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Summer 2014 news events people

Keeping our

COOL INSIDE!

Summer

RECREATION GUIDE PAGE 20

9 THE DROUGHT SITUATION

13 ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE

30 SUMMER TIPS


GET READY FOR THE DOG DAYS OF SUMMER PARK IT

Head to Live Oak Park for no-hassle, free air conditioning. • Arrive at Live Oak Park Community Center, open daily from 8 a.m.-10 p.m. • Sit back and relax.

GO OLD SCHOOL Make your own cooling system with these low-tech instructions. • Find an ordinary household fan. • Prepare a saltwater solution using 7 parts water to 1 part salt. • Fill an empty plastic bottle threequarters full with the saltwater solution, and place into freezer.

STAY COOL, MAN

• Stay hydrated, but avoid sugary liquids, which can cause you to lose more body fluids. • Wear lightweight, light-colored clothing. Protect yourself from the sun with a hat, sunglasses and sunscreen of SPF 15 or higher. • Limit outdoor activity to morning and evening hours. • Check on neighbors who may be especially heat-sensitive, including infants, young children and seniors.

• Remove frozen bottle from freezer and place it in a shallow container in front of the fan. The container will catch any condensation. • Turn on your fan and notice the cooler air.

GET WITH THE

PROGRAM

Sign up for Nixle and get notifications of cooling center hours and other public safety alerts sent directly to your mobile phone. Text 91780 to 888777, or visit the City’s website to subscribe. Standard messaging rates apply.

9701 LAS TUNAS DR., TEMPLE CITY, CA 91780 • (626) 285-2171 • WWW.TEMPLECITY.US


INSIDE THIS ISSUE 4 City Manager’s Message

6 Snapshots

Staying local this summer

Capturing the community spirit

5 City Briefs

8 City Calendar

Recent City Council actions

Upcoming meetings and events

9 The Drought Situation

Responding with conservation

13 Rediscover Temple City

Exploring the community

20 Recreation Guide

Summer 2014 classes and activities

28 People

9

The Drought Situation

13

Sister City Ambassadors

30 Ask City Hall

28

Sister City Ambassadors

Seasonal tips and reminders

Rediscover Temple City Temple City Connect

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temple city

editor’s message

Hi there.

TEMPLE CITY CONNECT is the City’s quarterly magazine that connects the community to City Hall.

EDITOR My name is Don Penman. For those of you I’ve yet to have the pleasure of meeting,

Don Penman

I am Temple City’s Interim City Manager. My job is to oversee City Hall operations as the search continues for a permanent candidate. Though I may be known as “the new

MANAGING EDITOR

guy” around town, I’ve actually been an observer of Temple City for a while, having

Brian Haworth

spent the last 14 years of my career next door with the City of Arcadia, including several years as City Manager. In the last few months, I’ve very much enjoyed working in Temple City and have learned a great deal about the community. For one, I’ve learned that residents are very civically minded and active in driving innovative and forward-thinking ideas. To encourage that ongoing involvement with City Hall, we’re introducing the new “City Briefs” column (page 5) that highlights City Council actions from the past quarter. Hopefully, the feature will allow citizens to more easily tune in to what’s happening at City Council meetings, and encourage them to become even more engaged and informed on current affairs.

There’s always something new and interesting to discover, and as we head into summer, there are even more reasons to go out and re-explore Temple City.

As we all know, one hot topic of late revolves around water. After experiencing three of the driest winters on record, Governor Jerry Brown declared a drought emergency in California and urged residents to reduce water consumption by 20 percent. On page 9, “The Drought Situation” opens the conversation with local water companies to see what they’ve been doing to secure

Wendy Chung

WRITERS Steve Nathan Chelsea Pitcher

PHOTOGRAPHERS Omer Cetinkale Matthew Escobar Jerry Jambazian

TRANSLATOR Stella Yu

CONTRIBUTORS Kathleen Chou Amber Lee Sabina Li

the community’s future water supply. We also share some tips for residents on how to

DESIGN

participate in the conservation effort. From rebates for more water-efficient appliances,

Fuel Creative Group

to free conservation devices, saving water means saving cash. While very serious about civic issues, I’ve also found that Temple City residents are a fun-loving bunch. It’s a small town with quaint character, but the city also has much going on and offers a rich cultural experience through its diverse population and institutions. There’s always something new and interesting to discover, and as we head into summer, there are even more reasons to go out and re-explore Temple City.

CITY COUNCIL Carl Blum MAYOR

Tom Chavez MAYOR PRO TEM

Starting on page 13, find the entertainment guide packed with events and activities

Fernando Vizcarra

for all ages. If you haven’t already made travel plans, think about a “stay-cation”

COUNCILMEMBER

to enjoy local library programs, the City’s summer concerts and even the annual Camp-A-Palooza at Live Oak Park. If you’re really itching for a faraway vacation, we’ve included options for you to “go glocal” with a selection of international restaurants here in Temple City that allow you to eat your way around the globe, while still sticking around the neighborhood. So this summer, try to get out and explore your hometown. Temple City may be known as a quiet little suburb, but there’s definitely a lot more to it than meets the eye.

Don Penman Interim City Manager

4

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Summer 2014 www.templecity.us

Vincent Yu COUNCILMEMBER

Cynthia Sternquist COUNCILMEMBER

COVER PHOTO Summertime fun City of Temple City 9701 Las Tunas Dr. Temple City, CA 91780 ©2014 City of Temple City. All rights reserved. If you have questions or comments regarding our magazine, please email us at connect@templecity.us.


temple city

council highlights

CITY BRIEFS

Catch up on City Council actions from March 3 through May 20. City Council meetings are regularly held the first and third Tuesdays every month.

NEW MANAGEMENT

HISTORY THROUGH THE ARTS

Don Penman was hired to serve as Interim City Manager for a six-month period to oversee City operations and help coordinate the recruitment of a new full-time City Manager.

Artist Robin Brailsford’s new “Temple City Routes” artwalk along Rosemead Boulevard will soon be accompanied by mini online profiles curated by The Homestead Museum, to tell the community’s history prior to the Town of Temple’s 1923 establishment.

