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Anthony M Giannini Master of Architecture 2012 University of California, Berkeley

WORK EXCERPT


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Anthony M Giannini _Master of Architecture 2012 University of California, Berkeley

AIA Henry Adams Award

_Bachelor of Science in Architecture 2010 University of Idaho Summa Cum Laude

4920 Coronado Ave, Oakland, CA 94618 USA T: +1 510.516.GIAN E: labAMG@gmail.com

www.labAMG.com


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University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

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CONTENTS MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

University of California, Berkeley

Fall 2010-Spring 2012

GRADUATE WORKS RE-FUSE | Master of Architecture Thesis Fall 2011-Spring 2012 Instructor: Ronald Rael Rael San Fratello Architects

theX | Arch 202 Advanced Option Studio Fall 2011 Instructor: Jordi Truco HYBRIDa

Modo City | Arch 201 Studio: Case Studies in Design Spring 2011 Instructor: Mark Anderson Anderson Anderson Architecture

DeConstruction | Arch 201 Studio: Case Studies in Design Fall 2010 Instructor: Jill Stoner

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURE

University of Idaho

Fall 2005-Spring 2010

UNDERGRADUATE WORKS Elliptigo | Arch 454 Design Studio Spring 2010 Instructor: Randal Teal

ICMA Firestation | Arch 354 Design Studio Spring 2009 Instructor: Frank Jacobus


RE路FUSE


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University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012

re-fusing refuse to create performative architecture, whereby alleviating societies of their state of refuse

RE·FUSE Our consumer-oriented society has created a shifting paradigm in which trash is now our largest renewable resource: a new non-natural nature. Paper and plastic comprise over 50% of the globe’s landfill. When this waste is perceived as a new-natural resource it can be mined to produce the building materials of the future. It is imperative that we integrate this ubiquitous resource into emergent rapid manufacturing technologies coupled with a real-time, hands-on-digital approach. Americans alone, throw away enough office paper to build a 12’ high wall from LA to NY and enough plastic bottles to circle the globe 4 times each year. re·fuse explores how paper and plastic can be transformed into multi-performative materials—cellulose fiber and extruded recycled plastics, how these materials, when calibrated through digital design and fabrication processes, can create architectural skins that respond to views and light and create insulation and water proofing, and proposes a new vision for additive manufacturing at large scales.

Thesis Review 05 May 2012 UC Berkeley Wurster Hall New Gallery Review Committee

[RR] Ronald Rael [LC] Leigh Christy [PT] Peter Testa

Thesis Studio Director, UCB Writer/Architect Testa/Weiser SciArch

[JA] Javier Arbona

Academic/Intellectual

[DG] David Gissen

Experimental Historian, CCA

[JS]

Jill Stoner

[JB] Joseph Becker [MK] Melanie Kaba [DF] David Fletcher [TB] Tom Buresh

Professor/Chair of Graduate Adv, UCB Curator SF MOMA Theorist Researcher, UCB Professor, CCA Chair, Department of Arch, UCB


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

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Fall 2011 - Spring 2012 University of California, Berkeley Master’s Thesis Instructor: Ronald Rael Rael San Fratello Architects


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University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

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Using the readily available paper and plastic refuse on site, many developing civilizations can create an inversion whereby alleviating the negative impacts of refuse and creating beautiful architecture.

DEPOLOYABLE MACHINES PRINT BUILDING MODULES IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES


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University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012

108.61 Empire State Buildings

188.88 Empire State Buildings

FALL 2011- SPRING 2012

%

RE•FUSE

MASTER’S OF ARCHITECTURE THESIS

2010 United States MSW Generated 2010 United States Total Total MSW Generation 250 Million Tons (before recycling) 250 Million Tons (pre-recycling)

United States Landfill Resources

United States Landfill Resources

other glass

5%

astic

wood

50%

28.5%

rubber, leather textiles

Paper

Paper

33% recycled

25%

metals

FILL

Plastic

12.4% Plastics

STIC

food scraps

72 million tons of paper/year

41.4 million tons of plastic/year

yard trimmings 258.84 million cubic yards

148.833 million cubic yards incinerated

PAPERPLASTIC

ion tons of paper/year

lion cubic yards

Ocean Garbage Patches

41 Million Tons of Plastic/Year (USA only) Ocean Garbage Patches

Largest Global Trash Conglomerates

41.4 million tons of plastic/year

189 Empire State Buildings 148.833 million cubic yards

72 Million Tons of Plastic/Year (USA only)

tes Landfill Resources

188.88 Empire State Buildings

108.61 Empire State Buildings

72 million tons of paper/year

41.4 million tons of plastic/year

258.84 million cubic yards

148.833 million cubic yards

bage Patches

50% Paper

25% Plastic

13%

cinerated

54%

LANDFILL PAPER PLASTIC 50%

25%

46%

109 Empire State Buildings 108.61 Empire State Buildings

e Buildings

13%

Ocean Garbage Patches

54%

LANDFILL PAPER PLASTIC 50%

25%


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

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NEW -NATURAL RESOURCES

Plastic

Material Samples

entification Code

n identification coding system for plastic, represented by the numbers on the of plastic containers, was introduced by SPI, the plastics industry trade ion, in 1988. Municipal recycling programs traditionally target packaging ers, and the SPI coding system offered a way to identify the resin content of and containers commonly found in the residential waste stream. Plastic ding system forare plastic, represented by the numbersthat on the old containers usually marked with a number indicates the type of ers, was introduced by SPI, the plastics industry trade Consumers can then use this information to determine whether or not certain nicipalarerecycling traditionally target packaging ypes collectedprograms for recycling in their area. Contrary to common belief, just oding system offered way to identify content of looks very similar e a plastic product hasathe resin numberthe in aresin triangle, which ommonly found itindoes the not residential stream. Plastic cycling symbol, mean it waste is collected for recycling. usually marked with a number that indicates the type of en Identification use this information sin Codes to determine whether or not certain for recycling PET in their area. Contrary to common belief, just has the resin number in a triangle, which looks very similar HDPE does not mean it is collected for recycling. Vinyl 3” LDPE odes PP PS OTHER

Material Samples THERMOPLASTICS

Resin Identification Code

Plastic Material Samples The resin identification coding system for plastic, represented by the numbers on the of plastic containers, was introduced by SPI, the plastics industry trade Material:bottom association, in 1988. Municipal recycling programs traditionally target packaging

because a plastic product has the resin number(HDPE) in a triangle, which looks very similar high-density polyethylene (plasticnot grocery bags) to the recycling 3”symbol, it does mean it is collected for recycling.

3”

polyethylene thermoplastic made from petroleum

4 5 6 7

binder wheat-based

3”

Vinyl LDPE PP PS OTHER

material newspaper

newspaper How Plastic Is Made

newsprint

3”

.5”

Binder:

binder wheat-based glue

Plastics can be divided in to two major categories: thermosets sugar & unbleached wheat flour and thermoplastics. A material thermoset solidifies or “sets” irreversibly when heated. They are useful for their newspaper durabilityglue and 3”strength, and are therefore used primarily in automobiles and newsprint wheat-based construction applications. Other binder uses are adhesives, inks, and coatings.

material newspaper newsprint

.5” wheat-based sugar & unbleached wheat flour glue

3”

sugar & unbleached wheat flour

A thermoplastic softens when exposed to heat and returns to original condition at room temperature. Thermoplastics can easily be shaped and molded into products 3”such as milk jugs, floor coverings, credit cards, and carpet fibers.

