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Landscape, a selection of design work by

Abby Jones, MLA a.leigh.j.13@gmail.com 740.418.1188


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New features: Gravel and stone border under tree in lawn Urbanite and pea gravel pathway Herb and fruit garden Meadow borders Coastal sage scrub and bougainvillea hillside Succulents around the pool 3

Slice of California

Big texture, bold color

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Vibrant arrangements with California favorites 2

Existing lawn Existing paving

Existing pool

Southern California is an optimal location for experimenting with a wide variety of plant combinations. This landscape ties a couple of California’s native plant ecosystems with other popular mainstays. The sloped hillside will be planted with coastal sage shrub groundcovers with a backsplash of bougainvillea. Agave and Mexican grasses will be intermixed. The wall at the foot of the slope is overhung with Blue Senecio which emphasizes the blue of the water and creates a transition into the clean, structural succulents planted at ground level. The homeowners wished to retain but minimize their lawn, so borders of meadow grasses and grass-like wildflowers were added. A pathway of urbanite and pea gravel creates a comfortable stroll along the house and leads to the fruit and herb garden along the west side of the property.

Existing lawn

1. Rennovation of the plantings around the existing pool, Photoshop. Plants disguise the walls and maintain year-round color. The succulents are low maintenance and will shed little to no biomass into the pool. 2. The walkway around the house will be widened and moved to allow for a lush border of meadow grasses and wildflowers around the house. Rendered in Photoshop. 3. Other features of the plan include a fruit and herb garden on the west hillside and a border of stone and grasses to minimize the existing lawn around the existing carrotwood tree. Rendered in Illustrator. 4. Photos of the nearly-completed install.


Salvia officinalis ‘Purpurea’ Purple Sage

Purple Sage Remove all shrubs and trees Existing wall +6.5’

Composter

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Keep existing Foxtail Palm Wodyetia bifurcata

2 Nandina Keep existingExisting Nandina domestica

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Keep tree

Keep existing Paperbark Tree Melalueca quinquienervia

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Pathway Mulch Edging

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Keep existing Foxtail Palms Wodyetia bifurcata

Seat wall +18”, existing

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Existing Paving

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Remove all shrubs and vines

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Planting and drainage retrofits

Existing Patio FG = 245.3’

Existing wall +6.5’

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Eco-Chic Planting

Breakfast nook

Patio with arbor

Ex. Gate

8'

Existing Driveway

Garage GF = 244.8'

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Front Yard North

House FFE = 245.8'

Existing Arbor

Existing Creeping Fig Ficus pumila

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Anigozanthos flavidus ‘Cape Red Lead’ Kangaroo Paw

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Phormium tenax ‘ Atropurpureum’ New Zealand Flax

Planter

Existing Paving

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Slight mound

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Oreganum vulgaris Culinary Oregano

Vegetable Bed

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Remove Tree

Ex. Step +6”

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Dining

Existing Step +6”

Existing Raised seating

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Entry

Seating wall +18”, existing

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Existing Creeping Fig Ficus pumila

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Pennisetum setaceum ‘Rubrum’ Purple Fountaingrass

Conceptual Design and Planting Plan A Fresh Eco-Friendly Garden Villacorte Residence 21 Candlewood, Irvine, CA 92620

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24'

Rv

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Existing Hardscape

Ex.

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Nandina domestica ‘ Gulf Stream’ Heavenly Bamboo Penstemon heterophylus ‘Margarita BOP’ Margarita Beardtongue

