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Temple City

Winter 2013 news events people

VOTING

Rules INSIDE!

WINTER RECREATION GUIDE PAGE 26

12 EXTREME MAKEOVER

18 MARCH MADNESS

23 ART WITHOUT BORDERS


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INSIDE THIS ISSUE 4 City Manager’s Message

18 March Madness

Connect with your vote

The upcoming Municipal Election

5 Perspectives

20 Lessons From Abroad

Locals hit the polls

Embracing civic participation

6 Snapshots

23 Art Without Borders

Capturing the community spirit

Creating an open-air gallery

9 Making Headlines

26 Recreation Guide

Reviewing 2012 accomplishments

Winter 2013 classes and activities

12

Extreme Makeover:

12 Extreme Makeover

33 Ask City Hall

Reimagining our downtown

New laws ahead

15 Counterparts

34 People

What’s up, Doc?

Jennifer Gass, 1982 Camellia Queen

Las Tunas Drive

17 Election Results See how Temple City voted

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20

Art Without Borders

Lessons From Abroad Temple City Connect

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temple city

city manager’s message

CONNECT WITH YOUR

vote!

TEMPLE CITY CONNECT is the City’s quarterly magazine that connects the community to City Hall.

EDITOR Jose Pulido

MANAGING EDITOR Reflecting on recent developments that made 2012 stand out, a unifying theme clearly

Brian Haworth

emerges. From completing our first-ever Citizen’s Academy, to adopting a more interactive approach to code and law enforcement through the FASE Program and

COPY EDITOR

Community-Oriented Policing Strategy—many of the milestones we shared (page 9)

Roger Grody

promote citizen education and outreach. And heading into 2013, with the Municipal Election in March, I hope many of you will continue the momentum by heading to the polls. As the saying goes, government starts at the ballot box, and it is your involvement that ultimately drives ongoing community progress. On page 12, read about the Las Tunas Drive redesign effort. With the Rosemead Boulevard Enhancement Project starting construction in January, we’re now looking to revive Las Tunas into a vibrant downtown. In doing so, we launched an aggressive outreach campaign to solicit public involvement, and at the first design workshop on Nov. 14, about 200 community members shared their visions for the future of the

WRITERS Stephanie Chan Wendy Chung

PHOTOGRAPHERS Bryan Ariizumi Jerry Jambazian Su-E Tan

corridor. With another meeting scheduled for Dec. 19, I hope you will come see the

TRANSLATOR

designs and pick your preferred concept. After all, the success of the project will be

Stella Yu

measured by how well it serves you, the

As the saying goes, government starts at the ballot box, and it is your involvement that ultimately drives ongoing community progress. JOSE PULIDO, CITY MANAGER

community, and supports local businesses. If you need a little inspiration getting involved, turn to page 20. Four local

CONTRIBUTORS Rebecca Lopez Steve Nathan

immigrants share stories of how they first

DESIGNER

started paying attention to City Hall affairs and

Fuel Creative Group

explain what it is that keeps them engaged. Even the most active community members

CITY COUNCIL

had to start somewhere, and I encourage you

Vincent Yu

to explore the opportunities—one of which

MAYOR

is the public arts program (page 23). With a new commission now established, the Art

Cynthia Sternquist

in Public Places program will turn Temple City into an open-air gallery, with pieces that

MAYOR PRO TEM

celebrate local history and heritage. With our community such a diverse one, the unique installations will no doubt draw interest and attraction toward supporting our economic development efforts. Looking back, the last three years have seen a lot of change—brought about by the above developments and more. From adopting policies that safeguard our long-term

Carl Blum COUNCILMEMBER

Fernando Vizcarra COUNCILMEMBER

prosperity, to initiating new programs that address issues ranging from property values

Tom Chavez

to civic engagement—I am proud of what we’ve accomplished together and can safely

COUNCILMEMBER

say we are now in a better position to build a brighter future for Temple City. Heading into 2013, let’s keep up the progress. We’ve got plenty of exciting projects in store, so I hope you’ll continue being involved. Until next time, I wish you and your family a joyous holiday season, Happy New Year and Lunar New Year!

COVER PHOTO Getting out the local vote. PHOTO BY SU-E TAN City of Temple City 9701 Las Tunas Dr. Temple City, CA 91780 ©2013 City of Temple City. All rights reserved. If you have questions or comments regarding our magazine, please email us at connect@templecity.us.

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Winter 2013 www.templecity.us


temple city

perspectives

With the ballots cast at every election, we are reminded how fortunate we are to live in a democratic society, where our voices and our votes really do matter. During the recently passed Nov. 6 election, we hit the precincts to ask Temple Citians…

“WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST ELECTION AND WHAT GETS YOU TO THE POLLS?”

BY WENDY CHUNG AND REBECCA LOPEZ

“This is my second—the first time I voted, it was quick, it was easy and I made sure I was informed. It’s our right for one, and two, it’s our time to speak, so we gotta do what’s right.” DANESSA, 24

“The first time I voted—I want to say it was the Kennedy election—I was excited. Voting is a privilege and people have died throughout the world trying to voice their opinion in government, so I think it’s very important.” PAUL, 71

“I’m not old enough yet, but if I was, I would vote. It’s our future, you know what I’m saying? Our vote changes what our future is.” AARON, 17

JEM

“Just the fact that we live in such a glorious country where we have the privilege to vote for who our representatives and officials are—why not exercise the right? This is my first election and I was pretty excited. The last one, I was in high school—so it’s cool seeing it happen again, but now I’m part of it.” JEM, 19

“I have plenty of family members that fought for our right to vote so I feel I should exercise that right. My first time voting, I remember I was excited and really looking forward to it—made sure I was going to the right place and I had my little book. My parents always voted, so for me it was as natural as learning how to drive.” DORA, 37

“When I do turn 18, I will vote. For now I’m keeping my eye on the results. When we select a leader, it shows that we trust them to help make our country stronger.” EDDIE, 15

“It was maybe 20 years ago. My husband and I always vote because we want to express our opinion and be able to choose the person we want to be in government.”

“The first time I voted was in 1974. “It is important to vote because In 1976, I voted for Jimmy Carter. the president leads our country What brings me to the polls is my and their decisions can change DOROTHY, 61 innate animal right to vote! It’s our lives. I will vote when I can an honor and a privilege being because I am part of this country “I just remember it was nice to be old enough to vote! Every election a citizen. You have to get out and I have the responsibility is important, but we feel this one and vote. Especially now, I really to do so.” is especially so for the direction think this is a very important VICTORIA, 17 of our country.” time in the United States.” MICKEY, 57

MICKEY

JOHN, 66

VICTORIA

DOROTHY Temple City Connect

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temple city

snapshots

FROM SEPTEMBER’S ENDEAVOUR EXCITEMENT TO OCTOBER’S HALLOWEEN HAUNTS, AUTUMN IN TEMPLE CITY WAS FRAUGHT WITH ACTIVITIES THAT WERE TRULY “OUT OF THIS WORLD!” 1

SPACE SHUTTLE ENDEAVOR

All eyes were on the skies Sept. 21 when Endeavour flew over Temple City. Seeking a closer glimpse, dedicated fans like resident Su-E Tan trekked across the Southland to chase history in its tracks. And before shuttle mania fully settled, hometown hero and NASA astronaut Steven Lindsey returned on Nov. 10 to his home Boy Scout Troop 161, where he shared his experiences of “backpacking in space.” 2

SPIRITED AWAY It was a

Halloween to remember for Temple Citians of all ages, as Live Oak Park was transformed into a spooktacular fun house on Oct. 31. By day, seniors came out to play at the Trick-or-Treat Health Fair; while after dark, kids reveled at the candy-fueled Halloween Carnival. 3

OUR FUTURE TOGETHER On

Nov. 14, locals engaged with the City at the first Las Tunas Drive Community Workshop. The project’s design team presented possible street elements to revitalize the downtown district, with the public submitting input on preferred concepts. 6

Winter 2013 www.templecity.us

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CITY CALENDAR FOR DETAILS, CALL (626) 285-2171.

DECEMBER 13 16

Winter class enrollment begins Relaxed overnight parking enforcement begins

19 25

Las Tunas Drive Community Workshop Christmas Day (City offices closed)

10 16 21

Neighborhood Watch Meeting: Area 6 Rosemead Boulevard Community Meeting Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (City offices closed)

18 19 22

President’s Day (City offices closed) State of the City Address Camellia Festival (through 2/24)

11 14

Business Watch Meeting Neighborhood Watch Meeting: Area 1

JANUARY 1 6 7

New Year’s Day (City offices closed) Relaxed overnight parking enforcement ends Winter classes begin

FEBRUARY 1 2 8

Income Tax Preparation Assistance begins Lunar New Year Celebration Neighborhood Watch Meeting: Area 9

MARCH 3

5 8 10

Municipal Election Arbor Day Event Daylight Saving Time begins (2 a.m.)

Farmer’s Market Locally grown fruits, vegetables, plants, flowers, honey, cheeses and baked goods. 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m. City Hall 9701 Las Tunas Dr.

every sunday

STAY CONNECTED Get updates on City events @ConnectwithTC

facebook.com/ConnectwithTC

SEND US YOUR PHOTOS: Have you attended a recent Temple City event? Submit your favorite photos to connect@templecity.us for possible publication in our next issue.

Temple City Connect

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HE AIR T N O

DIAL FORWARD. MOVE FORWARD.

...Broadcasting from City Hall... STARTING IN FEBRUARY Turn to AM 1690 KNCT Radio for the latest Temple City news and updates— including traffic advisories, road closures and detours during construction of the Rosemead Boulevard Enhancement Project.

CITY OF TEMPLE CITY

9701 LAS TUNAS DR., TEMPLE CITY, CA 91780

(626) 285-2171


temple city

feature

MAKING HEADLINES BY WENDY CHUNG AND BRIAN HAWORTH

It was a front page year for the City. As 2012 draws to a close, we reflect on the most notable accomplishments of the past 12 months, summarized in encapsulating headlines.

Though the following achievements range widely—from media relations and historic resources, to investment portfolios and pavement management— all are unified by a simple objective. Each initiative is driven by at least one of eight identified City Council goals, established in a strategic approach to improving the community. »

Temple City Connect

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temple city

feature

VISION AND LONG RANGE PLANNING

COMMUNICATIONS/ CITIZEN EDUCATION

PUBLIC HEALTH AND SAFETY

Recent planning studies will come into play next year, when the City begins the process of updating its General Plan. The document, last modified in 1987, identifies policies and programs to guide the community’s long-term growth. Public participation will be a critical element of the process. More details will be announced as they become available.

Toward promoting government transparency and responding to community demand for public information, the City launches a robust communications program—including news releases, social media and a revamped quarterly magazine. Meanwhile, the City introduces Citizen’s Academy to engage with community members on City Hall affairs, and continues monitoring new and better ways to reach the local public.

While public safety is traditionally seen as a sole responsibility of local law enforcement, the City has taken a new approach, enlisting community involvement to assist in crime prevention and emergency preparedness. As a result, efforts have increased public awareness, enhanced neighborhood safety and fostered greater community ownership.

