Page 1

WINTER 2019

UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA

THE

FACULTY OF PHARMACY AND PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES

HOW ALBERTA PHARMACISTS ARE BRINGING HEALTH CARE

INTRODUCING THE SMHEARTCARD

MANAGING ASTHMA

LOOKING BACK AT THE MOSKALYK DECADE


THE PROFESSION’S PLUTONIUM

FUEL THE PHARMACY PROFESSION AND LAUNCH THE NEXT GENERATION INTO THE FUTURE AS A PRECEPTOR. Preceptors are the flux capacitors of the pharmacy profession, and now it’s easier than ever to join the UAlberta Pharmacy precepting team! Our simplified three-step sign-up process will let you start making a difference right away and give you the opportunity to nurture and promote the profession, develop personally, and influence the maturation and education of your colleagues of the future. Visit our website at UALBERTA.CA/PHARMACY/PRECEPTORS to join the team. 2

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | WINTER 2019


Contents Dean: Dr. Neal M. Davies Assistant Dean, Advancement: Kieran Andrew MacIsaac Editor: Kalyna Hennig Editorial Assistant: Courtney Bettin Contributors: Courtney Bettin Johnny B. Good Kalyna Hennig Kieran Andrew MacIsaac Marty McFly Jyllian Park Selena Phillips-Boyle Amy Schuring Matthew Stepanic Biff Tannen Goldie Wilson Daniel Wood Design/Illustration:

04 Dean's Distillate

NEWS & NOTES 08 Preceptor of the Year 10 Outstanding Alumnus

SPOTLIGHT 12 History Book Tour Ever wondered how the Faculty got its start? Be part of Dean Davies’ book tour, and learn all about the evolution of one of the most boasted programs in Canada.

14 White Coat & Awards

20 Back to the Future

Dignitaries from across the province

Alberta pharmacists share how the

watched as the inaugural Doctor of

province’s unique scope of practice

Pharmacy class put on their white coats

allows them to be some of the most

for the first time.

innovative, patient-centred, and

15 Dr. Jamali Research Symposium Students and colleagues

Paul Twa

commemorated Dr. Jamali’s 37 years

Editor’s Note:

in the faculty at the annual research

The picture of a modern pharmacist is more fluid than ever, especially in Alberta, where pharmacists stand in front of various backdrops and on various platforms. In this seventh issue, I invite you to step into the time machine of the pharmacy profession and marvel not only at the advances that have been made in Alberta and beyond, but at the diversity of care and opportunity in your industry. — Kalyna Hennig The Mortar & Pestle is published twice per year to keep our community of alumni, students, and faculty connected and informed. As always, we welcome your comments, suggestions and story pitches to guide future issues. phcomms@ualberta.ca ualberta.ca/pharmacy

FEATURES

conference in November, showcasing some of pharmacy’s brightest.

independent practitioners in the field.

25 Asthmanagement If asthma is one of the most common chronic conditions in the country, then why is it still one of the most mismanaged?

IN THE MORTAR

LOOKING BACK

16 Smart Hearts

27 The Moskalyk Decade

This device helps administer lifesaving

From clinical rotations to renovated labs

medication to prevent a fatal heart

and extensive course changes, Dean

attack, and it fits in the palm of your

Moskalyk helped pave the way for the

hand.

faculty's outstanding pharmacy program.

30 Fast Facts 2018

18 Professional Precedent The ongoing opioid crisis is inspiring

Learn about all the pieces that come

PharmD student, Hannah Kaliel, to

together to make the Faculty of Pharmacy

discover a more all-encompassing

and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

approach to substance abuse treatment.

19 Fighting Superbugs

31 Great Scott! How many great Scotts call the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical

facebook.com/ualbertapharmacy

Though the discovery of antibiotics

@ualberta_pharmacy

transformed patient outcomes around

@UAlberta_Pharm

the world, it also started a clock.

Sciences home?

linkedin.com/school/ualberta-pharmacy THE MORTAR & PESTLE | ualberta.ca/pharmacy

3


DEAN'S DISTILLATE

S

UMMER IS A distant memory now, and since our last

and second to none in the universe. We also recognized the successes

correspondence another academic year has commenced

of many pharmacy students and graduate students who have received

and is in full swing. This is perhaps the most exciting time in

scholarships or other honours. I am so proud of our collective

the history of the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical

accomplishments. I can never thank you enough for your efforts to build

Sciences at the University of Alberta. As you will see in this edition of

the profession of Pharmacy, and I look forward to continuing to advance

The Mortar & Pestle, we have had a productive year and accomplished

down the road together.

many things. We kicked off the year with our first Entry to Practice PharmD Class of 2022 and a TGIF. Looking inward, the new academic

I had some existential time-travel this fall at airports and in airplanes to

year continued with our University Homecoming where alumni had

contemplate our Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences’ past,

the opportunity to go back in time again (p.15). These events gave us an

present, and future. The preparation of future pharmacy practitioners

opportunity to acknowledge the Golden Graduates of 1968 and many

towards the provision of primary health care in our province, nation, and

other class reunions experiencing various milestones. Of course, the

world, starting here at the University of Alberta is, of course, our defining

centerpiece of our Homecoming Season was the White Coat and Awards

characteristic. This past year our pharmacy students scored better and

Ceremony (p.14). This year, we were extremely fortunate to have the

higher in the 2018 Pharmacy Examining Board of Canada examinations

Deputy Premier and Health Minister Sarah Hoffman and Dr. Robert

than ever before and we are proud of this accomplishment. In addition,

Foster, our 2018 Outstanding Pharmacy Alumnus Award recipient from

as we have an intermodal mission and academic culture within our

the Class of 1982 (p.10), as dual keynote speakers. Talk about modeling

faculty, the other equally important components of our pursuit and

successes for our student pharmacists; the excitement was timeless!

identity is related to the preparation of new pharmaceutical scientists and the creation and dissemination of world-class pharmacy research. I am

“IF YOU PUT YOUR MIND TO IT, YOU CAN ACCOMPLISH ANYTHING.”

tremendously proud of the research and scholarship accomplishments

­— GEORGE MCFLY

spectacular research showcase and a worthy tribute to the legacy of one

over the past year which you will find homage to in this issue of the magazine as well. The Jamali Research Symposium, in particular, was a of our stalwart professors, Dr. Fakhreddin Jamali (p.15). The Faculty

We enter this new era in pharmacy education with great hopes and

Almanac indicates that undergraduate and graduate student academic

aspirations for the future of our pharmacy program and medication

trajectory continues to look promising in the future.

expertise in patient-centred care. We are on a wonderful path forward, having commenced a PharmD curriculum which will

Furthermore, reconnecting the faculty with alumni of the past is always

ultimately facilitate continued prosperity that is uniquely Albertan

a personal highlight for me. Meeting many of you through our history

4

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | WINTER 2019


DEAN'S DISTILLATE

book tour (p.12) to present you with a copy of The Indispensable History

dedicated toil and support of our faculty, staff, students and alumni

of the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of

towards our destination, and that is why I keep an ‘Attitude of

Alberta at various events continues to be an endearing memory. Our

Gratitude’ each and every day as your Dean of Pharmacy.

history is an unrivaled adventure that stands the test of time! I think

I am happy to inform you all that the newly renovated Pharmacy

that I almost have enough material and stories now for two more

Care laboratory has been recently and officially unveiled (p.7), and

sequels to the book.

soon we will break the ice after a long and hard winter, and spring forward to celebrate the achievements of the Class of 2019.

Many of you fondly recount scenes of the various Deans and eras, including Dr. Richard Moskalyk who is featured in this issue (p.27). is having met with so many outstanding pharmacy alumni. I especially

“ROADS? WHERE WE ARE GOING WE DON’T NEED ROADS!”

enjoy meeting pharmacist alums and supporters that have matured into

­— DR. EMMETT BROWN

Amongst the myriad of things I have enjoyed during my tenure as Dean

outstanding practitioners, as well as community and pharmaceutical leaders. For instance, Fedora Pharmaceuticals is continuing to

Here’s the reality. The future is now. Time circuits on. Flux capacitor,

demonstrate leadership and partnership with us and Dr. Carlos

fluxing. Engine running. 1.21 jigawatts of ongoing Pharmacy and

Velazquez-Martinez in promising research investigations dedicated to

Pharmaceutical power here in the faculty at your alma mater.

bettering the use and effects of life-saving antibiotics (p.19). Thank you for having me as your Dean. Now let’s get back to writing As always, our students and faculty value and respect your ongoing

our Prescription for the Future.

backing. Whether you consider donating and giving back to support the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences to memorialize

Sincerely,

a lost loved one, create a better tomorrow for the next generation of pharmacists, or for another personal reason, the end result is the same: a Prescription for the Future at the University of Alberta. We appreciate your past, present, and future support. It’s never too late. The road to our successes and accomplishments is made possible by the hard and diligent work of an entire profession with a singular focus

NEAL M DAVIES BSc(Pharm), Ph.D., R.Ph.

on excellence. I cannot adequately express my appreciation for the

Dean and Professor

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | ualberta.ca/pharmacy

5


NEWS & NOTES

AWARD-WINNING STUDENTS

dillon lee (left) with melissa padfield,

interim vice-provost & university registrar (right).