Agency

.5”

sugar & unbleach

sugar & unbleached wheat flour

Material:

to two major categories: thermosets and thermoplastics. A oplastic softens when exposed to heat and returns to original condition at ets” irreversibly when heated. useful for mperature. Thermoplastics can They easily are be shaped andtheir molded into products and are therefore used credit primarily in and automobiles and milk jugs, floor coverings, cards, carpet fibers. Other uses are adhesives, inks, and coatings. 3” mental Protection Agency hen exposed to heat and returns to original condition at oplastics can easily be shaped and molded into products verings, credit cards, and carpet fibers.

polyethylene therm

binder .5” wheat-based glue SPI Resin Identification Codes wheat-based glue 1 PET sugar & unbleached wheat flour 2 HDPE 3”3

2

material high-density p VO (plastic groce

VOLUME

sugar & unbleached wheat flour

Binder:

TH

80%

polyethylene thermoplastic made from petroleum

astic Is Made

can be divided in to two major categories: thermosets and thermoplastics. A et solidifies or “sets” irreversibly when heated. They are useful for their y and strength, and are therefore used primarily in automobiles and ction applications. Other uses are adhesives, inks, and coatings.

80%

THERMOPLASTICS VOLUME

material containers, and thepolyethylene SPI coding system offered a way to identify the resin content of (HDPE) high-density high-density polyethylene (HDPE) bottles and containers commonly found in thegrocery residential waste stream. Plastic bags) (plastic grocery bags) are usually marked (plastic household containers with a number that indicates the type of binder to determine whether or not certain plastic.thermoplastic Consumers can then use this 3” .5”information polyethylene from petroleum wheat-based glue plastic types are collected material for recycling in their area. Contrary to common belief, just

.5”

binder wheat-based

sugar & unbleach

3”

Environmental Protection Agency

material newspaper

Material:

newsprint

newspaper

3”

3”

Binder:

.5”

binder polyvinyl acetate (PVA glue) (C4H6O2)n

Paper

material newspaper

3”

material variation

newsprint

.5” binder polyvinyl acetate (PVA) (C4H602) polyvinyl acetate (PVA glue) (C4H6O2)n 3”

material newspaper newsprint

Paper

3”

.5”

material variation

binder polyvinyl acet

3”

material newspaper newsprint

Material:

3”

.5”

newspaper 3”

Binder:

material newspaper

3”

binder wheat paste (powder-based)

paper density

vegetable starch

newsprint

.5”

wheat paste (powder) 3” starch vegetable

binder wheat paste (powder-based)

paper density

material newspaper

vegetable starch

newsprint

3”

.5”

binder wheat paste

vegetable starch

material 2 parts newspaper

3”

newsprint

1 part paper mache paper, clay, plaster

material 2 parts newspaper .5”

3”

newsprint

Material:

3”

1 part paper mache paper, clay, plaster

binder

low-molecular-weight carbohydrates produced by the hydrolysis of starch or glycogen. Dextrins are mixtures of polymers of D-glucose units linked by α-(1->4) or α -(1->6) glycosidic bonds.

dextrine 2 parts newspaper3” .5” clay, plaster) 1 part paper mache (paper,

aperture variation

material 2 parts news

low-molecular-weight carbohydrates produced by the hydrolysis of starch or glycogen. Dextrins are mixtures of polymers of D-glucose units linked by α-(1->4) or α -(1->6) glycosidic bonds.

Binder:

3”

dextrine

low-molecular-weight carbohydrates produced by the hydrolysis of starch or glycerin vegetable starch material paper mache .5” paper, clay, plaster binder dextrine

3”

3”

binder dextrine

Material:

3”

material paper mache

paper, clay, plast

binder dextrine 3”

binder dextrine

.5”

low-molecular-we by the hydrolysis

Dextrins are mixtu units linked by αglycosidic bonds

3”

low-molecular-weight carbohydrates produced by the hydrolysis of starch or glycogen. Dextrins are mixtures of polymers of D-glucose units linked by α-(1->4) or α-(1 ->6) glycosidic bonds.

low-molecular-weight carbohydrates produced by the hydrolysis of starch or glycogen. Dextrins are mixtures of polymers of D-glucose units linked by α-(1->4) or α-(1 ->6) glycosidic bonds.

Binder:

3”

dextrine

1 part paper

paper, clay, plaster

paper mache (paper, clay, plaster) .5”

newsprint

aperture variation

dextrines are mixtures of polymers of D-glucose units linked by a-(1->4) or a-(1->6) glycosidic bonds.

module thickness variation

material paper mache

paper, clay, plaste

binder dextrine

module thickness variation 3”

.5”

3”

low-molecular-wei by the hydrolysis Dextrins are mixtu units linked by α-( glycosidic bonds.


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University of California, Berkeley

FALL 2011- SPRING 2012

RE•FUSE

Master of Architecture 2012

MASTER’S OF ARCHITECTURE THESIS


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

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NEW NATURAL MATERIALS

Paper

Plastic

Material Research and Development raw paper

raw plastic

GRIND

GRIND

grinded paper

coarse > fine

grinded plastic

FILTER

MELT

grinded paper | binder

ultra-fine paper powder

melted plastic

BINDER

Paper and plastic have added an inconceivable amount to the ubiquitous cultural waste that literally covers the globe, embedding in them the greatest potential for repurposing. The methodology for potentializing these materials as performative materials, as generated through the additive manufacturing process, was through a series of empirical studies. Paper and plastic (PP) have an integrally complementary relationship that proves highly practicable as building materials and assemblies. In the case of refuse, the strategized dichotomy between these materials is essential.

EXTRUDE

grinded paper | binder | moisture

plastic filament

In brief, paper has innately high insulative properties, both thermally and acoustically. When combined with a bonding agent, synthetic or natural, it has a compressive strength comparable to oriented strand board and fibrous concrete. Where the properties of paper fall short, plastic upholds forte. Plastic has the capacity for high tensile stress while being intricately formed and waterproofed. The relationship between paper and plastic can be lightly compared to that of concrete and steel. Through the course of re路fuse studies, two pioneering processes for reusing paper and plastic in additive manufacturing have been expanded. A handful of companies are developing ways in which Thermoplastics, 80% of all plastics, can be ground up, melted and extruded into new filament for use in fused-deposition-modelers. Through a process that I developed, paper can now be grinded and 3d-printed in standard 3d-printers that lay down successive layers of material in a bed, and it can be extruded in forthcoming fused-deposition-modelers. By choreographing the coarseness of the resultant paper and the variation of fused plastic, the material properties can be transformed for maximum performance.


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University of California, Berkeley

FALL 2011- SPRING 2012

RE•FUSE

Master of Architecture 2012

MASTER’S OF ARCHITECTURE THESIS


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

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PERFORMATIVE FACADE: 3D-PRINTED PLASTIC AND PAPER MODULES


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University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012

Top: Automated module layout and labeling for fabrication. Below: Automated Material Quantification using paper and plastic. Parametric Grasshopper Model responding to change of porosity. Bottom: Form Analysis of Annual Incident Radiation.