PASSING THE GAVEL

The gavel switched hands at the annual Council Reorganization on March 8, where Carl Blum was named Mayor, and Tom Chavez, Mayor Pro Tem. Councilmembers were also assigned voting roles and responsibilities for local governing boards.

LAS TUNAS DRIVE TRAFFIC STUDY

Kimley-Horn and Associates will conduct a traffic impact analysis to further investigate the potential effects of traffic lane reductions originally proposed for the Las Tunas Drive redesign. Findings will be presented to the Council in early fall.

SUPPORTING THE MARCH

To support Temple City High School’s march to the 2015 Tournament of Roses Parade, a $15,000 donation was approved to help with the band’s $125,000 fundraising goal for new instruments and uniforms. PLANNING THE CIVIC CENTER OF TOMORROW

The Council will continue discussions later this year with TCUSD and the County library, regarding a possible joint venture for a Civic Center redesign. An assessment survey for City Hall is underway to determine whether upgrading or consolidating the buildings might yield greater long-term cost savings and operational efficiencies.

BUILDING STREETS FOR EVERYONE

NEW LIFE FOR FORMER FUNERAL HOME

The Safe Routes to School and Bicycle Master Plan implementation projects are underway. The City is soliciting bids from contractors to install 12.6 miles of new bike facilities around town, as well as pedestrian safety enhancements near nine local school campuses. School zone improvements are scheduled to be completed over the summer.

Following the City’s recent acquisition of the former Temple City Funeral Home, architectural surveys will be conducted to recommend appropriate reuse options for the site like public parking, park space or mixed-use development. The analysis will be completed this summer.

REGULATING DAY SPAS

The Arts Annual Plan for the coming fiscal year includes completion of Rosemead Boulevard public art installations, development of funding strategies, and talks of a rotating mural program at Temple City Library.

NEW ART COMING SOON

With the proliferation of massage establishments across the region, a new regulatory ordinance was passed to prevent overconcentration in Temple City. Development of a more comprehensive massage and “Day Spa” ordinance is underway.

LEARN MORE For complete staff reports, visit the Public Meetings page at www.templecity.us.

PLANNING FOR MORE PARKS A newly adopted Parks and Open Space Master Plan sets a 20-year vision for the City’s recreational facilities, identifying opportunities and strategies for acquiring parkland and trails.

Temple City Connect

5


temple city

snapshots

IF FANTASTIC WEATHER AND SUNSHINE WEREN’T REASON ENOUGH, TEMPLE CITY’S SPRINGTIME EVENTS AND ACTIVITIES DREW COMMUNITY MEMBERS OUTDOORS TO ENJOY NATURE, RECREATION AND A NEWLY REOPENED ROSEMEAD BOULEVARD.

1 ARBOR DAY On March 12, students gathered at Live Oak Park for the City’s annual Arbor Day celebration, featuring interactive activities, cherry picker rides, and tree plantings aimed at increasing tree education and appreciation among Temple City’s youth. 2

YOUTH SPORTS FESTIVAL

Little ones made a beeline for Live Oak Park on April 26 for the ultimate playtime. Highlights included recreation games, sports demonstrations and exciting jumpers to kickstart young residents toward active, healthy lifestyles. 3 ROSEMEAD BOULEVARD GO FESTIVAL

Highway makeovers don’t happen every day, so it’s no surprise the community came out in full force on May 10 to celebrate Rosemead Boulevard’s grand opening. Families enjoyed live entertainment, exhibitors, raffles and kids’ activities. Walking and biking tours also showed off the project’s new features.

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Summer 2014 www.templecity.us

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Temple City Connect

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temple city

city calendar

CITY CALENDAR FOR DETAILS, CALL (626) 285-2171.

Summer 2014

JUNE 12 Registration begins for summer classes (page 20) Neighborhood Watch Meeting: Area 6 13 Father’s Day Game Night

JUNE

13

JUNE

FATHER’S DAY GAME NIGHT 6:30-9:30 p.m., Live Oak Park Celebrate dad with pizza and chicken wings, inflatable obstacles, a pool tournament, trivia and card games. Fee is $5 per person. Pre-register by calling (626) 285-2171, ext. 2360.

Alooo-ha seniors! Put on your Hawaiian dresses and shirts and join us for an evening of entertainment, food and fun. Enjoy a delicious barbecue dinner and exciting Polynesian entertainment sets. Tickets are $10 per person. Must be 60 years and up to participate. Pre-register by calling (626) 579-0461.

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EVERY SUNDAY

JULY

30

RELAY FOR LIFE

19 Senior Luau

Join the communitywide fight against cancer. The 24-hour walkathon at Temple City High honors loved ones lost to disease, and raises awareness and funds for cancer research and prevention. To donate or learn more about how you can get involved, visit www.relayforlife.org/templecityca.

23 Summer Basketball, STARS Club, Teen Zone, Mini Sports Camp begin (pages 24, 25)

BEATS & EATS 5:30-9 p.m., Temple City Park

Food truck madness hits Temple City Park once again! Arrive early to pick up a supper picnic before the Country show begins with Brian Lynn Jones & The Misfit Cowboys. Scheduled truck appearances include Rice Balls of Fire, Chancho’s Tacos, Austyn’s Burgers, Slammin’ Sliders, Paradise Cookies & Ice Cream, and Waflt Truck.

6:30-8:30 p.m., Temple City Park Take your dogs and cats for a night out on the town! The Annual Rabies Clinic features low-cost vaccinations at $5 per pet and microchipping at a resident rate of $15 per pet. Dog licensing services will also be offered. All dogs and cats must be on leashes or in carrier boxes.

Every Sunday, 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m., City Hall Get stocked for the week with fresh, seasonal and regionally sourced produce.

JULY 2 Summer Concert: Independence Day Celebration with Wartime Radio Revue 4 Independence Day (City offices closed) 7 Summer classes begin 9 Summer Concert: Phat Cat Swinger 10 Neighborhood Watch Meeting: Area 7 11 Rabies Clinic 16 Summer Concert: Tommy Tassi & The Authentics 23 Summer Concert: Captain Cardiac & The Coronaries Relay for Life 26-27 30 Summer Concert: “Beats & Eats” with Brian Lynn Jones & The Misfit Cowboys

AUGUST JULY

18 to 19

CAMP-A-PALOOZA

1 Registration begins for fall Mini T-Ball, Intro to Hardball (page 24)

Overnight, Live Oak Park

6 Neighborhood Watch Meeting: Area 8

Bring your family to a night at the carnival! This year’s Camp-A-Palooza features giant slides, carnival games and crafts, and sideshows that will delight family members of all ages! $60 per family includes a 20' x 20' camp space, entertainment, dinner and continental breakfast. Register now at Live Oak Park Community Center, or call (626) 579-0461 for more information.