Pharmaceutical sciences doctoral graduate student, Dr. Zaid Alma’ayah

Dillon Lee (PharmD 2020) received the Lougheed Scholarship this

(PhD 2018), supervised by Dr. Ayman El-Kadi, won the 2018 Governor

year for her superior academic achievement, demonstrated leadership

General’s Gold Medal for achieving the highest standing/cumulative scholarly

through involvement and participation in university and community

achievement of all doctoral graduates at the University of Alberta.

organizations, and passion for helping others.

The Nashi Award When Aceel Nashi (BSc Pharm ’98) graduated, he says his class was labeled by some, incorrectly, as one of underachievers.

memorize facts but how they applied those facts towards their practice,” says Nashi. “I want them to make a positive difference for their patients, their communities, and the profession of pharmacy itself.”

“I HOPE THIS AWARD ENCOURAGES STUDENTS NEVER TO SUPPRESS THEIR DREAMS AND AMBITIONS BUT TO TAKE A CHANCE AND FIND OUT HOW THEY WILL BECOME THE LEADERS AND INNOVATORS OF TOMORROW.”

Years later, that same class has produced many presidents of the Alberta College of Pharmacy, leaders in pharmacoeconomics, and successful entrepreneurs. This is the inspiration behind his generous creation and donation of

Applications for the $1500 award open in the 2019 winter term with the winning student awarded at the Class of 2023’s White Coat and Awards Ceremony in the fall. While the winning student has to

The Nashi Award, a yearly scholarship that will be awarded to a student not

be in satisfactory academic standing, grades are not a direct factor

based on an academic accolade but for their commitment to community

in the decision-making process. Instead, students are encouraged to

service, volunteer work, and an aspiration to precept later on in their career.

showcase how they put class knowledge to good use through out of

“A student’s legacy will not be determined by how well they could

the box thinking.

6

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | WINTER 2019


NEWS & NOTES

FUTURISTIC PATIENT World Class CARE LABS Visitors Tajen University

a new patient care laboratory in the medical sciences building was completed and opened to students this winter.

FESTIVE PHARMACY

DURING THE FIRST week of the 2018-2019 school year, the Faculty welcomed

visitors from Taiwan’s Tajen University. The TU pharmacy students and faculty toured our practice labs and facilities, talked with faculty members, and learned about pharmacy practice and education in Alberta. Tip: Keep up with us on Instagram and follow @ualberta_pharmacy

Alumni Weekend 2019 IF YOU WEREN’T able to get a copy of Dean Davies’ History Book,

The Indispensable History of the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical THIS YEAR SANTA stopped by the Faculty of Pharmacy and

Sciences at the University of Alberta, during the book tour; this is your

Pharmaceutical Sciences to deliver holiday cheer and special

chance! Join your fellow alumni on campus for Alumni Weekend

deliveries of Dean Neal Davies’ History Book to all the good little

September 19-22, 2019 to catch-up, attend events, and grab your

faculties on campus!

complimentary copy of the book. Come back to the future!

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | ualberta.ca/pharmacy

7


NEWS & NOTES

Preceptor of the Year by courtney bettin FROM THE MOMENT Jane Ward (BSc Pharm

2006) became a licensed pharmacist, she was also a preceptor. Twelve years later, and after ten students have shadowed her in various roles, Ward has been recognized for going above and beyond with the 2018 Preceptor of the Year Award. Her nominator, Dymtro Dimitri Kachenyuk (PharmD 2018), worked alongside Ward at the Calgary Remand Centre as part of his rotations this past year. “Her passion for the profession, teaching, and working with students was evident to me within the first hour of us working together,” says Kachenyuk. “She emphasized that she would always match the effort that I put in.”

all awarded preceptors in attendance at the calgary book launch on november

22nd,

where jane ward (pictured middle, in red) received the preceptor of the year award.

After identifying his desire to become

“I really believe that you learn by doing,” says

more knowledgeable about diabetes,

Ward. “There’s only so much that you can learn

hold a debriefing meeting where the two could

Ward organized for Kachenyuk to hold a

by reading books or watching someone else. I

touch base and review how things were going.

presentation for nurses in the facility about

really like my students to jump in and practice

She encouraged Kachenyuk to communicate

diabetes management and encouraged them

on their own. That might mean that they make

tangible goals each week, which she helped to

to use her student as a point of contact for

mistakes, but they will learn from them.”

facilitate through quizzes or activities.

related questions during his preceptorship.

Every week during the rotation, Ward would

But beyond any pharmacology or technique,

TOP NOTCH TEAM

AVENUE EDMONTON’S TOP 40 UNDER 40 Congratulations to alumni Essi Salokangas (BSc Pharm 2016) and Klaudia Zabrzenski (BSc Pharm 2016) for being named two of Avenue Edmonton’s Top 40 under 40! Both pharmacists by trade, they worked together to start the Adherence and Community Engagement (ACE) team, which serves people with HIV/AIDS who have trouble accessing care, and are big advocates for bringing health care services to those experiencing poverty. Read more about their work in the November 2018 issue of Avenue Edmonton or online at avenueedmonton.com/City-Life/Top-40-Under-40 8

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | WINTER 2019

photos daniel wood


NEWS & NOTES

Ward hopes to instil a sense of passion in her

him is the reputation Ward’s gained for being

students that they can sustain over a long career

reliable and adaptable. He says that, while

in the profession. Despite her natural gift to

working at the Remand Centre, he noticed

teach, she feels truly successful when the students

one psychiatrist would specifically request

are learning to do things in their own way.

to work with Ward because of her ability to

“My favourite part of being a preceptor is

communicate effectively with patients. It’s

when we transition from mentor-student to

something that he hopes to embody as he

working as coworkers,” says Ward. “With a

moves through his own career.

little bit of guidance, they have that confidence

“She takes pride in describing and

to do what needs to be done and you can let

showing other health care professionals

them fly. It’s really rewarding to know that

what pharmacists can do,” says Kachenyuk.

you’ve helped them in that journey.”

“She is always advocating for better use

This quality of helpfulness is something felt

of pharmacists and she embodies her

not only by her students, but her colleagues as

recommendations by truly practicing to

well. Kachenyuk says that part of what inspires

her full scope.”

THE FACULTY OF PHARMACY AND PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES WOULD LIKE TO CONGRATULATE THE RECIPIENTS OF THE

2018 PRECEPTOR RECOGNITION AWARD. Ouida Antle

Derek Durocher

Chelsey Jesso

Marvin Menssa

Lori Romonko-Slack

Duy Truong

Katelyn Archer

Dana Dyke

Mike Johnson

Nathan Morin

Allison Saade

Jason Tse

Benton Attfield

Anne-Marie Ewanchuk

Patrick Jones

Zakari Murakami

Jaime Salmon

Marion Uniat

Brittany Audette

Lucy Fald

Nermen Kassam

Judy Musey

Gisele Scott-Woo

Rebecca VandenBorn

Douglas Bennett

Sharon Falk

Kevin Kastner

Dean Myers

Marshall Semeniuk

Trevor Vanderfluit

Philipe Boilard

Catherine Foote

Jaclyn Katelnikoff

Ali Neil

Tracey Simpson

Amanda Visscher

Wilmer Bong

Matt George

Joanne Kendrick

Michael Newman

Douglas Sinclair

Robert Vretenar

Anita Brown

Omer Ghutmy

Riham Khamis

Tony Nickonchuk

Randy Skiba

Emily Vuong

Trang Bui

Heather Gilfoy

Mahdi Khanafer

Andrew Noh

Kelsey Slater

Deanna Waknuk

Ryan Bullock

Taria Gouw

Sheri Koshman

Carlene Oleksyn

Randy Sloan

Kyo Wallin

Cassie Charlesworth

Kurt Greene

Timothy Kraft

Darcy Padula

Jeremy Slobodan

Courtney Walz

Alexandra Charlton

Jasdeep Grewal

Denise Kultgen

Judi Parrott

Alexandre Spivak

Travis Warner

June Chen

Lisa Guirguis

Brenda Kuper

Mehul Patel

Tanya Sprague

Carol Wei

Lydia Cheung

Paul Gustafson

Grace Lee

Michelle Picard

Alma Steyn

Kevin Wong

Chris Chilibeck

Angela Hanson

Amanda Leong

Tasha Porttin

Burke Suidan

Rashida Yamani

Jeffrey Chow

Laura Harris

Scott MacAllister

Luiza Radu

Anar Suleman

Peter Yoeun

Sandra Cook

Cheryl Harten

Tahir Malik

Raed Rawdah

Rajendra Tarpara

Emily Yu

Oksana Dacko

Roy Hassan

Pam Mathura

Dixie Richardson

Dean Tatlow

Rosalia Yuen

Kimberly Defoe

Karen Hee

Gord Matthies

Ravina Rimpy

Joshua Yung Tay

Saly Zachariah

Heather Derrick

Braiden Hellec

Jennifer McKinney

Marie Rodway

Azra Taylor

Eldon Zaretski

Cathy Dewaal

Suzanne Henry

Natalie McMurtry

Lin Roffel

Michelle Teasdale

Jian Zhou

Simran Dodd

Lisa Hodgson

Robert McQueen

Heather Roflik

Dactin Tran

Tamara Zugeb

Lori Duffy

Jennifer Howe THE MORTAR & PESTLE | ualberta.ca/pharmacy

9


NEWS & NOTES

Outstanding Alumnus Dr. Bob Foster RECIPIENT OF THE 2018 OUTSTANDING PHARMACY ALUMNUS AWARD by courtney bettin

ON ROTATION AT the University of Alberta Hospital as a pharmacy

undergrad in 1982, Dr. Robert “Bob” Foster (Bsc Pharm '82; PharmD '85; PhD '88) had to find a solo research topic. He stumbled upon

be jarring, the average number of years a drug takes to go from the research

pharmacokinetics—a branch of pharmaceutical sciences, in its infancy

phase to the pharmacy is 12 years, so it seems Foster is right on schedule.

at the time, that examines the movement of drugs within the body.