FALL 2011- SPRING 2012

RE•FUSE

MASTER’S OF ARCHITECTURE THESIS

Paper

Paper

Paper

Paper

Paper

Paper

439,871 in³ 7,542.37 lbs Plastic

505,894 in³ 8,674.45 lbs Plastic

564,988 in³ 9,687.72 lbs Plastic

600,709 in³ 10,300 lbs Plastic

622,467 in³ 10,673 lbs Plastic

635,830 in³ 10,902 lbs Plastic

182,360 in³ 5,242.68 lbs

191,549 in³ 5,506.89 lbs

203,742 in³ 5,857.42 lbs

600,709 in³ 10,300 lbs

224,501 in³ 6,454.21 lbs

232,511 in³ 6,684.54 lbs

30

JANUARY

40

FEBRUARY

50

60

MARCH

70

APRIL

80

MAY

JUNE

439,871

505,894

564,988

600,709

622,467

635,830

9.427962

10.84

12.11

12.88

13.34

13.63

7,542.37

8,674.45

9,687.72

10,300

10,673

10,902

215.59

247.84

276.79

294.29

304.94

311.48

182,360

191,549

203,742

214,958

224,501

232,511


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

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PARAMETRIC FORM-FINDING VIA GRASSHOPPER

Computational Design Methods

Through a deep material research and development of waste paper and plastic, there has been an emergence of high-performance materials that arise through the additive manufacturing processes of 3D-printing and fuseddeposition-modeling. As these additive manufacturing processes are digitally produced, the newly invented materials of waste paper and plastic lend themselves to be fully integrated into a highly computational design process and output. In these wall case studies, the Rhinoceros plug-in, Grasshopper, was used as the parametric tool to manage a large variety of variables with material properties in order to create performative walls comprised of proliferated components. In short, parametric design means that a limitless variety of parameters can be used to create a resultant solution. While any variable changes, the resultant is automatically updated based on the new parameters. Variables including, and not limited to, local conditions of climate and natural forces can be integrated into the Grasshopper definition. The re路fuse wall was designed as a curtain wall in a mixed-use gallery typology that responds to human view conditions, internal illuminance levels, and optimal daylighting control. Depending on dimensional restrictions of available 3d-printers, contractor JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER assembly preferences and aesthetic adoptions, a grid is created over the proposed wall surface. This grid creates a series of unique, allowably double-curved surfaces, each having a unique surface normal, and determines the relative size of the components. By first analyzing the internal conditions of eye-level views out towards the

San Francisco skyline, the individual component aperture diameters in the relative x-axis are parametrically sized to create a distinctive view and illuminance gradient along the wall. Simultaneously, the normals of each parent surface are analyzed for incident radiation and its exclusive relationship to the local sun angles. Based on the newly created aperture of each component and basic Pythagorean theories, which are written in the Grasshopper definition, a component depth along the relative y-axis is automatically created. The result is a global-scale, limitlessly-curved wall comprised of proliferated unique components that create the optimal views and lighting conditions that were desired. As all of the geometry in the re路fuse wall is parametric, being linked to any variable desired, other factors such as material thickness, plastic versus paper, are controlled. The amount of paper and plastic in the form is automatically quantified and outputted. This creates an instant feedback that allows the designer to wholly understand the materialusage implications for use in design decisions and reviews. For example, on page 14, as the overall porosity of the wall changes, the quantity of paper and plastic is recorded. In this case, relative to intuition, an unexpected result occurs: a proportional relationship between porosity and material quantity. As porosity increases, material quantity increases. OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER Situations like these demonstrate the stipulation of utilizing parametric design to provide immediate feedback of ones design decisions.


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University of California, Berkeley

FALL 2011- SPRING 2012

RE•FUSE

Master of Architecture 2012

MASTER’S OF ARCHITECTURE THESIS


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

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PERFORMATIVE FACADE: 3D-PRINTED PLASTIC AND PAPER MODULES

α_45°

α_45°

α_45°

α_45°

α_45°


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University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

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Left: 1:1 scale, 3d-printed waste paper, mock-up wall. Structural design inspired by the material-to-structure efficiency of sectional bird bone. Below: Full model. Actual dimensions: 36”W x 20”H

3D-PRINTED WASTE-PAPER PROTOTYPE WALL

We can now take this form that we design digitally and start to imagine it in real life, very easily, and prove the computational, performative qualities of our design.

“Since I’ve proven that these materials can be used in additive manufacturing technologies, it lends itself to be used in a really heavy digital and computational design process.

Here is where I’m taking pa-

per and plastic and letting it respond to a series of variables including lighting conditions, view conditions etc, while giving back a real-time, quantitative feedback of the amount of paper and plastic being used in these modules that it’s laying out. Specifically, it is showing how it automatically lays out these modules as you’re changing those variables. Another great thing about the process of additive manufacturing is the connection between the digital and the physical world: it now is becoming very close and this relationship is evolving everyday.”


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University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

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Left: 1:1 scale, re·fuse prototype wall. Fused-Deposition-Modeled recycled plastic shell, infilled with medium-coarse, binded waste paper. Each component is unique, being shaped by the grasshopper script to optimize sunlight control of the interior space. Actual dimensions: 36”W x 20”H.

FUSED DEPOSITION MODELED RE-FUSE PROTOTYPE WALL


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University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012

Top: 1st fused-deposition-modeled wall components. White PLA infilled with bonded waste-paper. Bottom: fused-deposition-modeled wall component with optimized form based on the 45-degree extrusion limits.

FALL 2011- SPRING 2012

RE•FUSE

MASTER’S OF ARCHITECTURE THESIS


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

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PARAMETRICALLY CREATED FDM WALL MODULES

Module Variation: Aperture Width vs. Depth

Module Variation Within Manufacturing Constraints: Optimized for 45째 Extrusion Limits


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University of California, Berkeley

FALL 2011- SPRING 2012

RE•FUSE

Master of Architecture 2012

MASTER’S OF ARCHITECTURE THESIS


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

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Top-Left & Below: Fused-deposition-modeled structure based on structural bird bone. Printed within most 45-degree extrusion limits with a 2-loop, 1mm wall thickness. Final prototype to be infilled with bonded waste-paper. BottomLeft: 3D-Printed concrete form based on highly efficient sectional bird bone with the goal of minimizing material.

NEW EFFICIENCIES THROUGH NATURAL FORMS


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University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012

Parametrically created wall components made from 3d-printed wood. Each module has specific holes and bevels for assembly.

FALL 2011- SPRING 2012

RE•FUSE

MASTER’S OF ARCHITECTURE THESIS


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

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3D-PRINTED WOOD: VARIABLE WALL COMPONENTS


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University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012

Below: Exploded diagram showing the digital disassembly of this variable component wall. Each component is unique with it’s own label for reassembly. Bottom: Diagram showing the relationship between each unique module of the wall and how they are automatically laid out and fitted into the Z-Corp 8” x 8” printing beds for rapid manufacturing. Right: The realization of the digital diagram below: 3d-printed concrete prototype wall .

FALL 2011- SPRING 2012

RE•FUSE

MASTER’S OF ARCHITECTURE THESIS

Layer_3 3_H 3_G 3_F 3_E 3_D 3_C

Layer_2

3_B 3_A

2_H 2_G 2_F 2_E 2_D 2_C

Layer_1

2_B 1_H

2_A 1_G 1_F 1_E 1_D 1_C

1_B

1_A

3_F 3_G 3_H

2_E 2_F 2_G 2_H 3_A 3_B 3_C 3_D 3_E

1_F 1_G 1_H 2_A 2_B 2_C 2_D

3_H

1_A 1_B 1_C 1_D 1_E

3_G 2_H

3_F 2_G 1_H 3_E 2_F 1_G 3_D

2_E 1_F

3_C 2_D 1_E 3_B 2_C 1_D 3_A

2_B

La

yer_

1_C 2_A

La

yer_

1_B

1_A

La

yer_

1

2

3


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DIGITAL MODEL TO PHYSICAL REALIZATION: ASSEMBLY CASE STUDY


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University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012


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University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012

Right: The robots analyze the despaired space and, by utilizing the structural properties of plastic and paper, 3d-prints a new spatial bridging between the two buildings. Paper and plastic are negotiated for optimal material-to-structural efficiency. Paper is utilized as the compressive and insulative material while the plastic is used as the outer-shell, serving as the waterproof, tensile structure. Below: Proposed robot utilizing existing technologies: waste processing and additive manufacturing. Free from axial restraints, this 3d-printing robot can create large-scale buildings with a limitless array of typologies and building assemblies.

FALL 2011- SPRING 2012

RE•FUSE

Bottom: New, highly-performative wall typologies using paper and plastic made possible by non-axial 3d-printer robots.