1/25/2013 1/8” = 1’-0” 1/21/2013 Pg 1/2

Colorful Native or Mediterranean Plants

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This design for Sustainable Solutions Partners updated an exhausted, overgrown landscape. The new plant palette has color all year, fragrant blooms, culinary herbs, and is drought tolerant and low water. The red and purple color palette chosen by the client is carried through in specific cultivars of New Zealand Flax, Edmunds Manzanita, purple non-invasive Fountain Grass, pink Monkey Flower, Purple Sage, red Kangaroo Paw, and purple Penstemons. Light green plants like Lime Thyme, Sedum, and Variegated Flax Lily provide an interesting contrast to the purples and reds. Edible plants include the thyme, oregano, and purple sage dispersed throughout the plantings. The clay soil on site was amended by removing several inches of the clay and tilling in coarse compost, and the drainage will be improved by steeper grading and additional area drains. The larger plants on site tolerate clay soils. Shade tolerant natives were used along the shadiest walls of the site. 1. Eco-friendly Update Plan View - Drawn in AutoCAD, rendered in Illustrator. 2. Perspective 1 - Rendered in Photoshop 3. Perspective 2 - Rendered in Photoshop 4. Pathway and Drainage Section - Drawn in AutoCAD 5. Grading and Drainage Plan - Drawn in AutoCAD


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2. Asian-Inspired Walk

San Timoteo Estate

Blue-flowering native meadow “sea�

Masterplan

3. Rustic Back Yard

Asian Inspired Walk Hillview Terraces

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Rustic Back Yard

4. Hillview Terraces Tropical Pool

Orchard & Garden Guest House

Orchard . Gardens . Terraces . Patios . Guest House The existing features of this San Timoteo Canyon Estate included the house, walkways, driveways, access roads, pool, fenced perimeter and lower field, pond, concrete pad, and a few mature trees. The owners of the estate wanted an ecclectic variety of outdoor living spaces and productive areas. The major new features are an orchard and food garden, terracing and seating near the pond, wildflower sea meadow, and new plantings for the planter beds around the house. Behind and uphill of the home is a flat terrace which became a vegetable garden, herb garden, and fruit orchard. In the center of the orchard is a grove of olives overhanging a flagstone-paved seating and cozy fire pit. Taller nut trees, native oaks, and a line of pepper trees create a soft separation between this hide-away and the access road. Many native plants were used with spaced bloom seasons so that honey bees would have a food source year-round. 1. Masterplan, drawn in AutoCAD, rendered in Illustrator 2. The Asian-Inspired garden design for the front walk takes advantage of shade and more intensive water use near the home. 3. The back and periphery of the house has a selection of colorful native and drought tolerant plants. 4. Flagstone patios around the pool will host family events. Dry stacked stone walls terrace the hillside and enhance the valley view. 5. The aerial view and photos show some existing site features


Construction

Project management

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Translating Designs into Built Landscapes This design/build project in Los Angeles expanded a backyard, giving the clients an accessible, functional space. The design ideas the clients favored evolved into a somewhat eclectic, quirky, and fun landscape. The overall design concept was carried through into the installation successfully, and the clients are very happy with the outcome. 3

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We began with clearing the back yard of the existing iceplant, ivy, and tree of heaven sprouts. Then, we terraced the hillside to create a patio and three terraces for vegetable gardening. The patio surface was made with urbanite and planted with Silver Carpet plant. We built the stairs using in-ground rated pressure treated wood with stabilized decomposed granite for the tread surfaces. Native perennials near the street give way to culinary herbs along the upper stairs. A succulent mix of agaves, cactus, aeoniums, sedums, aloes, and crassula create interesting textures behind the patio wall, and natives control erosion on the steep upper hill. We created two zones of drip irrigation, and two zones with water-efficient sprinklers. 1. “After” Montage - Photographs 2. Design development concept sketch - Photoshop sketch using tablet and pen on photograph background 3. “Before” image - Photograph of hillside after brush clearing but before grading.


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Red Fields to Green Fields, Los Angeles (R2G-LA)

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Collaborators: Dakotah Bertsch, Mike Boucher, Eran James

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The R2G-LA plan addresses the lack of accessible park space in many of Los Angeles’s communities, especially in the most disadvantaged neighborhoods. Within these neighborhoods there are numerous foreclosed, for-sale, and abandoned properties that contribute to urban blight. R2G-LA would increase accessible park space and improve real estate conditions by converting these red fields to green fields.