“Getting the drug to market is vindication,” says Foster. “To know

Thirty-six years and a lifetime of achievements in the field later, he’s

that I was able to do that with the right team and the right mix of

been recognized with the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical

science and business—to have a success like that—is really cool.”

Sciences’ 2018 Outstanding Pharmacy Alumnus Award. But for Foster,

Voclosporin is just one of the many successes Foster has had over

accolades were never part of the equation; his curiosity is propelled by

his career. In total, the biotech CEO has over 240 patents of which 216

the enjoyment of keeping up with an ever-growing field.

are currently active. In the mid-1990s, Foster developed the Helikit, a

“When I graduated, we used synthetic chemistry to create most of

breathalyzer-based diagnostic kit used to scan for stomach ulcers that

our molecules. Things have changed so much, things that we couldn’t

bypassed the need for biopsy. Foster sold the creation in 2006, but it

have ever imagined,” says Foster. “That’s what I find so exciting, that it’s

continues to be used in medical labs across the world today.

evolving so quickly that most of the names of the drugs I first learned about have disappeared or changed.” Like so many compelling success stories, Foster started out as a one-man operation in his home office. After completing his education, he set out with nothing more than an IKEA desk and filing cabinet to create his own biopharmaceutical company. By the mid-1990s, he had created Voclosporin, an immunosuppressant drug to treat kidney inflammation caused by lupus, and signed a deal with one of the largest Swiss drug companies. In 2008, Foster saw the funding for his company, Isotechnika,

“PHARMACY OVERALL HAS SO MUCH FLEXIBILITY AND SO MUCH POTENTIAL. YOU CAN EITHER CHOOSE TO BE A PHARMACIST IN THE TRADITIONAL SENSE, OR YOU CAN USE IT AND COMBINE IT WITH ANY NUMBER OF THINGS.”

cut significantly and was forced to slow down production to keep the company afloat before finding an alternative partnership five

Now, Foster spends his time as Chief Scientific Officer at

years later and rebranding to Aurinia. He says that in a field like

ContraVir Pharmaceuticals and as an adjunct professor with the

pharmaceutical sciences, learning to be patient is one of the hardest

faculty. It’s a far cry from the retail pharmacist he was once on the

but most critical traits to develop.

path to becoming, and he hopes that his story inspires others in the

“It can be frustrating if you’re purely thinking about the business aspect.

field to use their ingenuity for good.

But if you’re thinking about the overall successful program and the health

“Pharmacy overall has so much flexibility and so much potential. You

and well-being of the patient, ultimately, it’s better to be safe than sorry.”

can either choose to be a pharmacist in the traditional sense, or you can

Fifteen years later, Voclosporin has finished recruiting for phase three

use it and combine it with any number of things,” says Foster. “I really

research, and Foster hopes to see his drug hitting the market as soon as 2020.

do believe that when it’s time to leave this world, we must leave it with

Though the amount of time and commitment spent on just one creation may

something more than what we’ve taken out of it.”

10

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | WINTER 2019


NEWS & NOTES

FACULTY NOTES Congratulations to Dr. Nathan Beahm on

from the Faculty of Engineering at the

welcoming a daughter into his family in

University of Alberta.

We honour those alumni who have passed. ALFRED ARMSTRONG BSc Pharm 1951 | September 6, 2018

September 2018. Dr. Sherif Hanafy Mahmoud was awarded Anjela Dela Cruz took on the position

the Neurocritical Care Society Presidential

of Program Advisor, Student Services in

Citation at the Neurocritical Care Society

August 2018.

annual meeting held in Boca Raton, Florida in September 2018. He also led a novel

Dr. Paul Jurasz, Associate Professor,

educational activity in his course PHARM

was awarded a CIHR Project grant in the

417 Neurology in October in which students

September 2018 competition.

got to experience epilepsy from the eye of an epilepsy patient using virtual reality

Dr. Tony KL Kiang, Assistant Professor,

IN MEMORIAM

technology (pictured below).

DELORES THERESA BARTESKI (NEE DALGYS) BSc Pharm 1959 | April 22, 2018 KENNETH HONG FOONG BSc Pharm 1972 | June 21, 2018 MARILYN GAELICK BSc Pharm 1954 | October 17, 2018 LOMA HALABY BSc Pharm 2001 | June 23, 2018 EDYTHE EALINE KINZEL (NEE CODE) BSc Pharm 1950 | December 20, 2017

has been invited to serve on the Honorary Editorial Board of the European Journal

Dr. Ubaka Ogbogu was promoted to

of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics,

Associate Professor effective July 1, 2019.

published by Springer/Nature of Adis.

He also co-authored a book (with Dr. Erin Nelson, Professor, Faculty of Law) titled

Susan Kuzmak joined the faculty as

Law for Healthcare Providers (LexisNexis

Research Accountant, coming to us

Canada, 2018).

JOHN GARY LANGFORD BSc Pharm 1964 | April 7, 2018 GERALD OSCAR LUNDGREN BSc Pharm 1953 | January 20, 2018 CLAUDETTE MASTROVITO (NEE DEMERS)

BSc Pharm 1972 | December 27, 2018 DAVID ERNEST RITCHIE BSc Pharm 1952 | February 3, 2018 ORVALL KENNETH ROER BSc Pharm 1956 | March 14, 2018 MAURICE FRANCIS SIMPSON BSc Pharm 1960 | June 29, 2018 GLORIA WHITE (NEE YEE) BSc Pharm 1976 | August 27, 2018

CLIFFORD HART WRIGHT BSc Pharm 1955 | September 19, 2018

The News & Notes section is dedicated to highlighting events, awards, accolades, and updates of our faculty, staff, students, and alumni. If you have news or a note to share, email us at phcomms@ualberta.ca

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | ualberta.ca/pharmacy

11


SPOTLIGHT

History Book Tour

1914 — 2018

should—to British Columbia—for tea and

with “Yeahs” to the book, while the Toronto

ensued. Since the launch at mission control

repartee with alums, along with Uberbooks

cohort were raptured by it as well.

on November 1st in Edmonton to a crowd

delivering copies throughout Victoria. We

of nearly 500 alumni and industry leaders

then sped 88 miles per hour through the fog

excursions and alumni await in the Excited

at University of Alberta’s Myer Horowitz

to our next port of call—the Waterfront in

States and beyond. We hope to see more

Theatre, our time travel machine has

Vancouver—for a wonderful Enchantment

Alumni come back for Homecoming in

delivered us across the country.

Under the Sea gathering of alumni transplants.

September 2019 to catch up where it all began,

The exploits continued in early February in

grab our Faculty almanac, and reminisce!

ADVENTURES OF OUR history book have

At our sequel event in Calgary, Mayor Naheed Nenshi opened the festivities for 250

our nation’s capital with our Eastern alumni

alumni diaspora. In 2019, our Delorean has

colonies. The Ottawa crew were almost

taken us where the Transmountain pipeline

parliamentarian in their unanimous support

Now refueling has occurred, and more

SAVE THE DATES: Los Angeles: March 5, 2019 San Diego: March 7, 2019 Hong Kong: April 4, 2019 Edmonton: September 21, 2019 For more information, visit: ualberta.ca/pharmacy/ history-book-tour

dean neal davies with his family at the edmonton book launch on november

12

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | WINTER 2019

1st.


SPOTLIGHT

dean neal davies ( right) with mayor of calgary, naheed nenshi (left), at the calgary book launch on november

22nd.

HEY ONTARIO! For those alumni in the Ottawa area who couldn't make the ice trek in on your hover boards, Scott Watson (BSc Pharm '93; MSc 2000) has a few history books and free swag in stock at his main street location, Watson's Pharmacy and Compounding Centre. Others in the greater Toronto area can swing by the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy where alumnus Dr. Wayne Hindmarsh (PhD '70) is guarding a stash of copies to allocate on a first come first serve basis as well.

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | ualberta.ca/pharmacy

13


SPOTLIGHT

WHITE COATS & AWARDS THIS FALL WE welcomed the Class of 2022­—

15 graduate studies awards presented and 37

Alumnus Award recipient, Dr. Bob Foster

the inaugural Doctor of Pharmacy class­­­­—to

undergraduate awards. Special guests rose to the

(BSc Pharm '82; PharmD '85; PhD Pharm

the profession and celebrated the success of

occasion to encourage and celebrate the next

'88) (p.10), addressed the crowd regarding

undergraduate and graduate students at the

generation of pharmacists.

his successful career, offering guidance and

White Coat and Awards Ceremony. New

The Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical

inspiration to pharmacists new and old.

pharmacists in training donned their white coats,

Sciences welcomed the Honourable Sarah

Representatives from the Alberta College of

read the code of ethics, and signed the pledge of

Hoffman, Deputy Premier and Minister of

Pharmacy, Alberta Pharmacists’ Association,

professionalism in front of friends, pharmacists,

Health, as she encouraged the Class of 2022

and Canadian Society of Hospital Pharmacists

and family. Awards, scholarships, and bursaries

to work hard, make positive changes, and

brought greetings, white coat drapers, and

were awarded to students as well, with over

love what they learn. Outstanding Pharmacy

financial sponsorship to the event as well.

honourable sarah hoffman, deputy premier and minister of health addresses the crowd.

