June 30, 1969. He held that portfolio until he retired from provincial politics at the dissolution of the assembly in 1979. Following his time in elected office, Dowling served as Commissioner for Alberta’s 75th Anniversary celebrations and later led the province’s participation at Expo ‘86 in Vancouver. In 2000, Dowling was awarded the Alberta Centennial Medal, and he was honoured at the University of Alberta Alumni Recognition Awards on September 25, 2013, for his contributions to the community, province, and country. On March 4, 2019, Robert passed away at the age of 94 years old. 

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | ualberta.ca/pharmacy

13


SPOTLIGHT

Gardening Tips for Grads

F

OR 105 YEARS the University of Alberta Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences has planted successful student crops and sent graduates out into the world of health care

and pharmaceuticals at our convocation harvest. Academics are gardeners who strive for the synergistic dose of sunlight, fluids, pesticides, nutrients, and fertilizer to ensure a professional crop of graduates each spring. When our graduates further ripen into successful practitioners, they carry not only the health of their communities but our legacy of excellence we strive for at the Faculty. We continue to plant each year. We scrutinize seed catalogues of applicants to be admitted and plot how to plant row on row a new class. The spectacle of convocation is a milestone event in our academic lives and, indeed, a much anticipated day of harvest punctuated by a palpable spirit of celebration. For the student pharmacists in our field, graduation marks the end of a long and transformative growing process after developing in one of the most difficult, challenging, and demanding programs at the University of Alberta. Convocation is a time of celebration, a time of jubilation made after years and years of diligent toil and focus that each and every graduate put forward to achieve. As pharmacists, it isn’t just a milestone. The professional designation that becomes officially imparted is one that also comes with significant professional duty. Becoming a trusted member in an exclusive professional guild is an incomparable role of respect, trust, responsibility, and accountability to the public. All of this is evident in the Class of 2019. 

2019’S TOP TEN FERTILIZERS FOR PHARMERS 1.

RESPECT

2.

TRUST

3.

RESPONSIBILITY

4.

ACCOUNTABILITY

5.

MINDFULNESS

6.

MUTUAL SUPPORT

7.

CONSENT

8.

COMPETENCE

9.

COMPASSION

10. INTEGRITY


SPOTLIGHT

International Pharmaceuticals AN ACCOUNT FROM THE INAUGURAL CHIBA-ALBERTA SYMPOSIUM ON PHARMACEUTICS IN JAPAN

BY DR. MICHAEL DOSCHAK

OVER SEVEN DAYS THIS FEBRUARY, a delegation of nine University of Alberta Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical

UOFA FOPPS DELEGATES (LEFT TO RIGHT) DR. DAVID PEREZ GOMEZ, DR. CARLOS

Sciences (FoPPS) researchers were invited to travel to Chiba

VELAZQUEZ, DR. DINESH BABU, DR. FRANK WUEST, MS. LOCKHART JAMIESON, DR.

University in Japan to participate in the inaugural Chiba-Alberta Pharmaceutical Sciences Symposium. Organized by Dr. Hidetaka

MIKE DOSCHAK, MR. BENJAMIN WAJDA, DR. ARNO SIRAKI, DR. JOHN SEUBERT. PICTURED IN FRONT OF THE BELL TOWER CIRCA 1890 FROM THE ORIGINAL CHIBA UNIVERSITY CAMPUS.

Akita and others at Chiba’s Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences (GSPS), the symposium marked the rejuvenation of

evening, the Canadian faculty were treated to a traditional Japanese

collaborative ties between the two schools and the involvement of

supper hosted by the Dean of Chiba GSPS, Professor Masami Ishibashi,

the current generation of faculty and trainees at each institution.

along with several additional faculty professoriate. Our hosts introduced

The renewed inter-institutional relationship commenced in 2017 when current Assistant Dean International, Dr. Mike Doschak, visited Chiba University for a research presentation

us to the intricacies of Japanese cuisine, culture, and their aspirations for the upcoming symposium. The second day of the symposium commenced with podium

with reciprocal visitation and research presentations to FoPPS in

presentations by each of the invited professors interspersed with

Edmonton by Dr. Kousei Ito and Dr. Shigeki Aoki in summer 2018,

Chiba faculty presentations. Topics covered included drug delivery,

hosted by Dean Dr. Neal Davies. The original “Agreement for

pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, pharmacokinetic modeling,

Research Co-operation” with Chiba’s GSPS dates back to January

and cancer energy metabolism research. One positive outcome was

1987 and was signed by then Dean, Dr. John Bachynsky, and Chiba

witnessing how our FoPPS researchers gelled together as an academic

Dean, Dr. Haruo Kitagawa.

team, supporting each other in turn to ensure each podium presentation from our guest professors and trainees was constructively critiqued

After the long flight from Edmonton via Vancouver to Tokyo, five professors—myself, Dr. John Seubert, Dr. Arno Siraki, Dr. Carlos Velazquez, and Dr. Frank Wuest—and four post-doctoral fellows and

by the visiting Canadian faculty to suitably honour their advanced pharmaceutical sciences research. The third day was dedicated to two sequential all-day poster sessions

graduate student trainees—Dr. Dinesh Babu Nithyananda, Dr. David

which allowed the Chiba school undergraduate and graduate trainees

Perez Gomez, Lockhart Jamieson, and Benjamin Wajda—were

to present their research to the visiting Canadian delegates. Additional

greeted at Narita airport by Chiba school graduate trainees. On tours

one-on-one partnering discussions and presentations were held by Chiba

of Chiba University’s pharmaceutical sciences laboratories the next

faculty members and research staff for all visiting Canadian professors

day, our group saw many things of impact including the zebra fish

in an effort to connect and catalyze like-minded collaborative research

facility, radiopharmacy labs, and the medicinal chemistry laboratories

interests and potential future trainee exchange.

bubbling with multiple “potions” destined for anti-inflammatory drug

The final day was spent touring Tokyo under the guidance of our

synthetic schemes as complicated as the 21 sequential step synthesis of

hosts, with special thanks to Dr. Akihiro Hisaka, Dr. Kousei Ito, Dr.

carbazomycins in the lab of Professor Atsushi Nishida, who currently

Shigeki Aoki, Dr. Takeshi Susukida, and Dr. Hiromi Sato. I took a side

serves as the Associate Dean International for Chiba University. That

trip on the Shinkansen bullet train to visit the Kyoto University Faculty

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SPOTLIGHT

TOP LEFT: TRADITIONAL JAPANESE SUPPER WITH FACULTY MEMBERS (LEFT TO RIGHT) DR. KUNIKAZU MORIBE, DR. CARLOS VELAZQUEZ, DR. YASUSHI ARANO, DR. JOHN SEUBERT, DR. MASAMI ISHIBASHI (DEAN), DR. FRANK WUEST, DR. HIDETAKA AKITA, DR. MIKE DOSCHAK, DR. KOUSEI ITO, DR. ARNO SIRAKI

of Pharmaceutical Sciences where I had been invited to meet with and

and collaborate on pharmaceutical cardiac research. At the same time,

give a guest presentation to the Kinki Branch of the Pharmaceutical

Associate Professor Dr. Shigeki Aoki will also visit the lab of Dr. Frank

Society of Japan, hosted by Professor Yoshinobu Takakura.

Wuest at the Cross Cancer Institute to collaborate on preclinical micro-

Since our return to Edmonton, active research collaborations have

PET research.

commenced in earnest for each of the professors involved, including

On behalf of the University of Alberta delegation, we sincerely

the first trainee exchange in April 2019 when the fully funded Japan

thank our Chiba University hosts for an outstanding symposium and

Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) post-doctoral fellow, Dr.

experience in Japan. We now look forward to the research outcomes that

Takeshi Susukida, joined my Pharmaceutical Orthopaedic Research

will follow from our renewed collaboration and to hosting our Japanese

lab to undertake activated CD4 and CD8 lymphocyte labeling and

collaborators at the 2nd Chiba-Alberta Symposium, to be held in the

micro-CT imaging during idiosyncratic drug toxicity events in a rodent

near future (dates to be determined). 

model recently published in the collaborating lab of Dr. Kousei Ito. The second academic exchange is slated for October 2019 and will involve the arrival of Assistant Professor Dr. Hiroki Tanaka (from the Chiba lab of Professor Hidetaka Akita) to be hosted by the lab of Dr. John Seubert

If you would like to learn more about the Chiba-Alberta Symposium on Pharmaceutics, please email mdoschak@ualberta.ca

AFPC CONFERENCE 2019 The annual Association of Faculties of Pharmacy of Canada (AFPC) Conference was held at the University of Alberta this year from June 11th to 14th and celebrated its 75th anniversary. Of the 200+ pharmacists, academics, researchers, and educators from across Canada that came to Edmonton, eight Deans of the 10 Canadian schools of pharmacy joined the festivities and toured our UAlberta facilities (pictured right). Above and beyond the conference activities, the Faculty of Pharmacy also hosted two “Alberta Nights” at local pubs to encouragement networking over food, drink, and karaoke. The conference would not have been a success without the teamwork of the University of British Columbia, University of Saskatchewan, extra work of Faculty and staff, and in particular, of Dr. Nese Yuksel. 