MASTER’S OF ARCHITECTURE THESIS

3-Dimensional Scanners: spatializing existing spaces

Raw Plastic Storage: faster printing: low precision

Raw Paper Storage: faster printing: low precision

Material Processing Chamber: paper: grind, sift, binder, moisture plastic: grind, melt, extrude

Plastic Extruder 1: Fused Deposition Modeling faster printing: low precision

Plastic Extruder 2: Fused Deposition Modeling slower printing: high precision

Paper Extruder 1: Fused Deposition Modeling faster printing: low precision

Plastic Extruder 2: Fused Deposition Modeling slower printing: high precision


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ROBOTICALLY 3D-PRINTED WALLS: NEW TYPOLOGIES CREATED FROM WASTE PLASTIC & PAPER


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University of California, Berkeley

FALL 2011- SPRING 2012

RE•FUSE

Master of Architecture 2012

MASTER’S OF ARCHITECTURE THESIS


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

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NEW FORMAL POSSIBILITIES THROUGH LARGE-SCALE 3D-PRINTING

Future Large-Scale Fabrication

In the world of additive manufacturing today, there is a diligent marathon to create larger 3d-printers, with the same goal in mind: 3d-print larger objects. In some cases, researchers are already creating concepts to 3d-print entire buildings. Enrico Dini, an engineer from Italy, has already started to revolutionize construction by successfully 3d-printing buildings out of sand. The central weakness of these concepts is the idea of always needing the printer to be larger than the object it is creating. re路fuse proposes an alternative solution: integrate all of these existing additive manufacturing technologies into a freely navigable robot. Much like a paper wasp gathers fibers from dead wood and plant stems, mixes it with a moisture content, saliva, and constructs beautiful and functional spaces, the robot will gather nearby paper waste, process it, add a moisture content and extrude it into new spatial structures. The robot is also much like a spider, which is an arthropod, having a segmented body and hydraulically controlled legs, they navigate impossible terrain while consuming protein and extrude silk into tensile structures with silk glands. The robot will gather plastic, and while crawling up existing and newly created forms with their hydraulic legs, they will extrude plastic into tensile and waterproof structures. Using existing 3d-scanning technology, these robots will determine existing and potential spatial characteristics. Through a series of spatial, structural and environmental analyses, new proposes will be created, which provides real-time feedback of material needs and design proposals to a central network for humans to review and revise if desired. This will be a continuously looping system of material gathering, material processing, spatial analysis, new spatial/structural proposals and robotic 3d-printing.


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University of California, Berkeley

FALL 2011- SPRING 2012

RE•FUSE

Master of Architecture 2012

MASTER’S OF ARCHITECTURE THESIS


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

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Right: World’s first 3d-printed waste paper. These were the first successful prints using newspaper and binder in the ZCorp 310 3d-printer. April 2012.

WORLD’S FIRST 3D-PRINTED WASTE-PAPER


theX


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University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012

“Traditional architecture starts from the premise that architectural structures are singular and fixed . . . Emergence requires that the opposite is true – that those structures are complex energy and material systems that have a lifespan, exist as part of an environment of other active systems, and develop in an evolutionary way.”

theX Natural structures are analyzed and understood as hierarchies of very simple components organized into constructs from the smallest arrangement of material, through successive subassemblies to the most complex – the whole organism or body. Properties and performances emerge that are more than the sum of their parts. The aim of the project is to explore an integral design towards a multiprerogative material system that will act as structure and skin at the same time. The development of these systems will originate from the definition of their simplest constituents integrating manufacturing constraints and assembly logics in parametric components. The research process includes the experimentation and learning of material in order to find its “intelligent” behavior. This new knowledge will be applied in the design of a physical system (phenotype) capable of self organizing into various configurations. Human occupancy, in particular proximity and time lapse, will be the parameters that will define multispatial requirements. These requirements transfer to the phenotype, described by software- controlled parameters. Consequently, the system design also includes the development of a parametric digital system containing the limits, laws, and possibilities allowed by the physical system. Dialogue between the environment and system is necessary. Sensors will take the information to our controller to then use the code to define the reaction of the entire system to the sensed impulse.

Michael Weinstock


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Fall 2011 University of California, Berkeley Arch 202 Advanced Option Studio MATERIAL INTELLIGENCE Instructor: Jordi Truco HYBRIDa Credits: Pablo Zunzunegui


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University of California, Berkeley

FALL 2011

the_X

Master of Architecture 2012

ARCH 202 ADVANCED OPTION STUDIO


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

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n tio co

e

line

con

ne

tion

nn

lin

n li

ec

n

tio

co

line

tio

ec

nec

tion

ec

nn

con

nec

nn

co

lin

co

e

DIAGRAMS OF TOPOLOGICAL VARIATION

89°

133°°

102°°

78°

89°

tion

nec

con

78°

line 78°

91°° 89°

91°°

102°°

133°° nec

co

nn

line

ec

tio

ectio

n line

co

nn

ec

tio

tion

e

con 47°

lin

47°

n

47°

con

47°

nec

47°

tion

conn

17

line

27 33 17

78°

13% 21.6%

89°

24.7%

27 33

n

lin

e


50

University of California, Berkeley

FALL 2011

the_X

Master of Architecture 2012

ARCH 202 ADVANCED OPTION STUDIO

r=33

89°

17

r=90

r=47

89°

47° 47°

47°

89° 78° 78°

33

27

133°

STAGE 1 Components +1 : +1 : +1

STAGE 2 Components +2 : +2 : +2

STAGE 1 Components +1 : +1 :=1

133°

47° 47°

47°

102°

102°

78°

78°

78°

91° 91° 89°

89°

89°


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

51

DIAGRAMS OF ALLOMETRIC VARIATION

89° 89° 89°

r=33

tang

ent li

r=47 78°

78°

78°

r=90

133°

STAGE 1 Components +1 : +1 : +1

ent

tang line

STAGE 2 Components +2 : +2 : +2

STAGE 1 Components +1 : +1 :=1

133°

47° 47°

47°

78°

78° 78°

102° 102°

91° 91° 89°

89°

89°

ne


52

University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

53


University of California, Berkeley

54

Master of Architecture 2012

Below: By studying the physical component models, the x,y,z coordinates were gathered from a series of locations on the model during controlled deformations. These points are then used to produce parametric models in Grasshopper: exact digital replicas of physical behaviors.

FALL 2011

the_X

ARCH 202 ADVANCED OPTION STUDIO

26.00 12.85

11.00

21.62 9.48

7.72

12.26 4.8

4.45

0.00

0.00


55

DIAGRAMS OF DEFORMATION

STAGE 0 ( x, y, z )

STAGE 1 ( x, y, z )

STAGE 2 ( x, y, z )

STAGE 3 ( x, y, z )

POINT 1 POINT 2 POINT 3 POINT 4 POINT 5 POINT 6 POINT 7 POINT 8 POINT 9 POINT10 POINT11 POINT12 POINT13 POINT14 POINT15 POINT16 POINT17 POINT18 POINT19 POINT20

POINT 1 POINT 2 POINT 3 POINT 4 POINT 5 POINT 6 POINT 7 POINT 8 POINT 9 POINT10 POINT11 POINT12 POINT13 POINT14 POINT15 POINT16 POINT17 POINT18 POINT19 POINT20

POINT 1 POINT 2 POINT 3 POINT 4 POINT 5 POINT 6 POINT 7 POINT 8 POINT 9 POINT10 POINT11 POINT12 POINT13 POINT14 POINT15 POINT16 POINT17 POINT18 POINT19 POINT20

POINT 1 POINT 2 POINT 3 POINT 4 POINT 5 POINT 6 POINT 7 POINT 8 POINT 9 POINT10 POINT11 POINT12 POINT13 POINT14 POINT15 POINT16 POINT17 POINT18 POINT19 POINT20