14

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | WINTER 2019


SPOTLIGHT

Dr. Jamali Research Symposium TAKING ON A special name this year, the Faculty of Pharmacy and

Pharmaceutical Sciences’ annual Research Day was hosted in honour of Dr. Fakhreddin Jamali’s retirement after 37 years of service to the faculty and to the pharmaceutical sciences. Dr. Jamali was celebrated on November 29th and 30th as undergraduate and graduate students presented their research in engaging poster and oral presentations. Over 15 research awards were given to students to celebrate their excellence in research, and colleagues from across the industry gathered at social events and celebrations. Keynote speakers included two of Dr. Jamali’s former graduate students, Dr. Okpo Eradiri (PhD Pharm '87), Quality Assessment Lead, Office of New Drug Products, the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, and Dr. Reza Mehvar (PhD Pharm '88), Professor and Chair of the Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chapman University.

If you would like to contribute to the Dr. Fakhreddin Jamali Graduate Fellowship in Pharmaceutical Sciences in honour of Dr. Jamali’s retirement, it's not too late: contact us at phgrad@ualberta.ca

left to right: dr. reza mehvar, dr. mo jamali, and dr. okpo eradi

Alumni Weekend 2018 ON SEPTEMBER 22ND, alumni flooded back to campus to spend

An Afternoon at the Movies viewing historical footage of past deans, pharmacists, and change-makers in the profession; catch up with old friends and colleagues; and tour around campus.

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15


Smart Hearts

from left to right:

dr. ian patterson, dr. john mackey, james stewart, dr. neal davies

by jyllian park

“BECAUSE MINUTES MATTER” is more than

of ASA and three of NG, eliminates the need

began a conversation with his friend James

a slogan. The phrase—which you’ll find

for those at-risk of suffering a heart attack to

Stewart, a retired engineer. Stewart, an avid

on the website and branding materials of

carry around bulky containers of medicine

outdoorsman who frequents his remote camps

the newly launched SMHeartCard—was a

(like the commonly prescribed NG spray,

in the foothills, carried the combination of

founding principle behind this unassuming

typically made available in 9 cm tall bottles).

pills in a resealable plastic bag in case him or

but lifesaving device. Developed in Edmonton

“People don’t keep their heart medications

a companion were to suffer a heart attack in a

by University of Alberta alumni Dr. John

with them,” says Dr. John Mackey, Professor

Mackey (MD ’90), James Stewart (MEng

and Director of Clinical Trials for the

'89), Dr. Neal Davies (BSc Pharm ‘91)

University of Alberta Department of

and implemented with cardiologist Dr. Ian

Oncology. “Coronary artery disease (CAD)

Patterson, SMHeartCard aims to reduce

patients are not compliant like cancer

the time between the onset of heart attack

patients. With cancer patients, if you tell

symptoms and a patient’s access to the

them to do something, they do it,” says

combination of Nitroglycerin (NG) and

Mackey, who cited a recent study conducted

Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)—commonly known

by Dr. Catherine Horsman at the University

as Aspirin—that work to break down clots,

of Medicine Hat that found only 18% of her

open up the blood vessels, and help to restore

patients with CAD actually carry NG, while

blood flow. Because the sooner you take these

none at all carried ASA. “What it comes

medications, the less likely you are to have a

down to is that the current method to carry

severe or fatal heart attack.

these medications just isn’t convenient for the

“Medical literature is very clear that the

general public.”

time from your symptoms to treatment is a

The cherry red, credit card sized ASA and NG pill holder doesn’t look like much at first

The issue first came into focus when

remote location.

key determinant of outcome,” says Mackey,

glance, and that’s entirely the point. Small and

Mackey—whose own brother has CAD and

referencing a study out of Montreal that

discreet, the device, which holds four tablets

regularly travels without his medications—

determined the median time for heart attack

16

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | WINTER 2019


IN THE MORTAR

patients receiving ASA upon arrival to the

can be carried in a wallet, pocket, or attached

emergency room was 98 minutes. “Many people

to a cellphone and can be refilled without a

die prior to contact with the medical system.

prescription at any Canadian pharmacy.

With your first heart attack, about 30 to 40 percent never actually make it to hospital.”

SMHeartCard is available for purchase on the company’s website (smheartcard.ca) for $19.99 and in a growing number of pharmacies. These

“WE TALKED ABOUT INVENTING A SOLUTION, AND WE HAD DONE THAT ON PAPER AND IN PRINCIPLE, BUT WE NEEDED THE EXPERTISE TO MAKE IT HAPPEN.”

pharmacies offer SMHeartCard to patients with

The need for a portable and convenient

+  Shortness of breath +  Chest pain + Sweating

stock NitroStat 0.3mg tablets for this purpose.

+  Nausea, indigestion, heartburn, or abdominal pain

The initial run of 10,000 units has hit the market,

+ Fatigue

with another, larger order in production as the

+  Sudden dizziness or lightheadedness

known CAD and CAD risk factors, and they

inter-disciplinary team looks to take the product across the country and world.

Who is at-risk of heart attack?

“Our hope is that enough people will be carrying SMHeartCards that we will be able to demonstrate improved population-based

container to transport the lifesaving pills was

What are the symptoms of a heart attack?

outcomes,” says Mackey. And there’s already a case for the effectiveness

+  Those who smoke, drink heavily, or are physically inactive +  Those with medical conditions such as angina, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity

clear but it turned out that the application

of the wallet-sized device after Mackey found

wasn’t as straightforward. Storing ASA is fairly

use for the SMHeartCard on a recent flight from

routine. It’s the NG that posed a challenge for

Cancun to Edmonton. His fellow passenger,

the oncologist. “There is no easy way to store

a man in his 70s, began complaining of seven

it,” says Mackey of the pill that is both heat

out of ten chest pain. By the time Mackey had

and light sensitive, layers itself onto almost

administered the third pill of NG, the man’s

every known form of plastic, absorbs into

pain had subsided. A little less than a week after

the cotton used to reduce the humidity in the

the flight, the man’s wife contacted Mackey

bottle, and has even been known to explode.

to inform him that her husband had in fact

1.  Open your SMHeartCard.

suffered a small heart attack, but thanks to his

2.  Chew and swallow all ASA tablets.

SMHeartCard, suffered no major complications.

3.  Take the first NG pill and place it under your tongue to dissolve.

“We talked about inventing a solution, and we had done that on paper and in principle, but we needed the expertise to make it happen.” That’s where Dr. Neal Davies, Dean of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, came

“We want to see that the people who have heart attacks will have less severe ones and they will be less likely to die. Our goal is to save lives.”

in. “John came to me saying that he was having a problem and I said ‘that’s what pharmacists do! We solve problems,’” says Davies. Davies led the team in prototyping a variety of

To learn more about SMHeartCard or to carry the life-saving device in your

packaging options and materials to maintain the

pharmacy, visit smheartcard.ca

stability and performance of the drug over time.

or call 780-965-7678

They conducted tests at extreme temperatures and with different environmental factors for periods ranging from one up to 52 weeks. After months of trials, they landed on the final design, a polyfluorinatedpolymer insert and cap liner. The container keeps the pills stable for up to six months at room temperature as well as body temperature for storage in a pocket, and even in

How is the SMHeartCard used? When you experience symptoms of a heart attack:

4.  If symptoms continue after five minutes, take the second NG pill and place it under your tongue to dissolve. 5. If symptoms continue after another five minutes, take the third and final NG pill and place it under your tongue to dissolve and access emergency medical care (call 911).

How long does a filled SMHeartCard last? SMHeartCard has been shown to effectively store the NG pills for six months. The team recommends a refill of NG tablets every six months.

harsh winter or summer temperatues. The card

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IN THE MORTAR

Professional Precedent STUDENT HANNAH KALIEL CONFRONTS ADDICTION IN HER COMMUNITY AT THE HAZELDEN BETTY FORD FOUNDATION’S PROFESSIONALS IN RESIDENCE PROGRAM by courtney bettin

photo selena phillips-boyle

THE OPIOID CRISIS claimed the lives of

a mental illness. They don’t

nearly 4,000 Canadians in 2017, and Hannah

look at it as an illness at all,

Kaliel (PharmD 2019) felt an obligation to be

but as a lack of willpower.”

a part of the solution. In the winter term, she

One of the biggest

reached out to Minnesota’s Hazelden Betty

barriers that Kaliel hopes to

Ford Foundation Professionals in Residence

improve is the stigmatization

program, which is designed to help inform

around addiction. She wants her patients to feel

their daily dispense, so take advantage of that

health care professionals on the best way to

more comfortable reaching out for help. Since

and provide them with holistic care.”

support patients suffering from addiction.

pharmacists interact with patients throughout the

Encouraged by Clinical Associate Professor Candace Necyk’s previous experience in the same program, Kaliel spent six days in

Going into the program, Kaliel expected to

year, she says that they should be diligent about

leave with a vast knowledge of pharmacology

noticing signs of substance abuse.

related to addiction. While that was a

“We’re very good at asking patients if they

component, she was surprised to find that

Minnesota alongside 12 other participants

smoke and helping with smoking cessation.

most of her learning was focused on the non-

attending lectures that covered topics like co-

That’s been on the top of pharmacists’

medicinal support that she could offer. Having

occurring disorders, motivational interviewing,

priorities for I don’t know how many years

rapport and an open dialogue with people who

and the neurobiology of addiction. However,

now, yet we’re still so shy to ask about alcohol

are regulars at the pharmacy can go a long way

she also learned about the societal attitudes

use or illicit substance use.”

in identifying and addressing substance use

that patients with substance use disorders face.