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The Vitality of Drug Discovery

Dr. Vishwa Somayaji

DR. VISHWA SOMAYAJI’S NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE SPECTROMETER FACILITY BY COURTNEY BETTIN PHOTO JULIA BROWN PHOTOGRAPHY Access to a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) facility is the key component of any university looking to research organic compounds, including those used for medicinal purposes. At the University of Alberta this is no different. Dr. Vishwa Somayaji, who’s been running the U of A’s facility out of the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences for the past 30 years, says that while NMR is a commonality amongst academia that

you only pay attention if the water doesn’t flow when the tap is turned

doesn’t make it any less crucial to the research process.

on, similarly the synthetic part of research comes to a halt if the NMR

“The use of NMR is so entrenched that it is one of the first instruments in any infrastructure that supports any medicinal chemistry

facility is down for any reason.” On top of educating researchers on how to use the NMR facility

lab that has a pharmaceutical research program,” says Dr. Somayaji.

and helping to interpret results, Dr. Somayaji is also in charge of

The significance for the Faculty is even more crucial as nearly all

guaranteeing the machine runs smoothly. NMR spectrometers run on

pharmaceutical research will utilize the NMR facility at one point

liquid helium which facilitates the superconducting coil, and needs to be

or another.

changed out at regular intervals. Adding liquid nitrogen every two weeks

The NMR machine works by confirming the structure of a molecule, identifying exactly what a compound is, and ensuring that it’s a pure

helps slow the loss of the helium, which is facing a shortage worldwide. In his time at the facility, Dr. Somayaji has seen the university

sample while still keeping it intact. For example, Dr. Somayaji says that

upgrade from a 300 MHz system to 600 MHz which allows for

most drugs are synthesized in a multistep process, so at every step along

greater sensitivity and a higher resolution both of which contribute to

the way it will be tested in the NMR to verify that the compound is still

easier interpretation of the results. In addition, having a higher field

pure and the reactions are happening as they should.

spectrometer allows the same amount of work to be done in a fraction

Over the years, this type of structure-based experimentation is used

of the time. In the future he hopes to see even more advances being

in a variety of ways at the university and has helped researchers publish

made to increase the quality and caliber of research being produced.

papers, obtain patents, and establish their own companies such as AltaRex and Isotechnika. “In a way the NMR lab has become like a water tap in a kitchen,”

“If the Albertan and Canadian economies pick up in the coming years, thus easing the pressure on granting agencies, I see the Faculty getting better accessories that enhance the sensitivity of the existing

says Dr. Somayaji. “Researchers everywhere have come to use it as an

spectrometer,” says Dr. Somayaji. “And with Dr. Davies at the helm as the

integral part of medicinal chemistry and drug research. And just as

Dean of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, the future is bright.” 

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IN THE MORTAR

In-House Healing DR. KEVIN MORIN COMBINES PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES AND PSYCHIATRY TO BETTER PATIENT OUTCOMES BY JYLLIAN PARK PHOTO JULIA BROWN PHOTOGRAPHY WE ARE ALL BORN WITH THE SAME HOURS IN A DAY, but some

to develop natural health care products and new technologies related

among us manage to ring out just a bit more time from the clock.

to EEGs.

Dr. Kevin Morin (BSc Pharm 1991, Ph.D. Pharmaceutical Sciences 1997,

After decades of development Sunmor was successful this year in

MD 2001) splits his time between his inpatient psychiatry practice at

gaining Health Canada approval for Techamex, a chamomile extract that

Alberta Hospital and his clinical research and development projects,

the company sees as a powerful alternative to traditional sleeping pills

which seemingly stack one on top of another and number into the

and benzodiazepines. Working on the front line of mental health and

dozens. Informed by the labyrinth of circuitry within the human brain,

psychiatric care at Alberta Hospital, Dr. Morin is all too familiar with

Dr. Morin has devoted his professional life to understanding how

the risks associated with medications developed to help with symptoms

the organ’s intricate electrical activity can impact patient health

of depression, anxiety, and sleep disorders. He sees the therapeutic

and well-being.

product as a game changer for treating his patients. “I am very keen for

A Ph.D., MD, and entrepreneur, his many credentials achieved

it being used as a replacement for Ativan or other benzodiazepines,”

from the University of Alberta cover his office like wallpaper, now

says Dr. Morin. “We know that these can be detrimental in the long run,

punctuated with his most recent designation — specialty trained in

especially with dependence and tolerance issues over time.”

neuromodulation from Harvard University in 2017. A lifelong learner,

While developing Techamex, Dr. Morin and his team received a

Dr. Morin’s insatiable thirst for mapping and grasping the human

patent for a technology that uses EEG to read the chemical signature of

brain has ingrained him into the fabric of his alma mater. He serves

pharmaceuticals. Referred to as Pharmaco-EEG, this type of modified

the university as a researcher, in-faculty licenced psychiatrist, and most

EEG neuroimaging can be used in combination with pharmaceuticals

recently as a collaborator with Applied Pharmaceutical Innovation

to see how the different compounds affect brain activity in patients.

(API), an interdisciplinary network within the University of Alberta’s

“Many different compounds in psychiatry have a certain signature that

Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences to regulate, patent,

can be very specific for different compounds. Pharmco-EEG allows us to

and market medical technologies and research (see p. 23). “I feel good

understand how compounds work, and then my company has been busy

about working with API and the faculty as a collaborator in advancing

working on how machine-learning and artificial intelligence take the

technological opportunities in Alberta, especially for other companies

EEG and look for certain patterns within it.”

that are up and coming. I struggled when starting out, and I look at this

Never one to rest for long, Dr. Morin is looking to expand his work

as my way to give back to a Faculty that has been very supportive over

doing clinical program development in repetitive transcranial magnetic

the years,” says Dr. Morin.

stimulation (TMS) and in theranostics, a growing field of medicine

After leaving the University of Alberta following his residency in

combining targeted therapy based on diagnostic tests. Specifically,

2006, Dr. Morin trained at Alberta Hospital under Professor Flor-

his work examines how neuro imaging can inform physicians and

Henry, a renowned psychiatrist who has lead clinical study and research

psychiatrists how chemical compounds, including ketamine and

into neurophysiological assessments and electroencephalography (EEG).

cannabinoids used to treat depression, may be impacting a patient’s brain.

Seeing the direct benefits of using EEGs to diagnose and treat patients,

And on top of it all Dr. Morin is a valued resource to the Faculty

Dr. Morin looked to combine his background in pharmacy and delve

and student body. “My heart lies in the Faculty of Pharmacy and

further into the study of how neuroimaging technology can improve

Pharmaceutical Sciences because this is where my tools have come from,"

patient outcomes. He is the founder and lead researcher for both

says Dr. Morin. “Besides doing research and projects, I see students who

Sunmor Research and Precision Neuroclinics in downtown Edmonton.

may need support. I enjoy helping folks out who may be struggling. It is

In concert with PhDs and researchers — many from the U of A — he is

pretty intense being in pharmacy. It’s a lot to learn. I have a role in giving

combining his expertise in neuroimaging and pharmaceutical knowledge

back to the Faculty, and it’s gratifying to support the students.” 

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Students were given a set of case studies that required a prescribing decision. They were allowed to use any resources that they would have access to in practice including online references and fellow colleagues. Once completed, the cases were followed with a confidence survey to determine whether the student felt they had made the correct decision. Woit analyzed the data on a scale that rated each answer as appropriate, suboptimal or inappropriate. From there the inappropriate answers were divided up based on the outcome for the patient, including not immediately harmful, potentially harmful, and potentially lethal. Based on the previous research, Woit thought both groups would

Prescribing Success for Student Practitioners GRAD STUDENT CASSANDRA WOIT WORKS TO GROW PHARMACY STUDENT CONFIDENCE BY COURTNEY BETTIN

show similar levels of competency but lower levels of confidence. In the literature, medical students often comment that their undergraduate education does not adequately prepare them to prescribe. However, Woit thought that medical students would rate themselves more confident than their pharmacy counterparts since not all pharmacists become prescribers. Regardless, she expected there to be low levels of self-awareness, with students reporting that they felt confident in their decision even if their prescription was incorrect. “Although we’re still working on the final results, from what I’m seeing in the data, there will be unexpected differences between the two groups of students,” Woit reports. The common types of prescribing errors that medical students made in the study are different from the those of pharmacy students, and both groups of students struggled with including all the legal requirements of a prescription. Woit suggests that a reason for the difference could be the curriculum. Medical students don’t spend substantial time learning about prescribing

PHOTO JULIA BROWN PHOTOGRAPHY

until their clerkship or residency while pharmacy students learn to assess

IT’S NO SURPRISE that health care providers are viewed as some of

comes later.

prescriptions early on in their degree, although learning to prescribe

the most esteemed professionals in society. Patients put a lot of trust in

“I think prescribing is something that needs to be more focused on in

practitioners to provide first-class health care throughout every stage of

both faculties,” says Woit. “Especially if our results show that the students

their life.

are feeling like they’re not confident in prescribing.”

That trust is what inspired Cassandra Woit (MSc 2019) to base

She hopes her research can be used by the university to find ways of

her thesis on the confidence and competency levels of fourth-year

supplementing students and filling in the necessary gaps before they get

pharmacy and medical students in the act of prescribing medications

to real patients.

for their patients. “I’m really interested in the act of prescribing and what makes a

Overall, as a prescribing pharmacist herself, Woit says that the project has given her a deeper appreciation for the field. As pharmacists become

good prescriber,” says Woit. “A prescribing error can have really small

more involved in prescribing they offer another avenue of support for

consequences or really huge consequences, depending on the situation.

patients, ensuring that the health care received is the best it can be.

It’s an area where, if (pharmacists) are going to be prescribing more, we want to make sure that we’re making the right decisions.” Pharmacy students and medical students from the University of Alberta participated in her study, which was based on a similar project by the Working Group Research on CPT Education of the European Association for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics (EACPT).

“As pharmacists, we’re not always the best advocates for our profession. I hope this will show that our students are really well equipped to take on prescribing in their scope of practice, and they should be more confident in their abilities as new graduates.” Woit will defend her thesis this September. Once the results of the study are published, discussions about preliminary conclusions will be open. 

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FEATURES

the

Pharmer’s almanac A FORECAST FOR PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES BY REGION

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Local pharmers weigh in on the future of their disciplines.