Recent Planning Efforts Set Stage for Upcoming General Plan Update

Housing, mobility, historic resources studies to be integrated into community blueprint Impending Housing Element to Qualify City for Millions in Federal, State Grants

Outside resources will help create new housing programs for all segments of population First-Ever Historic Resources Survey Opens Preservation Discussions

City to possibly establish preservation ordinance toward protecting local landmarks City Moves Forward in Developing Multimodal Transportation System

Incoming bike, pedestrian amenities and possible trolley to enhance local mobility

Press Coverage Provides Additional Outreach

Sheriffs Shift to Community-Oriented Policing, Enlist Public in Crime Fighting

City strengthens local, regional media relations—including Chinese press—to reach broader audiences

New strategy fosters proactive public involvement in local law enforcement

City Joins Social Media to Meet Community Members Online

Reformatted Neighborhood Watch Meetings Draw Higher Attendance

Facebook, Twitter platforms brings City’s communications into digital age

City reorganizes watch areas and provides dinner, childcare to encourage participation

Connect Debuts, Receives National Recognition

Institutional Agencies, Community Orgs Meet for Disaster Prep Exercises

Revamped quarterly delivers with substantive reporting, promotes transparency Inaugural Citizen’s Academy Proves Successful

Program engages community, sparking involvement and developing leaders City Continues Expanding Communications Channels

AM 1690 radio station, public info billboard arrive in 2013 Redesigned City Website Launches This Summer

New platform to offer enhanced navigation, user experience

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Winter 2013 www.templecity.us

Local stakeholders, City conduct ongoing trainings to rehearse recently adopted emergency operations plan Live Oak Park Now a Red Cross Evacuation Center

Locals have nearby access to Red Cross aid in case of disaster City Adds Park Patrol Presence

Increased surveillance during weekends, afterhours enhances park safety, security

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT With elimination of the local redevelopment agency, the City loses out on $1 million in annual revenues for economic development projects. However, recognizing that such projects stimulate local business and are critical for the community’s long-term prosperity, the City set up an Economic Development Fund, allowing critical projects to continue.

City Copes with Loss of Redevelopment Agency Revenue

New ordinance allocates $8M from General Fund for high-yield economic development projects Gateway Project Acquires Construction Permits, Slated for 2014 Completion

Underground parking structure in progress, building construction begins next year Economic Development Strategy Lays Roadmap for Local Prosperity

Comprehensive plan will program $8M Economic Development Fund Temple City to Become a Filming Destination

City, Chamber of Commerce to revamp permit regulations to attract film production Incoming Tenants Reenergize Temple City Marketplace

City removes antiquated restrictions, allowing owner to enter negotiations with Guppy House, 85 Degrees Bakery, The Habit, Starbucks


QUALITY OF LIFE

FISCAL POLICIES

Recognizing the vital correlation between community prosperity and quality of life, the City initiated programs to help maintain and bolster local property values—addressing such issues as neighborhood aesthetics and livability, as well as recreational and cultural opportunities.

While many cities are still cutting services and facing financial challenges, strategic budgeting and investment practices have kept Temple City in the black. With local revenues on an upward trend, the City will continue monitoring finances toward promoting long-term stability.

Innovative FASE Program Achieves 80% Compliance, Wins State Award

City overhauls regulations to set clear expectations for property maintenance Parks Events Attendance at 23K, a 40% Upsurge over 2011

City to pursue sponsorships to offset costs; looks to expand events in 2013 City Enters Into Joint-Use Agreements to Improve Parks Programming

Local school districts provide facilities for additional recreational opportunities Popular Senior Lunch Program Celebrates First Anniversary, Looks to Grow

Sold-out meals prompt City to seek additional outside funding New Commission to Define Public Arts Program

Council Sets Use Restrictions to Safeguard General Fund Reserve

Ordinance sets required reserve balance at $21.7M; designates dollar amounts for specific purposes General Fund Reserve Grows in 2012

Zero-based budgeting, strategic spending ups City’s rainy day fund to $23.8M

SUSTAINABLE INFRASTRUCTURE With much of the local infrastructure as old as the city itself, a renewal is in order to accommodate community use in the near and distant future. In achieving these upgrades, the City is strategically pursuing grants and alternative sources to ensure minimal or zero impact to the General Fund.

Second BTA Award Brings Total to $922K for Bike Plan Implementation

Grants fund half of Bike Plan’s 26 miles of proposed lanes; first-ever bikeways coming next year as part of Rosemead Boulevard Enhancement Project $432K Grant Improves Pedestrian Safety Near 9 Schools

Safe Routes to School award funds sidewalks, crosswalks, signage

City Increases Yields on $36M Investment Portfolio in Tough Market

64 New ADA Ramps Promote Universal Pedestrian Access

Diversifying assets leads to growth in returns from less than 0.5 to 0.75%

Project uses federal dollars to improve access for elderly, mobility-impaired

City Secures $5.5M in Competitive Grants

Construction on Rosemead Boulevard Begins in January

Grants enable City to fund otherwise unaffordable projects Recent Pension Reforms to Realize Long-Term Cost Savings

First installations to be featured in upcoming Rosemead Boulevard Enhancement Project

New rules reduce City’s contributions to employee pensions, retirement health benefits

Responding to Growing Demand, City Adds 10 New Recreational Programs

Local Revenues Rise for Third Consecutive Year, Bolstering General Fund

2012 class registration up 5%; staff solicits patron input to ensure competitive offerings

Growing sales, property tax proceeds enable City to sustain high level of service

Project creates regional destination with public art, bike lanes, new sidewalks and more

BASIC CITY SERVICES Toward elevating customer satisfaction and operational efficiency, staff focuses on improving service delivery and strategically addressing maintenance needs of local facilities.

City Goes Virtual in 2013, Providing 24/7 Service

New e-gov capabilities, smartphone app broaden access to City Hall Pavement Management Plan to Program Strategic Street Maintenance

City will institute 6-year repaving cycle for all streets, prioritizing by need Tree Crews Near Completion of First 4-Year Trim Cycle

City focuses on regular maintenance to protect $17.4M urban forest City Awarded Competitive Grant to Replant 300 Trees

$70K grant to fund partial replacement of 500 trees lost in last year’s windstorm

TO LEARN more about the stories behind these headlines, log on to the City’s website, www.templecity.us.

Temple City Connect

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temple city

feature

Nothing defines a community like its downtown, and Temple City is committed to revitalizing its historic core. BY STEVE NATHAN

LAS TUNAS DRIVE:

A drive down Temple City’s Las Tunas Drive reveals a busy thoroughfare with shops that conjure memories of the past—but one can’t help imagine a time when its sidewalks enjoyed as much action as the asphalt. Nonetheless, new storefronts with a shift into modern, multicultural designs indicate there is a renaissance afoot—and there’s nothing like a vibrant downtown! More than any other neighborhood, downtown reflects the essence of a community and is the place where residents and visitors meet to explore diverse cuisine, fashion, art and ideas. In recognition of the central role of Las Tunas as the local downtown main street, the City is committed to revitalizing the corridor. “There is opportunity to create a genuine downtown, making Las Tunas a real community, a place 12

Winter 2013 www.templecity.us

where people want to shop, do business and congregate,” says Mayor Pro Tem Cynthia Sternquist. “But right now, it’s just a street that is not oriented to walking and public transit.” The renaissance of Las Tunas will play an important role in the City’s ambitious economic development strategy. On Oct. 23, the City Council awarded a contract to Freedman Tung + Sasaki Urban Design

(FTS)—an award-winning company that’s revitalized downtowns in Cathedral City, Mountain View, Livermore, Redwood City and Huntington Beach—to prepare streetscape plans to revive Temple City’s most economically and historically significant thoroughfare. “We love cities, large and small, and recognize every city is unique,” says FTS Principal Gregory Tung. “We love to be able to help spark engagement and support for a plan that local people can really fall in love with.”

Rediscovering Downtown Las Tunas is literally the heart of the city— home of the original townsite at Temple City Boulevard. Over time, it developed like many “Main Street” business districts across America, serving as the place where


the community would gather, hear news and engage in business and dialogue. While historically connected to the outside world by stagecoach—later automobile and the Pacific Electric Red Car—Temple City today is a truly international community, globally linked by 747s and the Internet. Toward highlighting this rich heritage, it is time Las Tunas underwent a revitalization that includes the community’s all-American roots and current global orientation; attracts a vibrant and diverse selection of merchants; while celebrating its physical and cultural characteristics with unique streetscape design and compelling public art.

The Transformation Though Temple City’s multicultural population may have differing opinions, many share an appreciation for vibrant downtowns. Older Temple Citians recall a time before suburban shopping malls, when Las Tunas was a thriving commercial district; while many newly arrived Asian immigrants remember the central business districts and bustling community markets from their native countries. Recognizing this very fondness for exciting city centers, the City is initiating infrastructure improvements along Las Tunas that will pique regional interest and spur private investment to stimulate the local economy. Signs of renewal by property owners are already evident, with business owners—some utilizing a City-funded Façade Improvement Program—taking initiative to spruce up their storefronts. As Las Tunas houses some of the City’s most prime property, this project could further bolster assessed valuations. Offering examples of possibilities, Tung brings up Castro Street—a commercial corridor in Mountain View, Calif., that FTS previously redesigned and which he suggests is analogous to Las Tunas. Initially, Castro Street primarily served as a traffic route, but by restructuring its parking configuration to make it more of a local destination, FTS was able to transform the once thoroughfare into an economic development engine with popular restaurants and boutiques. Likewise, Las Tunas was originally part of a grid system crisscrossing the San Gabriel Valley. “The L.A. region has these grid arterial roads, which provide easy auto mobility,” says Tung. “But it has resulted in streets with a sameness that is also neither pedestrian- nor bicycle-friendly.” The challenge is then to turn these generic, uninspired

environments into compelling gathering places that cater to pedestrians and provides a multimodal approach to accommodate different forms of transportation. Back on Las Tunas, Tung explains that the street cannot be uniformly approached since four blocks—two on either side of Temple City Boulevard—comprise a traditional downtown core, while the remainder is a more recently developed commercial corridor. The four-block core has distinct advantages that FTS can build upon—contiguous storefronts and cultural diversity, both of which can keep shoppers engaged and entertained. However, Tung notes, “It’s very traffic-dominated—not planned as a place to hang out. The width and uncrossability of the street also creates problems for adjoining residential properties and can be a barrier between neighborhoods.” As a result, the lack of an accessible crosswalk creates a major drawback for a well functioning downtown. Options to improve the core will likely encompass a wide range of physical elements—including installation of new landscaping, public art, sidewalks, street furniture, lighting, traffic signals and transit shelters. Beyond downtown, Tung recommends placing identity landmarks at Muscatel and Baldwin avenues to demarcate city limits. “Many people don’t even know when they’ve entered Temple City,” he says, reminding us that the city is competing with many other San Gabriel Valley communities for recognition and sales tax dollars. While the firm brings a wealth of experience, Tung stresses, “It’s not our job to come with preconceived ideas about Temple City.” He explains that the public’s input is critically important at public meetings. “We look at every community and see what distinctive characteristics already exist and attempt to build upon those themes,” he says, insisting that designs should serve as a unifying element, building already present qualities.

Elements of Design A strong theme in the City’s revitalization of Las Tunas is the harmonizing of various transportation modes, including a new City trolley and addition of bike lanes. Depending on community desires, another possibility is “parklets”—parking spots converted into pedestrian-friendly green spaces, which Tung notes can be problematic but represent

“There is opportunity to create a genuine downtown…a place where people want to shop, do business and congregate.” MAYOR PRO TEM CYNTHIA STERNQUIST

one option for calming traffic in adjacent residential neighborhoods. Tung also identifies an opportunity in Temple City to explore angled parking. On Castro Street, though such a configuration necessitated the sacrifice of traffic lanes for additional parking spaces, the overall effect sent a message to visitors that they’d entered a place designed to gather and linger—where drivers are converted into pedestrians. Further developing the pedestrian atmosphere, FTS also interspersed new green space and al fresco dining areas between parking spaces to create a more inviting environment. “When your community’s main street is also a primary through-route, you have to make a decision,” says Tung. “The community needs to look for opportunities to transform a busy arterial into something that addresses local needs, in effect saying, ‘Now it’s our turn to have our community back.’” While noting that the physical diversion of traffic can assist with this strategy, Tung also adds that innovative street design will naturally discourage through-traffic over time. “People will come to know it’s no longer the through-route, and will change their behavior.” In addition to inspirations from the Castro Street effort, recent City developments will also come into play in this project—including Temple City Connect

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Residents engaging at the first Las Tunas community workshop held Nov. 14 at Live Oak Park.

the Downtown Parking Study, Traffic Calming Master Plan, Historic Resources Survey and new Art in Public Places Program (see page 23). Of the potential impact of art, Lesley Elwood of Elwood & Associates—the firm coordinating the City’s new program— believes it will draw people to spend time in downtown, adding, “When people hang around, they tend to spend more money.”