After working directly with a patient through the Hazelden program, Kaliel was confronted

"THE BIG PROBLEM IS THAT PEOPLE STILL DON’T LOOK AT SUBSTANCE USE AS A MENTAL ILLNESS." “No one wants to become addicted to

disorders before they become deadly. “The more that we stop, take a step back,

with another barrier created by substance

and look at the person in front of us as a

abuse stigma—treating a person as though their

human being and not just as somebody we’re

addiction is what defines them. Once a patient

going to write a care plan for, the more you

has started a treatment plan for opioid abuse

start to understand the patient experience

or alcoholism, it can be easy to forget that there

more and more and can tailor the way you

may be other issues below the surface.

provide care to each of those patients.”

“Often, we have a patient who gets their

something or have their life controlled by a

suboxone, and we forget about the fact that

To learn more about the Hazelden

substance, but sometimes we’re pushed to that

they also have asthma or diabetes or high blood

Betty Ford’s Professionals in Residence

point,” says Kaliel. “It’s an all encompassing

pressure or mental health issues. We can't just

program, go to: www.hazeldenbettyford.

problem in our society, and the big problem is

look at them as an addict but as a whole patient.

org/education/medical-professional-

that people still don’t look at substance use as

They are coming to your pharmacy every day for

education/professionals-residence

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IN THE MORTAR

Fighting Superbugs

incidence of chemoresistance, and the challenges associated to the hunt for new antibiotics,” says Velazquez-Martinez. Fedora is no stranger to anti-infectives or to the faculty. Its CEO, Chris Micetich, and his team have over 120 years of cumulative experience in the area. Chris’ father, Dr. Ron Micetich, a former faculty member, created the beta-lactamase inhibitor Tazobactam in partnership with Japan’s Taiho Pharmaceutical Company, which is now

SETTING THE CLOCK BACK TO TREAT INFECTIONS OF THE FUTURE

a blockbuster drug with over one billion USD sales annually. “We are proud to continue the longstanding relationship with the faculty. This partnership will serve as a model for all university-industry interactions across the country, resulting in highly skilled and educated

by kieran andrew macisaac

candidates being sought out to enter the work force. As a team, we’re working closely together to bridge the transition gap between academia

Though the discovery of antibiotics transformed patient outcomes,

and industry,” says Chris.

saving millions of lives since the creation of Penicillin in 1928, it also

The partnership between Fedora and the faculty is a pilot project

started a clock. By their nature, bacteria and other infection-causing

in applied learning. Working in the lab of Velazquez-Martinez, post-

micro-organisms continually adapt to antimicrobial treatments, reducing

doctoral students, Dr. Myron Wilde and Dr. Yasin Tabatabaei, funded

their effectiveness and becoming more resistant to treatment over time.

by Alberta Innovates, are taking part in a once in a lifetime project. With Fedora, they are working on the chemical synthesis of a series of

For much of the 20th century this was combatted by the development of new classes of antibiotics to which disease-causing

drug molecules with potential antibacterial activity, specifically against

microbes had not been previously exposed. However, the most recent

gram-negative strains resistant to current antimicrobial treatments that,

class of antibiotics in use today is based on a discovery made 33 years

if successful, will go on to save countless lives. In the process, they will

ago or earlier¹. As a result, the world faces a growing threat from the

receive direct industry experience and be positioned to start meaningful

rise of antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

careers in the pharmaceutical industry, continuing on to contribute to

It is estimated that over 700,000 people die annually as a result of AMR infections². This number is expected to grow to 10,000,000 by 2050³ if new

this critical area for the future of health care worldwide. “This educational model is expected to provide postdoctoral

ways of combating microbes that are becoming AMR—or “superbugs” —

fellows with a high-level vision not only on technical aspects related

are not found. Canada has recognized this urgent need for action, and

to synthetic organic chemistry, but also the approach followed by

in 2017 the Public Health Agency of Canada released its Pan-Canadian

entrepreneurs in the high-risk drug development business,” says

Framework for Tackling Antimicrobial Resistance and Antimicrobial Use based on

Velaquez-Martinez.

4

input from concerned experts in academia, government, and industry. One team working to fight these superbugs is Fedora Pharmaceuticals Inc. (Fedora)—a biotech in Edmonton dedicated to the discovery and development of novel antimicrobial drug candidates that challenge

Beyond the training opportunity, he says that their goal is the production of at least one lead molecule with a potent, selective and safe profile for its potential use as an antibacterial agent. “For the first time since I started my research career at the University

AMR—and the laboratory of Dr. Carlos Velazquez-Martinez,

of Alberta, my group will have the opportunity to learn the wide variety

Associate Professor in the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical

of translational considerations guiding the design and development of

Sciences. Spurred by a grant from Alberta Innovates, the partnership

new drug candidates,” says Velazquez-Martinez. “We consider this an

between Fedora and the faculty is focused on developing a new

exciting opportunity to work with industry, and at the same time, bring

pipeline of antibiotic drugs that will be effective against multi-drug

funds to carry out research from sources other than traditional granting

resistant pathogens.

agencies. This model has the added benefit of a commercial partner

“This is an exciting and timely field of research considering the significant amount of evidence reported worldwide on the increasing

1

willing to help us with the much needed translational jump, moving ideas to high-value products that save lives.”

Daptomycin, which was discovered in 1984.

5

2,3,4 The Review on Antimicrobial Resistance. Tackling drug-resistant infections globally, 2016. Available: amr-review.org

Chemical & Engineering News, volume 96, issue 49. The hunt for new antibiotics grows harder as resistance builds, 2018. Available: https://pubs. acs.org/toc/cgeabj/96/49

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FEATURES

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FEATURES

HOW ALBERTA PHARMACISTS ARE BRINGING HEALTH CARE

by matthew stepanic

IF PHARMACISTS FROM the practice’s

skill sets available to them today. She was

prescription refills. Today, there are 2,181

early origins got their hands on a DeLorean

also one of the first 15 pharmacists to receive

pharmacists in Alberta practicing with

and journeyed from their herb jar-lined

prescribing authority during the pilot in 2007.

additional prescribing authority.

apothecaries to the modern clinics in Alberta today, not only would they be shocked by the advances in technology but also by the roles and skill sets of contemporary pharmacists.

And like the amount of theoretical and physical work that would go into inventing a

“IT’S NOT EXPANDING; IT’S WHAT WE DO.”

time machine, researchers and pharmacists invested years of work into these new

Many families and patients across Alberta may not realize that their pharmacists actually have

regulations before they became a reality. “I don’t even like to use the word ‘expanded’

“There’s actually quite a bit of research in

the broadest scope of practice in the world,

anymore in Alberta because it’s been ten

pharmacy practice demonstrating the value

while in other provinces and countries the

years,” says Yuksel. “It’s not expanding; it’s

of the pharmacist,” says Yuksel. “All of that

services provided by the most accessible health

what we do.”

helps demonstrate that a pharmacist makes

care professionals are still limited to dispensing

a difference in patient outcomes and why we

Back in 1999, the Alberta government

pills—a task with which those time-travelling

passed the Health Professions Act, which

needed to have things like prescribing. Now

apothecaries would be very familiar.

combined all health professionals to be

prescribing’s just another tool in patient care.”

As other jurisdictions catch up to Alberta’s

governed under one act and replaced their

Whether it’s through vaccinations,

scope of practice—one that includes prescribing

scopes of practice with restricted activities.

prescriptions, referrals, disease screenings,

drugs, managing and changing dosages,

The Alberta College of Pharmacy saw this

or developing and maintaining detailed care

injecting vaccines, ordering lab tests, and

as an opportunity to pursue the right to

plans, Albertan pharmacists provide fuller,

referring patients to other services—Alberta

dispense, prescribe, and administer drugs

more effective, and diverse care to their

boasts over ten years of expanded practice and

by injection, among others functions. In

patients than ever before. And even though

is leading health care back to the future by

December 2004, the Minister of Health and

prognostication may not fall under any

example. Dr. Nese Yuksel (BSc Pharm ‘88),

Wellness approved the new regulations for

health professional’s scope of practice—and

Professor, women’s health expert, and 2016’s

pharmacists, and by April 2007, they came

time travelling’s just a bit too dangerous!—

Canadian Pharmacist of the Year, is one of the

into effect. This new ability allowed for better

pharmacists, students, policymakers, and other

pharmacists expertly navigating the DeLorean.

patient care—pharmacists usually spend

health care professionals, who are both new

Beginning in 2001, Yuksel sat on many of

the most face-to-face time with patients

recruits and veterans to the health care system,

the expert panels that crafted the policies that

anyways—and allowed them to respond to

were eager to share their perspectives on the

brought Albertan pharmacists the roles and

emergency situations and fill out emergency

value of Alberta’s futurist scope of practice.

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FEATURES and families at the centre of our discussion.

are less accessible, but pharmacists are right

And whatever that future looks like, I

there and ready to answer everything really

have to believe the success depends on the

quickly. With our patients, it helps that they

pharmacist’s willingness to create strong

are able to build that relationship with their

relationships with the individuals they

pharmacist and ask their questions. Pharmacists

I have an immense sense of pride knowing

serve and to be committed to the full

help our clients adhere to a treatment plan

that I will be practicing [in Alberta]. Alberta’s

assessment of individuals every time that

and really get people on board about what’s

scope of practice has increased the amount of

they engage with them.

happening and why it’s happening. They

Jessica Buhler (BSc Pharm 2019)

Student & President, Alberta Pharmacy Students’ Association

skills I will learn within my pharmacy degree, and I believe there is an increased level of respect from other health care professional students when they learn about what a pharmacist is able to do.