(-44.5, 44.5, 0) (44.5, 44.5, 0) (44.5, -44.5, 0) (-44.5, -44.5, 0) (-38.55, 38.55, 0) (38.55, 38.55, 0) (38.55, -38.55, 0) (-38.55, -38.55, 0) (-34.37, 0, 0) (0, 34.37, 0) (34.37, 0, 0) (0, -34.37, 0) (-31.63, 31.63, 0) (31.63, 31.63, 0) (31.63, -31.63, 0) (-31.63, -31.63, 0) (0, 0, 0) (0, 0, 0) (0, 0, 0) (0, 0, 0)

(-40.5, 43.43, 0) (40.5, 43.43, 0) (40.5, -43.43, 0) (-40.5, -43.43, 0) (-35.07, 38.28, 1.82) (35.07, 38.28, 1.82) (35.07, -38.28, 1.82) (-35.07, -38.28, 1.82) (-31.06, 0, 4.8) (0, 35.66, 4.8) (31.06, 0, 4.8) (0, -35.66, 4.8) (-21.48, 31.63, 4.45) (21.48, 31.63, 4.45) (21.48, -31.63, 4.45) (-21.48, -31.63, 4.45) (-3.08, 0, 6.07) (3.08, 0, 6.07) (0, 0, 0) (0, 0, 12.26)

(-32.75, 43.41, 0) (32.75, 43.41, 0) (32.75, -43.41, 0) (-32.75, -43.43, 0) (-28.34, 38.32, 3.37) (28.34, 38.32, 3.37) (28.34, -38.32, 3.37) (-28.34, -38.32, 3.37) (-25.24, 0, 9.48) (0, 37.27, 9.48) (25.24, 0, 9.48) (0, -37.27, 9.48) (-23.84, 31.63, 7.72) (23.84, 31.63, 7.72) (23.84, -31.63, 7.72) (-23.84, -31.63, 7.72) (-9.01, 0, 9.09) (9.01, 0, 9.09) (0, 0, 0) (0, 0, 21.62)

(-25, 42.72, 0) (25, 42.72, 0) (25, -42.72, 0) (-25, -42.72, 0) (-20.76, 38.87, 6.26) (20.76, 38.87, 6.26) (20.76, -38.87, 6.26) (-20.76, -38.87, 6.26) (-17.96, 0, 12.85) (0, 39.52, 12.85) (17.96, 0, 12.85) (0, -39.52, 12.85) (-18.9, 31.63, 11) (18.9, 31.63, 11) (18.9, -31.63, 11) (-18.9, -31.63, 11) (-15.01, 0, 11.04) (15.01, 0, 11.04) (0, 0, 0) (0, 0, 26)

20 20

20

(1-4) (5-8) 9 (13-16)

(10-12-17-18-19-20)

(14-15) 11 (6-7) (2-3)

1

2 10

5 13

(5-8) (1-4)

9

(13-16)

(10-12) 17

19

18

(14-15)

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(6-7) (2-3)

1

6

2 10

5

(10-12) 17

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16 7

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(1-4)

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(6-7) (2-3)

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11

( 0, 0, 0 )

15

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(19-20) 18

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(14-15)

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14

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(10-12)

19

( 0, 0, 0 )

15 12

17 (13-16)

(19-20)

18

( 0, 0, 0 )

15 12

(5-8)

6

13

11

( 0, 0, 0 )

(6-7) (2-3)

10

5

14

17

9

(14-15) 11

19

(19-20) (17-18-19-20)

18

1

6

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(5-8) (1-4)

(13-16)

15

16 8

7 3

4

7 12

3


56

University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012

Below: Study model on the integration of waterproofing. Seeking an answer towards a more thermally appropriate component.

FALL 2011

the_X

ARCH 202 ADVANCED OPTION STUDIO


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

57

Below: Once the component deformations and their proliferated relationships are properly analyzed, we can start to control the exact global form by telling each individual component which local deformation to take on. Each individual component has two main deformations: overlapping distance and rotation angle. These slight local changes can have dramatic effect on the overall form. Perfect freedom, however, is not permitted in a proliferated component form as there are specific restrictions and abilities of the system. Through a series of emperical and analytical studies, one must understand the behavioral characteristics of the system in order to capitalize on its unique abilities.

ALGORITHMIC PROLIFERATION

++ POSITION 1P

-

-OSITION 1

POSITION 3

POSITION 3

POSITION 2

+ POSITION 3

-

-

-

-

-

-

< 60

< 75

< 60

< 75

< 80

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< 120

< 105

< 120

< 105

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+

+

+

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POSITION 1

POSITION 3

POSITION 3

+

+

+

< 120

< 120

< 105

< 60

< 60

< 75

-

-

-


58

University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012

Below: Parametric scheme of two components producing local change. By throroughly investigating the local deformations of each physical component, we create a series of x,y,z points which all correlate to itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s specific geometry. Using these points found from the physical model, we integrate them into a parametric definition in Grasshopper. This allows us to digitally represent the parametric relationships of an actual physical component.

FALL 2011

the_X

ARCH 202 ADVANCED OPTION STUDIO


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

59

.75

component overlap : 11.2575 radians : ..16875 local angle : 113° point 1 to 2 distance : 44.77mm

.7

component overlap : 10.507 radians : .1575 local angle : 117.5° point 1 to 2 distance : 47.81mm

.65

component overlap : 9.7565 radians : .14625 local angle : 122° point 1 to 2 distance : 50.84mm

.6

component overlap : 9.006 radians : .135 local angle : 126.4° point 1 to 2 distance : 53.88mm

.55

component overlap : 8.2555 radians : .12375 local angle : 130.9° point 1 to 2 distance : 56.9mm

.5

DIGITAL TECHTONICS

component overlap : 7.505 radians : .1125 local angle : 135.4° point 1 to 2 distance : 59.95mm

100mm

angle

.45

0mm

component overlap : 6.7545 radians : .10125 local angle : 139.92° point 1 to 2 distance : 62.9mm

local radian angle

point 1

0mm 90mm

0mm

180mm point 2

90mm


60

University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012

Bottom: First studies to produce dynamic local change on a single component. By creating a pully system and integrating the servo into each component, local change via arduino was first possible. With knowledge of how much deformation was desired, a series of gear ratios were created in order to control how much actual deformation occurred on the component.

FALL 2011

the_X

ARCH 202 ADVANCED OPTION STUDIO

6.0518

6.0518

6.0518

5.4933

5.4009

3.8625

2.8589

8.0000

7.4364

6.0038

4.5830

12

Required Displacement: 2” Arduino rotation: 170 degrees 170/360 = 2/C 720/170C Circumference= 4.235”

7.97

4.57

11.136

6.87

C= xD 4.235 = 3  x D 4.235/3.14 = D Diameter = 1.348 R = D/2 Radius = .6744

r =.6744”

170° 2.0000

2”


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

61

MECHATRONICS: INTEGRATION OF ACTUATORS AND ARDUINO


62

University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012

Below: First studies to produce dynamic local change on multiple components with one servo. By creating a secondary rib system, the servo, pulleys and gears could all be integrated into the system. Bottom: Rotation variability within each component was now possible with the latest integration of pulley systems at the top and bottom of each rib.