Convergence of Resources Other important projects coming down the pipe will also dovetail with the planned improvements for Las Tunas. The former

and the City will result in a comprehensive, master-planned Civic Center to serve as a centerpiece for downtown. Along with the ambitious streetscape proposal and development projects on the drawing board, significant infrastructure improvements will be part of the project. In October, the City was awarded $598,000 in federal highway funds to improve traffic signals at seven Las Tunas intersections, which will not only enhance auto, but pedestrian safety. In September, another $479,000 in grant funds was received from the Caltrans Bicycle Transportation Account

“The community needs to look for opportunities to transform a busy arterial into something that addresses local needs, in effect saying, ‘Now it’s our turn to have our community back.’” FTS PRINCIPAL GREGORY TUNG mortuary site at 5800 Temple City Blvd. is being prepared to accommodate growing visitors with a new parking facility; the longneglected former Alpha Beta supermarket site is now planned for a mixed-use development that will not only generate revenue for the city, but also bring new residents to downtown; and a likely collaboration between Temple City Unified School District (TCUSD)

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Winter 2013 www.templecity.us

to support the construction of 12.6 miles of bike lanes along Temple City streets— including Las Tunas.

Community Buy-In While the developing streetscape plans primarily address physical improvements, the grand objective is to create a heart of the city that attracts and accommodates people—

the most essential component in invigorating a downtown. Ultimately, the success of this endeavor will depend on how well it serves the community—from residents and regional visitors to local business owners. Tung explains that an improved Las Tunas could attract new retail and restaurants, offering residents new shopping and dining opportunities without having to travel to neighboring cities like Pasadena or Monrovia. Furthermore, with the redesign process bringing together local merchants, there is a possible opportunity to establish a Business Association, or even a Business Improvement District (BID)—which if approved by the district’s merchants would authorize business owners to fundraise for concerted marketing efforts. All told, the project could jumpstart local economy, generating greater sales tax revenue and increased property valuations to promote long-term local prosperity. Before finalizing plans, the City is encouraging public involvement. “It’s critical that local residents and businesses, as beneficiaries of this project, submit their ideas and visions,” said Sternquist. “The City and FTS are here to facilitate, but input from the community will drive the design.” With public input gathered at the first workshop held Nov. 14, FTS is developing three concepts to be unveiled at a second Dec. 19 meeting. Community members will have an opportunity to select preferred options, with FTS integrating comments into a refined design. Plan in hands, the City will then aggressively pursue grants to fund the project, hoping to replicate the success of the Rosemead Boulevard Enhancement Project in securing outside money. Already, the City has identified $6 million in available grants, with an upcoming January application deadline. If successful, Las Tunas could see improvements as early as 2014. TO LEARN about the Las Tunas Drive Project, attend the Dec. 19 meeting at Live Oak Park. For more info, visit www.lastunasdrive.com or call the City Manager’s Office at (626) 285-2171.


temple city

counterparts

What’s up, Doc? ACUPUNCTURE & ORIENTAL MEDICINE

HEALTHCARE PARTNERS

health east to west Both Eastern and Western medicine help treat ill patients, but each culture differs in its medical approaches. Here’s a brief breakdown: Wellness

BY STEPHANIE CHAN

Ah-choo! Just when you think you’ve escaped the sneezes and coughs of the flu season, the signs of a sore throat and runny nose may require that unavoidable visit to a neighborhood clinic. Lucky for Temple Citians, there’s no need to venture far, given the community’s diverse selection of friendly doctors. Meet two local physicians of Eastern and Western medicine traditions— both prescribed with extensive knowledge and medical experience.

Since 2000, Dr. Karen Wang has served Temple City and nearby communities with treatments in herbal medicine and acupuncture. Wang received her Master’s and Doctor of Oriental Medicine (O.M.D.) degrees from Los Angeles’ Samra University. Wang did not always anticipate a career in traditional Chinese medicine, as her original interest was in dentistry. When she witnessed her mom’s slow, but eventual recovery from age-related ailments with Oriental remedies, she began to rethink her path. “My mom and I discussed how she healed from Oriental medicine so I became more interested in the field,” notes Wang. “Pursuing an Oriental medicine degree also allowed me to study part-time while still being a full-time mom.” While she specializes in pain relief with acupuncture, Wang also helps treat respiratory and gastrointestinal disorders, as well as other chronic conditions. Her clientele is typically older, with an average age of 60 and above—some of whom have been seeing Wang for more than 20 years. Recently however, younger patients have also been stopping by to seek therapy for sports injuries. “I’m happy I can help my patients—even if I can’t cure all their illnesses,” says Wang, who strongly believes that finding balance, derived from the Chinese philosophy of yin and yang, is important to living a healthy life. Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine 5814 Temple City Blvd., (626) 285-1181 www.acupunctureandorientalmedicine.net

Dr. Jaime Ramos has been part of Temple City’s HealthCare Partners for five years, performing as a family practice physician and regional supervisor for HealthCare Partners offices in neighboring cities. As someone who has always enjoyed learning—never having missed a day in high school—Ramos developed a passionate interest in medicine as an undergraduate in college. He then pursued and obtained his medical degree at the University of California, Los Angeles, completing his residency at the HarborUCLA Medical Center. “I like being able to talk to patients and care for their needs,” states Ramos. “Being able to see that I’m helping people—I like that.” This local HealthCare Partners office is no stranger when it comes to helping the community. It has partnered with the Temple City Chamber of Commerce to sponsor a Chamber Mixer Event and hosted the Senior “Trick-or-Treat” Health Fair with the City’s Parks and Recreation Department. Both events provided attendees with literature and information on healthy living practices. HealthCare Partners has been serving Temple Citians for over 20 years. According to Ramos, “Customer service comes first.” HealthCare Partners 9810 Las Tunas Dr., (626) 309-7600 www.healthcarepartners.com

• With Eastern medicine, being healthy is finding balance in qi, the body’s natural energy. • With Western medicine, being healthy means lacking signs of pain or symptoms. Examination • Eastern medicine focuses on self-preventive care through lifestyle and the mind/body connection. • Western medicine is able to treat life-threatening illnesses that require medical or surgical intervention. Treatment • The response to herbal Eastern medicine is slower, but involves no side effects. • The response with Western medicine is usually instantaneous in suppressing symptoms. Doctor’s Role • In Eastern medicine, the doctor acts in an assistant role, helping people stay well instead of fixing them when they’re ill. • In Western medicine, the doctor acts as a problemsolver, fixing what is broken and identifying what is wrong.

Temple City Connect

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CA CRV

Go Green to Get Green. Keep Temple City green and beautiful by recycling. It pays in so many ways. Simply collect your empty beverage bottles with the CRV-eligible symbol, and get money back when you turn them in at a California Recycling Center. To find one near you, visit calrecycle.ca.gov.

CITY OF TEMPLE CITY

9701 LAS TUNAS DR., TEMPLE CITY, CA 91780

(626) 285-2171


temple city

feature

RESULTS ARE IN! SEE HOW TEMPLE CITY STACKED UP IN THE POLLS ON NOV. 6.

BY WENDY CHUNG AND REBECCA LOPEZ

VOTER TURNOUT On Election Day, about 121 million Americans cast their ballots for a turnout of 57.5 percent.

PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION

U.S.

Temple City

57.5%

48.6%

California

Temple City



President Barack Obama won reelection with 332 electoral votes, to challenger Mitt Romney’s 206. The popular vote was a closer race—with Obama winning 50 percent and Romney, 48. Barack Obama

59.1%

57.7%

Mitt Romney

38.6%

40.4%

California

Temple City

STATE PROPOSITIONS

Of the 11 statewide measures on the ballot, here are the top five vote-getters in Temple City. Log onto www.templecity.us to see more results. PROP 30: Temporarily increases sales tax, and personal income tax on residents earning more than $250,000 per year, to fund education and public safety.

YES 54.2%

YES 51.7%

PROP 32: Prohibits use of payroll-deducted funds for political purposes, but allows voluntary employee contributions.

NO 56.2%

NO 57.4%

PROP 34: Repeals the California Death Penalty.

NO 52.7%

NO 57.4%

PROP 37: Requires labeling on genetically altered foods and prohibits such foods from being labeled as “natural.”

NO 52.9%

NO 55.3%

PROP 36: Amends the Three Strikes Law to shorten sentencing for some nonviolent offenders.

YES 68.8%

YES 64.3%

California

Temple City

MEASURE A: Changes the position of County Assessor from elected to appointed.

NO 77.8%

NO 77.9%

MEASURE J: Extends existing one-half cent sales tax to accelerate construction of regional transportation projects.*

YES 66.1%

YES 57%

COUNTY MEASURES

LOCAL MEASURE MEASURE S: Authorizes TCUSD to issue $128.8 million in bonds to upgrade, renovate and repair educational facilities.

OUT OF BOUNDS 

What happened in elections beyond Temple City? In El Monte, 59.8 percent of voters rejected the Soda Tax, which would have levied a one-cent tax per fluid ounce of sugar-sweetened beverage served in the city. In Pomona, 60.2 percent of voters passed the Library Parcel Tax, which imposes a $38 parcel tax to increase library hours and services. In Long Beach, 54.9 percent of voters rejected a proposal to change the city’s municipal election dates to coincide with state election dates. Across L.A. County, 17 school bond measures showed up on local ballots, with voters passing them all. In Alabama, 59.2 percent of voters rejected Amendment 4, opting to keep segregationist language in the Alabama Constitution relating to separation in schools by race. In Walton, Ky., a City Council race ended in a tie, after one candidate’s wife forgets to vote.

YES 63.1%

*Requires 66.7% approval to pass. Data based on unofficial counts. For complete and official results, log onto the County Clerk/Recorder-Registrar website at www.lavote.net.

KNOW YOUR REP: LEGISLATIVE DISTRICTS ARE REDRAWN EVERY 10 YEARS TO REFLECT POPULATION CHANGES FROM THE U.S. CENSUS. HOW HAS THIS AFFECTED TEMPLE CITY? MEET YOUR NEW REPRESENTATIVES.

FORMER

NEW

29 U.S. Congressional: Adam Schiff

27th U.S. Congressional: Judy Chu

21st State Senate: Carol Liu

22nd State Senate: TBD in 2014

44th State Assembly: Anthony Portantino

49th State Assembly: Ed Chau

th

Temple City Connect

17


temple city

feature

MARCH MADNESS BY WENDY CHUNG

It seemed like just yesterday that Temple City took to the polls for the November election—but don’t put away those voting pens just yet! There are plenty more decisions to be made during the March 5 Municipal Election. How much do you know about local voting? Read on and find out!



DID YOU KNOW?

 The City’s elections are conducted on an at-large basis—meaning voters elect all five councilmembers, rather than just one who represents their own district. In the upcoming March election, each voter chooses their two preferred candidates, with the two most popular to be seated as members of Council.

Temple City’s government is led by a City Council of five publicly elected representatives.