AUG

NATIONAL NIGHT OUT

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6 p.m., Temple City Park

Farm Fresh Food

FARMER’S MARKET

25 Summer Concert: Tom Nolan Band

Camp-A-Palooza (page 19) 18-19

6 p.m., Temple City Park

RABIES CLINIC

18 Summer Concert: The Wise Guys

9 a.m., Temple City High School

INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION Suit up in your stars and stripes and celebrate with us at the biggest Fourth of July party in Temple City! Enter the Patriotic Picnic Contest, or sit back and enjoy a throwback World War II USO show by Wartime Radio Revue. Free hotdogs will be served on a first-come, first-serve basis while supplies last.

JULY

26

SENIOR LUAU 4:30-7:30 p.m., Live Oak Park

JULY

JULY

AUG

23

Summer Concert: The Answer National Night Out 13 Summer Concert: The Catillacs 18 Registration begins for Fall STARS Club, Teen Zone, TC Super STARS Cheer (page 25) 20 Summer Concert: Raymond Michael 23 Pass, Punt & Kick Contest (page 24) 25 Mini T-Ball, Intro to Hardball begin (page 24)

Get together with your public safety team for a fun night of live music, food, crafts and exciting displays of law enforcement gadgets and gear!

27 Summer Concert: Fortunate Son

PASS, PUNT & KICK

1 Labor Day (City offices closed)

10 a.m., Live Oak Park Does your kid dream of making the NFL draft? Boys and girls ages 6-15 compete in football skills to advance through various levels of competition. Proven athletes may land a chance to represent a pro team at the 2014 National Championships! Registration is taken on the day of the event.

SEPTEMBER Registration begins for Flag Football, Volleyball 4 Registration begins for fall classes 8 Fall STARS Club, Teen Zone begin Elementary Flag Football practice begins 11 Neighborhood Watch Meeting: Area 9

STAY CONNECTED Get updates on City events @ConnectwithTC facebook.com/ConnectwithTC

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Summer 2014 www.templecity.us


temple city

feature

THE DROUGHT SITUATION

With the governor’s recent drought declaration, Temple City residents and water agencies are responding to the issue of water scarcity through heightened conservation efforts. BY STEVE NATHAN

Temple City Connect

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ALTHOUGH OUR STATE IS DEFINED BY AN 850-MILE COASTLINE, CALIFORNIANS HAVE ALWAYS HAD AN UNEASY RELATIONSHIP WITH WATER. NOW IN THE MIDST OF A SERIOUS STATEWIDE DROUGHT, WE ARE FACED WITH THE REALITY THAT FRESH WATER, LIKE OTHER COMMODITIES, IS A LIMITED RESOURCE. FROM FARMERS WHOSE LIVELIHOODS DEPEND ON ITS ABUNDANCE, TO URBAN RESIDENTS WHO DEMAND CONVENIENT, UNINTERRUPTED SUPPLIES, EVERYBODY IS URGED TO REEVALUATE THEIR NEEDS AND CONSERVE. STRAIGHT FROM THE SOURCE

Unlike some municipalities that operate their own water services or contract with a single provider, Temple City is served by five different companies that connect residents to fresh water sources. According to Shane Chapman, General Manager of the Upper San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District (Upper District), the state of affairs in Temple City is a remnant condition of an industry that’s been historically fragmented, but is recently experiencing consolidation due to escalating infrastructure replacement costs. As a wholesale entity, the Upper District supplies water to Temple City agencies including California American Water Company, East Pasadena Water Company, Golden State Water Company, San Gabriel County Water District and Sunny Slope Water Company. One of the city’s larger providers in terms of customers served is Pasadena-based Sunny Slope Water Company. Expanding on the mission of providing clean water, Sunny Slope General Manager Ken Tcheng notes that even though 70 percent of the earth’s surface is covered in water, less than one percent of that amount is available for drinking. In California, where recent dry spells have further exacerbated the scarcity issue, conservation and resource management have become paramount to ensuring continued access to clean water supplies. While there is no single source of water that serves all of California, many urban residents in the state rely on a combination of imported water from reservoirs in Northern California and the Colorado River as well as local underground water. Temple City is fortunate that about 75 percent of its supply 10

Summer 2014 www.templecity.us

is pumped locally from underground aquifers in the San Gabriel Valley, and the community is not dependent on more expensive imported supplies, which in the drought have been drying up to critical levels. Lawrence Morales, Vice President and General Manager of East Pasadena Water Company, reports that his agency pumps 100 percent of its water from local aquifers. Agreeing that local water “is always a good thing,” Water Resources Manager and Chief Hydrogeologist Toby Moore of San Dimasbased Golden State Water Company notes some benefits and key issues pertaining to groundwater. Sourced regionally, it tends to be the more cost-efficient option. Also because local basins are protected and actively managed per court order, local water is a more sustainable resource. Unlike some of the basins in California’s Central Valley, which farmers are depleting faster than they can be replenished, the San Gabriel

Valley aquifers are limited each year to a predetermined safe yield. Nonetheless, Moore notes, a prolonged drought could severely test our supply. Also, although aquifer water is not associated with extensive transport, it still implicates treatment costs. Due to high mineral content and industrial activity in urban areas, groundwater sometimes needs to be treated for “hard water,” industrial solvents or nitrites from fertilizers. Moore also notes that in other communities, industry professionals have started looking into how water supplies may be affected by “fracking”—the controversial process of extracting oil or natural gas through hydraulic fracturing. And though he is not currently aware of any such operations in the San Gabriel Valley, Moore assures that local water providers go to great lengths to provide a reliable water source. UNDERSTANDING WATER RATES