FALL 2011

the_X

ARCH 202 ADVANCED OPTION STUDIO

8.2399

8.2399

12.0000

12.0000

8.2399

8.2399

12.0000

12.0000


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

63

MECHATRONICS: INTEGRATION OF ARDUINO AND ACTUATORS

6.0518

6.0518

9.0777

8.1013

8.1013

6.5565

6.5565

5.1847

5.1847

11.1546

11.1546

9.0057

9.0057

6.8745

6.8745

91° 102° 133°

6.0518

9.0777

6.0518

8.1013

8.1013

6.5565

6.5565

11.1546

11.1546

9.0057

9.0057

102° 133°

5.1847

5.1847

6.8745

6.8745

91°


64

University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012

Typical suburban growth neglects any and all human behavior: driven by the developerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bottom line. Inexpensive, yet precious land in the outskirts of cities is subdivided into plots for optimal profits, cheap builder plans are implemented into soulless stick houses, and fences are put up to provide a false sense of security and individuality of the residents. All social interaction is cut off as traditional street activity is turned inward towards the back yards. The result is a lifeless and static expansion of little boxes with little or no social interaction between residents and no ability to change over time. Below: California City, California is a microcosm of failed suburban typologies popping up all over the globe. the_X proposes a new solution whereby new

FALL 2011

the_X

new houses are implemented as seed plots and placed within proximities of existing suburban houses. Over time, these seeds adapt to internal human behaviors and desires for relationships with nearby houses and open space. These seeds become unique homes to the residents, being spatially specific to their individual lives. Meanwhile, as relationships with other houses form, figure-ground relationships change, creating optimal exterior courtyards for social events and play.

ARCH 202 ADVANCED OPTION STUDIO

Seeding Plots

Human Occupation + Interior/Exterior Transformation_ time frame 1

Human Occupation + Interior/Exterior Transformation_ time frame 2

Human Occupation + Interior/Exterior Transformation_ time frame 3

Figure-Ground Open Space Transformation


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

65

Below: Instead of placing spatially arbitrary and static, builder designed, homes into vast plots of land, spaces can evolve over time as the residentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s human behaviors take place. As new people become residents of that space, the form of the house evolves accordingly. Over time, patterns evolve, such as weekendvs-weekday relationships. With the residents permission, the building can start to predict optimal forms and evolve by themselves in order to maximize spatial efficiencies and keep the resident satisfied. Below Right: A 3-house scenario where the relationships between the three plots evolve over time to create an exterior courtyard.

EVOLVING FIGURE-GROUND & INTERNAL HUMAN BEHAVIORS


66

University of California, Berkeley

FALL 2011

the_X

Master of Architecture 2012

ARCH 202 ADVANCED OPTION STUDIO


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

67

ADAPTABLE HOUSE PHYSICAL PROTOTYPE


MODO CITY

Multi Objective Design Optimization


70

University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012

MODO CITY Modo City proposes a super high-density ‘New City’ which provides homes, necessities and recreational space for 100,000 people as well as supporting and providing for on-site industry. The city is composed of a building system which is unique to its own site yet adaptable to a wide range of climates and cultures. The constituent parts of the building system are manufactured on-site employing a wide-range of skilled trade, business and agricultural workers in its development. In general, the city is generated to accommodate the needs of its own citizens while also functioning as a tool for changing the larger ecology which is made possible due to its emmense scale. In Chengdu, one of the main issues at hand is the quality of air which our city addresses by incoporating filtration elements to cleanse the air as it moves throughout the city. Within the logic of a naturally occurring city growth, the comprehensive form of the towers simultaneously morph for optimal climate response. Tower structures and programs conglomerate around vast, cityscale voids. These voids behave as vertical-stack cylinders that, through pressure differentials, pulls up air from below. Before exiting the towers, the air is forced through a series of filters and finally through wind-turbines. Consequently, energy is created while naturally cooling the climate in and around vertical cities. By constantly parsing climate data, in particular wind conditions, the size of the massive internal air chambers fluctuate to create optimal air movement throughout the vertical city. Ancient culture is imperitive to the Chengdu way of life. The calm climate and lifestyle deeply embedded within Chengdu culture was imperitive to preserve throughout these vertical cities. By taking the horizontal street life of current Chengdu and pulling it up into the city with a series of doublehelix ramps around the internal voids, we provide a new, but highly familiar lifestyle for residents throughout the entire verticality of the city. Surrounded by fresh air, these ramps become the ‘streets’ of a traditional cityscape.

Multi Objective Design Optimization


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

71

Invited participant in the International Design Competition: VERTICAL CITIES ASIA Spring 2010 University of California, Berkeley Arch 201 Studio: Case Studies in Design Instructor: Mark Anderson Anderson Anderson Architecture Credits: Pablo Zunzunegui, Marcy Monroe, Gabriella Aguirre, Micharel Bergin, Brian Gillette, Micah Burger, Mou Yujiang

* Work shown was my contribution to the project.


72

University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012

Water Filtration: A gravity fed filtration system runs gray and black water through a series of filters where it is either diverted to composting programs or run through a series of filters and tanks to be deposited in onsite ponds and ultimately returned to an underground carbonated acquifer. Air Filtration: Everyone needs fresh air. The theme of the competition and a main metric in determining the success of our design iterations. We utilize a passive system for filtration of the air, which takes in outside air through large park/lungs and utilizes a rhizomatic filter to remove 98% of particulates before the air is discharged to the occupants. 24000 Cubic Meters of Air per Minute is filtered and either distributed

SPRING 2011

MODO CITY

ARCH 201 STUDIO

into the buildings mechanical system or released to the outdoors at points of social congregation. Community: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gray Spaceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is an important part of life for the people of Chengdu, who enjoy the temperate climate and a more relaxed pace of life than their other large city counterparts throughout China. We address this by creating courtyards at various scales throughout the project from the city wide, to the neighborhood and the individual unit. We have placed one tea house for an average of every 200 residents. Some are large, some are small, all provide a sense of community for the citizens of our city.


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

WIND ENERGY Using stack-ventilation to provide reliable and ample wind movement, wind-turbines

AIR FILTER particle collectors

WATER HARVESTING

FOOD PRODUCTION Revolving hydroponic machines to produce organic food on-site

GEOTHERMAL ENERGY heating and cooling with use of heat exchanger and heat pump.

73


74

University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012

Economy & Industry: By creating an industry for the construction of our city and others beyond, we create a sustainable pathway for the agrarian population to migrate to the city and become home owners due to their work. The average worker can be trained to assemble the modular structural system and become a home owner in less than two years. Structure: The structure is modular and works with flexible moment connections that perform in a seismic event to prevent collapse and injury to the inhabitants. A slightly hexagonal superstructure contributes to the success of this measure.

SPRING 2011

MODO CITY

ARCH 201 STUDIO


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini Growth Logic: Using a series of rules and a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;cellular automataâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; system which abstracts the city into units, we developed a method for determining the relative proximity from one unit to another, to provide the optimal planning distribution throughout the city. The chart at right shows how circulation is distributed and how vertical movement is weighted higher than horizontal. Perpetual Planning: During and after the construction of the city, the project will be studied by a team of building scientists and architects to verify the accuracy of the simulations used to define the plan and facade components. This allows the on-site fabrication shop to respond to the studies performed, and

75

to create a feedback loop that ensures success.

Solar Response: Due to an unusually low amount of sun in Chengdu, we decided to make solar prediction a lower weight in the optimization system. This ensures that the city is not generated to be heloiocentric, when the benefits of this type of move would not be fully realized in a city where there is not much access to direct sunlight.

ADAPTIVE & RESPONSIVE CITY GROWTH

CLOUD COVERAGE 1 .90 .80 .70 .60 .50 .40 .30 .20 .10 0 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

RELATIVE HUMIDITY >DRY BULB TEMPERATURE 1 .90 .80 .70 .60 .50 .40 .30 .20 .10 0 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

TEMPERATURE RANGE 1 .90

Thresholds

.80 .70 .60 .50 .40 .30 .20 .10 0 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

After a community reaches a critical density, the development stops and the sharp vertical line represents a drop in local population density as the new frame is installed, this gradually rises as new inhabitants move to the city and the cyclle continues.