Local elections are neutral, allowing campaigns to focus on community issues rather than party platforms and partisan politics. Temple Citians do not vote for a mayor; instead councilmembers annually elect amongst themselves a ceremonial head to represent the City. Also appointed is a mayor pro tem, who serves in the mayor’s absence.

With terms expiring for two councilmembers in 2013, two seats will be open in the upcoming election. The other three Council seats—filled during the 2011 election—will be decided on again in 2015.

CHANGE OVER TIME

ELECTION DATE

TOTAL BALLOTS CAST

Prior to 1997, municipal elections were held in April of even-numbered years. This changed in 1994, when voters elected to move Temple City elections to odd years to avoid competition with presidential election campaigns, instead allowing voters to pay more attention to local issues.

March 4, 1997

2,101

465

March 2, 1999

2,959

731

March 6, 2001

3,549

923

March 4, 2003

3,013

1,020

March 8, 2005

2,991

1,214

Between 1986 and 2011, the percentage of votes cast by mail has soared from 5 to 56 percent.

March 6, 2007

3,095

1,362

March 6, 2009

3,554

1,835

March 8, 2011

3,069

1,710

18

Winter 2013

www.templecity.us

VOTE BY MAIL


RULES AND REGS

Article V of the City Charter addresses “Conduct of Municipal Elections,” setting forth regulations for such procedural matters as qualifications for elected office, term limits, election dates, etc.

WHO RUNS?

HOW LONG?

WHEN?

WHAT ELSE?

Candidates must be at least 18 years old and registered voters of Temple City who have lived in the city for at least one year prior to the election.

Councilmembers serve four-year terms, and are limited to serving two consecutive terms, but may run for office again after at least two years from when their second term ends.

Temple City’s Election Day is the first Tuesday after the first Monday in March of odd-numbered years. Elections are staggered—meaning voters elect two and three councilmembers at a time every alternating odd year. This allows for continuity in the elected body.

In addition to councilmembers, voters may also exercise direct democracy through referendums, initiatives and recalls.

TAKE ACTION! If you’re not already participating as a candidate or campaign volunteer, there are many other ways to get involved in the March election.

PRECINCT POLLING LOCATIONS Find your designated polling place on the back page of your sample ballot. Voting hours are March 5, 7 a.m.-8 p.m. For assistance locating your precinct, call the City Clerk’s Office.

Precinct #1 Temple Beth David 9677 Longden Ave. Temple City, CA 91780

Precinct #10 City Hall 9701 Las Tunas Dr. Temple City, CA 91780

Precinct #2 Vote-by-mail

Precinct #64 Live Oak Park Community Center 10144 Bogue St. Temple City, CA 91780

Precinct #4 First Lutheran Church 9123 Broadway Temple City, CA 91780

GET INFORMED Familiarize yourself with the candidates and their positions. Call the City Clerk’s Office for campaign contact info. Also keep an eye out for independently sponsored candidate forums, which usually take place in February.

PRECINCT #1

VOLUNTEER Become an election outreach volunteer and help get the word out by posting flyers around town and working registration drives. For more information, contact the City Clerk’s Office.

Precinct #73 La Rosa Elementary 9301 La Rosa Dr. Temple City, CA 91780

PRECINCT #4

REGISTER TO VOTE If you are a U.S. citizen and 18 years of age by the Municipal Election, make sure you are registered to vote. Forms are available at the library, City Hall and post office. Also register online at www.sos.ca.gov. Deadline is Feb. 18. Last day to request vote-by-mail ballots is Feb. 26.

Precinct #68 Cleminson Elementary School 5213 Daleview Ave. Temple City, CA 91780

PRECINCT #2

PRECINCT #10 PRECINCT #64

PRECINCT #68 PRECINCT #73

NOTE: For an enlarged version of the official precinct map, visit www.templecity.us.

GET OUT THE VOTE Vote early by mail, or on March 5 at your designated polling place. Vote-bymail voters who miss the mailing deadline can still drop off their ballots at City Hall or any Temple City precinct during normal operating hours.

WATCH ELECTION RESULTS

For additional questions on included statistics, contact the Communications Office at (626) 285-2171, ext. 2324. For more information related to the Municipal Election, call the City Clerk’s Office at (626) 285-2171, ext. 2317.

After 8 p.m. on election night, tune to the City’s public access channel or log on to the City’s website for unofficial ballot counts. Official results are reported at the next regularly scheduled Council meeting, during which declared winners are seated as incoming councilmembers. Temple City Connect

19


temple city

feature

Lessons From Abroad BY WENDY CHUNG

LOCAL IMMIGRANTS REMIND US OUR VOTES REALLY DO MATTER The Temple City community is one of tremendous diversity. Our residents hail from virtually every corner of the globe, representing a multitude of cultural backgrounds. But while neighbors may differ in birthplace or heritage, a common place to call home and a shared interest in preserving local wellbeing unite us all. Of the 45 percent of Temple City’s population that is foreign-born, 67 percent is naturalized with the same democratic rights and responsibilities as native-born citizens. In the narratives that follow, four local immigrants—from Taiwan, Malaysia, Brazil and Mexico, representing Chinese, Italian, German and Mexican backgrounds—share their perspectives on why civic engagement and voting in the upcoming March Municipal Election matter. Though born in distant lands, each individual has enthusiastically embraced Temple City as their adopted hometown, and through active participation and involvement, assert their residency and ownership in the community.

20

Winter 2013 www.templecity.us


Close To Home ELAINE TAN, 43: Born in Taiwan; immigrated to U.S. in 1983; naturalized in the 1980s; moved to Temple City in 2009; speaks English, Chinese SU-E TAN, 42: Born in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; immigrated to U.S. in 1990; moved to Temple City in 2009; speaks Mandarin, Cantonese, Hokkien/Taiwanese, English, Malay

Upon first learning of Temple City’s anemic voter turnout in recent municipal elections, husband and wife Su-E and Elaine Tan are floored. “Of everyone who lives here, only five percent showed up?” Mr. Tan repeats incredulously. “Wow!” While initially taken aback, Mrs. Tan reminds her husband how not long ago, they themselves were part of that alarming statistic. Prior to becoming Temple City residents, the Tans lived nine years in San Gabriel, where they say they “never knew anything about the city.” Things changed when in 2009 the couple bought a property in Temple City. Curiously, it was the odd shape of the Tans’ parcel that brought them into the folds of civic engagement. “Fixing our home is what got us started—because of a narrow lot!” says Mr. Tan, laughing. “Yeah, we came into problems when we wanted to remodel and extend our house,” Mrs. Tan explains. “We had a lot of back-and-forth with the City— went through a lot of appeals and petitions.” And despite having gone through what many would have considered a frustrating experience, the Tans emerged with a newfound appreciation for local government. “Going through this process, I learned a lot,”

said Mr. Tan. “The code made sense— it prevents people from building something ugly and trying to get away with it. We all want to maintain our property values for the community.” “After the whole thing,” Mrs. Tan tells, “we came to the conclusion that we feel strongly that our city government really needs people who know what they’re doing.” So in 2011, Mrs. Tan, a naturalized citizen since sometime in the 1980s, voted in her very first municipal election. “It’s something I feel is very close to me. Whereas I doubt myself when it comes to the presidential election— there’s so much conflicting information on the radio and online—with our city, you can see the people and talk to them!” That interaction is critical, according to Mr. Tan. “By knowing each of them, we came to realize how important it is for the right people to be onboard, making decisions for our community.” With the remodeling of their home now complete, the Tans hope to continue their engagement with the city. For Mr. Tan, even as a non-U.S. citizen—he holds a Green Card and is a citizen of his native Malaysia— he really enjoys being involved and has participated in the City’s inaugural Citizen’s Academy, Public Arts Advisory Group and the local Friends of the Library organization. “After going through this process and learning how the City operates, you know what, I’m interested!” he says. “And when we see the City is functioning well, it makes us so proud to be Temple City residents.”

Hooked on Civics DAN ARRIGHI, 62: Born in Sao Pãolo, Brazil; immigrated to U.S. in 1955; naturalized in 1994; moved to Temple City in 1986; speaks English, Italian, Spanish

If any Temple Citian can fully appreciate the power of a single vote, it’s Dan Arrighi. It is a well-known tale that during the 2007 Municipal Election, Arrighi—then an incumbent City Councilmember running for reelection—lost to an unlucky coin toss that came after a dead-even tie with challenger Fernando Vizcarra. In light of this incident, one might assume it is redemption that gets Arrighi to the polls. But in fact, Arrighi has always been a dedicated voter— much before his bid own for public office. For him, it is pride of ownership, as well as a sense of duty to give back to the community that has provided him and his family so much, that drive Arrighi’s passion for taking part in local affairs. And he does so through any means he can, from voting to participating in local community groups. Among his current commitments include serving as a current Parks and Recreation Commissioner, volunteering at his church and the Kiwanis Club, as well as continuing his 25-year involvement with the Boy Scouts. And given his extensive history of community participation, it does not come as a surprise that Arrighi has a problem with apathy. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE…

Temple City Connect

21


If any Temple Citian can fully appreciate the power of a single vote, it’s Parks and Recreation Commissioner Dan Arrighi.

ARRIGHI CONTINUED…

“If you just sit at home watching TV and don’t involve yourself in who’s going to represent your community, you’re delegating someone else to make decisions for you.” He implores people to take ownership of their community. “Just because the streets are swept and the trash is collected, doesn’t mean you shouldn’t have a say in who is running your city. You should vote to have an elected body that represents you, and not just the minority who cast their ballots.” While a diligent voter who takes his U.S. citizenship seriously—Arrighi proudly flies an American flag on his front porch and admits to getting “very annoyed” when flags are not correctly presented—this born Brazilian of Italian and German descent did not actually become naturalized until 1994. For a brief period between arriving to the U.S. in 1955 and becoming a U.S. citizen, Arrighi had even returned to his father’s homeland of Italy where, as an Italian citizen, he was required to serve in the army. However, he explains, “It was out of respect to my dad that I remained an Italian citizen. When he passed, I decided there was no need to be one anymore, because even though my heritage is Italian, my allegiance is to the United States, which afforded me an education and career path among other things.” Since gaining U.S. citizenship, Arrighi has never missed an election. “We don’t have a fiefdom, we don’t have a monarchy, we don’t have a dictatorship. Here, we have government by the people,” he said, stressing the power of the ballot, “Your vote counts and your vote matters.” Especially with the convenience of vote-by-mail, there are no more excuses. “Put it in the mailbox and you’re done!”

