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Hank Warneck June 2012


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DESIGN / BUILD COLLABORATION boathouse/guesthouse, Thousand Islands, NY

THESIS STUDIO

a museum for the Tiber River, Rome, Italy

COLLABORATIVE COMPETITION SUBMISSION

2010 ULI/Gerald D. Hines Student Urban Design Competition

INTERDISCIPLINARY URBAN DESIGN STUDIO

a strategy for urban regeneration, Portland, OR

SKETCHBOOK

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BOATHOUSE

summer / fall 2011 A collaboration as half of the design/build collective Jo(h)n’s, Hammett & Henry. The project is a revitalization of a dilapidated historic boathouse/guesthouse. Specific project goal was to create a space for two in which the St. Lawrence River can be experienced on an intimate level. My role: co-designer, co-builder, primary contact for client.

drawing: site topography and building orientation 4


01 DESIGN / BUILD COLLABORATION

photo: view of Boathouse from river 5


photo: view from site, Canada

Site The main concept for the interior of the cabin was drawn from the dominating visual feature: the line of the landscape on horizon.

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photos: reveal details inspired by landscape line on horizon

Translation From the idea of a horizontal line, we created a series of reveal details that are repeated throughout the project at various scales.

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drawings: interior studies

Draw The main process media of the project was pencil sketching.. Project process was a flow between sketching and building: problems encountered with tools were solved with pencil. Solutions conceived with pencil were refined with tools.

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photos: construction process: framing, finish work

Build Reconstruction involved lifting the entire building 3� to repair rotten framing members, and continued through framing and finish work. The majority of design breakthroughs came when a built reality created a constraint that pushed us to a creative solution.

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photo: kitchen/hearth space, as seen through tri-fold doors 11


DETAIL & SECTION

1/4” REVEAL AROUND JAMB EXTENSIONS

A SECTION A

SHIP-LAP SIDING 1/4” REVEAL AROUND JAMB EXTENSIONS

SHIP-LAP SIDING COMMON PINE 1” X 8” (ON FACE) PRIMED WHITE

BLACK TRIM HEAD SCREWS 2” OFF BOTTOM OF BOARD. IN STRAIGHT LINE

1/2” REVEAL BTWN SIDING AND FLOOR

JAMB EXTENSIONS, 7/8” PROFILE, 1/2” PROUD OF SIDING SASH CORD WINDOW FRAME B SECTION B

SHIP-LAP SIDING SASH WEIGHT 1/4” REVEAL AROUND JAMB EXTENSIONS JAMB EXTENSIONS, 7/8” PROFILE, 1/2” PROUD OF SIDING SILL

drawing: typical refurbished wood double hung window detail

Detail Design details were driven by material and tool constraints, and a desire to relate the project to the site. Design development with the client resulted in the creation of several details, including the whitewashed ship-lap siding and the window jamb reveal on the original double hung windows.

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ELEVATION OF SLEEPING AREA/KITCHEN WALL PORCELIN LAMPHOLDER W/ EDISON BULBS @ 25 WATT 2 X 1 5/8” TRIM HEAD SCREWS CONNECT STRINGER TENON TO SUPPORT PAIR SHELVES, 2” x 6” CHERRY. ONE SIDE, ONE EDGE SQUARED. OTHER EDGES LEFT WITH MILL MARKS.

SHELF STRINGERS COMMON PINE, 3/4” X 1 3/4”. PAINTED WHITE. TENON CUT TO 1/4” SHELVING SUPPORTS. COMMON PINE, 3/4” X 1 3/4”. PAINTED WHITE. 1/4” REVEAL BETWEEN PAIR. 5/8” DRYWALL. FINISHED W/ VENETIAN PLASTER 1/2” REVEAL AT INTERSECTION W/ WALL/CEILING/FLOOR CUSTOM CANVAS CURTAIN W/ SEAMS AT 16” TO MATCH WALL REVEALS. PARCHMENT COLOR, WHITE STITCHING

BLACK TRIM HEAD SCREWS 2” OFF BOTTOM OF BOARD. SET IN STRAIGHT LINE

SHIP-LAP SIDING COMMON PINE 1” X 8” (ON FACE) LIGHTLY PRIMED WHITE

drawing: kitchen wall/sleeping space elevation

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photos: details of furniture pieces fabricated on site

Furniture Shelving in the kitchen and bedroom as well as the kitchen island, kitchen table and a pair of asymmetrical benches were created, referencing details developed at earlier stages of the project. Horizontal surfaces were made from a large cherry tree that was milled several years ago on the property. The cherry was flattened on one face, leaving the bottoms and edges in their ‘natural’ (from the sawmill) form. A simple supporting structure cradles the cherry tops.

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photos: entry view, stove was recovered from abandoned cabin on site

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photo: screened in porch with double post/rafter detail

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photos: before (L) and after (R)

drawing: N/S section though Boathouse and river 19


A MUSEUM FOR THE TIBER enabling riparian / urban connections winter / spring 2011 professor : James Tice

‘This studio asks how could Rome benefit if its river edges were freed of their 19th century encrustations and the Tiber was conceived as natural asset rather than as threat.’ -studio brief, James Tice.