WIND VELOCITY 15 14 13 12 11

Incremental Progress

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

After the settlement for a given area reaches a critical density, the superstructure for the area adjacent begins to be built and then populated, similar to the process articulated above.

SUN CHART > JUNE-DECEMBER 90 12

80 11

13

Foundation for Tower

70 10

60 50

14

9

40

The base of the tower is a central meeting point and provides a nexus for retail and civic spaces. This is also where the circulation lobby for the towers is located.

15

8

16 11

30

12

13

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20

9

15

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90

60

30

0

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60

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120

SUN CHART > DECEMBER-JUNE 90 12

80 11

13

70 10

60 50

Population Begins

14

9

40

15

8

16 11

30

12

10

13 14

9

17

20

9

15

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Inhabitants begin to move into the structure over time, patterns and communities emerge from the settlements and algorithms provide guidelines for proper proportions of retail and housing for optimizing density against other parameters.

WIND ROSE NORTH

WEST

EAST

SOUTH

Frame Installed Superstructure is installed which accepts units, depending on the results from location and direction simulation depicted above.


deConstruction


78

University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012

deConstruction

2 5

2 6

4 2


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

79

Fall 2011 University of California, Berkeley Arch 201 Studio: Case Studies in Design Instructor: Jill Stoner

The new 577 Airport Blvd Building, located on the Anza Lagoon, plays

all weave together, creating a blended microcosm of the world at best.

a vital role in the re-situation of the site. Previously a sterile office com-

The building itself was deConstructed with respect to the horizontal

plex, the site now brings life to the area by creating crucial links to the

link, light and air. It is rethought of as units inside a whole. Each unit

Burlingame neighborhood just due South.

has the ability to be a thermal unit in itself, allowing for manipulation of

The main link across teh

101 not only links the neighborhood to the beautiful site, it also links

all different climate types.

the buildings themselves.

and research hydroponic systems.

This building, comprised of agricultural re-

This allows maximum freedom to explore The entire North corridor is com-

search facilities, is an export of domestic foods. The building adjacent

prised of vertical growth panels that fold down for harvesting.

is the agricultural hub of the area. With the connection of these build-

provides crucial research opportunities while providing amazing beau-

This

ings and the neighborhood, the locals have a never-ending connection

ty for the airplane passengers to the North. The building is an organ-

with recreation, beauty and food. Here, Water, Earth, Air and Vegetation

ism for rhizomatic experiences of agricultural knowledge and beauty.


80

University of California, Berkeley

Master of Architecture 2012

ROOF GARDEN

ROOF GARDEN

VERTICAL HYDROPONICS

HYDROPONICS

VERTICAL HYDROPONICS

RESEARCH

VERTICAL HYDROPONICS

HYDROPONICS

VERTICAL HYDROPONICS

RESEARCH

VERTICAL HYDROPONICS

FOOD OUTLET VERTICAL HYDROPONICS

RESEARCH

CONVENTIONAL

CONVENTIONAL


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

81

Left: Through the deConstruction of an existing spec office building, a machine was conceived. The north facade is utlized for a series of vertical hydroponic panels that can rotate down to a horizontal position for harvesting and maintenance. A series of thermally independent units are created on the southern side of the building, which allows for controlled experimentation and research for larger scale urban agriculture. At the third flloor, a horizontal walkway, linked from the city of Burlingame across the lagoon, is activated and serves as the output for the grown produce. Here, conventional farming methods are compared to urban growth techniques.

AGRICULTURE THROUGH SECTIONAL FUNCTION


ELLIPTIGO


84

University of Idaho

Bachelor of Science in Architecture 2010

ElliptiGo World Headquarters Redesign Competition

ELLIPTIGO

‘ELLIPTIGO’ is not simply an elliptical-bicycle: it is a LIFESTYLE. A lifestyle full of health, energy, activity, outdoors, happiness and social activities. It is an exceptionally bold scheme. The space of the ElliptiGO World Headquarters should exemplify these values and be a complete embodiment of ElliptiGO. The spirit of ElliptiGO and the programmatic functions and needs of its workers were coupled together in this design. By taking a very rational approach with ElliptiGO’s needs and desires in first priority, the design is a literal translation of ElliptiGO. The space needs to feel open, fresh and energetic while fully functioning with adaptability and flexibility. The design features a boldly inserted, ‘shell component’ that functions as shelter, systems storage, equipment storage, acoustic containment and splendor. Due to its modular construction; it becomes mesenchymatic, lending itself to the temporal needs of the ever-growing ElliptiGO. There is a grand oscillation between the workers and the various spaces in the ElliptiGO space; therefore, the north side of the building is left open as a hallway. This allows efficient, non-interrupted flow of people, bikes and equipment. The workers all have different needs and desires; therefore the ‘shell component’ has been shaped to accommodate full gradients of quiet-to-loud spaces and private-to-public spaces. This design is ElliptiGO: Bold, Energetic, Flexible, Activating, Adaptable and Compelling


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

85

2nd Place Entry Spring 2010 University Of Idaho Arch 454 Design Studio Instructor: Randal Teal


86

University of Idaho

SPRING 2010

ELLIPTIGO

Bachelor of Science in Architecture 2010

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN VI


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

87

Below Left: The redesign of the existing space is considered as a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;space within a spaceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. By inserting a modular system which hugs the south-side of the space, the north-side is freed up to accomodate the continual oscillation between the front and back of the space. A thickness is developed into the shell, behaving as the storage for electrical, mechanical and equipment. Through the subtraction of the modular shell, spaces are molded around the exact needs of Elliptigo. These spaces respond to programmatic functions as well as acoustic and privacy gradients. Below Right: The modular shell is comprised of simple materials and assemblies for affordable and quick construction.

A MODULAR, SPACE-WITHIN-A-SPACE

Modular System: Quick and affordable to construct. Flexible and Rhizomatic. Storage: Space for storing equipment. Fully accessible. Steel Stud Structure: Cost efficient and repetitive system. Acoustic Panels: Provides ambient acoustic absorption while creating quiet rooms. Wood Slats: Skin which provides further acoustic dampening.


88

University of Idaho

SPRING 2010

ELLIPTIGO

Bachelor of Science in Architecture 2010

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN VI


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

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MULTI-USE SPACE THROUGH MODULARITY


CMU FIRESTATION


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University of Idaho

Bachelor of Science in Architecture 2010

39th Annual ICMA C.M.U. Firestation Design Competition

CMU FIRESTATION This project received the 1st Place Prize of the 39th Annual Idaho Concrete Masonry Association (ICMA) Firestation design competition. The basic principle behind this competition was to utilize the CMU blocks in an innovative, efficient and creative manner to design a new firestation in Boise, Idaho. Firestations have an innate demand for a clear and logical layout with flexibility for future changes. Two longitudinal, CMU walls split the entire length of the building, forming the main structure, developing logical programmatic separation, allowing for efficient circulation and creating the opportunity for transient transverse walls. These movable transient walls create the necessary flexibility for inevitable programmatic changes throughout the lifespan of the station. Passive design strategies are key in the long-term success of the building. By implementing horizontal louvres on the southern facade, daylight and heat gains are controlled. Thermal mass plays an integral role in providing comfort for the firefighters in the summer and winter while keeping overhead costs down.


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1st Place Entry Spring 2009 University of Idaho Arch 354 Design Studio Instructor: Frank Jacobus


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University of Idaho

Bachelor of Science in Architecture 2010

Below: A new Concrete Masonry Unit (CMU) detail was developed to allow for ribbon-windows while providing ample thermal dampending to the North. CMU walls span the length of the building and serve as the main structure, allowing for partition walls to be placed in between with future mobility options. Along this North side, all program is stacked vertically to free the southern interstitial space for maximum circulation efficiency to the apparatus. The public spaces are on the bottom level, the semi-public are in the middle level, and the private spaces are stacked on the top level, creating an appropriate privacy gradient.