T

DRUG DELIVERY By Dr. Afsaneh Lavasanifar, Professor

The main objective of Drug Delivery research is to make drugs work better and have fewer side effects. This means designing and developing delivery systems that can achieve this goal for individual drugs and given disease conditions. In the future, discoveries on the means of communication and signaling between cells and organelles in nature will set the stage for the design and engineering of bio-mimetic (read: synthetic methods which mimic biochemical processes) delivery systems for more efficient and smart delivery of therapeutics. Artificial intelligence will routinely be used to develop such delivery systems for given therapeutics.

he 2019 Pharmer’s Almanac

To get there, the field of Drug Delivery will see improvements in the regulations and standardization of biological formulations to

has long-range forecasts

be implemented; more extensive adoption of nano-medicine by the

for the foreseeable future of

different therapeutics, similar to the way protein drugs and biologics

pharmaceutical industry for the formulation and re-formulation of

pharmaceutical sciences by region,

were adopted by the industry; and approvals of new materials as

including outlooks for areas like Drug

formulation of existing drugs or as development of pharmaceutical

Delivery, Pharmacokinetics, and

bioavailability, target accessibility, or reducing side effects of different

more. Our long-range predictions can be used to make more informed decisions about plans to support the pharmaceutical sciences and prepare for a healthier and more advanced

pharmaceutical excipients by regulatory authorities for the reproducts for emerging drugs with the aim of enhancing the therapeutics. In my lab, our short term goal is to be able to get regulatory approval for drug delivery technologies developed here to date. This will then lead to the expansion of the general development of nano-technology and our delivery platform to drugs under development—rather than only the reformulation of drugs currently in the market—as well as alternative routes of administration and disease conditions other than cancer. In the long term, we will see the development of bio-mimetic delivery

future. Check out what our experts

systems that can sense the physiological changes imposed by the disease

have to say about their areas of

their shape, size, and/or integrity. This means, patients will have access

pharmaceutical sciences.

disease and biochemistry while inside their body in order to heal them

internally and/or external stimuli and respond accordingly by changing to drugs that will have the ability to change and adapt to their specific more safely and efficiently.

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FEATURES

DRUG DISCOVERY: CANNABIS, CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES By Dr. Raimar Loebenberg, Professor, DDIC Founder & Director and Dr. Vijay Somayaji, DDIC Manager

The Drug Development and Innovation Centre (DDIC) at the Faculty focuses on designing and improving dosage forms and pharmacopeial

FREE RADICAL TOXICOLOGY: PSYCHOLOGICAL STRESS, OXIDATIVE STRESS, AND CANNABIS By Dr. Arno Siraki, Associate Professor & Director of Pharmaceutical Sciences Graduate Studies

standards. It has the capabilities to support various types of research in

We are exposed to a variety of stimuli that have effects which can be

the form of developing, synthesizing, and formulating drugs all the way

beneficial, detrimental, or a mixture of both. Psychological stress—or

through clinical trials, in one place.

environmental stress—has various definitions, in which all include a

Drug development usually faces frameworks that are limiting, in

negative physiological response resulting from a threat to one’s well-

that researchers in academic environments are left to their own devices

being (or at the very least produced from an unpleasant stimulus).

to approach incubators, investors, and larger pharma or biotech

A component of this physiological response includes a phenomenon

companies to take their project through the many different stages of drug

referred to as oxidative stress. The latter is a term used to describe

development. But the DDIC’s licenses makes it unique.

the imbalance between antioxidant and pro-oxidant biochemical or

The DDIC has Natural Health Products licensing, which ensures

biological signaling to favour pro-oxidant (toxic) conditions in the

that approved manufacturing practices can run in-faculty, including

organism. Such conditions have been considered to be involved in

involvement in clinical trials manufacturing, manufacturing of herbal

many diseases, including neurological, cardiovascular, and oncological

and natural health products, and the infrastructure to analyze forensic

diseases. There have been many attempts to determine the ideal

samples. Plus, the DDIC is the only academic lab in Canada with the

biomarker to measure oxidative stress, which would ideally be

Health Canada site license required to test and produce medicinal

correlated with psychological stress. An example of a key biomarker

cannabis products. Its Controlled Substances licensing gives it the

includes lipid peroxidation products, such as malondialdehyde or

ability to investigate and work with nearly any drug that is on Health

8-iso-prostaglandin F2α.

Canada’s schedules. The ultimate goal of the DDIC is supporting clinical research. Not many people can do what we do in pharmacy programs—actually create the materials that the clinicians can use. Currently, the DDIC is

Certain individuals may experience a benefit by using cannabis to reduce psychological stress. An important question to pose is if cannabis also offset the physiological effects of stress, i.e., oxidative stress. The smoke itself is known to cause oxidative stress, as combustion

researching pain and pain management solutions, including psychoactive

produces free radicals and carcinogens. As such, smoking cannabis

substances, cannabis, and controlled substances. Since our framework

may produce acute beneficial effects but have unwanted health

makes us the link between research and the finished product, in the next

consequences. However, an alternative would be to use edible cannabis

five years we will see multiple companies and drugs make it clinical trial

oils or cannabis-containing foods that do not utilize combustion.

faster and more efficiently than in industry standards. In the span of

In addition to its main ingredients (cannabidiol and

two years, we will be able to get new companies formed and have their

tetrahydrocannabinol), cannabis contains hundreds of compounds,

products hit the market. Industry sees this process take as long as 15

many of which have unknown biological effects. Some of these

years, but the DDIC will be at the helm of re-defining drug development

compounds resemble known antioxidants molecules. In my laboratory,

processes and bringing new, more effective drugs to patients that

studies are underway to determine if compounds in cannabis contain

need them.

antioxidant or pro-oxidant activity. These studies are essential for

Our capabilities put us in a position to do cutting edge research and lead the industry into the future of drug development under a new framework—one that is better and continues to bridge the gap between research, clinical trial, and the market.

providing the groundwork for understanding the full spectrum of activity of cannabis-containing products. In the future, the interplay between psychological stress, oxidative stress, and cannabis will provide insights into the global understanding of the effects of cannabis use.

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ANNOUNCING THE LAUNCH OF APPLIED PHARMACEUTICAL INNOVATION By Andrew MacIsaac, Assistant Dean, Advancement & CEO of API

POTENTIALLY LIFESAVING MEDICAL discoveries often fail to find a pathway forward through the complex web of

PHARMACOKINETICS By Dr. Sherif Mahmoud, Clinical Associate Professor

scientific, regulatory, and market considerations required in modern drug development. Innovators often become trapped in a scenario where they are an expert in the science of their newly discovered drug candidate, but not

In the future, pharmacokinetics—which studies the movement of

in the myriad of complementing areas that are required to

drugs within the body—will give health care providers the ability to

bring a drug forward.

prescribe drugs personalized for their patients following a simple blood test interpreted in the context of patients’ data. Personalized pharmacotherapy, where the right drug is given at the right dose to the right patient, will be the direction of drug therapy in the future. Evidence has shown that traditional pharmacotherapy, where most drugs are dosed at fixed doses, might not result in comparable benefit and safety profiles among patients. Drug product monographs and therapy guidelines provide guidance on drug selection and dosage adjustment based on patient factors; however, those factors are generally limited to age, weight or body mass index and renal and liver function. Other factors have been implicated in altered drug action and disposition among individuals such as patients’ comorbidities and disease severities (i.e. drug-disease interaction) and the individual’s genetic makeup; nevertheless, they are seldom taken into consideration. The field of pharmacokinetics will be an essential pillar for personalized pharmacotherapy through identifying patient-specific characteristics that predict how the drug will behave in a specific individual. In addition, with advances in analytical methods, therapeutic drug monitoring will be applied to more and more drugs further supporting the personalized drug regimen era. This will work in concert with other fields such as pharmacogenomics and metabolomics to generate decision-making algorithms that will help clinicians prescribe personalized drug therapy for their patients. Data from those fields

These areas of expertise are precisely what we train for at the University of Alberta Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. In the past, there was little opportunity for our graduate students to work on drug development here in Canada, and as such many have predominately gone on to illustrious careers outside of Canada, like Brian Corrigan (PhD, Pharmacy 1996), the Global Head of Clinical Pharmacology for Pfizer, or Majid Vakilynejad (PhD, Pharmacokinetics 1996), a senior director at Takeda. But with the creation of Applied Pharmaceutical Innovation (API) the future is changing. Assistant Dean, Andrew MacIsaac, and Clinical Associate Professor, Dr. Pat Mayo, have launched API—an armslength not-for-profit in close collaboration with the Faculty with the goal of empowering drug development in Canada by building translational teams to tackle the tough road from bench to bedside. In support of this initiative, API has signed a $6 million partnership with Mitacs, a federal granting program, to fund students in the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences working on real-world drug development projects.

are currently being continuously generated; however, they still lack

Over the past eight months, API has pulled together

the translation piece that transforms this data into day-to-day usable

over 20 industry partners, large and small, and is now

decision algorithms.

being announced as a major component of the innovation

My ultimate research goal is to utilize pharmacokinetics and

ecosystem in Canada. Watch for more to come in the

pharmacodynamic research findings in conjunction with the other pillars

months ahead as API serves as a catalyst for innovation

of personalized pharmacotherapy to inform clinical decision-making

at the University of Alberta and far beyond, unlocking the

in the patient populations that I study (epilepsy, critically ill, and those

potential of discoveries in the health sciences. Learn more

with hemorrhagic stroke) for the sake of improving their outcomes.

about API at appliedpharma.ca

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Growing Rural Health Care

Growing rural health care JERRY SAIK’S WORK TO GIVE BACK

BY KALYNA HENNIG THE STUDENT EXPERIENCE has evolved immensely over the last

extra sustenance. He relied heavily on these and Friday night dinners at

100 years with tuition increases, the advancement of technology, and

his mom’s throughout his time in school. But in between the big

ever-growing specifications within disciplines. In pharmacy, the evolving

wins those football funds dried up, and he was not the only person

scope of practice creates a vast variety of roles for pharmacists to take

that struggled.