Much has been written about the current California drought, which finished its third year with one of the driest winters on record. “This is extremely serious,” says Chapman, who notes that the region received only 4.4 inches of rainfall last winter, compared to an average annual rainfall of 18.5 inches, and only about 23 inches of rain over the past three winters combined. “Just to get back to normal, or at least average rainfall conditions in the San Gabriel Valley, it would have to rain over 33 inches today,” he says. Locally, conservation and resource management efforts like water recycling have helped providers cope with drought conditions, and Chapman says these practices will continue to be vital for the future. Even as weather forecasters are predicting a wet El Niño winter at the end of this year, industry professionals quickly point out that it would be a mistake to assume that a single rainy event will fully solve the state’s water supply issues. As Chapman elaborates, while the weather is one major component, the discussion of water supply also involves growing population numbers and infrastructure costs. For customers, it is helpful to understand how rates are determined. As Morales notes,


SUNNY SLOPE WATER COMPANY 1040 El Campo Drive Pasadena, CA 91107

EAST PASADENA WATER COMPANY

(626) 287-5238 www.sunnyslopewatercompany.com

3725 Mountain View Pasadena, CA 91107 (626) 793-6189 www.epwater.com

GOLDEN STATE WATER COMPANY 110 E. Live Oak Ave. Arcadia, CA 91106 (626) 446-1374 www.gswater.com T E M P L E C IT Y B LV D.

R O S E M E A D B LV D.

UNA LAS T

S DR.

BALD WIN AV E .

even if the drought doesn’t persist and consumers embrace conservation efforts, water rates will most likely continue to rise, given population pressures to produce more water, the rising costs of infrastructure maintenance and water treatment, and other associated expenses such as staffing and personnel. Even new programs and measures implemented to address the drought may contribute to higher rates. So why conserve? Without any proactive efforts, Moore explains, rates would likely accelerate at an even faster pace, as water companies scramble to open new lines and create new water sources, which can be prohibitively expensive. “You’ve got to meet your demand one way or another, whether it’s through a new source of supply, or by reducing demand.” Reinforcing Moore’s point, Chapman explains that 70 to 80 percent of a water provider’s costs are fixed, and do not change as the amount of water delivered changes. “Water rates continue to go up because of the costs of replacing worn-out infrastructure, increasingly stringent drinking water quality regulations, and scarcity of supply in the imported water system,” he says. As a result, a household’s water bill tends to increase faster than the rate of inflation, but conservation efforts actually slow that rate of increase because they save the company from having to develop a new source. “Water conservation is the least expensive option to improve supply reliability. By using less water, we don’t have to develop new expensive supplies,” Chapman explains, citing the costs of digging new wells or importing water from the Colorado River. And there is considerable data suggesting that our newfound conservation consciousness has already paid dividends. Between 1990 and 2010, the population of Southern California increased by three million people—equivalent to the entire city of Chicago—yet total water usage remained flat. Had conservation efforts not been implemented, water bills throughout the region, including Temple City, would be much higher than they are now. As the state’s population and demand for water continue to grow, the availability of water will not. Furthermore, the costs

CALIFORNIA AMERICAN WATER 8657 Grand Ave. Rosemead, CA 91770

SAN GABRIEL COUNTY WATER DISTRICT

(888) 237-1333 www.californiaamwater.com

8366 Grand Ave., Rosemead, CA 91770 (626) 287-0341 www.sgcwd.com

THE WATER TABLE Take advantage of these rebates and offers from your water agency. For details, visit the company’s website or call the phone numbers above. Rebates marked with a below are offered through the Upper San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District. Visit www.upperdistrict.org or www.socalwatersmart.com. SPECIAL OFFERS

COMPANIES

Free water-saving devices

Rebates for landscape conversion

Rebates for appliance replacements

Education resources and programs

Temple City Connect

11


planted on Rosemead Boulevard. Eventually, the plan is to also to modernize irrigation systems in the medians—some of which are up to 40 years old. The systems at the City’s two parks are newer and more water-efficient in helping City Hall maintain aesthetically pleasing green space. Burroughs also reports that some water-wasting practices that were taken for granted years ago, such as regularly hosing off tennis courts, have been discontinued. “Our water bill is pretty big and we’re doing everything we can to reduce it, but at the same time meet the public expectations for recreational and open space,” says Burroughs of her difficult balancing act.

VERY SIMPLE ACTIONS TAKEN AT THE INDIVIDUAL LEVEL CAN YIELD MAJOR SAVINGS—ESPECIALLY WHEN MULTIPLIED BY THOUSANDS AND MILLIONS OF HOUSEHOLDS. associated with developing new sources of water and maintaining existing infrastructure are enormously expensive and increasing. Because these costs are ultimately borne by consumers, adopting water-efficient habits is something that should be a priority regardless of weather patterns or climate changes. Morales believes consumers have generally been responsive to appeals to cut water consumption. Still, East Pasadena Water Company and Temple City’s other water agencies are committed to continued education and outreach, distributing free conservation kits to customers, enclosing valuable tips in water bills, and offering other incentives such as subsidizing water-efficient irrigation systems. CONSERVING TOGETHER

Trying to lead by example, some water companies have instituted water-saving

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Summer 2014 www.templecity.us

practices at their facilities, such as converting lawns to drought-friendly landscaping. City Hall is also looking into its water usage practices and later this year, will decide whether to establish reduction goals. Already, toilets at all public facilities have been switched out for more efficient lowflow devices, and waterless urinals have been installed. The dilemma, according to Parks and Recreation Director Cathy Burroughs, is balancing conservation efforts with public expectations at City parks. Residents naturally prefer their parks to have lush green grass and colorful flowers, both of which demand substantial amounts of water. “We’re constantly inspecting our irrigation systems for leaks, and water only at night,” reports Burroughs. Her staff is also gradually converting medians on Temple City streets to droughtresistant landscaping, like that recently

EMERGENCY OR OPPORTUNITY?