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Our team estimated that R2G-LA could transform over 2,000 distressed properties and vacant lots in Los Angeles’ most park-poor and incomepoor communities into vibrant parks, plazas and open spaces.

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Filling gaps at larger scales

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The project involved working with several stakeholders, research, inventory and analysis at three scales, selection of study neighborhoods based on economic need, park poverty, and urban typology, and example green field designs. 1. Sample neighborhood analysis: parks, 1/4mi buffers, and red fields; commercial land use and corridors; topography hillshade. Drawn and rendered in GIS ArcMap. 2. Sample regional analysis: park poverty; economic poverty; land use; urban typologies in impoverished, park-poor areas. Drawn and rendered in GIS ArcMap.


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Urban Ag

Food Security in Cities

Red Fields to Green Fields, Los Angeles Collaborators: Dakotah Bertsch, Mike Boucher, Eran James The design for Lincoln Heights Local is comprised of three major areas: (a) the community garden, (b) the farmers’ market plaza, and (c) the terraced orchard. This “green field” will provide much needed green space and ammenities for the surrounding community.

(a)

The community garden takes advantage of the site’s southward exposure. By providing space for local residents to garden in individual or group plots, the garden would instills a sense of ownership among community members. Additionally, the garden provides an opportunity for the nearby schoolchildren to participate and learn side by side with other community members. The farmers’ market plaza utilizes the site’s accessibility and visibility to create a destination. Built-in seating in the plaza enhances the multi-functionality of the design. The farmers’ market fulfills a need in the community since the next closest farmers’ markets are 2.4 and 3 miles away, in China Town and El Sereno, respectively. Other programmatic elements were developed to augment the primary functions: an orchard with walking paths, a fruit and juice stand, and a multi-purpose community building.

(c)

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1. Perspective - Drawn in Sketchup, rendered in Photoshop. 2. Plan Perspective - Drawn in Sketchup and AutoCAD, rendered in Photoshop.


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Public Parks

Urban/Ecological Interface

Red Fields to Green Fields, Los Angeles 2

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Collaborators: Dakotah Bertsch, Mike Boucher, Eran James

Trail

Picnic Area

1) Programming and design for this site takes advantage of its unique location next to the Arroyo Seco. The park can educate children and parents about local natural history while also improving mental and physical health through recreation. The design can indicate the historic ecological conditions of the area, restore habitat for wildlife and plant species, and provide opportunities for outdoor education. An interpretive nature center will serve as a hub for educational programming, with additional education elements including a pond, a gathering circle, native vegetation, and a trail around the site. Rendered in Photoshop.

Overlook node

Small playground Multi-use field A

Gathering circle Ecology pond

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Curb cutouts A’ Entrance plaza

Nature center

Figure 8–27. Axonometric view of Arroyo Seco Park design in Lincoln Heights

Nature playground

Multi-use field

Native plant mound Gathering circle

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Figure 8–28. Section-elevation A-A’ of playground, multi-use field, and nature education area in Arroyo Seco Park

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2,3) Other design elements bring people into the site and activate it, thereby enhancing safety. Visitors will be welcomed and encouraged to enter the site by an attractive entry feature. The entry feature creates a sense of arrival as well as a meeting point. Playgrounds are appropriate for the site, due to its proximity to an elementary school and residential community. Picnic and barbecue areas encourage community investment in the park by supporting use by a variety of community members. A multi-use recreation field supports a variety of uses at different times, including informal play for children. Additionally, a walking and jogging path creates opportunities for residents to exercise or connect with nature. 2. Rendered in Photoshop, 3. Drawn in AutoCAD and Sketchup, Rendered in Photoshop.


Problem Solving 1. The universally accessible Tunnel connects the community and creates a venue for restaurants, artist galleries, clubs, boutique gyms, etc. Drawn in AutoCAD, rendered in Photoshop. 2. Land use was reallocated to remove barriers to the river. Partial graphics by Jen Chung. Rendered in Illustrator 3. Parks, Complete Streets, and bioswales were sited based on inventory. Rendered in Illustrator 4. River Park North - terrace “waves” design concept by me, rendering by Jen Chung. 5. Tributary Park treats urban runoff and connects people to River Park. Rendered with Photoshop and hand drawing. 6. The Stair overlook connects pedestrian flows and creates an iconic hub. Rendered with hand drawing and Photoshop.