on. One thing that hasn’t changed? The stress and pressure that comes with being a university student. Alumnus and generous supporter of the Faculty, Jerry Saik (BSc 1971,

“I remember one year there was guy who collapsed on the field. Our trainer Ray Kelly recognized he was in need and took him out for a meal,” says Saik. “I wasn’t quite that bad, but eventually I was

BSc Pharm 1974), is familiar with the struggles that accompany attaining

eating soup and crackers.” As for alternate sources of income like awards

a university education. Coming from a low-income household of five

and scholarships aimed at student athletes, there were very few, if any,

brothers and a single mother in the 1960s and early ‘70s, he supported

at the time.

himself through six years at the University of Alberta, first to get a

“My emphasis for what I do is recognizing what I personally

Bachelor of Science with a focus on biological and physiological sciences

experienced in the past,” says Saik of his philanthropy. He has his own

and then to receive his Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy. All the while,

foundation, the Saik Family Foundation, which has supported the

he was also a dedicated and successful student athlete playing for the

Golden Bear Alumni Football Scholarship Program, Adopt-an-Athlete

Golden Bears Football team.

program, and Bears Education and Tutoring Program for the last 20

“When I was growing up, we had no money,” says Saik. “I hate to

years as well as a large endowment that generates around $4,000 a year

say that we were raised in poverty, but we were. For university I would

for student athletes in the pharmacy program called The Jerry Saik and

be working for only three or four months of the year to support myself

Family Athletics and Pharmacy Award. He’s also treasurer and active

during school. But when you are in university for six years like that, you

member of EdPharm Partnership, a group of 36 independent pharmacies

eventually start falling backwards.”

that strive to develop working and social relationships with pharmacy

The Golden Bears Football team were defending National College Bowl champions when Saik started university and joined the team in

owners and family, pharmaceutical manufacturers, wholesalers, and other pharmacy-related companies.

1968 as a defensive end. In 1972, they were national champions again.

Saik says that current Golden Bears Football coach and former

These victories meant some funds were available for team meals and

Edmonton Eskimo, Chris Morris, has a focus that he can really get

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behind. “Chris is willing to re-catch the glory of the old days, but he

Tofield, Holden, and many other places. If they went to the doctor and

also wants to give the student athletes the ability to excel academically,”

the pharmacist was closed after their appointment, that’s a much bigger

says Saik. “When he started, there were one or two guys that were

inconvenience than in the city. “It wasn’t just about my hours. It was

All-Canadian academic athletes. Last year, there were 22 of them! It’s

always about caring about the patient,” says Saik. “We stayed until the

amazing how valuing and enforcing educational study and community

last person was served.”

involvement can motivate student athletes to excel. More than 30 of

In 1991, Saik bought the pharmacy alongside his wife, Diane, who

them had GPAs over 3.0 and a 95 per cent retention rate. So that’s why

was born and raised in Daysland. In 2012, they took the lead on a full

I do what I do.” Under this leadership Saik says the Bears are having a

renovation that included a brand-new pharmacy addition with private

better time recruiting football players, too, even though U of A athletics

clinical service areas, offices, and a city-worthy front store operation. On

has less funding than other universities across Canada. “With the

behalf of the Daysland Hospital Foundation, Saik facilitated the building

emphasis on education and a good football program, some people are

of a new full-scale, state-of-the-art, naturally lighted medical clinic

foregoing other big team offers for the balance that's available here.”

that boasts large physician exam rooms with capacity for at least five physicians, readiness for electronic medical records, private treatment

“Rural pharmacy is where things happen."

rooms, and a separate area for physiotherapy. The front store, pharmacy,

Beyond his passion for athletics, Saik’s past is also rooted in rural

half the length of the Daysland main street.

pharmacy practice. After his graduation in 1974, he spent three years

and medical clinic building are all seamlessly attached and span nearly “This medical clinic and pharmacy is one of the very best ones in the

working with Stan Lissack (BSc Pharm 1958)—an active member of the

province. It gives physicians the excellent working environment that they

Canadian pharmacy profession who introduced Saik to its innovators

wanted to practice in and space for every type of patient to receive the

and motivators—in Daysland, Alberta, a small town about 140 km from

care they need,” says Saik. The pharmacists, physicians, and registered

Edmonton with a population of around 800.

technicians all work collaboratively to serve patients, including those

During his first years, Saik also worked with the local hospital

living in the extended care building in town.

supervising pharmacy needs, reviewing patient charts, and even going on medical rounds with the doctors. After breaking off on his own for a few years, he ultimately returned to Daysland to run, and eventually buy, Daysland Pharmacy. During his period of ownership, Saik and fellow pharmacist Mark Badry—who bought the pharmacy from Saik with his wife, Mary Jane Badry, a registered pharmacy technician, in December 2015 when Saik was in pre-retirement—provided supervisory pharmacy

“ I want to allow students to actualize on their potential with an expectation that they will raise the bar, and this is a way I can pay it forward."

services to Daysland Hospital as well as Killam, Hardisty and Galahad for a five-year period. The duo also re-introduced daily medical rounds in Daysland and weekly pharmacy reviews in the other centres. Upon his return in 1988, Saik was driven towards dedicating his

“Since I’m a rural pharmacist, I recognize that a lot of the students aren’t coming to rural areas because they are not familiar with rural lifestyles and relocating can be challenging,” says Saik. “But rural

practice to patient care. “We ensured that everyone was personally

pharmacy is where things happen. You’re in a small community where

greeted and acknowledged when they arrived in the pharmacy. It

you know everybody, and the opportunity to learn and advance your

develops loyalty, and pharmacists have a mandate to develop trust,

career is tremendous.” This is why he has started a new endowment with

professionalism, and positive relationships.” Four years after his

the Faculty, Saik Family Foundation Rural Pharmacy Fund, to support

retirement, his dedication to his patients is evident, as each and every

and incentivize students to take placements in rural communities.

person we passed—customer or employee—greeted Saik by name and vice versa as we toured the new Daysland facilities. “Working within this environment, in a rural community, you get to

“The main thing is that I lived through a tough time in university, and I want to allow students to actualize on their potential with an expectation that they will raise the bar, and this is a way I can pay it

know everybody and it gives you the ability to really help them,” says

forward,” says Saik. “I want to give back because pharmacy has been

Saik. “We would stay open past our regular hours when it was -30 or

good to me. I haven’t had an easy life financially, and I want to make

-40, just waiting for the last patient to come out of the clinic down the

other’s lives easier whether it’s students or my patients. I hope they can

street.” Patients come to Daysland from Camrose, Hardisty, Forestburg,

give back to others when they are able to as well.” 

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | ualberta.ca/pharmacy

25


FEATURES

Backyard pharmacy BY BRENDAN MIDDEL

THOUSANDS OF YEARS BEFORE THEY EVER LANDED ON THE SLIDE OF A MICROSCOPE OR IN A CLINICAL TRIAL, plants with medicinal properties were grown and used in Canada to treat illness and ailments. Popular culture has shed light on some plants and their uses—like morphine derived from poppies, cocaine from the coca plant, and most recently, the newly legal cannabis plant—while reconciliation and recognition of the role of traditional medicinal knowledge from indigenous peoples renews a sense of discovery and protection of native plants, improves experimental and clinical approaches to medicine, and provides insight for research into new therapeutic drugs and treatment.1 Still, many plant benefits and effects have yet to be proven true by science such as historical folklore among early settlers that encouraged single women to place rosemary and thyme under their pillows to lend them luck in finding true love. Some species have both the potential to be helpful or be lethal, if used improperly, while others just offer beautiful ornamentation in a garden, but do you know which plants used in modern medicine today could be growing in your own backyard?

St. John's Wort

Prince’s Pine, Pipsissewa

Scientific name: Hypericum perforatum

Scientific name: Chimaphila umbellata

Pharmacological derivative(s): Naphthodianthrones like hypericin

Pharmacological derivative(s): arbutin, chimaphilin3,4 2

Klamath Weed has been used medicinally

features clusters of pink, purple, and white nodding flowers and has been

anxiety, depression, and other central

known for flavouring candy, soft drinks, and beer. Historically, it was used

nervous conditions. It is a perennial

by indigenous peoples and physicians as prescriptions for bladder and urinary tract infections as well as prostate inflammation because of its

prairies, pastures, or fields, and its dotted

diuretic, astringent, and disinfectant properties.4,5

yellow flowers typically bloom between late

Modern use of Prince’s Pine

spring and early summer. In Canada, the

interests researchers because

Klamath Weed is considered to be an invasive

traditional use demonstrates

species and is toxic to most animals. Modern clinical research supports its use as an antidepressant for mild to moderate forms of depression, and about nine groups of pharmacological compounds including antibacterial, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory have been identified in it.2,3 In Germany, St. John’s Wort has outsold the antidepressant Prozac at a ratio as high as 20 to 1 as an approved treatment

26

throughout southwestern Alberta in dry coniferous montane sites. It

for over two millennia to treat insomnia,

plant most commonly found growing in

for depression.