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Winter 2013 www.templecity.us

Taking Part, Being Part JAIME DIAZ, 61: Born in Mexico; immigrated to U.S. in 1963; naturalized in 1984; moved to Temple City in 1976; speaks English, Spanish

“Do I feel like I have part ownership of the community?” Without hesitation, Jaime Diaz affirms, “Well, we own a home here, so yes, I feel that quite literally we own part of the community.” This sense of comfort and belonging however, was not always the case for Diaz. “I was 12 years old when we came to this country, and to be truthful, I didn’t like it,” he recalls. Whereas in his native Mexico, Diaz was accustomed to an active and lively neighborhood culture, the relative lack of community interaction in American suburbia was tough. “None of us spoke English, so we were unable to communicate, even with the bus driver.” As a result, he and his family were slow to assimilate. But 49 years after his arrival, Diaz now feels deeply rooted in America—particularly Temple City, his hometown since 1976. “I feel like I belong,” he says. Through civic participation, Diaz has been able to recreate the sense of community he so missed from childhood. He and his wife Olga first got involved as volunteers when their two daughters were in school. After becoming an assistant coach for his daughters’ soccer team, Diaz learned about the operations of the City’s recreational facilities and became familiar with how Council decisions affected parks programming. Actually speaking with elected City officials at games and other events ultimately led Diaz to realizing how important it was that his leaders’ values aligned with his—particularly in regards to his much cherished freedoms to pursue his dreams and a better standard of living for his family. For Diaz, it is these shared values and visions that can unify a population as diverse as Temple City into a cohesive community. Even though he’s witnessed a major demographic change since his own arrival in Temple City, Diaz is ever optimistic about the future. “This country was founded by immigrants. As long as we all hold the same principles and ideas about how our community’s going to be run, I don’t see anything wrong,” he said. While speaking of visions and goals, Diaz points to voting as the means to achieve results. “Local elections affect our way of life in our own communities,” he says, while acknowledging it may be more difficult for working families to vote because of other priorities. However, he also believes it’s a responsibility too important to neglect—with news of unrest and oppression around the world serving as all the more reason for Diaz to appreciate life in America and exercise his democratic rights. “We have to be aware of the politics and be aware of how our governments are being run, so we don’t lose the privileges and rights we now have,” he stresses. And as part of keeping City Hall responsive, Diaz doesn’t hesitate to report problems in his neighborhood—such as when streets are not properly swept—while noting his appreciation for the accessibility of local government. “We have to keep our government accountable for maintaining our quality of life as a community,” he says.


temple city

feature

A new program transforms Temple City into an open-air gallery BY STEVE NATHAN

Art can celebrate achievements, document failures, pay homage to heroes and challenge traditions. Regardless of its message, it never fails to enrich us. Now, a new Public Arts Commission will establish an Art in Public Places Program that transforms Temple City into an accessible, open-air art museum—showcasing works reflective of the community’s multicultural spirit, instilling a sense of local pride and creating a more desirable environment for residents, visitors and businesses. Blank Canvas The interest in creating public art emerged during Temple City’s 50th Anniversary Celebration in 2010. “We realized there was no recognition of Walter Temple, the city’s founder,” recounts Councilmember Fernando Vizcarra, who helped spearhead the installation of Walter Temple’s bust near City Hall. The public art initiative gained momentum during the design phase of the Rosemead Boulevard Enhancement Project, during which the community was challenged to transform an

unsightly stretch of asphalt into an attractive community destination. The value of a more comprehensive public program not restricted to a single street or site was soon recognized. That same year in December, the City Council assigned two of its members to a Public Arts Ad Hoc Committee and established the Public Art Advisory Group, comprised of three local residents. These individuals recommended to establish an Arts in Public Places Program and adopt a Public Arts Ordinance. After researching

best practices in California, staff produced two ordinances with consensus to move first with one creating a Public Arts Commission and Arts in Public Places Program. The second ordinance would establish actual funding mechanisms for installing and maintaining art pieces.

Art Advisors The Arts in Public Places Program allows for the procurement, commission, installation and maintenance of public art in Temple City. It provides for a Public Arts Commission consisting of five appointed members with a professional background or keen interest in the visual arts to advise the Council on pertinent issues. The members, to be seated in January, will serve without compensation for two-year terms. The ordinance also requires the Commission to develop an annual arts program that involves goals, proposed expenditures and implementation plans. Through the ordinance, Temple City becomes the 34th city in the County to establish a formalized public arts program. As Vizcarra insists, “Public art should be part of the fabric of what we do in Temple City.” Temple City Connect

23


To coordinate the program, the City retained Elwood & Associates, a firm whose experience includes working with numerous cities and public agencies—including the Metro Gold Line. Founder Lesley Elwood welcomes and appreciates the challenge of expressing Temple City’s rich heritage. “A diverse population creates greater opportunities for the program, resulting in art that not only reflects many cultures, but is unique to Temple City,” she said, noting that the celebration of distinct values can lead to an artistic expression of the community’s collective consciousness. One of Elwood’s first responsibilities is to guide the Commission in creating a “community profile” that will set the tone for the city’s aesthetic priorities. The profile will be the product of input collected at neighborhood meetings. “The nature of public art is to be defined by the public, not by me,” emphasizes Elwood who is simply coordinating efforts. “My job is not to bring my vision but facilitate their vision.” Vizcarra reinforces this philosophy of a communitydriven public art program stating, “We want folks to feel they have some ownership.”

Painting by the Numbers Another of Elwood’s responsibilities is to develop the funding mechanism for public art. While some public art programs from two or three decades ago have fallen victim to unanticipated maintenance costs, Elwood says working with “a conservation expert who reviews all methods and materials prior to installation, can allow the City to have a realistic estimate of [future] maintenance expenses.” While the method for funding has not yet been established, it will likely be consistent with most cities’ public art programs, which require developers to contribute through a so-called “percent-for-art” ordinance that would levy a nominal fee—typically 1 percent of a project’s construction budget— into a public arts fund. According to Elwood, most sophisticated developers generally do not object, recognizing that the installation

24

Winter 2013 www.templecity.us

The interest in creating public art emerged during Temple City’s 50th Anniversary Celebration in 2010. “We realized there was no recognition of Walter Temple, the city’s founder.” COUNCILMEMBER FERNANDO VIZCARRA

of public art makes a community more desirable—ultimately, supporting higher rents and drawing quality tenants.

Economic Impressionism Cities like Pasadena, Santa Monica and Beverly Hills have all boosted their appeal through a commitment to the arts, while Twentynine Palms and Pomona recently incorporated programs to define a unique identity that would keep them economically competitive. Likewise in Temple City, there is recognition that public art can be a vital economic development tool—not only enhancing property values, but also attracting visitors and major national retailers to consider investing in the community. The first art pieces to arrive will be the pedestrian-oriented artwalk seating nodes planned for the Rosemead Boulevard Enhancement Project. And as the Las Tunas Drive Project (see pages 12–14) moves forward to revitalize the city’s downtown district, similar amenities can be envisioned for that corridor. “If we get people more involved, they can better see the benefit,” says Vizcarra, who believes businesspeople

affected by the streetscape redesign may view the Las Tunas project more favorably if they, like residents, are active in providing input on public art. The Councilmember, who may not view the public art program as a direct economic development strategy, clearly recognizes the benefits for business districts like Rosemead Boulevard and Las Tunas Drive, noting that every aspect of urban design lends itself to public art. Furthermore, there is potential to stimulate local business, as professional artists commissioned to create installations will likely support local suppliers, fabricators and craftsmen.

An Eclectic Collection: Expressing Diversity In a multicultural community like Temple City, a well designed public arts program becomes a democratic concept that allows residents to participate in the selection and creation of pieces that reflect shifting demographics, represent respective cultures and celebrate the community’s diversity. Because public art is directly or indirectly funded by the community as a whole and selected by community representatives, it generates public discourse and fosters citizen engagement. “We have a cultural diversity that has to be incorporated into the art program, and it’s important to reach out for participation from a cross-section of the community,” says Vizcarra. From creation of the community profile to the selection of individual artists and projects, the Art in Public Places Program stipulates a high degree of public involvement. “It’s crucial to make a concerted effort to reflect the community’s collective values, but even when there is controversy, that’s not necessarily a bad thing,” says Elwood. “In the art world, no press is bad press. Art gets people talking, engaging in dialogue and sharing an experience.” SUBSCRIBE TO UPDATES about the Arts in Public Places Program by e-mailing publicarts@templecity.us.


THIS WINTER BRRREAK, HAVE A

DECEMBER 26-28 & JANUARY 2-4 • 7 AM-6 PM Hey kids! Head on down to Live Oak Park for super cool games, crafts and activities! While there's no snow in Temple City, come with us on field trips to wintery wonderlands! Who's ready for Knott's Merry Farm, ice skating and sledding?

Winter Camp

Winter Zone

Grades K-5 / $125

Grades 6-9 / $90

Live Oak Park Community Center

Live Oak Park Annex Additional fees apply for field trips.

NOW ENROLLING AT LIVE OAK PARK ANNEX For more information, call (626) 285-2171, ext. 2360.

CITY OF TEMPLE CITY

9701 LAS TUNAS DR., TEMPLE CITY, CA 91780

(626) 285-2171


recreation guide

Get Active!

temple city

Don’t just stand there! Get your body moving and your brain thinking with stimulating classes offered by our Parks and Recreation Department.

26

Winter 2013

www.templecity.us

Sign up for classes starting Dec. 13 online at www.templecity.us or by mailing in completed registration forms, which can be obtained at Live Oak Park Community Center, 10144 Bogue St. In-person enrollment begins Dec. 17 at the Community Center. Incomplete applications or checks may result in failed enrollment. Space is limited, so reserve your spot early! For more information, call the Parks and Recreation Department at (626) 579-0461. Classes begin the week of Jan. 7 at Live Oak Park unless otherwise noted. No class will be held Jan. 21 and Feb. 18, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day and President’s Day. Class schedules and prices are subject to change.


Youth and Adult Activities

EDUCATIONAL BRICKS 4 KIDZ / Bricks 4 Kidz

Have loads of fun—and learn a bunch!—using LEGO® bricks to explore the worlds of engineering and architecture.

CHILD DEVELOPMENT LITTLE STARS / Recreation Leaders

Bond with your tot through song, game, stories and crafts in this parent participation class. CODE

DATES

AGE

9039

1/22-3/28

2 yrs. T/Th

DAY

TIME

FEE

9:30-10:45 a.m.

$100

TINY TOTS / Sarah Nichols Tiny Tots

Toddlers can build social skills, make new friends and learn independence while experiencing music, art projects and group activities. Children must be at least three years old and potty-trained by the first class. In-person registration required; bring proof of birth date and immunization record. (No class 1/21 and 2/18.) CODE

DATES

9040 1/7-3/22 9041 1/8-3/21

AGE

DAY

3-5 yrs. M/W/F 3-5 yrs. T/Th

TIME

FEE

9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

$330 $240

CODE

DATES

AGE

9032

1/8-3/12

6-10 yrs. T

DAY

TIME

FEE

3:30-4:30 p.m.

$85

COMPUTERS FOR ACTIVE ADULTS / AGI Academy

It’s never too late to learn! Get hands-on practice with basic computer usage and word processing. $5 material fee due at first class. CODE

DATES

AGE

9033 9034

1/11-2/15 2/22-3/29

50+ yrs. F 50+ yrs F

DAY

TIME

FEE

11 a.m.-12 p.m. 11 a.m.-12 p.m.

$78 $78

COMPUTER ADVENTURE FOR ALL AGES / AGI Academy

Designed for those who are interested in sharpening their skills in Microsoft Office Word, PowerPoint and Excel. $10 material fee due at first class. CODE

DATES

9145 1/11-2/15 9146 2/22-3/29

AGE

DAY

8+ yrs. F 8+ yrs. F

TIME

FEE

5:30-6:30 p.m. 5:30-6:30 p.m.

$78 $78

INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM / AGI Academy

DANCE

Get the fundamentals of news reporting, news writing and news judgment—all while improving your writing skills! $10 material fee due at first class.

BALLET & TAP / Shekinah Glory School of Dance

Lively music and classical steps introduce children to the art of dance. Ballet and tap shoes required. Family members allowed during two-year-old class only. (No class 2/1.) CODE

DATES

AGE

DAY

TIME

FEE

9017 9018 9019 9020 9021

1/11-3/8 1/11-3/8 1/11-3/8 1/11-3/8 1/11-3/8

2 yrs. 3 yrs. 4-5 yrs. 6-8 yrs. 8+ yrs.

F F F F F

1:30-2 p.m. 2-2:30 p.m. 3:15-4 p.m. 4-4:45 p.m. 4:45-5:45 p.m.