At this time, because local resources are being used at sustainable levels, water companies are focusing efforts on education outreach and encouraging voluntary cutbacks by offering special rebates and offers. While legislators debate new technologies and billion-dollar public works projects, citizens are learning that very simple actions taken at the individual level can yield major savings— especially when multiplied by thousands and millions of households. For instance, simply turning off the faucet while brushing one’s teeth can save 10 gallons per day; fixing a leaky toilet can save as many as 50 gallons per day; and washing only full loads of clothing can save as many as 45 gallons per load. With Governor Brown urging Californians to step up during the drought and reduce water consumption by 20 percent, residents making the effort are recognizing that the job can be easily done and does not necessarily involve major lifestyle compromises. GET WATER-SMART For tips on how to conserve, visit www.saveourh20.org. To learn more details about rebates and special offers, contact your water company.


temple city

feature JULY 18–19

Camp-a-Palooza

REDISCOVER Temple City Have a stay-cation this summer and explore parts unknown in your hometown. Rediscover Temple City through community events, arts and culture, nature and diverse restaurant offerings. EVENTS ARE FREE UNLESS NOTED. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL (626) 285-2171.

JUNE

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FATHER’S DAY GAME NIGHT 6:30-9:30 p.m., Live Oak Park, $5 per person Fathers and children of all ages, come enjoy family fun night with pizza and chicken wings, inflatable obstacles, a pool tournament, trivia and card games.

JUNE

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JUNE

14 to 23

SOAP MAKING WORKSHOP

BIG BAND DANCE 6 p.m., Embassy Suites in Arcadia, $35 per person Enjoy a spectacular night of dinner and dancing featuring live music by the Pride of Temple City’s Green and Gold Jazz Bands! Proceeds will help students reach their fundraising goal for participating in the 2015 Tournament of Roses Parade. For more information, call (626) 548-5040.

Times vary, Live Oak Park

JUNE

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The cream of the crop from 10 local Little Leagues come together to determine who is the best in the region. Come out to cheer on your Temple City American and Temple City National players while enjoying great summertime weather, baseball and some friendly competition. For more information, visit www.leaguelineup.com/tcall or www.leaguelineup.com/tcnll. JUNE

2 p.m., Temple City Library Get in on some good, clean fun by making your own monogram soap. For adults.

LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL TOURNAMENT OF CHAMPIONS

JUNE

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JOE GANDELMAN & FRIENDS 10:30 a.m., Temple City Library Comic ventriloquist Joe Gandelman kicks off this year’s summer reading program by introducing a madcap cast of dummies and puppets that will delight and surprise your preschooler. For ages 4-6.

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SENIOR LUAU 4:30-7:30 p.m., Live Oak Park, $10 per person Aloha seniors! Join us for an evening of entertainment and fun. Enjoy a delicious dinner including barbecue pork ribs, potato salad and more. Exciting Polynesian entertainment sets the mood and guests are encouraged to go with the flow wearing their favorite Hawaiian dress or shirt. Pre-registration is required. For ages 60 and up. For more information, call (626) 579-0461.

OUTDOOR SURVIVAL SKILLS WORKSHOP 2 p.m., Temple City Library Learn outdoor skills and wilderness survival. For ages 12-18. JUNE 14–23

Tournament of Champions

SUMMER CONCERT: THE WISE GUYS 7 p.m., Temple City Park For 21 years, The Wise Guys have entertained crowds with its talented vocalists, exciting soloists, screamin’ horn line and roarin’ rhythm section. Sit back for an evening of nostalgia as this 18-piece ensemble kicks off this year’s Summer Concerts series in grand fashion by bringing back the Age of the Big Band.

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JULY 2

Independence Day Celebration

JUNE

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25

MAKE YOUR OWN HANDPRINTS

JULY

2

2 p.m., Temple City Library

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3 p.m., Los Angeles County Arboretum and Botanic Garden, $25 per Arboretum member/$30 per general adult

6 p.m., Temple City Park Celebrate Independence Day with a throwback World War II USO show! Early birds get free hotdogs, and don’t forget your stars and stripes for our second Patriotic Picnic Contest! JULY

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SUMMER CONCERT: TOM NOLAN BAND

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8 a.m., City Hall Community Room Temple City’s Relay for Life continues its mission to stomp out cancer—this time taking to the streets to “Paint the Town Purple!” Join volunteers in placing purple ribbons around street trees to raise community awareness for cancer research and prevention. For more information, call (626) 422-4503.

2 p.m., Temple City Library

JULY

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Summer 2014 www.templecity.us

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BILINGUAL ENGLISH/ CHINESE STORYTIME Every Tuesday, 10:30 am, Temple City Library Come and enjoy a variety of stories, poems, songs, finger-plays and more presented in Mandarin Chinese and English. Children and participants of all language levels are welcome to practice their Chinese language skills in a fun and safe environment.

6:30-8:30 p.m., Temple City Park Brush up on the rules of pet-ownership in Temple City and take advantage of this once-a-year event for dog licensing, vaccinations and microchipping—all on one straight shot. Low-cost vaccinations are available for $5 per pet, and microchipping at a resident rate of $15. For more information, call (626) 285-2171.

JEWELRY-MAKING WORKSHOP 2 p.m., Temple City Library Make a fun bracelet you can wear all summer long! For teens and adults.

SUMMER CONCERT: TOMMY TASSI & THE AUTHENTICS 7 p.m., Temple City Park

PAWS TO READ, PAWS TO SLUMBER STUFFED-ANIMAL SLEEPOVER Overnight, Temple City Library Drop off your favorite stuffed animal friend for a fun night at the library. At pick-up the next day, you will receive special souvenir pictures from the party. For ages 3-11.

4 p.m., Temple City Library Root beer is a mysterious thing. Come blind taste different brands of root beer, and help us find the one that’ll hit the spot! For ages 12-18.

ANNUAL RABIES CLINIC

Rock around the clock with Summer Concerts favorite Tommy Tassi & The Authentics as they return with more ’50s and ’60s rock and roll hits.

ROOT BEER TASTING

Balloons, magic, puppetry and juggling all in one show! Arty Loon’s hilarious antics will entertain your child and familiarize them with various forms of performance art. For ages 6-11.

FOR UP-TO-THE-MINUTE EVENTS THROUGHOUT TEMPLE CITY, VISIT WWW.TEMPLECITY.US.

JULY

Temple City goes Vegas-style with Phat Cat Swinger’s roaring horn lines, booming toms and jumpin’ rhythms—all brought together by the crooning vocals of Douglas Roegiers.

11 a.m., Temple City Library

all summer long!