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Living Streets Bike Paths Bioswales HSR: Elevated HSR: Trenched Freight Lines

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Boyle Heights Riverpark: North

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Boyle Heights Water Quality of Life Instructors: Jessica Hall & Weimin Li, Collaborator: Jennifer Chung

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The objectives of this project were to enhance community connections, increase green space, and increase water treatment and infiltration. Our inventory revealed several barriers including freeways, industrial zoning, railroad tracks, and topography. To address these issues, first, land use was reallocated and rail lines were consolidated to the west of the river. Then, the terraced River park was sited along the river allowing people to view and stroll along the water. Additionally, a second Tributary park was sited to connect upper Boyle Heights via a tunnel and universally accessible (5% slope) pathway. Finally, major streets were redesigned as “living streets,” and bioswales were sized and sited according to hydrologic flow patterns. Tributary Park includes a central bioswale, permeable paving, native vegetation, movable seating, and plaza space. Two main connective features at either end of the park are the 6th Street Stair and the Tunnel. The Stair fits the historic beaux arts theme and creates an iconic destination. From the Stair overlook, visitors can view the new park and river channel. The Tunnel creates the ultimate connection for the community. Because of extensive programming with restaurants, shops, cafes, art exhibits, interactive light shows, yoga studios, and more, the Tunnel is a safe, active route and destination.


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Conservation 1. 2. 3.

Amphitheater

Site Boundary

Parking lot Entrance

Moderate Use Areas

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Nature Rehabilitation Areas (minimal use)

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Demonstration Garden Ocean Breeze Santa Ana Winds

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n Juan River and on the terraces in consideration. The habitat that they need to survive and other native plant species will be preserved.

red)

Coast Horned Lizard

Long-eared Owl

White-tailed Kite

California Gnatcatcher

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of Landscape Architecture, Cal Poly, Pomona, LA332L, Mike Sweeney

San Juan Creek Terraces on the Urban Fringe Instructor: Mike Sweeney The site is located on Rancho Mission Viejo property in Orange County and is currently grazed for cattle. The uphill land is slated for a low density housing development, and the four terraces directly above San Juan Creek will be turned into a nature park that will help conserve the wash below. Several sensitive native plant and animal species can be found within or near the site.

Mountain Lion

Juan Creek Terrace

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Site Inventory mapping. Topo from AutoCAD, Rendered in Photoshop. Program analysis mapping. Topo in Sketchup, diagram in Photoshop. The amphitheater allows students a grand view as they learn about their surroundings. Section drawn in AutoCAD, rendered in Photoshop. Detail drawn in AutoCAD. Camoflaged restroom blends into the park. Rendered in Photoshop. Transparency bridge allows views to the canyon beneath. Rendered in Photoshop. Grading plan shows drainage features to retain the site’s runoff. The snake berm around the parking lot and the amphitheater are also shown. Drawn in AutoCAD.

Buered Access to Natural Areas

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The concept behind my design is camouflage inspired by the native animals. The design fits seamlessly into its surroundings. In addition to color, camouflage is a property of texture and shadows, and this design explores a variety of textures and transitions from smooth to rough and from large to small. One major design objective is to take advantage of views and control the strolling experience to enhance views. Board walks lead visitors through wildflower meadows, restored vegetation, and a botanic learning garden. The parking lot is hidden from view behind a snake-mimicking berm. The amphitheater serves as a viewing platform, seating area, and stage where classes can be held to teach about the natural history of the area.