$55 $55 $65 $65 $65

CODE

DATES

AGE

9147 9148

1/11-2/15 2/22-3/29

10-14 yrs. F 10-14 yrs. F

Have fun while learning the latest routines and techniques. Dances include the Cha-Cha, Rumba, Samba, Waltz, Tango and Foxtrot. Dance shoes required. DATES

LEVEL

Beg./Int. 16+ yrs. S

AGE

DAY TIME

11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

FEE

$58

LINE DANCE / Bill Chang

Step into this old Western dance—with a twist! Learn basic line dancing set to country and non-country music. Level I for beginners, levels II and III for experienced dancers. (No evening class 2/1.) CODE

DATES

LEVEL

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

9023 9024 9025 9026 9027 9028 9029 9030

1/11-3/22 1/11-3/22 1/8-3/12 1/7-3/25 1/10-3/14 1/8-3/12 1/9-3/13 1/11-3/15

Level II Level III Level II Level I Level II Level I Level I Level II

15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs.

F F T M Th T W F

$60 $60 $60 $60 $60 $60 $60 $60

6:20-7:50 p.m. 8-9:30 p.m. 7:40-9:10 p.m. 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. 9-10:30 a.m. 6-7:30 p.m. 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.

$78 $78

Build strength through a fusion of low-impact, high-energy dance and exercise. Bring two light hand weights (2-3 lbs. each). (No class 1/21 and 2/18.) 9042 1/7-3/25 9043 1/9-3/13 9044 1/7-3/25

1/19-3/9

FEE

4:30-5:30 p.m. 4:30-5:30 p.m.

45+ CARDIO DANCE & STRENGTH TRAINING / Amy’s Health & Fitness

CODE

9022

TIME

FITNESS

BALLROOM DANCE / Robert Chin

CODE

DAY

DATES

AGE

DAY

45+ yrs. M 45+ yrs. W 45+ yrs. M/W

TIME

FEE

8:15-9:45 a.m. 8:15-9:45 a.m. 8:15-9:45 a.m.

$43 $43 $73

KICKBOXING CARDIO DANCE CHALLENGE / Amy’s Health & Fitness

Combine the intensity and power of kickboxing with the playfulness and fun of dance for a unique workout. Exercise mat required. (No class 1/31.) CODE

DATES

AGE

9046

1/10-3/21

16+ yrs. Th

DAY

TIME

FEE

7-8:15 p.m.

$50

SENIOR FITNESS SWEATING TO THE OLDIES / Amy’s Health & Fitness

Burn calories and strengthen your heart while singing along to your favorite hits of the ’50s and ’60s. You’ll have so much fun, you’ll forget you’re exercising! Must register in person. CODE

DATES

9047 1/11-3/1

LEVEL

AGE

DAY TIME

Beg./Int. 60+ yrs. F

8:30-9:45 a.m.

FEE

Free

Temple City Connect

27


SLIM & TONE PILATES/YOGA BLEND / Amy’s Health & Fitness

Get relaxed and strong at the same time. Reduce stress while increasing strength, flexibility and energy. Yoga mat required. CODE

DATES

9048 1/22-3/23

AGE

DAY

16+ yrs. S

TIME

FEE

8:45-10:30 a.m.

$55

SUN-MOON YOGA / Michael Appleby

Balance, strengthen, align and flex. A well-developed mind-body rapport brings better health and well being. Yoga mat required. CODE

DATES

AGE

9049

1/7-3/25

16+ yrs. M

DAY

TIME

FEE

7-9 p.m.

$60

Feel invigorated from the inside-out through a flowing series of dynamic poses. Fitness mat required. DATES

9045 1/9-3/13

LEVEL

AGE

DAY TIME

Beg./Int. 16+ yrs. W

7 -8:30 p.m.

Sing weekly new tunes and learn about percussion instruments. Kids will enhance their awareness of music and movement at an early age through rhythm and multicultural songs. (No class 2/16.) CODE

DATES

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

9121 9122 9123 9124 9125

1/8-2/26 1/19-3/16 1/19-3/16 1/19-3/16 1/19-3/16

0-6 yrs. 0-5 yrs. 19 mos.-2.5 yrs. 2.5-5 yrs. 0-2.5 yrs.

T S S S S

$105 $105 $105 $105 $105

5:45-6:45 p.m. 9-10 a.m. 10-11 a.m. 11 a.m.-12 p.m. 12-1 p.m.

PIANO, PIANO! / Music, Math & More

TOTAL YOGA: BEAT STRESS AND TONE / Amy’s Health & Fitness

CODE

KIDS MUSIC N’ MOTION-MUSIC CLASSES / Kids Music N’ Motion

FEE

$50

Learn to read piano notes and play basic songs. Bring a three-ring binder and 20 sheet protectors to the first class. (No class 1/21 and 2/18.) CODE

DATES

LEVEL

9050 9051

1/7-3/11 1/7-3/11

Beg. 5+ yrs. Int. 7+ yrs.

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

M M

$85 $85

4-4:30 p.m. 4:30-5 p.m.

MUSIC AND PRODUCTION

SELF DEFENSE AND MARTIAL ARTS

CHILDREN’S MUSICAL THEATER / Kids Music N’ Motion

JAPANESE SWORD–IAIDO / Rojen Recreation

Learn basic theater skills and vocal techniques in this fun and improvisational class! Performance for family and friends held at the end of the session. $25 materials fee due at first class.

Iaido is a traditional art of Japanese swordsmanship. Learn traditional forms and how to cut with the samurai sword in this hands-on class. (No class 2/1.)

CODE

DATES

9129 1/8-2/26 9130 1/8-2/26

AGE

DAY

5-8 yrs. T 8-13 yrs. T

CODE

DATES

AGE

TIME

FEE

9144

1/11-3/22

15+ yrs. F

3:30-4:15 p.m. 4:15-5 p.m.

$125 $125

JU-JITSU & JAPANESE SWORD / Rojen Recreation

DRUM LESSONS / Kids Music N’ Motion

Make a beat with lessons on basic drumming techniques, coordination, rhythms and music theory. Each class includes electric drum sets for students. It is recommended to have drum pads/kits to practice at home. $25 material fees due at first class. CODE

DATES

9138 1/10-2/28 9139 1/10-3/28 9140 1/10-3/28

AGE

DAY

6-8 yrs. Th 9-13yrs. Th 14+ yrs. Th

TIME

FEE

3:30-3:15 p.m. 4:15-5 p.m. 5-5:45 p.m.

$125 $125 $125

Hit that key with basic note recognition, keyboard scales and music theory foundation in a group setting. Each class includes keyboards for students. $25 materials fee due at first class. (No class 2/16.) CODE

DATES

AGE

DAY

TIME

FEE

9131 9132 9133 9134

1/19-3/16 1/19-3/16 1/19-3/16 1/19-3/16

4-6 yrs. 7-10 yrs. 11-15 yrs. 11-15 yrs.

S S S S

3-3:45 p.m. 3:45-4:30 p.m. 4:30-5:15 p.m. 5:15-6 p.m.

$125 $125 $125 $125

GUITAR LESSONS / Kids Music N’ Motion

Amplify your experience with basic strumming and chords along with reading of music and learning the treble clef scale. Students must provide their own guitar. $25 materials fee due at first class. CODE

DATES

9135 1/8-2/26 9136 1/8-2/26 9137 1/8-2/26

28

AGE

DAY

5-8 yrs. T 9-13 yrs. T 14+ yrs. T

Winter 2013 www.templecity.us

TIME

FEE

3:30-4:15 p.m. 4:15-5 p.m. 5-5:15 p.m.

$125 $125 $125

TIME

FEE

8-9 p.m.

$51

Learn the fundamentals of traditional martial arts—Judo, Aikido, Kendo—and the weapons of self-defense. Second hour of instruction covers the basics of Iaido, the art of Japanese swordsmanship. (No class 2/1.) CODE

DATES

AGE

9143

1/11-3/22

15+ yrs. F

DAY

TIME

FEE

7-9 p.m.

$61

JU-JITSU & KARATE / Jennies Gym

Build strength while learning martial arts techniques for self-defense. Lessons include Judo, Aikido, Kendo and Karate. CODE

GROUP PIANO LESSONS / Kids Music N’ Motion

DAY

DATES

9052 1/8-3/14 9053 1/8-3/14 9054 1/8-3/14

LEVEL

AGE

DAY TIME

All 13+ yrs. T/Th 8-9 p.m. New 8-12 yrs. T/Th 6-7 p.m. Grn. Belt+ 8-12 yrs. T/Th 7-8 p.m.

FEE

$61 $61 $61

LITTLE KICKERS JU-JITSU / Jennies Gym

Teaches self-esteem and discipline through age-appropriate martial arts lessons. (No class 2/1.) CODE

DATES

9055 1/18-3/8 9056 1/18-3/8 9057 1/18-3/8

LEVEL

AGE

New 5-7 yrs. Ylw. Belt+ 5-7 yrs All 8+ yrs.

DAY TIME

FEE

F F F

$49 $49 $56

4:30-5:15 p.m. 5:15-6 p.m. 6-7 p.m.

NIPPON KEMPO KARATE / Do Mar

Develop respect, discipline and self-confidence through this self-defense system based on punching, kicking, blocking, joint locks and ground combat. (No class 1/21 and 2/18.) CODE

DATES

LEVEL

9058 9059 9060

1/7-3/25 1/9-3/13 1/7-3/25

All 7+ yrs. M/W 6:30-8 p.m. New 5-9 yrs. W 5:40-6:25 p.m. Ylw. Belt+ 5-10 yrs. M 5:40-6:25 p.m.

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

$55 $34 $34


SPECIAL INTEREST

TENNIS ACADEMY / TJP Tennis Professionals

KIDS IN THE KITCHEN / Jennies Gym

Let’s get cooking! Little chefs can learn their way around the kitchen practicing new skills, techniques and recipes. $25 materials fee due at first class. CODE

DATES

AGE

DAY

9061 9062

1/9-2/27 1/9-2/27

4-7 yrs. W 8-12 yrs. W

TIME

FEE

4-4:45 p.m. 5-6 p.m.

$53 $53

NATURE & SCIENCE WORKSHOP / Jennies Gym

Explore the wonders of nature and learn the principles of science through simple experiments with household items. A list of materials for the entire session will be provided at the first class. CODE

DATES

AGE

9063

1/9-2/27

6-12 yrs. W

DAY

TIME

FEE

3-3:45 p.m.

$61

PARENT WORKSHOP / Platinum Academy

Taught by a Harvard-educated instructor, this workshop empowers parents to forge strong relationships with their teenagers during the high school years. Learn to increase mutual trust and prepare your kids for the challenges of college, both academically and emotionally. CODE

DATES

DAY

TIME

FEE

9064 9065 9066 9067 9068 9069

1/8 1/22 2/12 2/26 3/12 3/26

T T T T T T

7-8 p.m. 7-8 p.m. 7-8 p.m. 7-8 p.m. 7-8 p.m. 7-8 p.m.

Free Free Free Free Free Free

Have fun while preparing for match play. Challenge yourself with physically demanding court workouts and drills. Tennis shoes required. Bring a racquet and new can of three tennis balls to the first class. (No class 1/21 and 2/18) CODE

DATES

LEVEL

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

9078 9079 9080 9081 9082 9083 9084 9085

1/7–3/11 1/9–2/27 1/7–3/11 1/11–11/9 1/11–11/9 1/9–2/27 1/9–2/27 1/9–2/27

Beg./Int. Beg./Int. Int./Adv. Beg./Int. Int./Adv. Beg. Int. Adv.

8-12 yrs. 8-12 yrs. 10+ yrs. 8-12 yrs. 10+ yrs. 14+ yrs. 18+ yrs. 18+ yrs.