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7 p.m., Temple City Park

ARTY LOON VARIETY SHOW

ONGOING

JULY

SUMMER CONCERT: PHAT CAT SWINGER

7 p.m., Temple City Park

PAINT THE TOWN PURPLE

ANIMAL ART: ANIMAL PRINT DUCT TAPE LANYARDS Make absolutely fabulous duct tape lanyards for your keys, photo ID or library card. For ages 7-11.

One word sums up this band’s mission: “Dance!” With a world-class rhythm section, and great singers and soloists, the Tom Nolan Band lights up the stage playing a mix of originals and classic tunes ranging from soul and blues, to jazz and R&B. JUNE

Kids are invited to make their own Plaster of Paris handprint keepsake. All materials will be provided. For ages 5-11.

SUMMER CONCERT: INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION WITH WARTIME RADIO REVUE

22ND FAMILY MUSIC FESTIVAL

The Beach Boys come to the ’burbs for this family-favorite music festival presented by County Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich, the Los Angeles County Department of Parks and Recreation, and the Los Angeles Arboretum Foundation. Gates open at 3 p.m., with the concert starting at 5:30 p.m. on Bauer Lawn. All tickets are for lawn seating, and may be purchased at www.pasadenasymphony-pops.org. JUNE

JULY

JULY

18 to 19

CAMP-A-PALOOZA: NIGHT AT THE CARNIVAL Overnight, Live Oak Park Temple City’s unique family campout experience returns with a “Night at the Carnival!” Enjoy carnival games, extreme slides, arts and crafts, live sideshows, marionette theater and more. Cost includes a 20' x 20' camp space, dinner and continental breakfast. Camp setup begins Friday at 2:30 p.m., with the carnival beginning at 3 p.m. For more information, call (626) 579-0461.

NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH First Wednesday, 5:30 p.m., various locations Join your neighbors and public safety personnel to learn tips on crime prevention, home security and emergency preparation. Dinner and childcare provided. Find the next meeting for your Watch Area at www.templecity.us.

BABY & TODDLER STORYTIME Every Wednesday, 10 and 11 a.m., Temple City Library Bring your babies and toddlers for back-to-back storytime featuring rhymes, songs, fingerplays, stories and movement. Ages four to 18 months, 10 a.m.; 18 months to three years, 11 a.m. There is no storytime on June 18.


JULY

19

BATH SALTS & FIZZIES 2 p.m., Temple City Library Learn to make bath salt sachet bags and fizzies. Great for gift giving! For adults.

TEMPLE CITY KIWANIS CLUB 46TH ANNUAL BARBUCUE 6 p.m., Oak Avenue Intermediate School, $20 per adult/$7.50 per child Temple City Kiwanis is celebrating 75 years of service to the community with a hoedown! Bring your family and friends to enjoy a delicious barbecue dinner, and learn how you can join the club and help out in the community. JULY

23

Stop & Smell the Roses BY WENDY CHUNG

UNPLUG THIS SUMMER AND ENJOY YOUR NATURAL SURROUNDINGS. EXPLORE THE CITY’S PARKS AND SEE IF YOU CAN IDENTIFY THESE TREES AND FLOWERS.

Summer Shade

While blooms from beautiful pink and golden trumpet and purple jacaranda trees added color in spring, the dense leafy foliage of canopy trees provides cooling shade from the blazing summer sun. City Arborist Rob Cruse highlights his favorites.

ANIMAL ART: CRAFT STICK BIRD FEEDERS 2 p.m., Temple City Library Use sticks to build a bird feeder. For ages 5-11.

JULY

23

SUMMER CONCERT: CAPTAIN CARDIAC & THE CORONARIES 7 p.m., Temple City Park A newcomer last year, Captain Cardiac & the Coronaries excited the crowd with an energetic “blast into the past.” The group makes a much-anticipated return to the Performing Arts Pavilion, partying it up with more old-time rock and roll.

CAMPHOR At maturity,

FICUS Las Tunas Drive

camphors are large specimens that provide a lot of shade coverage. “We put it out on the field at Live Oak Park so the soccer players and other athletes can take breaks underneath.” Spot this tree by their distinctive black berries.

is one street you’ll find the ficus. These trees line the sidewalks and their dense growth can be an excellent source of shade.

RED OAK Another tree that stays leafy in the summer is the red oak. Identify it by its leaves which have a distinctive pointy shape. Come fall, look for these trees to change color.

Bursts of Color

Find these sun-loving summer blooms in trees around town and flower beds at Temple City and Live Oak parks.

CRAPE MYRTLE

MARIGOLD

These trees stand out by their sinewy branches which in summer become densely covered in bundles of bright pink flowers. See two of them flanking the Performing Arts Pavilion during Summer Concerts at Temple City Park.

Find these globular orange and yellow flowers in the planters at both Temple City and Live Oak parks all summer long, adding a bright, vibrant pop of color.

GOLD MEDALLION These trees make the Southern California desert look strangely tropical in the summer, when they bloom spectacular clusters of yellow flowers.

AGAPANTHUS Also known as the African lily, agapanthus are the recognizable by their long green stems with heads of tubular bell-shaped purple flowers.

SUMMER ROSES PETUNIA These

SUMMER BEACH BUS June 11-Sept. 1, bus departs at 9:30 a.m. from Pamela Park (2236 Goodall Ave., Duarte), $3 general/$1.50 senior or persons with disabilities The Summer Beach Bus sponsored by County Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich takes residents straight to Santa Monica Beach for a day of surf and sand. Buses run Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays from Pamela Park in Duarte, departing at 9:30 a.m. and returning at approximately 4:40 p.m.

small little flowers pack a punch coming in shades of purples, corals, whites and magentas.

Find iceberg and tree roses adding a touch of delicate color to the planters of the City’s parks.