A dainty native evergreen shrub, Prince’s Pine is commonly found

3

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | FALL 2019

a lack of adverse effects. Modification of antimicrobial properties from its wintergreen phytoextracts is opening opportunities for researchers to find alternative effective treatments against bacterial resistance.6


FEATURES

Common Foxglove

Scientific name: Digitalis purpurea

Pharmacological derivative(s): digitalis glycosides, digoxin 3,7 A member of the figwort family, Common Foxglove is a favorite ornamental landscape

Fir Clubmoss, Alpine Fir-moss, Alpine Clubmoss, and Running clubmoss Scientific name: Huperzia selago, Diphasiastrum aplinum, Lycopodium clavatum Pharmacological derivative(s): huperzine A, alpha- onocerin, both acetylcholinesterase inhibitors3,9,10

herb with pink spotted tubular flowers

This perennial evergreen herb is found in alpine and forested gardens

arranged on three-foot tall towering spikes.

throughout British Columbia and Alberta, and contrary to its name, it

However, it is lethally poisonous to humans

is not a moss. It forms yellow-green and blue-green rhizomes standing

and pets. Medicinal extracts from the plant

in upright shoots with tiny lance-shaped leaves crowded in ranks along

have been found to increase force of systolic

the stem. Multiple subspecies and varieties easily confuse in appearance

contractions in congestive heart failure, lower

and nomenclature but are found throughout western North America.3,11,12

blood pressure in hypertensive heart ailments,

Clinical trials and laboratory research confirm the alkaloids present

and elevate blood pressure in a weak heart.3,7

in Fir Clubmoss show potential for treating Alzheimer’s disease and

Historically, Foxglove was used as medicine to

dementia.3,10 Spores from the plant are also used to coat non-

treat edema because of the active component

lubricated condoms, pills, and surgical gloves to prevent

digitalis glycoside’s effect on enhancing

sticking, and due to their highly volatile nature,

myocardial muscular contractions.7

can also be used as by photographers as

For an ecological flair, plant to attract

photographic flash powder or by magicians for

hummingbirds and other beneficial pollinators.

Madagascar Periwinkle, Rose Periwinkle Scientific name: Catharanthus roseus

special effect. Other uses include various consumer hygiene products ranging from dry shampoos to facial cosmetics.

Pharmacological derivative(s): indole alkaloids, known in their parent group as vinca alkaloid derivatives, vinblastine, vincristine3,8 Madagascar Periwinkle is an ornamental tropical/subtropical perennial that has been naturalized worldwide as a result of popularity as an annual garden cultivar. Though it is more likely found on a warm vacation outside Alberta, it has cultivated prominence in Canadian medical research and bloomed with the discovery and use for chemotherapeutic properties.3,8 Originally derived and researched for diabetes treatment by Canadian researcher Dr. Robert L. Noble, the research stemmed from isolating phytochemicals from the Dogbane family for possible links to traditional medicinal treatment of diabetes.8 Vinca alkaloids have been widely used in chemotherapy treatment for its anticancer activity since their Canadian discovery in 1950.8 Madagascar Periwinkle is toxic to livestock and humans.

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | ualberta.ca/pharmacy

27


FEATURES

Willow

Poison Hemlock

Pharmacological derivative(s): salicin, salicylic acid,

Pharmacological derivative(s): coniine3

acetylsalicylic acid3,13

Numerous species belonging to

Willows are woody deciduous plants that range from low ground cover

the Parsley family are edible

to shrubs towering a few meters tall. A first sign of spring, the Pussy

cultivars such as carrots,

Willow can be gathered up into a bouquet and put on display following

coriander, parsley,

a long winter. As a hardy colonizer, willows shelter microhabitat,

celery, and parsnips.

are palatable food for herbivores, and supply pollinating insects.

On the contrary,

Extracted from willow bark, polyphenol salicin is metabolized in the

Poison Hemlock—

body to salicylic acid.13 Willow is recorded as having been prescribed

an introduced

for pain and anti-inflammatories since early civilization by Sumerians

herbaceous biennial/

in Mesopotamia and ancient Egyptians. Notably, it was also actively

perennial herb from Europe—

used as traditional medicine across North America, Greece, China,

and its cousins native to western

and Rome. Commercial use in a common drug began when the Bayer

Canada and Alberta in the

Company registered its product name, Aspirin, in 1899 and made

Water-hemlock genus (Cicuta)

publicly available in 1915 for nonprescriptive consumption.13 Salicin has

are among the deadliest plants

also been extracted from the Populus genus part of the Willow family

in North America. Hemlock flowers

(aspens, poplars, and cottonwoods) and in wintergreen species. Recently,

are white with five petals arranged in

clinical studies demonstrate dose-dependent antiproliferative properties

umbels, and stems can stand up to

of Aspirin and evidence in treating colorectal and gastric cancers as well

three meters high. Its leaves look

as various types of leukemia by directly inhibiting prostaglandins and

fernlike, characteristic of carrots,

inducing apoptosis.13,14

parsley, etc. and exude offensive odours

Scientific name: Salix spp.

Scientific name: Conium maculatum

when crushed or broken. The poison that Socrates famously ingested to take his life was derived from Poison Hemlock, containing coniine. An official drug of the United States in Pharmacopoeia (1890-1920), coniine was historically used as a sedative and pain reliever in minute doses.3,15 Toxic effects of coniine on the central nervous system of animals and humans resemble the action of nicotine.16 Every part of the plant contains deadly alkaloid coniine, though it is particularly concentrated in the roots and fruit.15 Unfortunately, Poison Hemlock is very easy to confuse with common species like wild carrot or Queen Anne’s Lace, so stick closely to domesticated varieties.

Brendan Middel has a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Sciences with interests in native plants and birds for environmental education and conservation. His activities include work at both EnergyFuturesLab and The King’s University, experience as a resource conservation intern at Elk Island National Park, and as a research technician assisting data collection throughout the Alberta 28

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | FALL 2019

Rockies on Whitebark pine.


FEATURES

Canada Goldenrod

references

Scientific name: Solidago canadensis

1.

Uprety Y, Asselin H, Dhakal A, Julien N. Traditional use of medicinal plants in the boreal forest of canada: Review and perspectives. Journal of ethnobiology and ethnomedicine. 2012;8(1):7. doi: 10.1186/1746-4269-8-7.

2.

Henderson L, Yue QY, Bergquist C, Gerden B, Arlett P. St john's wort (hypericum perforatum): Drug interactions and clinical outcomes. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. 2002;54(4):349-356. doi: 10.1046/j.1365-2125.2002.01683.x.

3.

Foster S, Hobbs C. A field guide to western medicinal plants and herbs. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; 2002.

4.

Schwarting AE, Hiner LD. A histological study of chimaphila umbellata. J Am Pharm Assoc. 1943;32(7):182-187.

5.

Galván IJ, Mir-Rashed N, Jessulat M, et al. Antifungal and antioxidant activities of the phytomedicine pipsissewa, chimaphila umbellata. Phytochemistry. 2008;69(3):738-746.

6.

Kokorina LA, Neupokoeva AV. Influence of laser irradiation on the activity of plant pharmaceuticals with the assessment by the bacteria growth dynamics. Journal of Biomedical Photonics & Engineering. 2019:020302.

7.

Soldin SJ. Digoxin- issues and controversies. Clinical Chemistry. 1986;32(1):5-12.

8.

R L Noble. The discovery of the vinca alkaloids—chemotherapeutic agents against cancer. Biochemistry and cell biology = Biochimie et biologie cellulaire. 1990;68(12):1344-1351. doi: 10.1139/o90-197.

9.

Balick MJ, Beitel JM. Lycopodium spores used in condom manufacture: Associated health hazards. Econ Bot. 1989;43(3):373-377.

Pharmacological derivative(s): saponin

17

A flowering perennial herb native to North America and commonly found in plains and montane regions, Canada Goldenrod is an introduced species in gardens, floral arrangements, and landscapes across the world. A large solitary stalk with yellow flowers arranged in dense pyramidal clusters, it blooms from July to September, a great way to add colour and texture to a garden landscape for the later bloom and reddish fall foliage. Studies of Canada Goldenrod extracts show antitumor, anti-inflammatory, antifungal, analgesic, antimicrobial, and diuretic activity.17-19 Indigenous peoples used Solidago canadensis for many of these properties to treat boils, burns, and ulcers as well as flu, fever, and diarrhea. The therapeutic potential of plants like Solidago canadensis 3

reveals the powerful link between ancient traditional medicinal use and modern pharmacy.20 This is reflected in its name; from the Composite family, the Latin “Solidago” means “to make whole.”

10. Orhan I, Terzioglu S, Şener B. A-onocerin: An acetylcholinesterase inhibitor from lycopodium clavatum. Planta Med. 2003;69(03):265-267. 11.

Kershaw L, MacKinnon A, Pojar J. Plants of the Rocky Mountains. New edition ed. Canada: Partners Publishing and Lone Pine Media Productions (B.C) Ltd.; 2016.

12.

Polar J, Mackinnon A. Alpine Plants of British Columbia, Alberta and Northwest North America. Edmonton, Alberta: Lone Pine Publishing; 2013.

13.

Mahdi JG, Mahdi AJ, Bowen ID. The historical analysis of aspirin discovery, its relation to the willow tree and antiproliferative and anticancer potential. Cell Proliferation. 2005;39(2):147-155. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2184.2006.00377.x.

14. Mahdi JG. Medicinal potential of willow: A chemical perspective of aspirin discovery. Journal of Saudi Chemical Society. 2010;14(3):317-322. doi: 10.1016/j.jscs.2010.04.010. 15.

Al-Snafi AE. Pharmacology and toxicology of conium maculatum-A review. The Pharmaceutical and Chemical Journal. 2016;3(2):136-142.

16.

Vetter J. Poison hemlock (conium maculatum L.). Food and Chemical Toxicology. 2004;42(9):1373-1382. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2004.04.009.

17.

Abdel Baki P, El-Sherei M, Khaleel A, Abdel Motaal A, Abdallah H. Aquaretic activity of solidago canadensis L. cultivated in egypt and determination of the most bioactive fraction. Iranian Journal of Pharmaceutical Research. 2019;0(0). doi: 10.22037/ijpr.2019.2390.

18.

Zihare L, Blumberga D. Insight into bioeconomy. solidago canadensis as a valid resource. brief review. Energy Procedia. 2017;128:275-280. doi: 10.1016/j.egypro.2017.09.074.

19.