M W M F F W W W

$85 $85 $85 $85 $85 $85 $85 $85

6-7 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 7-8 p.m. 6-7 p.m. 7-8 p.m. 6-7 p.m. 7-8 p.m. 8-9 p.m.

PHOTO POLICY: Please be advised that all participants involved in any City of Temple City (“City”) programs or special events are subject to being photographed. Such photographs may be used by the City without an obligation to provide compensation to those photographed.

SPORTS GYMNASTICS & TRAMPOLINE / Jennies Gym

Young gymnasts will learn basic tumbling skills and exercises on the balance beam, bars, vault and trampoline. New students will be evaluated and grouped by ability. CODE

DATES

AGE DAY

TIME

FEE

9070 9071 9072

1/19-3/9 1/19-3/9 1/19-3/9

4-7 yrs. S 7-15 yrs. S 13+ yrs. S

10:30-11:30 a.m. 11:30-12:30 p.m. 11:30-12:30 p.m.

$71 $71 $71

KINDERGYM / Jennies Gym

Kids are not the only ones allowed to have fun, since parents get to come too! You’ll learn forward rolls, back rolls, handstands and more with your kids. Together, you’ll walk the balance beam, swing on bars and jump on the trampoline! One parent per child must attend each class. CODE

DATES

AGE DAY

TIME

FEE

9073 9074

1/19-3/9 1/19-3/9

9 m.-2 yrs. S 3-4 yrs. S

9-9:45 a.m. 9:45-10:30 a.m.

$71 $71

Learn table tennis from the pros! Former U.S. Olympians and National Champions teach rules and proper techniques. Dress in athletic wear and light shoes, and bring your own paddle. Equipment is available for purchase on-site. All classes held at the L.A. Table Tennis Association facility, 10180 Valley Blvd., El Monte. DATES

9075 1/8-3/12 9076 1/12-3/16 9077 1/13-3/17

AGE

DAY

6+ yrs. T 6+ yrs. S 6+ yrs. Su

The 69th Annual Camellia Festival is fast approaching. If you don’t already know how you’ll be participating the weekend of Feb. 22–24, there are plenty of exciting options! Whether you’re interested in being on court, or looking forward to playing carnival games—just make sure to keep these dates in mind! Application deadline for the Royal Court. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dec. 28

TABLE TENNIS / L.A. Table Tennis Association

CODE

A ‘ONCE IN A LIFETIME’ AFFAIR

TIME

FEE

7-8:30 p.m. 2-4 p.m. 3-5 p.m.

$190 $250 $250

Application deadline for carnival booths, parade floats and walking units. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jan. 7 Build-a-float workshops. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jan. 8 and 15 Royal Court Play Day. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jan. 12 Pre-sale tickets available. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feb. 1–21 Camellia Festival. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feb. 22–24 Camellia Festival Parade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Feb. 23 For details, log onto the City website, or call (626) 285-2171, ext. 2350.

Temple City Connect

29


Sit Back and Enjoy the Ride!

CONTINUOUS ENROLLMENT

High Hoops

BE A REGISTERED MEMBER

Hey kids—give it your best shot and make a slam dunk this winter!

BASKETBALL Various Locations Become a baller this season and play for a chance to make the Temple City All-Star team! The youth basketball league is open to boys and girls ages 31⁄2 to 5, or in first through eighth grades. The program teaches the rules, strategies and fundamentals of the game—dribbling, passing, shooting and defending—while emphasizing fun, sportsmanship, fair play and teamwork. Teams are co-ed with children grouped by age and school attended. Practices will be held twice a week, with games on Saturdays beginning Jan. 12 at the Oak Avenue Intermediate and Temple City High School gyms. Seasons end late-March for older divisions, and mid-April for younger. Fee includes instruction, league play, trophy and jersey. Registration form and payment of fees are required at time of registration. The registration fee includes a $10 non-refundable administrative fee.

CODE

DATES

AGE/GRADE SITE

9086 9087 9088 9089 9090 9091 9092 9093 9094 9095 9096 9097 9098 9099 9100 9101 9102 9103 9104 9105 9106 9107

12/10-4/20 12/10-4/20 12/10-4/20 12/10-4/20 12/10-4/20 12/10-4/20 12/10-4/20 12/10-4/20 12/10-4/20 12/10-4/20 12/10-4/20 12/10-4/20 12/10-4/20 12/10-4/20 12/10-4/20 12/10-4/20 12/10-4/20 12/10-4/20 12/10-4/20 12/10-4/20 12/10-4/20 12/10-4/20

3.5-5 yrs. 3.5-5 yrs. 3.5-5 yrs. 3.5-5 yrs. 3.5-5 yrs. 1st-2nd 1st-2nd 1st-2nd 1st-2nd 1st-2nd 3rd-4th 3rd-4th 3rd-4th 3rd-4th 3rd-4th 3rd-4th 5th-6th 5th-6th 5th-6th 5th-6th 5th-6th 7th-8th

DAY

Cleminson M/W Emperor M/W La Rosa M/W Longden M/W Live Oak Park T/Th Emperor M/W La Rosa M/W Longden M/W Cleminson M/W Live Oak Park M/W Cloverly M/W Emperor T/Th La Rosa T/Th Longden T/Th Cleminson T/Th Live Oak Park M/W Cloverly T/Th Emperor T/Th Longden T/Th Cleminson T/Th Live Oak Park T/Th Oak Avenue Gym T/Th

TIME

FEE

3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 4-5 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 4-5 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 5-6 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 5-6 p.m. 7-8 p.m.

$95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95

REGISTER NOW AT LIVE OAK PARK AND STARS CLUB LOCATIONS

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Winter 2013 www.templecity.us

Temple City’s Dial-A-Ride (DAR) is a membership transportation service for residents aged 60 years and older; or under 60 with a physical, psychological or developmental disability, as certified by a physician. Residents of certain unincorporated County areas adjacent to Temple City may also qualify for DAR membership, for travel between home and destinations within Temple City limits. For questions about DAR, including eligibility requirements and service, call (626) 285-2171, ext. 2361. Help us make your ride with us a great one by keeping in mind these considerations: Register to become an eligible member for DAR services. Complete a short application with proof of age and residency attached for processing. Rides must originate from DAR members’ residence. Passengers will be picked up curbside and most rides will be shared with other members. An escort may accompany passengers if medically required.

RESERVE YOUR TRIP IN ADVANCE Call the Reservation Dispatch to schedule a ride at (626) 286-2456. The best time to call is early morning and late afternoon. Reservations will be accepted up to 14 days in advance. Turn to page 31 for DAR hours of operation.

CONSIDER WHERE TO GO Reservations can be made for any purpose within Temple City limits. Trips to Arcadia, El Monte, Rosemead and San Gabriel are limited to reservations for medical appointments, government and daycare facilities, convalescent home visits, church, Westfield Santa Anita Mall or Home Depot.

PLAN YOUR PURCHASES When planning your next shopping trip, keep in mind that only four carry-on packages per person are allowed. Large, bulky items will not be allowed on the vehicle. Prohibited items include those that will not normally fit in a standard grocery bag. Drivers cannot assist with carrying packages onto private property.

APPLY FOR SHOPPING CARTS The City has a limited number of free foldable shopping carts for DAR members who have difficulty walking and carrying grocery bags from the vehicle to their residence. To apply for one, call (626) 285-2171, ext. 2361. Carts are distributed according to immediate need.

YOUR OPINION MATTERS Join the Parks and Recreation Commission at their annual transportation meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 20 at 7:30 p.m., in the Council Chambers, 5938 Kauffman Ave. The DAR service provider will be on hand to solicit input from members. DAR service to the meeting will be available by appointment.


Senior Programs FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL (626) 579-0461.

AARP DRIVER SAFETY JAN. 14 & 15 AND MARCH 11 & 12, 8:30 A.M.–12 P.M., $12-14 As you age, driving proficiency becomes increasingly important. The AARP Driver Safety Program is the largest and most respected refresher course, designed to help those 55 and older tune up their driving skills, allowing for normal age-related physical changes. Classes are offered at Live Oak Park Community Center. $12 for AARP members, $14 for non-members. Fee is payable by check at the first day of class. Pre-registration is recommended.

DIAL-A-RIDE MONDAY-FRIDAY, 7 A.M.–8 P.M. SATURDAY & HOLIDAYS, 10 A.M.–5 P.M. SUNDAY 9 A.M.–5 P.M.; 50 CENTS PER TRIP Provides curb-to-curb transportation service for elderly or disabled residents. Schedule a trip in town for any purpose; or to Arcadia, El Monte, Rosemead or San Gabriel for medical appointments, government and daycare facilities, convalescent home visits, church, Westfield Santa Anita Mall or Home Depot. Membership is required. For more information, call (626) 285-2171, ext. 2361.

LINKAGES PROGRAM FIRST & THIRD MONDAY OF THE MONTH, 10:30 A.M.–12 P.M. Offers free case management services to frail seniors (ages 60 and over) and adults with disabilities (ages 18 and older), affording them the ability and independence to remain safely at home and in the community. In addition to onsite assistance at Live Oak Park Community Center, services are also available by appointment. For more information, contact the YWCA San Gabriel Valley at (626) 214-9465.

SENIOR BINGO LAST THURSDAY OF THE MONTH, 1–3 P.M. Studies show that bingo can enhance memory skills and improve concentration. Play free at Live Oak Park Community Center—it’s fun and all games are played for prizes!

SENIOR LUNCH WEEKDAYS, 11 A.M., $2 DONATION Seniors over 60 years of age are invited to Live Oak Park Community Center for a hot lunch, activities and socializing with friends and neighbors. Monthly menus are available at the Community Center and on the City’s website, www.templecity.us. Hot tea and coffee are available for just 25 cents per cup—best price in town! Reservations are required 24 hours in advance by calling (626) 579-0461.

SENIOR WELLNESS SERIES THIRD WEDNESDAY OF THE MONTH, 10–11 A.M. Get informed on senior health issues. Free and open to seniors, their families and caregivers. JAN. 16: PREPARING FOR YOUR TAXES Workshop provider: New York Life FEB. 20: CARING FOR THE CAREGIVERS Workshop provider: Santa Anita Family Service MARCH 20: INTRODUCTION TO HOME HEALTH CARE Workshop provider: Care 4 You

SENIOR CELEBRATIONS Celebrate this season at the senior luncheon program! The City’s Parks and Recreation Department will host several holiday-themed lunches for seniors to enjoy together. For reservations, call (626) 579-0461. Space is limited. NEW YEAR’S EVE TOAST: DEC. 31 Join us to ring in the New Year with a festive toast! LUNAR NEW YEAR: FEB. 8 Celebrate the Year of the Snake and enjoy traditional treats. VALENTINE’S DAY: FEB. 14 Hey lovebirds! Spend time with your sweetheart while celebrating the senior luncheon program’s second anniversary! ST. PATRICK’S DAY: MARCH 15 Wear green and see if you have the luck of the Irish during the “Lucky Leprechaun” raffle.

FREE INCOME TAX PREPARATION FEB. 1 THROUGH APRIL 11, WEDNESDAYS, 9:30-11:30 A.M. IRS-certified AARP Tax-Aide volunteers will provide free Federal and State tax return preparation at Live Oak Park Community Center. Low- to moderate-income taxpayers are qualified, with special attention given to those 60 years and older. Get help with e-filing services and tax-related questions. Assistance is available in English and Chinese. Appointments are scheduled on a first-come, first-serve basis. Participants should bring their current year’s tax forms and preparation booklet, a copy of last year’s income tax return, SSA-1099 forms and the social security number of dependents, if any. To schedule an appointment, call (626) 579-0461. Participants with tax returns beyond the expertise of Tax-Aide volunteers may be provided with referrals to other professionals.