THE BIGGEST DIFFERENCE IS THAT PHARMACISTS IN ALBERTA ARE STARTING TO THINK DIFFERENTLY

are also the direct point of contact for vaccinations and life-saving naloxone kits —a drug that temporarily reverses an opioid overdose—for our clients. From a perspective in community health, we’re in the process of building a family health clinic here at the Mustard Seed, and we really

Dave Dolman (BSc Pharm 2005)

Manager of Government Health Benefits, Alberta Blue Cross

Mary Gunther (BSc Pharm 2009)

feel it’s vital to have a pharmacy as a fully

President, Alberta Branch, Canadian Society of Hospital Pharmacists

integrated piece within that clinic—not just a

was a major regulatory landmark for the

I’m fortunate that I work with a

be strong pillars within the treatment centre

profession of pharmacy in Alberta, but we

multidisciplinary team, and I’ve found

as well as employment opportunities because

must view that as a part of a process rather

[prescribing] very helpful in allowing me to

we want to reach out toward new Canadians,

than a standalone event. Ultimately, it is the

play a more active role in better executing

refugees, and our homeless population. That’s

delivery of care by the pharmacists themselves

the plans that the team has decided upon.

how we attain that whole wellness perspective

that has, and will continue to, truly change

As opposed to interrupting the physician if

and ensure less points of drop-off and more

the scope of practice.

they’re in the middle of something or trying

engagement. If one hand is holding the

to page someone out of surgery, once the team

doctor’s, the other hand needs to be holding a

has decided what the plan is, I’m one more

pharmacist’s, and that way we can completely

person who’s able to execute it. For example,

wrap around our clients to support them

when it’s really my recommendation, if I’m

towards health and change.

Expanding the scope of practice in 2007

Greg Eberhart (BSc Pharm '79)

Registrar, Alberta College of Pharmacy

storefront but as a part of the treatment team. Support for mental and physical health will

able to take ownership of that and write the

In working with pharmacy organizations

order under my own name, if there are any

across Canada and having presented and met

questions about it from the patient or the

with leaders in other jurisdictions, I think

nursing staff, they know they can talk to me

the biggest difference is that pharmacists

directly instead of asking the physician. It

in Alberta are starting to think differently

allows for better communication and better

than they are in other areas. Pharmacists

efficiency in providing care for our patients.

Jason Kmet

Community Pharmacist & Preceptor, Polaris Travel Clinic I’m operating a licensed pharmacy where

are increasingly focusing on patients and

travel vaccinations and other vaccinations

their health, and they’re focusing on the

are basically all we do. So without the

individuals rather than the drugs. The demographics of the population are changing rapidly, both from an age perspective as well as a cultural perspective. Therefore,

Landon Hildebrand

Psychologist & Director of Housing and Clinic Development, The Mustard Seed

legislation we have in Alberta, this place wouldn’t exist. When I’m prescribing vaccines or anti-malarial medicines, I need to make an assessment. These skills—

the system is being impacted by economic

As a psychologist, I’ve worked in community

reviewing people’s allergies, medications,

considerations, and it’s being impacted by

health both in rural and inner-city areas, and

and trip location and then administering a

rapid advancements in technology. It’s very

in these areas in particular, your pharmacist is

vaccination—are well within a pharmacist’s

important that we keep individual patients

your go-to person. Doctors and psychologists

skill set in Alberta.

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FEATURES

PHARMACISTS’ SCOPE OF PRACTICE IN CANADA¹ Prescriptive Authority (Schedule 1 Drugs) / Initiate

BC

AB

SK

MB

ON

QC

NB

NS

PEI

NL NWT YT

NU

Independently, for any Schedule 1 drug In a collaborative practice setting/agreement For minor ailments/conditions For smoking/tobacco cessation In an emergency Adapt / Manage Independently, for any Schedule 1 drug Independently, in a collaborative practice Make therapeutic substitution Change drug dosage, formulation, regimen, etc. Renew/extend prescription for continuity of care Injection Authority (SC or IM) Any drug or vaccine Vaccines Travel vaccines Influenza vaccine Labs / Order and interpret lab tests Techs / Regulated pharmacy technicians

1.

Implemented in jurisdiction

Canadian Pharmacists Association. Pharmacists’ scope of practice in Canada, 2016. Available: https://www.pharmacists.ca/cpha-ca/assets/ File/cpha-on-the-issues/ScopeofPracticeinCanada_DEC2016.pdf (Updated to reflect December 2018 scope of practice)

Since April 1, 2007, Alberta pharmacists have had the broadest scope of practice in the world.

Pending legislation, regulation or policy for implementation Not implemented

AROUND THE WORLD •

As of 2013, California pharmacists can supply emergency and hormonal contraception and smoking cessation drugs.

In New Mexico, pharmacist clinicians can prescribe vaccines, naloxone, tuberculosis testing, emergency and hormonal contraception, and smoking cessation drugs.

In the United Kingdom, pharmacists have most of the same authorities as in Alberta—including supplying emergency contraception and injecting flu vaccines—and can

alberta’s first pharmacy in fort mcleod, 1885

prescribe most medicines, except controlled drugs such as morphine and pethidine. THE MORTAR & PESTLE | ualberta.ca/pharmacy

23


FEATURES their medication when it is no longer effective,

family physician. Going forward, I hope to see

tolerated, or is too expensive to manage.

increased opportunities for pharmacists to be

Ambulatory Clinic Pharmacist & Preceptor

Overall, this brings value to the patient,

in specialty clinics as well, as we are often at the

especially geriatrics patients, in terms of their

forefront for addiction and mental health issues.

I manage patients’ care from discharge to

and collaboration between individuals

first visit (a few weeks to a few months after

involved in their care.

Gordon Matthies

empowerment, safety, education, cost savings,

discharge) and also include the family physician

Primary Care Network Pharmacist & Preceptor, Wood Buffalo

and community pharmacist when beneficial. I only work with internal medicine physicians, and over time we get to know and trust each

Randy Sloan (BSc Pharm '85)

Carlene Oleksyn

I was the first pharmacist to be hired by any

other. From this relationship I am fortunate to

Community Pharmacist & Preceptor

learn a great deal in several disease states, and

I went from hardly engaging patients, merely

ten years later, my day is full of patient

with that knowledge I am often independently

providing information at the counselling

consultations, mostly focusing on Type 2

prescribing for patients based on lab results

station, to fully engaging patients at intake

Diabetes, who have been referred to our

or physical assessment. Certainly, this has

and focusing on solving drug-related problems

team for full medical management of their

improved clinic efficiency because the physician

and optimizing drug therapy; really focusing

condition. My career has evolved into a focused

is able to continue to provide care to inpatients

on patients’ quality of life. Patients absolutely

subject area of diabetes and cardiovascular

while we help to manage outpatients. We are

love the care we provide. The convenience of

risk reduction, and it has led me to develop a

now starting to enrich the scope of practice

seeing their pharmacist for assessment amazes

significant level of expertise. I feel gratified that

for pharmacy technicians, and that is enabling

them. We always explain that when it comes

many family physicians in my community view

even further development for direct patient-care

to minor ailments, if a condition is outside

me as their local go-to diabetes professional.

opportunities for pharmacists.

our scope of practice or we feel requires a

A typical patient visit is 30 minutes long,

physician, we will refer them. Patients become

which allows plenty of time for discussion,

more engaged in their own care, and we’ve

education, and patient input. Patients value the

seen outcomes improved for patients in many

opportunity to discuss their health without

chronic conditions.

feeling rushed, and many also appreciate

Mike Newman (BSc Pharm 2014)

Supportive Living Pharmacist & Preceptor

Primary Care Network in Alberta. Now,

the invitation to be active participants in the decision-making about their therapy.

When I first graduated as a pharmacist, I moved to Ontario and worked there for two

Amy Semaka (BSc Pharm 2015; PharmD 2016)

years before returning to Alberta. Compared

Inner City Community Pharmacist

to Ontario, I provide more comprehensive,

Having the ability to order lab tests and

informed, and individualized patient care

prescribe have been big game changers,

here in Alberta. With our advanced scope, I

especially here in the inner city. My colleagues

can not only have a discussion with a patient

and I leverage our authority to order or

Ten years ago if you had told me that

about therapeutic options but I can review

prescribe medications to develop programs

pharmacists would eventually be providing

their medication history and any relevant

at our site, including a Hepatitis B program

over 50 per cent of all influenza vaccinations

tests, admissions, and consultations, which

that is already up and running, and soon, STI

in the province, I would have found that

is crucial to a good assessment of a patient.

treatment and care. Our scope of practice

incredibly hard to believe. But fast forward

My patients value how pharmacists offer

improves our role in the community and how

and the association’s work has made that a

solutions, alternatives, and services they often

much we tend to be involved with our patients,

reality. Pharmacists in Alberta are extremely

didn’t expect by pulling all the information

on teams, and in collaboration with our

proud of their scope and ability to provide

together and collaborating on a shared

neighbours across the street or in the clinic.

meaningful care on the front lines for patients.

decision and plan together. Patients also

We’re able to help if there’s a gap missing in

Being able to prescribe needed medications,

appreciate having the option of an emergency

patient care or when patients don’t have access

make adjustments to existing therapies, and

renewal of their medication, their medication

to the provider they need, especially in the inner

improve a patient’s health through their work

injected by me, or reviewing concerns with

city where a lot of patients don’t have GPs or a

is extremely rewarding for our members.