Kołodziej B, Kowalski R, Kędzia B. Antibacterial and antimutagenic activity of extracts aboveground parts of three solidago species: Solidago virgaurea L., solidago canadensis L. and solidago gigantea ait. Journal of Medicinal Plants Research. 2011;5(31):6770-6779.

20. Deeg K, Eichhorn T, Alexie G, et al. Growth inhibition of human acute lymphoblastic CCRF-CEM leukemia cells by medicinal plants of the west-canadian gwich’in native americans. Natural products and bioprospecting. 2012;2(1):35-40.

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | ualberta.ca/pharmacy

29


LOOKING BACK

The Pasutto Period

Franco Mario Pasutto

THE SIXTH DEAN OF PHARMACY AND PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES, 1999-2009

BY AL BUTEROL FRANCO MARIO PASUTTO was born in 1947 in Valvasone, Italy and emigrated with his mother to join his father in Canada when he was

Professor Pasutto

seven years old. The journey began by boat from Genoa to Halifax, then

When Dean Van Petten passed away in 1980, Dr. Gordon Myers was

by train to Edmonton, and eventually ended in Forestburgh, Alberta,

appointed Acting Dean and Pasutto was asked to teach Myers’ courses

where he settled for three years. From there, his family moved to Tofield

in bacteriology, antimicrobial drugs, and vaccines. In the following year,

where his brother Gianni was born. Several years later they moved on

Pasutto was appointed to an assistant professor tenure track position. In

to Edmonton.

1981, his contribution to teaching, administration, and research began

Pasutto received his primary education at St. Edmonds Junior High

in earnest. He rose quickly through the ranks and, by 1989, had shown

and O’Leary High School. In 1965, he was admitted to the Medical

great commitment and achievements in academia and was elevated to

Laboratory Science program at the University of Alberta but promptly

full professor.

transferred to Pharmacy the following year. He received a Bachelor of

During his 35 years at the Faculty, Pasutto believed it was important

Science in Pharmacy degree in 1972. Along the way, he joined the Zeta

to engage and contribute to all three aspects of academia: teaching,

Psi fraternity and subsequently served as its president. Disillusioned

research, and service. He instructed 18 different undergraduate and

by the restrictive distributive model of pharmacy practice, he decided

graduate courses with lecture hour contributions consistently ranked in

to enter the graduate program in pharmaceutical sciences under the

the top 5 per cent in the Faculty and 75th percentile in the University.

supervision of Dr. Ed Knaus and received a Doctor of Philosophy

Class sizes ranged from eight to 130 students.

(Medicinal Chemistry) in 1978. By this time Pasutto had married his wife, Marianne, and had two sons, Santino (1976) and Lorenzo (1980). Pasutto went on to apply his medicinal chemistry expertise to

In recognition of his teaching efforts, he was a four-time winner of the Bristol Myers Squibb Award for Excellence in Pharmaceutical Teaching (1985, 1988, 1990, 1996) and received the University of Alberta A. C.

the development of methodologies for the analysis of trace levels of

Rutherford Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching (1989). He

pharmaceuticals in biological fluids and pollutants in environmental

was appointed Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education in 1996.

samples. This led him to a two-year post-doctoral position with Dr.

Pasutto’s administrative service to the Faculty and university grew

Ronald T. Coutts, where he mastered various instrumental techniques,

dramatically with the passage of time. He was a regular (and often

particularly gas chromatographic and mass spectral analytical

repeated) member of Faculty Committees, and he also chaired the

applications. This resulted in his appointment as Drug Testing

Medicinal Chemistry Division, FSPC, FEC, Tenure, Admissions,

Supervisor at the Canadian National Track and Field Championships in

Faculty Accreditation Self-Assessment Reports, and was the Founder

Calgary in 1983 and the Universiade (World University Games)

and Chair of the Student Advisory Board. The Board was comprised

in Edmonton.

of eight undergraduate students who met with him on a monthly

30

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | FALL 2019


LOOKING BACK

The Dean selection process required candidates to present their

basis during the academic term. This provided a forum for improving communication between students and the rest of the Faculty and assisted

vision to various constituencies including pharmacy staff, students,

the Dean’s office in considering decisions that affected the student body.

professional associations, a forum open to the university community and,

He also served on multiple University Committees including the Association of Academic Staff University of Alberta (ASS:UA), U of

ultimately, the Dean Selection Committee. Franco’s vision was to face the critical question:

A Disciplinary Impaneling Board, Representative of Vice-President

“WHAT IS ACHIEVABLE, OVER THE NEXT FIVE YEARS, WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF THE CURRENT AND FUTURE CLIMATE OF INADEQUATE FISCAL AND HUMAN RESOURCES?”

(Academic) on Chairman Selection Committees, Representative of Vice-President Academic (1990-99) on University Departmental Chair Search and Selection Committees, U of A Representative to AUCC Inquiry on University Education, GFC Representative (Faculty of Medicine Tenure Committee), Convocation Committee, Canadian

To him, the challenges were:

Chemical Conference & Exhibition Committee, CAAST, Senate

1.

PHARMACY FACILITY: Without a new building, or substantive

Committee of Lay Observers of the Admissions Process in Quota

additional and redesigned space in the existing facility, it could

Programs, General Appeals, GFC, GFC Executive, Academic Planning

not recruit. It followed that, without additional staff, the Faculty

Committee, Senate, Chancellor Search Committee, and Focus Group

would not effectively realize innovations and advancements in

for Development of a Tuberculosis Curriculum.

the curriculum (PharmD), outreach education, and research/

Pasutto also chaired the AAS:UA External Relations, Health Sciences Faculties Education Sub-Committee, CAFA Exceptional

technology transfer. 2. BUDGET/FUNDRAISING: The operating budget at the time

Teachers Focus Group, Vice President Research for Committees, Vice

would not meet current and future demands relating to space,

President Academic for Enrollment Management Committee, University

capital equipment, undergraduate programs, research, and

Representative to Health Services, Education, Research Consortium

outreach education.

Education Sub-Committee, Nursing Curriculum Focus Group, and Builders of Alberta Awards Committee. He was elected by the university community as one of two nominees representing the AAS:UA academic staff on the Board of Governors from 1997 to 2000. During this time, he

3.

STAFF RECRUITMENT/RETENTION: Adequate space, budget, and competitive salaries would facilitate recruitment and retention.

4.

EXTERNAL COMMUNITIES: The Faculty needed to

also served as a representative on Board Committees.

establish, reaffirm and, in some cases, redefine their interactions

Dean Pasutto

with the Alberta Pharmaceutical Association, practitioners,

Pasutto became Dean of the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences in July of 1999. Upon his acceptance, it was discovered that there was no university or provincial government regulation preventing a Faculty Dean from simultaneously sitting on the Board of Governors. This was a clear conflict of interest and he resigned. Appropriate regulations were quickly enacted.

health authorities, government, third-party payers, and the industrial sector. 5.

FACULTY ENVIRONMENT ISSUES: Staff had suggested that the Faculty was drifting, not sailing. There was some divisiveness related to marginalization, loss of collegiality, a reticence to contribute without adequate compensation, and absence of an effective administrative framework.

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | ualberta.ca/pharmacy

31


LOOKING BACK Pasutto appointed Dr. Fakhreddin (Mo) Jamali as Associate Dean of Research, Dr. John Bachynsky as Director of Undergraduate Affairs, and Dr. Ed Knaus as Director of Graduate Studies. The Division Chairs were Dr. Steve McQuarrie (Pharmaceutical Sciences) and Ms. Sheila Kelcher (Pharmacy Practice). Renovations began with third-floor centralization of administrative and studentoriented services that had previously been scattered across six floors. Upon

Pasutto’s Areas of Research

1

completion, this area included offices for the Dean, Associate Dean, Accountant, Faculty Development, Computer Support, Continuing Education, Clinical Placements, and Undergraduate and Graduate Records. The Pharmacy Practice Laboratory was completely redesigned with a $400,000 donation from Shopper’s Drug Mart, and the Sterile Products Laboratory was also totally renovated. The Faculty initiated curriculum reform, considered different teaching models and modules, and began concerted efforts to develop a PharmD program. Under Pasutto’s

2

leadership the development of a joint MBA and BSc Pharmacy program with the Faculty of Business was proposed, and Dr. Raimar Lobenberg’s unique initiative to establish a Drug Development and Innovation Centre (DDIC) that would bridge the gap between basic sciences and clinical development of market-ready products was supported and pushed forward. In 2001, Pasutto initiated discussions between the Faculty, university officials, Student’s Union, and corporate pharmacy to bring the University’s Student Pharmacy Services facility to a modern model of pharmacy practice and to provide a training site for pharmacy students. In October of 2006, the Government of Alberta, alongside the privately-owned Katz Group, pledged $14 million to the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, making it the recipient of the largest one-time donation to a Canadian Pharmacy Faculty. Other pharmaceutical companies would go on to donate $5.5 million to be matched by the provincial government. This brought the total donation pledged to $25 million, and concrete plans to relocate Pharmacy were proposed for the building under construction at the corner of 87th Avenue and 114th Street. The university officially named it Katz Group Centre for Pharmacy and Health Research, which is still home to many of the Faculty's academic staff, graduate students, researchers, and laboratories today. Under Pasutto’s leadership, the Faculty maintained a steady top place in the national pharmacy board exams. He also revamped graduate and continuing education programs, unprecedentedly increased the Faculty’s financial footprint, enhanced and expanded the undergraduate program, and restarted and received approval from the University Governance system and the provincial government for the PharmD initiative. Outstanding clinical and scientific staff members were recruited, and collaborations with the Alberta College of Pharmacy helped secure prescribing rights for Alberta pharmacists — a national first. Pasutto received the Alberta Centennial Medal in 2005, an Alberta College of Pharmacy Honourary Life Membership in 2009, was conferred the title of Professor Emeritus upon retirement in 2011, and also received the Alberta College of Pharmacy Centennial Award for his contributions to the profession. In 2014, he received the Outstanding Pharmacy Alumnus award from the Faculty. Pasutto will also be remembered for his love of all things Italian, including soccer, espresso, and La Pasta Trattoria in Hub Mall. The Pasutto Room in the Edmonton Clinic Health Academy was dedicated in his honour in 2017. 