Temple City Connect

15


temple city

feature

Take a Hike BY CHELSEA PITCHER

JULY

24 and 25

HEAD OUT AND DISCOVER TEMPLE CITY’S LATEST ART ADDITIONS! TRAVEL ON “TEMPLE CITY ROUTES,” A SERIES OF 24 MOSAIC PAVERS AND POETIC TEXT ILLUSTRATING LOCAL HISTORY FROM THE 1600S-1920S, AND SHAKE HANDS WITH RED CAR WOMAN OR RED CAR MAN, COMMEMORATING THE ORIGINAL RAIL LINE THAT RAN DOWN LAS TUNAS DRIVE. FIND THESE ARTWORKS AND MORE ON ROSEMEAD BOULEVARD! JULY

26

ROBIN BRAILSFORD, TEMPLE CITY ROUTES

DANIEL STERN, RED CAR WOMAN

Thomas Temple, known for discovering the oil that restored the Temple family’s fortune, is recreated wearing traditional clothing that honors his dual Mexican-American heritage.

This bronze woman enthusiastically stretches out her hand to assist others onto a Red Car trolley heading towards Temple City’s future. She represents the people who seek ways to give back to the community.

JULY

26 and 27 JULY

30

SUMMER MUSICAL: DISNEY’S PETER PAN, JR. Temple City High School, time and ticket cost TBA Five weeks of dedication, preparation and rehearsals will lead up to the big production for the young actors of Temple City High’s theater camp! Watch as students grades two through nine light up the stage with a performance of Disney’s Peter Pan Jr. Time and ticketing information to be announced. For more information, contact the Performing Arts Department at (626) 548-5053.

EXPLORE THE ARTIST IN YOU 2 p.m., Temple City Library Have fun and create your very own artwork! For adults.

RELAY FOR LIFE 9 a.m.-9 a.m., Temple City High Join the community in coming together to raise funds and awareness for cancer research and prevention. Learn how to donate or participate at www.relayforlife.org/templecityca.

ANIMAL ART: BEADED ANIMAL CHARMS 2 p.m., Temple City Library Make a beaded animal friend to hang off your backpack, on a keychain, or in your room. For ages 7-11.

JULY

ROBIN BRAILSFORD, TEMPLE CITY ROUTES

DANIEL STERN, RED CAR MAN

In this tiled scene, Spanish Franciscan missionaries inhabit native Kizh lands for the Mission San Gabriel of which Temple City was once part.

Sporting hat and tie, this roughly 650 pound bronze man is jumping onto the Red Car trolley headed towards the future, knowing it is a train he doesn’t want to miss.

31

APRON PAINTING 4 p.m., Temple City Library Have fun and transform a plain apron into a work of art. For ages 12-18.

COMING SOON These directory monuments are a blank canvas now, but come winter they’ll be covered with intricate mosaic murals by Carole Choucair Oueijan paying tribute to Temple City’s landmarks and well-known amenities.

Scan and learn more about this growing collection using an online public art map, or visit www.goo.gl/maps/3c9V7.

16

Summer 2014 www.templecity.us

SUPPORT OUR TROOPS Every Wednesday during Summer Concerts, Temple City Park Give our troops serving overseas a piece of home. Visit the Blue Star Program at the Summer Concerts to write a letter to our brave men and women in the armed forces. Snacks are also for sale with proceeds benefiting veteran programs.

BOOK A LIBRARIAN: BASIC COMPUTER SKILLS First Thursday except Aug. 7, 10 a.m., Temple City Library Learn basic computer skills with one-on-one computer instruction. For adults.

all sum


JULY

30

SUMMER CONCERT: BEATS & EATS WITH BRIAN LYNN JONES & THE MISFIT COWBOYS 5:30-9 p.m., Temple City Park AUG

Throw on your cowboy hats as first-time Concerts performers Brian Lynn Jones & The Misfit Cowboys delivers their original, self-described “Rock’n’Tonk” sound. Arrive early for a supper on the go from food trucks Rice Balls of Fire, Chancho’s Tacos, Austyn’s Burgers, Slammin’ Sliders, Paradise Cookies & Ice Cream and Wafl Truck.

20

TIGER BINGO 2 p.m., Temple City Library Drop in for a round of bingo with a special animal theme. For ages 7-11.

SUMMER CONCERT: RAYMOND MICHAEL 7 p.m., Temple City Park

AUG

6

ANIMAL ART: PAPER PLATE ANIMAL MASKS 2 p.m., Temple City Library

AUG

9

Transform yourself into an animal of your choice using simple art materials. For ages 5-11.

NATIONAL NIGHT OUT 6 p.m., Temple City Park

AUG

13

The sheriffs are coming out in full force to meet and greet! Visit a showcase of gadgets and gizmos to learn how officers keep Temple City safe— and definitely don’t miss the free food, raffles, giveaways and children’s activities!

SUMMER CONCERT: THE ANSWER

CLOTHESPIN PHOTO HOLDERS 2 p.m., Temple City Library Make a clothespin photo holder to keep for yourself or give as a gift to someone special. For teens and adults.

AUG

23

ANIMAL ART: CRITTER COLLAGE 2 p.m., Temple City Library Create a fantastic animal using magazine scraps. For ages 3-11. AUG

SUMMER CONCERT: THE CATILLACS

A Summer Concerts favorite returns to light up the Performing Arts Pavilion once again. Join us for an evening of electrifying All-American classic rock!

SENIOR BINGO

FAMILY PLACE PLAYTIME

Last Thursday, 1-3 p.m., Live Oak Park Community Center

Every Friday starting July 11, 9:30 a.m., Temple City Library

27

Children up to age 3 and their caregivers are invited to a drop in play date at the library! Developmentally appropriate toys and books will be provided.

mmer long…

It’s always a mixed bag with The Catillacs! Welcome the band as they make their Summer Concerts debut playing a variety of rock, soul and ballads spanning the ’50s to ’90s.

NEIGHBORHOOD PRODUCE EXCHANGE Every last Saturday, 11 a.m., Temple City Library Do you grow extra vegetables and fruits in your garden? Come to the library to share the food with others! For adults.

GOODBYE SUMMER! ICE CREAM SOCIAL 11 a.m., Temple City Library Enjoy a festive ice cream social to celebrate the end of this year’s summer reading program. For ages 3-11.

7 p.m., Temple City Park

7 p.m., Temple City Park

Studies show that bingo can help enhance memory skills and improve concentration. Play free for a chance to win great prizes!

Concerts favorite Raymond Michael returns donning his iconic bell bottoms, cape and sideburns as the King of Rock and Roll. Watch him light up the stage with hits spanning “Hound Dog” to “Viva Las Vegas!”