Rome, a city whose history and culture grew out of an intimate relationship with the Tiber River has seen this connection severed by heavy-handed flood mitigation and transportation infrastructures. Construction of the 12 to 15 meter tall embankments between 1870 and 1920 effectively cut the Tiber River out of the Roman urban experience. Such separation of river from the urban landscape is a concern when considering the health of a region’s culture, economy and ecology. This thesis studio project was an investigation of how architects and landscape architects can identify and promote mutually beneficial relationships between city, river, ecology and individuals; how an existing urban fabric can be adjusted to support an engagement of landscape and river.

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02 THESIS STUDIO

rendering: concept of embankment walkway as ecological network/pedestrian amenity 21


Site The site on the old Farnesina grounds is at the intersection of an urban datum connecting the Janiculum hill to the city to the embanked Tiber river. A river on its east edge and the tallest hill in Rome to its west, the site is a step from the wilds of the Janiculum Hill to the urbanized Tiber.

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collage: the Tiber River in ancient Rome, site in red original image: Giuseppe Vasi, Prospetto di CittĂ Roma visto dal Monte Gianicolo, 1765

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0m + 20 m + 60 m

model: study of topographic relationship between the Janiculum Hill, the Farnesina [site] and Tiber River

Folded Landscape Project concept was based on the folding of the landscape, stepping it to meet the river’s edge and creating a variety of conditions for regional ecology and human habitation. By allowing the Tiber to come into the city, natural flood regimes are simulated; a flood gauge becomes part of the urban fabric.

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model: concept diagram illustrating the role a folded landscape plane would play for both urban and ecological life

drawing: study of landscape terracing, and the habitats created in the steps

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model: a study of the relationship between ancient urban fabric, landscape and museum

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drawing: series of building / landscape sections showing the changing relationship between building/landscape/river

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drawing: an inv the relationship of the three galleries (garden, room and wall) to light

A Museum for the Tiber The site will become a vision of what the relationship between city/building/ river/landscape can be in a Rome of the future. The Tiber Museum project looks to a time when ecological, urban and social processes are linked in a mutually beneficial way. The museum intervention will be an urban ecological catalyst; a host for an ecology that extends from Rome’s Janiculum Hill, out onto the now deserted river walkways, simultaneously activating the space for human occupation and creating a mobility network for a variety of native animal species.

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rendering: museum procession, landscape and river 31


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drawing: section through landscape steps to Tiber River, flood stages annotated on left

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ALLEY AS ARMATURE

enabling stability through flexibility a collaboration with Jonathan Chesley (mArch), Joseph Sadoski (mArch), Ryan Fiorentino (MBA), Justion Overdevest (LlArch, MBA) advisor: Roxi Thoren

‘the ULI/Gerald D. Hines Student Urban Design Competition... offers graduate-level students the opportunity to form their own multidisciplinary teams and engage in a challenging exercise in responsible land use. [teams will] have two weeks to devise a comprehensive design and development program for a real, largescale site.’ -from competition brief.

Characteristic of North American, car focused master plans, the area surrounding Mt. Baker Light Rail Station is constrained by both physical and conceptual barriers. Mitigating these barriers involves the identification of latent potentials embedded in the urban landscape. Urban remnants are activated to the benefit of local economies, ecologies and cultures.

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03 COLLABORATIVE COMPETITION SUBMISSION

drawing: GIS map of Seattle’s transit hubs 35


drawing: housing typologies and their economic/social attributes

Mobility By allowing mobility to span several scales, resilient urban typologies are formed that evolve and adapt over time. The revitalization of Rainier Alley creates a stage upon which individuals can play active roles in the formation of their community. A city with a landscape of self-realization. A landscape that is an artifact of its culture. A culture with the ability to dictate its own metamorphosis.

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drawing: forms of mobility enabled by proposed alley infrastructure

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drawing: plan and sections of urban study area 39


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drawing: phased development of study area

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ECODISTRICT AT LENTS

ecological based urban regeneration fall 2011 professor: Brook Muller A collaborative studio with Bennett Hart (Arch) and Renee Wilkinson (L. Arch), with emphasis on an integrated approach to architecture and landscape architecture.

‘... establish a green infrastructure framework for urban revitalization. We will approach this emphasis t an intersection of scales, first from the region to district scale and ultimately from the district to immediate site scale.’ - from studio brief, Brook Muller

A project investigating how small interventions can catalyze localized growth, and reach outward to create an urban ecological network capable of sustaining a population of mixed income residents along side a variety of flora and fauna. Water and habitat were the main metrics used to judge performance, both play a critical role in the experience of the public spaces in the community.

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04 INTERDISCIPLINARY URBAN DESIGN STUDIO

drawing: catalyst concept 43


model: study of street/building relationships

Public Space Public space in the district becomes a demonstration of the infrastructure supporting the ecological and economic systems of the district.

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model: study of main public space/flood basin

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model: stormwater retention park

Storm water Infrastructure Open space serves a double duty of collecting and storing, infiltrating, or transporting stormwater during peak rain events. When dry, the spaces are reclaimed by people in the district. Flood regimes, visible to all, take a role in shaping these spaces.

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model: flood plaza

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rendering: axonometric of community commons

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drawing: plan and section of community commons

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Draw Sketching to understand cities, buildings, objects, processes. A way to be involved with place.

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06 SKETCHBOOK

drawings: Rome

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drawings: New York

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drawings: New Orleans

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Thank You. HANK WARNECK 7500 NE Carene Lane Bainbridge Island, WA 98110 hank.warneck@gmail.com 406.451.3345

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