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THE MORTAR & PESTLE | FALL 2019

3

MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY: design, synthesis, and pharmacological evaluation of heterocyclic compounds acting on the arachidonic acid cascade. Specifically, the synthesis of leukotriene antagonists with bronchodilating activity and novel potassium channel activators. ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY: development of stereospecific chromatographic methods for the quantification of drugs and metabolites in biological fluids, including nonsteroidalanti-inflammatory drugs, s-adrenoceptor agents, antiarrhythmics, and calcium channel blockers. DEVELOPMENT OF MICROBIAL MODELS OF HUMAN METABOLISM: as an alternative to animal models and as tools for the preparative-scale synthesis of drugs or metabolites. Interests included s-receptor antagonists, antiarrhythmics, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories.

Pasutto received funding in support of research, equipment, and personnel from peer-reviewed sources (MRC/ CIHR, NSERC, Health & Welfare Canada, and AHFMR) as a principal or co-applicant. This funding resulted in more than 200 peer-reviewed publications, scientific abstracts, and presentations as well as supervision of more than 30 postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, technicians, and undergraduate summer students. Other research-related activities included being a Reviewer and/or Grant Committee Member for the Medical Research Council (CIHR), University Central Research Fund, and BC Health Foundation as well as a regular Reviewer for various scientific journals. He was also a Member of more than 200 PhD or MSc Candidacy and Defense Committees.


LOOKING BACK

Eh!

OH CANADA!

BY REX FILLER

THE ORDER OF CANADA was created in 1967 as part of Canada’s centennial celebrations and is the pinnacle of Canada’s honours system. It recognizes a lifetime of outstanding achievement, dedication to the community, and service to the nation and humanity. In the history of the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Alberta, three graduates have achieved this honour: Andrew Charles Anderson (Dip. Pharm 1934), Dr. Bernard Edward Reidel (BScPharm 1943, MSc 1949), and Dr. Kamal Kishor Midha (PhD 1969).

DR. BERNARD EDWARD RIEDEL

received the Lieutenant-Governor’s Gold Medal for his service and was discharged on April 1946 with the rank of Flying Officer. Dr. Riedel joined the University of Alberta’s

Dr. Bernard Edward Riedel was born on

School of Pharmacy in 1946 as a lecturer

September 25, 1919, and grew up in Fairview,

and then assistant professor, and received his

Alberta. He graduated from the University of

Master of Science in Pharmacy in 1949. From

Alberta with a BSc Pharm in 1943. He played

1950 to 1953, he was a PhD candidate in the

interfaculty basketball, received the APhA

Department of Biochemistry at the University

Scholarship first-class standing and the Alberta

of Western Ontario. Also in 1953, he was an

Pharmaceutical Association Gold Medal.

abstractor for the Physiology Biochemistry

Dr. Riedel was a 2nd Lieutenant in the

and Pharmacology section of Excerpta Medica

Canadian Officers Training Corps and served

and acted as Chief Training Officer for the

with the RCAF and RAF for three years as

University Reserve Squadron. He then spent

a navigator-bombardier with coastal and

a summer undertaking oncology biological

transport command in Northern Ireland. He

research at Canada’s atomic energy project in

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33


LOOKING BACK

Chalk River, Ontario, where a department of

Cunningham family donated new funds to

XI Scientific Research Society, Canadian Lung

public health bursary financed his work.

acquire major equipment. During his tenure

Association; chairman of the BC Transplant

the faculty developed a vigorous continuing

Society (1986 to 1989); and honorary president

of the Association of the Teaching Staff of

education program in conjunction with the

of the HSC Hospital Volunteers Association;.

the University of Alberta and the University

College of Pharmacists of British Columbia,

He was also a board member of the Derrick

of Alberta’s RCAF Squadron Commanding

and the Clinical Pharmacy program was

Golf and Winter Club in Edmonton; elder

Officer with the rank of Wing Commander.

created, bringing together community and

and session member of the Metropolitan

In 1956, he took a course in radioisotope

hospital pharmacy residencies and providing

United Church; executive of the Boy Scouts of

technology at the Oak Ridge Institute of

training opportunities for pharmacy students

Canada, Edmonton Region; and served during

Nuclear Studies. Then, in 1957, he undertook

to move toward a clinical, patient-oriented

the months of May and June for several years

summer research as a scientist at the Defense

practice of pharmacy. In addition to these

at the Reserve Officers School RCAF.

Research Board, Suffield Experimental Station.

developments, the BC Drug & Poison

In 1959, he demonstrated leadership as the

Information Centre was established. From

in the Order of Canada for his immense

Chairman of the CCPF. Between 1958 and

1976 to 1985, he was coordinator of Health

contributions as a scientist, academic, and

1967, he was a Professor in the Faculty of

Sciences with responsibilities for all University

senior administrator. He also received the

Pharmacy at the University of Alberta and,

Health Science Programs at UBC as well as

Centennial Medal (1967), a DSc (Honorary)

from 1961 to 1967, he was executive assistant to

the several teaching hospitals. During his

from the University of Alberta (1990), the

the University of Alberta’s Vice-President.

deanship, the number of teaching and research

UBC 75th Anniversary Medal (1990), a

Dr. Riedel was appointed Dean of the

faculty increased dramatically, and prior to his

Medal for the 125th anniversary of Canadian

Faculty of Pharmacy at the University of

retirement in 1984, he initiated a program in

confederation (1992), and the Queen’s Golden

British Columbia (UBC) from 1967 to 1984.

pharmacy administration.

Jubilee Medal (2002).

From 1954 to 1967, he served as the secretary

Under his leadership, the faculty’s name

Dr. Riedel also played an important role

On April 16, 1997, Dr. Riedel was invested

Dr. Riedel made significant contributions

changed from the “Faculty of Pharmacy” to

in a number of other organizations. He was

to Canada’s pharmaceutical and health

the “Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences”. In

a charter member of the Medical Research

sciences through his career as a professor and

1968, the undergraduate degree name changed

Council of Canada (1968 to 1969); first

administrator at the universities of Alberta

from BSP to BSc (Pharm), and the PhD was

Chairman of the Pharmaceutical Sciences

and British Columbia. Highly respected by his

added to the graduate studies program. He

Committee; AFPC Honourary Life Member

peers and the local community, he was a major

contributed to positioning the faculty at UBC

(1985); CPhA Honourary Life Member (1986);

influence on a number of young Canadians

as one of the strongest pharmacy faculties in

member of the BC Cancer Society, BC Yukon

who have gone on to successful careers in

Canada. In 1971, the new research wing of the

Division Canadian Cancer Society, BC Lung

academia and industry. He passed away on

Cunningham Building was opened, and the

Association, J.F. Morgan Foundation, Sigma

April 6, 2011.

ANDREW CHARLES ANDERSON

Pharmacy in 1948, the first Alberta pharmacy operated in conjunction with a local medical clinic. He became involved in civic politics in 1950

Andrew “Andy” Charles Anderson was born

with his election to the school board. His

in Shabbona, Illinois in 1910 and moved to

community service included 14 years on the

Champion, Alberta with his family in 1912. A

school board, three years on the city recreation

1934 graduate with a diploma in pharmacy, he

commission, and 34 years with the Rotary

worked at Kitson’s Pharmacy Ltd. for 14 years

Club. He was a Life Member of the Chamber

before opening Anderson’s Medical Dental

of Commerce, a Member of St. Michael’s

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LOOKING BACK

Hospital Board, and a Member of the Alberta

important developments in Lethbridge,

Lethbridge. Anderson Hall at the University

Housing Council. In 1963, Anderson was

including park development and the

of Lethbridge was named in his honour, as

awarded the first annual Bowl of Hygeia by

establishment of the University of Lethbridge,

was the Anderson Industrial Park in North

the Alberta Pharmaceutical Association. He

where he became a member of the Senate and

Lethbridge.

was elected Alderman in Lethbridge in 1964

Board of Governors. He was instrumental in

He was the first alumnus of the Faculty to

and Mayor in 1968. He was Mayor for six

the sale of the power plant, redevelopment of

be made a member of the Order of Canada in

consecutive terms, holding office until 1986.

downtown, relocation of the railway, building

1985. That same year, he received an Honorary

of a new city hall, and expansion to West

LLD from the University of Lethbridge.

Anderson was a central figure in many

DR. KAMAL KISHORE MIDHA

Board of the FIP Foundation for Education and Research (1998 to 2003); Co-Chair of the AAPS sponsored Bio International Conferences (1989, 1992, 1994, 1996, 1999,

Dr. Kamal Kishore Midha was born in

2003); Chair of the Pharmaceutical Sciences

Kamalia, India on October 26, 1941. He

Grants Committee, Medical Research Council

graduated from the University of Saugar

of Canada (1984 to 1988); and Co-Chair of

with a BSc Pharm in 1964 and MSc Pharm in

the AAPS Workshop on Bioanalytical Method

1966. He received a pharmacy PhD from the

Validation.

University of Alberta in 1969 and a DSc from

He was an active member of AAPS and has

the University of Saskatchewan in 1985. He

served on the Awards Committee, Nomination

is a recognized authority on bioavailability,

Committee, PPDM Fellows Review

bioequivalence, bioanalysis, pharmacokinetics,

Committee, AAPS Fellow Committee, and

and pharmacodynamics.

was a member of the AAPS Strategic Visioning

Dr. Midha’s academic career was primarily

Committee. In 1999, he was appointed a

at the University of Saskatchewan, where he

member of President’s Circle, National

received the AFPC Award for Excellence in

Academy of Science, National Academy of

Research and the McNeill Award (1984). He

pharmaceutical sciences and proceedings of

was a Professor of Pharmacy from 1979 to

Engineering, and Institute of Medicine, U.S. In

Bio International Conferences since 1989.