24

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | WINTER 2019

Margaret Wing (BSc Pharm '85)

CEO, Alberta Pharmacists’ Association


FEATURES

ASTHMAnagement

FROM MANAGING ASTHMA TO IMPROVING IT by amy schuring

OVER 3.8 MILLION Canadians¹—more than

Tatiana Makhinova, Assistant Professor,

10% of the population²—have asthma, making

pharmacist, and researcher.

“One [treatment] is a quick-relief medication, which is what patients use

it the most common chronic condition in the

Asthma symptoms are three–fold, she

country. Among them, 93% do not have their

explains. “One symptom is inflammation,

when they feel that discomfort, coughing, and shortness of breath. It helps with

condition under control³. So, what’s missing

another is bronchoconstriction—tightening of

bronchoconstriction,” says Makhinova.

when it comes to the treatment of asthma? A

muscles in the lung tissue—and also an increase

“Whereas, if we want to keep asthma under

monumental shift from managing the disease

in mucus.” These symptoms leave those affected

control, we need to target inflammation­—that

to improving it, along with the cooperation

by the disease with various respiratory issues.

is the long-term inhaler.”

of pharmacists and their patients, says Dr.

Fortunately, effective treatments are available.

Long-term inhalers are to be taken on a

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | ualberta.ca/pharmacy

25


FEATURES

regular basis, she explains; it is the preventative

education. They need that time to understand

measure to keep patients from experiencing

their disease and how it should be managed.”

asthma attacks and reaching for quick-relief medication all the time. Despite having adequate, accessible therapy

(WAAPs) to be very effective. “From studies, we know that it helps patients

Through her research, Makhinova has

keep their asthma under control and adherent to

recognized a “high patient need for asthma

their long-term medications, and yet, AAPs are

education and adherence support.” In order

not as commonly used as we wish.” In fact, less

for the condition, most asthma patients still find

to fill that education gap, she says pharmacists

than 2% of Albertans living with asthma have

themselves using their quick-relief inhalers four

need to engage in more meaningful dialogue

WAAPs, and fewer than 1 in 10 pharmacists sat

or more times a week. They struggle to breath,

with patients.

down to discuss AAPs with patients.6

5

are unable to exert themselves with physical

“Something we need to address is

activity, and are easily triggered by certain

“PATIENTS DON’T UNDERSTAND THE INDICATORS THAT THEIR ASTHMA IS NOT UNDER CONTROL.”

allergens; in other words, their asthma is out of control and, consequently, affecting their lifestyle. How does a disease so common, with such effective treatment, still leave the majority of patients limited by their symptoms? The answer, according to Makhinova’s research: barriers to medication adherence.

uptake by health care professionals,” says Makhinova. “Implementation is a very big challenge we are facing.” To encourage uptake of AAPs, Makhinova suggests implementing a standardized checklist for pharmacists to use when engaging with asthma patients. Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in Pharmacy Practice Dr. Lisa Guirguis’ Chat, Check and

Having focused her research on factors affecting

“We don’t provide enough attention to our

proper medication use as they relate to asthma,

patients, and we don’t educate them enough. We

she has found many patients stray from their

still aren’t asking our patients the right questions

recommended treatment because they don’t

to understand what exactly their challenges

to help facilitate pharmacist-patient

experience the noticeable, immediate relief

are.” One important tool that can provide

conversations and identify possible

from their long-term inhaler as they do their

proper education and support to patients, says

improvements that can be made to

quick-relief medication; therefore, individuals

Makhinova, is an Asthma Action Plan (AAP).

individuals’ therapy. “The CCC tools may

discontinue its use and as a result, their

An AAP is an outline organized into three

Chart [CCC] model is a prime example. The CCC tool outlines key questions

also be adapted to asthma and partnered

symptoms worsen. It was also discovered that

sections: green, yellow, and red. Green lists

with an implementation strategy to increase

92% of all patients, even those who have taken

symptoms that would indicate one’s asthma

pharmacist use of WAAPs,” says Guirguis.7

asthma medication for many years, made at

as under control, as well as the recommended

Makhinova explains that a tool like CCC

least one critical error when using an inhaler .

treatment to remain stable. Yellow highlights

can at the very least get a dialogue going

Often oblivious to their adherence barriers,

symptoms individuals can expect to

between pharmacists and asthma patients.

patients are left battling their asthma, unaware

experience when their asthma is becoming

Pharmacists can then begin to properly

their condition has declined.

out of control, and red when a patient is

educate patients and formalize action

4

most likely experiencing an asthma attack

plans—enabling individuals to improve their

that their asthma is not under control,”

and requires medical attention. Though a

condition and begin living with asthma,

explains Makhinova. “They need that

simple tool, Makhinova believes written AAPs

rather than being limited by it.

1.

4.

6.

“Patients don’t understand the indicators

2.

The Lung Association. Canadian asthma control

Raj & Barnes, Neil & Delafont, Bruno & Mahajan,

lung.ca/news/latest-news/survey-asthma-not-well-

Anadi & Thomas, Mike. (2017). Device errors in

Anadi & Thomas, Mike. (2017). Device errors in

controlled-most-canadians (accessed Nov. 20, 2018).

asthma and COPD: Systematic literature review

asthma and COPD: Systematic literature review

and meta-analysis. npj Primary Care Respiratory

and meta-analysis. npj Primary Care Respiratory

Government of Canada. Asthma in Canada, 2018. asthma-blog-en.html (accessed Nov. 20, 2018). The Lung Association. Canadian asthma control report infographic, 2016. Available: https://www. lung.ca/news/latest-news/survey-asthma-not-wellcontrolled-most-canadians (accessed Nov. 20, 2018)

26

Chrystyn, Henry & van der Palen, Job & Sharma,

Raj & Barnes, Neil & Delafont, Bruno & Mahajan,

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | WINTER 2019

Medicine. 27. doi:10.1038/s41533-017-0016-z.

Medicine. 27. doi:10.1038/s41533-017-0016-z.

Available: https://infobase.phac-aspc.gc.ca/datalab/ 3.

Chrystyn, Henry & van der Palen, Job & Sharma,

report infographic, 2016. Available: https://www.

5.

Chrystyn, Henry & van der Palen, Job & Sharma,

7.

Guirguis, L. M. (2018). Assessing the

Raj & Barnes, Neil & Delafont, Bruno & Mahajan,

knowledge to practice gap: The asthma

Anadi & Thomas, Mike. (2017). Device errors in

practices of community pharmacists. Canadian

asthma and COPD: Systematic literature review

Pharmacists Journal / Revue Des Pharmaciens

and meta-analysis. npj Primary Care Respiratory

Du Canada, 151(1), 62–70. https://doi.

Medicine. 27. doi:10.1038/s41533-017-0016-z.

org/10.1177/1715163517742162


LOOKING BACK

The Moskalyk Decade

Richard Edward Moskalyk

THE FIFTH DEAN OF PHARMACY AND PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES, 1989-1999 by johnny b. good

Early Life RICHARD (DICK) EDWARD MOSKALYK was born and raised in the town

of Hafford, Saskatchewan where his grandparents had set down roots upon their emigration from Ukraine. Moskalyk grew up with his brother and sister in the small town, attending its single classroom school. He

1960s–1970s

ended up skipping a number of grades, and by the time he finished grade 12, he had just turned sixteen.

MOSKALYK FIRST CAME to the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical

Sciences at the University of Alberta as a graduate student in 1961, following During his youth, Moskalyk became interested in the work of the town’s

three years as a research chemist with Health Canada in Ottawa, Ontario.

pharmacist and wanted to pursue a career as one himself. Though he

He had been accepted for the PhD program at the University of Michigan;

was too young to attend university right out of public school, his father

however, at a pharmaceutical conference he met Dean Mervyn Huston, who

spoke to the Dean at the University of Saskatchewan and Moskalyk was

convinced him to decline the offer and come to Edmonton instead.

accepted. He completed a Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy in 1956 from the College of Pharmacy at the age of nineteen. The year after he

In 1963, part way through his doctorate studies, Moskalyk accepted

graduated, he married his wife, Vi, and they had three children, Donna,

a position as an Assistant Professor of Medicinal Chemistry at the

Michael, and John.

University of Alberta, where he remained for 36 years. He completed his PhD in 1965 with interests in medicinal chemistry, including the

Unfortunately, as a 19 year old graduate, Moskalyk was unable to take

development of assay methodology and synthesis of model compounds

a position as a community pharmacist—pharmacists at the time were

and tetracycline ring A analogs.

required to be 21 years of age due to their work with narcotics. Unable to practice, he interned at Weyburn Hospital and then spent a year

In 1969, at the 25th Anniversary of the Canadian Conference of

with Merck Sharpe and Dohme in Montreal, Quebec working in its

Pharmacy Faculties (CCPF), a reorganized body with the new name of

quality control laboratories. Moskalyk found that he preferred this work

Association of Faculties of Pharmacy of Canada (AFPC) was proposed

to his original career aspirations, so he returned to the University of

by the review committee chaired by Moskalyk. By 1971, he was the

Saskatchewan and completed a Master of Science degree in 1959.

Secretary-Treasurer of AFPC.