SPRING 2009

CMU FIRESTATION

Right: The local climate of Boise, Idaho plays an integral role in the design of the firestation. Horizontal louvres on the southern facade are sized to allow winter sun penetration through the interstitial space and heat up the central, longitudinal wall for thermal mass heat transfer during the cold nights. These louvres do not allow direct summer sun to penetrate the space, which would add unwanted heat gains, but rather the light is diffused into the space.

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN IV

ROOF BASALITE PRECISION HALF HIGH D205 W/ “S” 389 MORTAR LINTEL REINFORCEMENT RIGID INSULATION ‘T’ SECTION 8” LINTEL SCORED HALF-HIGH BOLTED STEEL BRACKET GLAZING WINDOW MULLION FLASHING HORIZONTAL JOINT REINFORCEMENT GROUTED 16” O.C. VERTICAL REINFORCEMENT WINDOW SILL PLATE ‘W’ FLANGE SECTION


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CONCRETE MASONRY UNIT SOLAR AND PROGRAMMATIC RESPONSE

Summer Sun

Winter Sun


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University of Idaho

SPRING 2009

Bachelor of Science in Architecture 2010

CMU FIRESTATION

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN IV


www.labAMG.com Anthony M Giannini

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CIRCULATION AND PROGRAMMATIC EFFICIENCY


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Anthony M Giannini

4920 Coronado Ave, Oakland, CA 94618 USA T: +1 510.516.GIAN E: labamg@gmail.com www.LABAMG.com Education 2010-2012

University of California, Berkeley College of Environmental Design Master of Architecture [M.Arch] May 2012 AIA Henry Adams Award

2005-2010

University of Idaho College of Art & Architecture Bachelor of Science in Architecture [B.S.Arch] May 2010 Summa Cum Laude - 4.0 GPA

Experience 2012 [current]

Avila Design Berkeley, CA Work as an Independent Contractor for architectural design and visualization under expedited conditions.

2012 [current]

University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, CA Commissioned to design and fabricate a folded aluminum wall in the UCB CED Graduate Office using the latest CAD/CAM technologies with Veev Design.

2011 [summer]

Endrestudio Architects|Engineers Emeryville, CA As the direct assistant to the Principal, Paul Endres, FAIA, SE, PE, I helped facilitate the everyday responsibilities including construction documents, RFI’s, office management, business development, design and visualization.

2008 [summer]

Stonebridge Homes LLC Coeur d’Alene, ID Computer Aided Design work and site anaylsis on a 3,600sf custom home.

2005-2008

Parkwood Business Properties Coeur d’Alene, ID Parkwood develops and maintains business parks. Duties included an assortment of building construction and maintenance.

Honors + Awards 2012 2011 2010 2010 2009 2009 2009 2003 2002 2002

AIA Henry Adams Award UC Berkeley Architecture Highest Honors 2012 Berkeley Circus Merit Award Advanced Option Studio, UC Berkeley 2nd Place: ElliptiGO World Headquarters Design Competition Elliptigo Inc. Jesse Buchanan Plaque Honors Honors undergraduates with the highest possible scholastic record at the U of I 1st Place: 39th Annual ICMA CMU Fire Station Design Competition 2nd Place: ASME Lounge Redesign Competition 2nd Place: UI Engineering Studio Redesign Competition 1st Place: NASA Space Consortium Design Competition 1st Place: Lyon’s Club Art Competition 1st Arbor Day Logo Design Competition

Scholarships + Grants 2012-11-10 2012-11-10 2010 2009 2009-08-07 2009-08-07

(5) UC Berkeley Architecture Department Awards UC Berkeley Graduate Division Award Malcolm Reynolds Prize UC Berkeley Arthur L. Troutner Architecture Scholarship Burnett Access Scholarship Idaho Opportunity Scholarship


2008 2006 2006-05 2005 2005

Lloyd E. Stalker Architecture Scholarship Academic Competitiveness Grant Scholarship Idaho Robert Lee Promise Scholarship University of Idaho Achievement Scholarship Idaho Academic Scholarship

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Publications + Exhibitions 2012 2012 2012 2012 2011 2010 2009 2009

SOURCE Exhibition of thesis work at the Headquarters Gallery in Berkeley, Ca FuturesPlus.net Thesis work featured, 7 August 2012 ARQA.com Studio work with Pablo Zunzunegui, Material Intelligence was published Aug 1st, 2012 http://arqa.com/esp/proyectos/material-intelligence.html Maker Faire Bay Area Exhibited thesis work, UCB Group received the Editor’s Choice Award 2012 Berkeley Circus Exhibition of outstanding student work, UCB CED “Interactive Literacy Center a Fun Path to Reading, Learning”: Studio work was featured. 2010 Boise State University College of Education News: April 2010. 3-Page Feature in the Quarterly magazine: HERE WE HAVE IDAHO “A Student Perspective: Genius and Tenacity Buttressed by Scholarships”. Donna Emert. University of Idaho College of Art & Architecture Website Featured as a top architecture student at the University of Idaho

Study Abroad 2011 2009-08 2009-08

China: Beijing, Shanghai, Chengdu Invited to participate in the international design competition, Vertical Cities Asia England: London, Brighton Italy: Venezia, Firenze

Technical Skills Computer Modeling

Adobe

Rhinoceros 4.0 - 5.0 advanced modeling techniques, Plug-Ins: Grasshopper, Elk, Firefly Grasshopper complex parametric modeling Modo advanced sub-surface modeling techniques, advanced animation & rendering 3D Studio Max advanced photorealistic rendering Mental Ray, animation, daylighting analysis AutoCad Architecture Climate Consultant climate analysis using EPW Revit Architecture Ecotect climate simulation and analysis Sketchup Photoshop advanced and realistic graphic and photo manipulation Illustrator advanced vector-based diagrams & graphic design In-Design professional-quality page layout and organization Dreamweaver basic web design After Effects advanced video compiling, editing and effects

Animation/Video Motion-Tracking

3DS Max advanced photorealistic rendering and animation with MentalRay Syntheyes advanced motion-tracking for placing computer generated models into real video footage Modo 601 advanced animation and rendering techniques for professional quality video Adobe After Effects advanced skills in compiling and editing real video footage with CG.

Computer Aided Manufacuring

Laser Cutting advanced skills and knowledge in material properties machine maintenance 3D-Printing advanced knowledge and skills with Z-Corp 3D-Printers Fused Deposition Modeling advanced knowledge and skills with plastic extrusion printers

References

Paul Endres FAIA, SE, PE, Principal at Endrestudio T: +1 510 898 6960 E: info@endrestudio.com 4053 Harlan Street Suite 113, Emeryville, CA 94608 USA Ronald Rael Associate Professor at University of California, Berkeley - Principal at Rael San Fratello Architects T: +1 (510) 207-2960 E: r@el.net 2200 Adeline Street Suite 340, Oakland, CA 94607 Raveevarn Choksombatchai Associate Professor at University of California, Berkeley - Principal at VeevDesign T: +1 415 621 6597 E: info@veevdesign.com 49 Grace Street, San Francisco, CA 94103


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Anthony M Giannini _Master of Architecture 2012 University of California, Berkeley

AIA Henry Adams Award

_Bachelor of Science in Architecture 2010 University of Idaho Summa Cum Laude

4920 Coronado Ave, Oakland, CA 94618 USA T: +1 510.516.GIAN E: labAMG@gmail.com

www.labAMG.com


Anthony M Giannini

4920 Coronado Ave, Oakland, CA 94618 USA T: +1 510.516.GIAN E: labAMG@gmail.com

www.labAMG.com

Architecture Portfolio  

An architecture portfolio from the University of California, Berkeley and University of Idaho. 2009-2012.

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