Temple City Connect

31


Senior Excursions

GANNA WALSKA LOTUSLAND

The City offers one-day excursions to local and nearby destinations. Showing off the incredible diversity of attractions in Southern California, these daytrips range from tours and shows, to dinners and shopping. Registration is taken on a first-come, first-paid basis at Live Oak Park Community Center. For more information, call (626) 579-0461.

Enjoy the beautiful Montecito area of Santa Barbara on a guided tour of the lush gardens at Ganna Walska Lotusland—featuring plants from all around the globe. Afterwards, enjoy lunch and shopping on your own in downtown Santa Barbara, with a pit stop at Stearn’s Wharf before finally heading home. Registration deadline: Feb. 6.

VALLEY VIEW CASINO JAN. 10, 8:30 A.M.–5:30 P.M., $20 Whether you love playing video poker or slot machines, San Diego’s Valley View Casino is the place for you with 2,000 of the most exciting slots. First-time cardholders receive a free buffet lunch, while all players collect $15 worth of free slot play. Registration deadline: Jan. 4.

BOWERS MUSEUM JAN. 22, 10:30 A.M.–5 P.M., $29 Celebrate art and culture at Bowers Museum in Santa Ana! Take a self-guided tour and check out permanent collections of historical art pieces or the upcoming special exhibition titled “CUT! Costume and the Cinema.” Admission is included, with lunch on your own. Registration deadline: Jan. 17.

FEB. 15, 7:30 A.M.–6 P.M., $52

INDIO DATE FESTIVAL FEB. 22, 1:30–9:30 P.M., $21 Spend the day at the Riverside County Fair and National Date Festival! Enjoy the activity-filled day with camel and ostrich races, over 8,000 exhibits, live entertainment, and the Arabian Nights Musical Pageant show—a nightly performance filled with brilliant costumes, live singing and dancing. Admission is included. Registration deadline: Feb. 15.

THE NETHERCUTT MUSEUM & COLLECTION MARCH 7, 8:30 A.M.–4 P.M., $32 Step back in time at the Nethercutt Museum & Collection. First, take a two-hour guided tour through the Collection—which includes a recreation of an automotive grand salon of the 1920s and ’30s, as well as the finest of antique mechanical musical instruments. After lunch, explore the Museum on your own to get a closer look at more classic automobiles. Lunch at Bear Pit BBQ Restaurant is included. Registration deadline: Feb. 28. NOTE: Trips may be cancelled or changed at the City’s discretion. Refunds will be offered only if a replacement is found and notification of cancellation is provided at least eight days in advance of the trip.

Who’s Next? NOMINATE TEMPLE CITY’S 2013 OLDER AMERICAN OF THE YEAR Do you know a Temple City resident, aged 60 years and up, who is actively involved in the community, volunteering invaluable hours to your organization? If so, nominate that special person for recognition as the 2013 Temple City Outstanding Older American! Award applications are available at Live Oak Park Community Center or online at www.templecity.us, and are due by Feb. 15. For more information, call (626) 579-0461. Louis Paletta, 2012 Outstanding Older American of the Year.

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Winter 2013 www.templecity.us


temple city

ask city hall

Ask City Hall

Temple City Connect addresses questions from residents on a wide variety of City activities, projects and policies, keeping you connected, engaged and educated. In this issue, we introduce new laws that are now in effect or are proposed for 2013.

Star Spangled Sparks

In the next few months, the City will propose a law that allows for Safe and Sane fireworks to be discharged only on July 4 from noon to 10 p.m. This new law will decrease noise in the neighborhood. Note that there are no changes being proposed to the sale of Safe and Sane fireworks within the city. Trash to Treasures

A new law will soon designate four weekends a year as yard sale dates. These fixed dates will prevent yard sales from taking place every weekend toward preserving neighborhood attractiveness and tranquility.

No Ifs, Ands or Butts

Upon Resale

It’s time to quit lighting up as the City has enacted a new law that prohibits smoking on City property, within 20 feet of any public outdoor eating area, in public places and interior common areas of multifamily housing units where people can be exposed to secondhand smoke. (Ordinance No. 12-964)

This proposed law will protect buyers from purchasing property that does not conform to City’s building and zoning codes, as well as State safety regulations.

Snip and Chip

Effective July 1, a new law requires the spay, neutering and microchipping of all cats and dogs, in addition to the licensing of dogs. This new regulation conforms to State animal control laws, and also helps ensure the safety of residents from vicious and stray animals. (Ordinance No. 12-956)

For Rent

In the works is a multifamily residential inspection program that will be enacted to inspect rental properties every two years toward ensuring that housing units meet federal housing quality standards. FOR MORE INFORMATION: Contact the City’s Public Safety and Services Division at (626) 285-2171 ext. 2333.

Temple City Connect

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temple city

people

Meet the Royals BY WENDY CHUNG

What were your first impressions of Michael?

If I am being totally honest, I found him to be very annoying back then. He was a little bit naughty; I was kind of a goody two-shoes. I actually remember playing with my sisters and making fun of his last name. Now I’m stuck with it! When did the romance begin?

We didn’t start dating until I graduated from college. I was waitressing at Applebee’s in Monrovia and he was at one of my tables. He actually recognized me from the court, so we ended up chatting and eventually going out. The rest is history! We married three years later when we were 25 years old, and now have four children. Are your friends aware of your ‘royal’ past?

People are always surprised to hear that we have known each other for so long. At our engagement party, Mike’s mom had these cute invitations made where they Photoshopped a picture of us from the Court to put us together. Everyone got a kick out of it. What do you remember most about being on the Court?

The Royal Court was a big deal back then. Everyone I knew tried out. I remember the first play day—it was like being at a giant birthday party! We played games and sang songs. My favorite function was going to the Camellia Festival in our dresses. We also got to go on all of the rides before it opened to the public. What was it like being Queen?

I remember the crown feeling so heavy! We were in the local newspapers all of the time—it was exciting to see myself in print. My elementary school put a note on the marquis that said, “Congratulations, Queen Jennifer.” There was also a sign at Baskin Robbins. Do you still visit Temple City?

My parents still live in Temple City, my niece attends school there, and my youngest sister is a teacher there—so we visit often. I still make a point to come back home the weekend of the Camellia Festival to watch the parade and go to the carnival. Actually, the year Mike and I got married, we were invited to ride in the parade one more time!

VISIT the City’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ConnectwithTC to see photos of the Gass family and read more of what Jennifer had to say. Also check out the City website at www.templecity.us for more information on the 2013 Camellia Festival.

34

Winter 2013

www.templecity.us

When Jennifer Chinn first met Michael Gass, they were both first-graders, newly crowned Queen and Prince on the 1982 Camellia Festival Royal Court. Like most seven-year-old boys and girls, the two were more foes than friends—with Jennifer, then a self-described “goody two-shoes,” remembering Michael as being “a little bit naughty.” While first impressions are often said to be truest, in the case of this former bantering duo, a chance meeting 15 years after riding together on the Festival Parade’s royal float led to lasting romance. Thirty-one years after their initial encounter, the pair is now married and happily raising their family in Orange County. We caught up with Queen Jennifer, as she reminisced on fond Camellia Festival memories.


temple city

city services

QUICK CONTACTS

City Services

SCHOOL DISTRICTS ALL TELEPHONE NUMBERS ARE 626 AREA CODE UNLESS DESIGNATED.

Emergencies

Emergency Preparedness

Planning and Zoning

911

285-2171, ext. 2333

285-2171, ext. 2303

Request immediate sheriff, fire department or ambulance assistance to protect life or property.

Receive training to handle an emergency situation or local disaster.

See what you can do with your property and what developments are planned in your neighborhood.

Animals

285-2171, ext. 2330

285-7187

Apply for a City job and learn of other government employment opportunities.

Call to report a lost pet and stray or dead animals; get or renew a license.

Employment

Environment

Building and Development

285-2171, ext. 2333

285-2171, ext. 2301

Learn about water, recycling and energy conservation programs.

Obtain permits and inspections for repairing, remodeling or adding onto your home or business. Business Assistance 285-2171, ext. 2303

Public Safety (Temple Sheriff’s Station)

285-2171, ext. 2361

Reserve one of our facilities for sports team practices, birthday parties and private events.

Public Records

Metro Transportation Authority (323) 466-3876

Review or request copies of City records and documents. Recreation and Parks 285-2171, ext. 2361

Community Involvement

(800) 252-4613

285-2171, ext. 2317

Abandoned Shopping Carts

Seniors

Learn of upcoming public meetings, volunteer opportunities and how to serve on a City commission.

(800) 794-7384

579-0461

Community Preservation 285-2171

Improve your neighborhood— report property maintenance issues, illegal construction and garage conversions. Dial-A-Ride (First Transit)

Request shared transit service for seniors and the disabled. 285-2171, ext. 2361

Establish membership; general inquiries 286-2456

285-5240

Illegal Construction (after hours) Housing 285-2171, ext. 2303

Get information on rehabilitation programs, homeownership opportunities and landlord/tenant rights. Mayor and City Council

Let them know what you think! 285-2171, ext. 2322

Schedule a meeting 285-2189

Leave a suggestion, comment or complaint

Participate in our many recreational and cultural activities; report maintenance needs at City parks.

Stay active and healthy with our lunch program, recreational classes and referrals to wellness providers. Streets and Sidewalks 285-2171, ext. 2333

Request street or sidewalk maintenance; report broken street lights, traffic signals and signs. Trash and Street Sweeping (Athens Services) 336-3636

Elections and Voting

285-2171, ext. 2333

285-2171, ext. 2361

Ask about residential parking permits and parking tickets; report nuisance vehicles on public streets.

Get a street tree; report maintenance issues on street trees and medians. Youth

285-2171, ext. 2300

Find out what is required to improve your property, operate a business and conduct special events.

Chamber of Commerce 286-3101 Temple City Library 285-2136

UTILITIES AT&T (800) 288-2020 Charter Communications (866) 499-8080 Southern California Edison (800) 655-4555 The Gas Company (800) 427-2200

WATER DISTRICTS California American Water Company (888) 422-5269

Golden State Water Company (800) 999-4033

Tree and Median Maintenance

Permits and Licenses

RESOURCES

East Pasadena Water Company 793-6189

Parking

Register to vote, get information on election dates and find out how to run for City public office.

Foothill Transit District (800) 743-3463

Report service problems or make a special service request; get help with billing.

Schedule service

285-2171, ext. 2317

Temple City Unified 548-5000

MASS TRANSIT

Hotlines

Graffiti Removal

Rosemead Unified 312-2900

Form a Neighborhood Watch group, request increased patrolling and obtain police reports.

Find out how to start or expand a business, and how to do business with the City.

Help keep Temple City looking great by reporting:

El Monte City 453-3700

285-7171

285-2171, ext. 2317 Facility Rentals

Arcadia Unified 821-8300

San Gabriel County Water District 287-0341 Sunnyslope Water Company 287-5238

285-2171, ext. 2360

Learn about after school programs, day camps, sports leagues and recreational activities.

CAN’T FIND WHAT YOU NEED? We’ll find it for you! Just call (626) 285-2171.

Temple City Connect

35


Temple City Farmer’s Market

Locally grown fruits, vegetables, plants, flowers, honey, cheeses, baked goods and much more!

Stay up-to-date on the latest Temple City Farmer’s Market news and events!

Every Sunday 8:30 a.m.–1 p.m. City Hall, 9701 Las Tunas Dr.

Cash and EBT only

City of Temple City 9701 Las Tunas Dr. Temple City, CA 91780

Presorted Standard U.S. Postage PAID San Gabriel, CA Permit No. 10016

ECRWSS

POSTAL CUSTOMER TEMPLE CITY, CA 91780


Temple City Connect Winter 2013