2003, he was named Member of Honour in the

1995 and the coordinator of an MRC Program

Dr. Midha was the recipient of Kolthoff

Grant entitled “Towards More Efficacious Use of

Romanian Academy of Medical Sciences and

Gold Medal Award (1989), AAPS Research

Psychotropic Drugs” that attracted more than $6

received the Queen’s Golden Jubilee Medal.

Achievement Award in Analysis and

million from granting agencies and industry.

In 2004, Dr. Midha was awarded the Eminent

Pharmaceutical Quality (1992), Heinz

A research group he created was converted

International Scientist Award by Indian Drug

Lehmann Award for Outstanding Achievement

into Pharmalytics Inc., a not-for-profit drug

Manufacturers’ Association (IDMA), and

Award in Neuropsychopharmacology (1993),

metabolism and disposition institute of the

was the recipient of Pharmaceutical Sciences

and Distinguished Researcher Award from

University of Saskatchewan, on which he

World Congress. In 2011, he became a CPhA

the University of Saskatchewan (1994). In

served as Chair of the Board of Directors.

Honourary Life Member.

December of 1995, Dr. Midha was honoured

Dr. Midha was a member of the Expert Advisory Panel on Drug Evaluation and

with the Order of Canada.

In 2013, Dr. Midha was conferred with an honorary doctorate from Monash University,

His leadership positions include President

the Doctor of Laws (honoris causa),

International Pharmacopoeia of the WHO

of FIP (2006 to 2010); Vice-President of FIP;

and the author/co-author of approximately

recognizing his accomplishments and major

Chairman of the Board of Pharmaceutical

300 scientific articles and book chapters.

contributions to pharmaceutical science and

Sciences of FIP (1988 to 1996); Member of the

global health. 

He has co-edited and co-chaired topics in

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | ualberta.ca/pharmacy

35


LOOKING BACK

A touch of class BY KALYNA HENNIG

ENRICHING THE STUDENT EXPERIENCE through financial

given us so much and also memorialize several class members.” In

assistance or recognition of academic success doesn’t just advance

2019, the Pharmacy Class of 1991 Memorial Award was officially

the education of one student but the profession as a whole.

established. “It serves as an ongoing tribute to, and reminder of,

“Notwithstanding individual, family, corporate, and other legacy gifts given to the faculty, we are fortunate to have established a

an outstanding educational program, great memories, and a bright future,” says Dr. Davies.

number of Class Gifts in our 105-year span from 1914 to 2019

The second most recent Class Gift was given by the Class of 2013

that work to support the next generation of pharmacists and

in memory of their classmate, Laura Chee, who passed away in a car

pharmaceutical scientists,” says Dean Dr. Neal Davies (BSc Pharm

accident during her pharmacy degree.

1991). “These Class Gifts are the culmination of a collective passion

“Being able to establish an award and name it after your class is an

to advance the health of the community through education and to

incredible feat. It epitomizes not only class unity and perseverance

leave a legacy of success.”

but the legacy of your time here at the University of Alberta,” says

The most senior class to create a Class Gift is the Class of 1955,

Matthew Truong (BSc Pharm 2013), friend of Laura Chee and a

who generously created both a scholarship and a bursary. Over the

bursary recipient himself. “Laura’s friends, along with her family

years, their philanthropic torch has been passed on, and 11 Class

and the class of 2013, decided to create the Laura Chee Memorial

Gifts are currently available to students.

Scholarship in Pharmacy…to show our class unity and leave a

“In 2017, I wrote to my own classmates suggesting that we

legacy of our friend.” The Laura Chee Memorial Scholarship

collectively consider establishing such a gift,” says Dr. Davies of

in Pharmacy was awarded for the first time at the 2018 White Coat

the Class of 1991. “I’m proud to say that 60 members of my class

& Awards Ceremony.

have heard the call so far and responded with significant monetary donations. It’s our way to give back to the University that has

These two gifts are the only Class Gifts to be created by a graduating class that has graduated in the last 33 years.

PHARMACY CLASS GIFTS HISTORY

Class of 1955 Bursary & Scholarship “The financial relief you provided inspired me to volunteer and continue to

Class of 1957 Bursary

Class of 1960 Bursary

“Even a small amount of money can

“This bursary made an immense impact

make a big change in someone’s life.

on my success in the program and

“Your generosity and kindness has given

I now have the intent to open a charity

as a pharmacist.”

me the financial abilities to pursue

and help those who truly need it, as you

– KELLY GRAHAM, BSC PHARM 2013

pharmacy-related events like PDW!”

did for me.”

– HUI MING YANG, PHARMD 2020

– GURPAL DEOL, BSC PHARM 2014

give back to others in my community.” – PETER VAN HERK, PHARMD 2019

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LOOKING BACK

Classes of 1963, 1964, and 1965 Bursary “Your gift has helped me to help others.” – ANH VU, BSC PHARM 2011

“Your bursary allowed me to attend an eye-opening course held in Forio, Italy where we immersed ourselves in the Italian culture and learned the Mediterranean cultures’ approach to health and wellness…that I now incorporate into my practice every day.” - HEATHER DERRICK

Class of 1973 Bursary “I will never forget your kindness and will work harder to share this generosity with other students in need.” – NAYOUNG SHIN, BSC PHARM 2017

Class of 1975 Pharmacy Clinical Rotation Travel Award

Class of 1976 Bursary

Class of 2013 Laura Chee Memorial Scholarship in Pharmacy

Class of 1991 Memorial Award Class of 1985 Award

Created in memory of classmates. Inaugural recipients to be announced at the 2019 White Coat and Awards Ceremony.

A Class Gift is one means of supporting your alma mater. It can be a meaningful way to give back and ensure the continuity of the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Class Reunion Gifts can also be supportive and symbolic. For more information on establishing a Class Gift, contact Andrew MacIsaac at andrew.macisaac@ualberta.ca or 780-492-8084.

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37


FAST FACTS 2019

GOLDEN GRADUATES PHARMACY CLASS OF 1969 CELEBRATES 50 YEARS OF PHARMACY

Then & Now 1969

$15,550

Average Cost of a New House in Canada

2019

$387,000

$8,550

Average Yearly Income of a Canadian Pharmacist

$1,950

35¢

Cost of a Toyota Corolla

$93,932

Gas per Gallon

$23,999

$3.98

1969 Fast Facts

38

STANLEY CUP CHAMPIONS: MONTRÉAL CANADIENS

PRIME MINISTER: LIBERAL PARTY’S PIERRE TRUDEAU

FASHION: BELL BOTTOM JEANS AND TIE-DYE SHIRTS

TV: SESAME STREET MAKES ITS DEBUT ON PBS

NEWS: VIETNAM WAR PROTESTS: 250,000 MARCH ON WASHINGTON IN PROTEST OF THE VIETNAM WAR

SCIENCE: APOLLO 11 IS THE FIRST MANNED LANDING ON THE MOON

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | FALL 2019


FAST FACTS 2019

HEY JUDE-Y

JUDITH L. MALCOLM

BSc(Pharm) 1961

JUDITH A. HALLS

BSc(Pharm) 1967

JUDY L. SMORDIN

BSc(Pharm) 1980

JUDY T. CHU

BSc(Pharm) 1991

JUDITH A. SCOTT

BSc(Pharm) 1961

JUDITH D. VENZINA

BSc(Pharm) 1975

JUDITH H. GILHOLME

BSc(Pharm) 1983

JUDY Y. HUANG

BSc(Pharm) 1993

Did you know? IN 1969, THE BEATLES’ SONG HEY JUDE WAS

CANADA’S TOP SINGLE. IT WAS NOMINATED FOR RECORD OF THE YEAR, SONG OF THE YEAR, AND BEST POP PERFORMANCE BY A GROUP AT THE GRAMMY’S. AT THE FACULTY OF PHARMACY AND PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES, “HEY JUDE(Y)” HAS BEEN SUNG SINCE 1961, AS THESE JUDY’S HAVE ALL MADE HEALTH CARE better, better,

better ...

JUDITH J. ROSS

BSc(Pharm) 1962

JUDITH A. LORENZ

JUDITH G. JOHNSTON

BSc(Pharm) 1965

JUDY H. MUSEY

JUDITH M. BELL

BSc(Pharm) 1966

JUDY A. BREITKREUZ

BSc(Pharm) 1976

BSc(Pharm) 1977

BSc(Pharm) 1980

JUDY L. SCHOEN (NEE WONG)

JUDITH L. JORGENSON-NYROSE

BSc(Pharm) 1988

BSc(Pharm) 1983

JUDY M. GEE

BSc(Pharm) 1998

BSc(Pharm) 1985

JUDI W. LEE

BSc(Pharm) 2008

JUDY M. YIP (NEE MAH)

JUDY YUE MA

BSc(Pharm) 2019

JUDITH I. SUTTON

BSc(Pharm) 1967

JUDY MACK

BSc(Pharm) 1980

JUDY A. HERTEL

BSc(Pharm) 1989

JUDY XU

BSc(Pharm) 2021

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39


plant the seeds of inspiration today. With your donation to the Prescription for the Future Fund, you can help grow the next generation of pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists by supporting supplemental learning opportunities for students, exchange programs, student-led events and initiatives, conference attendance and so much more!

To learn more about our Prescription for the Future Fund or other giving opportunities, please visit uab.ca/givetopharm or call 780-492-8084.

Please return undeliverable Canadian addresses to:

Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences 2-35 MSB, University of Alberta 8613 - 114 Street Edmonton AB T6G 2H7 phcomms@ualberta.ca ualberta.ca/pharmacy 40

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | FALL 2019

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