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Graphic Talent

Hand Graphics & Painting

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Exploration of Ideas through a Variety of Media

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I start design projects on trace paper for easy layering and quick concept sketching. I am comfortable drawing and rendering with many media types. One of my favorite hobbies is acrylic painting. I like to explore ideas, dreams, and feelings as conveyed through color, light, shape, balance, and contrast. I occasionally made paintings for student landscape projects which called for more creative expression than most typical projects. 1. Heron Wading/Organics Composed of Inorgannics, We Need the Nonliving to be Alive. An exploration of building complex shapes out of patterns, simple shapes, and lines. Behind the work is a commentary on how people often view living things as more important than nonliving things. (acryllic on canvass). 2. Raised vegetable planter with Camelia fountain. Drawn and rendered by hand (pencil, pen, and marker on trace), finished in Photoshop. 3. “Grape Escape” outdoor classroom. Drawn in Sketchup, rendered by hand (pen and marker on trace). 4. ENV cafe courtyard “Patches and Corridors”. Drawn and rendered by hand and Photoshop (pen, marker, and colored pencil on trace). 5. Sketch on site at an oceanside resort, 15 min. (ink and marker on paper). 6. “Great Basin” multiuse passive rec and storm water infiltration field. (ink, pastels and chalk on brown paper).


Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Plant Biology Ohio University, Athens, OH

Graduated June 2007 summa cum laude

Sustainable Solutions Partners (Pomona, CA) Landscape Designer/Project Manager • I maintain positive client relations, make consultations and sales, create sustainable landscapes through successful design and project management, estimate accurately, draw construction documents, advise maintenance plans, and create effective advertising tools.

Sept. 2011 - present

Freelance Graphic Designer (Pomona, CA) • Exceeded expectations of clients with attractive document design and layout using Photoshop, SketchUp, Illustrator and InDesign. Work included 3-D imaging, logos, info graphics, and other promotional materials.

May 2011 - Dec. 2012

Red Fields to Green Fields Case Study (Los Angeles, CA) Volunteer Steering Committee Member • Guided team project direction, communicated in group meetings, completed multiple scales of analysis using GIS mapping, completed graphics, presentations, site designs, and written documentation.

Sept. 2010 - July 2011

Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition (Los Angeles, CA) Outreach and Development Intern • Created attractive template and contents for the 2009-2010 annual report. Participated in other outreach activities for the organization.

Summer 2010

Publications & Presentations

“Rain Gardens”. Sustainability Seminar. Regenerative Co-op, Pomona. March 31, 2012. “Red Fields to Green Fields, Los Angeles”. Lightning Talk. ESRI 2012 GeoDesign Summit. “Let them bike, let them live.” Subsurface Magazine. Spring 2009. Issue 2. pp 12-15.

Extracurricular Activities

American Society of Landscape Architects Associate Member Regenerative Co-op of Pomona - Community Organizer Pomona Valley Bicycle Coalition - Steering committee Student Chapter of American Society of Landscape Architects

Software

June 2011 - present Jan. 2010 - present Mar. 2012 - May 2013 Sept. 2008 - June 2011

AutoCAD, Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, SketchUp, GIS ArcMap and ArcCatalog, PlantMaster, Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Dreamweaver (HTML, PHP, CSS, Javascript)

Abby Leigh Jones abbyjonescreates.weebly.com a.leigh.j.13@gmail.com (740) 418-1188 997 Bradford St. Pomona, CA 91767 I chose this profession as a mechanism through which to unite communities and create ecological systems that are both functional and beautiful. I have over two years of experience as a professional landscape designer, seven years of education and experience in sustainability, and nine years of education and experience in ecology and native plant communities.

Skills

Work & Intern Experience

Graduated June 2011

Awards /Honors

Education

Master of Landscape Architecture California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA

Design, graphics, project management, research, analysis, planning, working with a team or solo, presentations, leadership, web design, event coordination, writing, editing, listening, and positive motivation

Featured Artist SCASLA Q. of Life Awards 2012 GeoDesign Summit Best Lightning Talk 2012 Chapman Forestry Award 2008 Senior Wolfe Award in Plant Biology 2007 Hughes Manasseh-Cutler Scholar 2003-07 University Scholar 2003-07


Abby Jones Landscape Design Portfolio