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | ualberta.ca/pharmacy

27


dr. patrick mayo ( right) receives the graduate student teaching award from dean moskalyk. mayo is now a clinical associate

1980s

professor of the faculty.

IN 1979, MOSKALYK was appointed Assistant Dean of Undergraduate

then appointed to the Deanship, which he held until 1999. During

Education in the Faculty and was receptive to the contemporary

that period, he also served as a Board Member of the Canadian

requirements of the profession. In 1980, he became President of the

Pharmaceutical Association and was Vice President of the Western

AFPC and made it a priority to establish outreach. He visited all

Region from 1988-89.

constituent faculties and compiled a list of suggestions, comments, concerns, and ideas to move the association forward. Then, in 1981,

During his time as Dean, the Faculty continued to grow and flourish

he was promoted to Associate Dean with specific responsibilities to

under his leadership. In 1989, a pre-pharmacy admission requirement was

develop the undergraduate curriculum.

added. One year of study in Science was required prior to entry into the four-year degree program. This change was enacted to help standardize

Moskalyk became a licensed pharmacist in Alberta so that he could

admissions for all applications and allowed existing pharmacy practice

serve on the Alberta Pharmaceutical Association Council and

courses to be developed with a more integrated focus and broader scope.

become its President from 1983-84. In 1985, he received the Alberta

These entrance requirements were enacted at all Canadian pharmacy

Pharmaceutical Association Award of Excellence. Committed to

schools. In the same year, the 75th Anniversary “Share the Vision”

academic excellence, Moskalyk served on the Pharmacy Examining

Campaign of the faculty was celebrated. Over the course of 75 years,

Board of Canada from 1985-86, and the Class of 1987 chose him for

Pharmacy education had moved from a three-year apprenticeship program

the Squibb Excellence in Teaching Award.

with an additional year of training, to five years of formalized academic education plus an internship of 500 hours (at minimum) and additional

When Dr. John A. Bachynsky ended his term as Dean in 1989, Dr.

clinical rotations in the final year. Under Moskalyk’s leadership, the

Richard Moskalyk replaced him, initially as Acting Dean, and was

Campaign had a goal of raising $2.8 million dollars.

28

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | WINTER 2019


LOOKING BACK

1990s IN THE 1990-91 academic year, Moskalyk was successful in overseeing the

Dean Moskalyk began developing both an entry-level six-year program

implementation of a 12-week clinical rotation for pharmacy students,

and a non-traditional PharmD distance learning program in 1997. At

and research grants held strong, including over one million dollars in

the same time, a proposed Baccalaureate in Pharmaceutical Sciences

external funding. In 1992, Dean Moskalyk was awarded the Governor

was also being considered for development for students interested in

General of Canada’s Commemorative Medal. The year 1992 saw, for

research. By the fall, the faculty was still contemplating curricular

the first time ever, an inter-professional course introduced for health

reform as they tried to focus on perfecting the PharmD program’s

sciences students. This was the beginning of a much-needed integration

proposed offerings. The following year, the faculty also undertook a

of health care training which included medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and

major fundraising initiative called “Built on Excellence,” a Pharmacy

others that needed to respond to the rapid changes in patient-centred

School for the 21st Century.

care. In 1994, Dean Moskalyk graduated the first graduating class of the five-year undergraduate program.

On June 30, 1999, Dean Richard E. Moskalyk concluded his tenth and final year as Dean. All the curricular changes that began with Dean Bachynsky

In 1995, the Medicinal Chemistry Group in the faculty was identified as

and were implemented by Dean Moskalyk resulted in an amazing streak

one of the 15 areas of established research excellence at the University

of student success in the faculty from 1988 through 1999, including each

of Alberta. Dean Moskalyk also continued to serve as the Chair of the

graduating class from 1992-97 placing first in Canada on the national

Deans of Health Sciences Group. This was the year that the Pharmacy

Pharmacy Examining Board of Canada examinations.

program was subject to its first accreditation process, which involved being judged by its ability to deliver a professional curriculum in large measure,

Dean Moskalyk was made Professor Emeritus of Pharmacy and

documentation and verification of planning in accordance with standards,

Pharmaceutical Sciences and was awarded the AFPC Honourary Life

and the provision of reasonable assurances for a quality outcome. The

Member in 2000 upon his retirement. He was also awarded the Alberta

results of the accreditation review were very complimentary, and the

Pharmacy Centennial Award of Distinction in 2011.

faculty received the maximum five-year accreditation. The R.E. (Dick) Moskalyk Scholarships in Pharmacy are awarded annually Renovations to research laboratories, offices, and teaching spaces in

to Pharmacy students with superior academic achievement entering

the Dentistry/Pharmacy Building were started under Dean Moskalyk’s

their second, third, or fourth year of studies. At the 2018 White Coat and

leadership in 1996, and the “Share the Vision” Donor Wall (pictured below)

Awards Ceremony, student Alisha Shivji received the scholarship.

was unveiled at a ceremony held on December 12th of the same year. This massive structure was located on the west side wall of the foyer and then

The Moskalyk Room in the University of Alberta Katz Group Centre

relocated in 2016 to its present space in the new Faculty of Pharmacy and

for Pharmacy and Health Research, second floor, was created in 2017 in

Pharmaceutical Sciences facilities.

remembrance of his dedicated service to the profession of pharmacy.

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | ualberta.ca/pharmacy

29


FAST FACTS 2018

 

523

FACULTY MEMBERS

PRECEPTORS

SUPPORT STAFF MEMBERS

2,665

PRECEPTOR SITES

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS OF 20 ASS 19 L C

OF 20 ASS 20 L C

OF 20 ASS 22 L C

5,630 LIVING ALUMNI RESIDING IN ALBERTA

127 127 135 131

3,569

GRADUATE STUDENTS

AMOUNT OF GRANT DOLLARS TAKEN IN

PhD STUDENTS

24

MSc STUDENTS

21

VISITING GRAD STUDENTS

4

In 2018, our undergraduate students were top of their class when compared to their peers across Canada.

30

OF 20 ASS 21 L C

LIVING ALUMNI

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | WINTER 2019

COUNTRIES REPRESENTED BY GRAD STUDENTS



DID YOU KNOW? The Class of 2022 is the inaugural Doctorate of Pharmacy Class.

$3.34 million COMMUNITIES SERVED BY PRECEPTORS AND PHARMACY STUDENTS

67

According to the 2018 QS World Rankings by subject, the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences ranks 3rd in Canada, 28th in the world, and 15th world-wide for research (of institutions with pharmacy programs).


FAST FACTS 2018

DO YOU KNOW HOW MANY GREAT SCOTTS HAVE GRACED THE HALLS OF THE FACULTY OF PHARMACY AND PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES OVER THE YEARS?

15 1

LOLA M. SCOTT

NORMAN M. SCOTT

Dip(Pharm) 1923

BSc(Pharm) 1924

N.L. SCOTT GOULD BSc(Pharm) 1977

BSc(Pharm) 1985

M. SCOTT WATSON

BSc(Pharm) 1993, MSc(Pharm) 2000

SCOTT L. KIRBY

BSc 1996, BSc(Pharm) 2001

SCOTT D. FROMBACH

SCOTT J. SAVAGE

BSc(Pharm) 1996

GINNY H. SCOTT

BSc(Pharm) 2002

DIANE SCOTT

BSc(Pharm) 1960

ALLANA J. SCOTT

BSc(Pharm) 1989

SCOTT J. GINTHER

BSc(Pharm) 1996

SCOTT E. MULLEN

BSc(Pharm) 2003

BY FIRST NAME FACULTY MEMBER

JUDITH A. SCOTT

13 3 24 ALUMNI 28 IN TOTAL BY LAST NAME

KENNETH D. SCOTT

BSc(Pharm) 1961

BSc(Pharm) 1965

RANDY SCOTT

BSc 1988, BSc(Pharm) 1990

SCOTT A. CAMPBELL

BSc(Pharm) 1997

SHELLEY C. SCOTT

BSc(Pharm) 2010

SCOTT G. MCLEOD

BSc(Pharm) 1991

SCOTT MCDONALD

BSc(Pharm) 1998

SCOTT WAKEHAM

BSc(Pharm) 2016

CURRENT STUDENTS

JOHN R. SCOTT

BSc(Pharm) 1971, MSc 1973

SCOTT K. CARR

BSc(Pharm) 1991

SANDRA L. SCOTT

BSc(Pharm) 2000

SCOT H. SIMPSON

MSc 2001, Professor and Associate Dean of Research and Graduate Studies Present

HONOURABLE MENTION DR. RONALD COUTTS Professor Emeritus Birthplace: Scotland VERITY F. SCOTT

BSc(Pharm) 2012

SCOTT WILSON

BSc(Pharm) 2020

SCOTT DYER

BSc(Pharm) 2021

SCOTT SPENGLER

BSc(Pharm) 2021

THE MORTAR & PESTLE | ualberta.ca/pharmacy

31


OUR FUTURE DEPENDS ON YOUR SUPPORT TODAY, SO WRITE A PRESCRIPTION FOR THE FUTURE! Donating to our Prescription for the Future Fund supports supplemental learning opportunities for students, exchange programs, student-led events and initiatives, conference attendance and so much more. To learn more about our Prescription for the Future Fund or other giving opportunities, please visit uab.ca/givetopharm or call 780-492-8084.

Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences 2-35 MSB, University of Alberta 8613 - 114 Street Edmonton AB T6G 2H7

phcomms@ualberta.ca ualberta.ca/pharmacy

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