SUMMER CONCERT: FORTUNATE SON 7 p.m., Temple City Park Fortunate Son makes its first appearance at the Performing Arts Pavilion with a tribute to John Fogerty and Creedence Clearwater Revival.

FARMER’S MARKET Every Sunday, 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m., City Hall Stock up for the week on seasonal, local produce and flowers, and fresh baked goods.

TEMPLE CITY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM First and third Sundays, noon to 3 p.m., summer hours on July 6 only, Woman’s Club (5954 Kauffman Ave.) The past comes alive at the Historical Society Museum. Flip through old Temple City High yearbooks, see vintage Red Car photos from the 1920s, and find relics from years gone by. Temple City Connect

17


5 H IG H S C H O O L

3

6

TEMPLE CITY BLVD

LAS TUNAS DR 4

2

You don’t need to spend a fortune to eat your way around the world—explore the eclectic mix of international restaurants right here in Temple City! This summer, take your taste buds on a global adventure,

1

ROSE M E A D B L V D

7

while supporting local business. BY SABINA LI

C ITY HALL

9

8

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Vietnam

Thailand

Taiwan

Indonesia

England

Japan

Mexico

Italy

China

9664 Las Tunas Dr., (626) 285-2899

9426 Las Tunas Dr., (626) 286-7795

9202 Las Tunas Dr., (626) 292-3888

5818 Temple City Blvd., 9578 Lower Azusa Rd., (626) 286-8763 (626) 444-0374

Feast on fresh spring rolls and a piping hot bowl of pho filled with your choice of additions! The extensive menu at Golden Deli has something for everyone.

With free delivery on orders over $15, Eden Thai is the perfect place to order a quick, easy and flavorful meal.

Soaked in a wonderfully seasoned broth, noodles from Ajisen Ramen make a delicious and hearty meal. Try their most popular dish, the Barbecue Pork Noodles.

Satisfy the grumble in your stomach with tacos, enmoladas, and burritos the size of a small child! Receive 15 percent off when you bring in this issue of Connect Magazine.

GOLDEN DELI

18

EDEN THAI CUISINE

DAI HO RESTAURANT 9148 Las Tunas Dr., (626) 291-2295

Dai Ho’s delicious Dan Dan Noodles and Beef Noodle Soup has gained a large following across L.A., having been featured on KCET’s food blog and reviewed by food critic Jonathan Gold.

Summer 2014 www.templecity.us

BANANA LEAF

H SALT FISH 5835 Temple City Blvd., & CHIPS (626) 309-0209

Never had Indonesian food? Banana Leaf is the perfect place to get a taste of what you have been missing! Their Nasi Padang and Sate Babi are highly recommended.

6326 Rosemead Blvd., (626) 286-2315

Fun Fact: chips in England are actually fries in the United States! Come try a traditional English fry-up of fish and chips.

AJISEN RAMEN

EL RUIZENOR GRILL PIZZA CART

Buon appetito! Enjoy home-style Italian favorites like creamy pastas and antipasto, as well as All-American staples like barbecue ribs, wings and potato salads. Then, of course, there’s the pizza!

HOUSE OF MANDARIN NOODLE 4819A Temple City Blvd., (626) 286-1689

With an extensive menu of Chinese dishes, this restaurant has been praised for its authenticity and prices. Stop by and give the green onion pancakes or beef pancake rolls a try.


CAMP-A-PALOOZA PRE SENTS

NIGHT AT THE

CARNIVAL JOIN US FOR A UNIQUE FAMILY EXPERIENCE UNDER THE STARS! $60/FAMILY INCLUDES A 20' X 20' SPACE | FAMILY-FRIENDLY GAMES, ACTIVITIES AND ENTERTAINMENT DINNER, CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST AND SNACKS

MARIONETTE THEATER GIANT SLIDES

SIDE SHOWS CARNIVAL GAMES

ARTS & CRAFTS

FUN FOR ALL AGES! REGISTER NOW AT LIVE OAK PARK COMMUNITY CENTER!

JULY 18–19 LIVE OAK PARK

9701 LAS TUNAS DR., TEMPLE CITY, CA 91780 • (626) 579-0461 • WWW.TEMPLECITY.US


recreation guide

Get Active!

temple city

DON’T JUST STAND THERE! GET YOUR BODY MOVING AND YOUR BRAIN THINKING WITH STIMULATING CLASSES OFFERED BY OUR PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT. Sign up for classes in person, by mail or online at www.templecity.us starting June 12. Registration forms can also be obtained at Live Oak Park Community Center, 10144 Bogue St. Incomplete applications or checks may result in failed enrollment. Space is limited, so reserve your spot early! For more information, call the Parks and Recreation Department at (626) 579-0461. Unless otherwise noted, classes begin the week of July 7 at Live Oak Park. There will be no class Sept. 1 in observance of Labor Day. Class schedules and prices are subject to change.

TABLE OF CONTENTS CLASSES Child Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Dance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Educational . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Music and Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Self-Defense and Martial Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Special Interest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 YOUTH SPORTS Skills and League Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 YOUTH & TEENS Teen Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 SENIORS Senior Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

MINI SPORTS CAMPS LIVE OAK PARK ENROLLING NOW 20

Summer 2014 www.templecity.us

Senior Excursions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 CLASS KEY

ACTIVE LIFESTYLE

FREE

EDUCATIONAL

NEW


Classes Shekinah Glory School of Dance

Students will be instructed in traditional jazz with proper technique, stretching and muscle conditioning. Jazz shoes required.

LITTLE STARS Recreation Leaders

Bond with your tot through song, game, stories and crafts in this parent participation class. (No class 7/22.) DATES

AGE

7/8-8/14 7/8-8/14

2 yrs. T/Th 1 yr. T/Th

DAY

TIME

FEE

9:30-10:45 a.m. 11-11:45 a.m.

$64 $43

TINY TOTS Sarah Nichols Tiny Tots

Toddlers can build social skills, make new friends and learn independence while experiencing music, art projects and group activities. Children must be at least three years old and potty-trained by the first class. In-person registration required; bring proof of birth date and immunization record. DATES

AGE

7/7-8/22 7/8-8/21

3-5 yrs. M/W/F 3-5 yrs. T/Th

DAY

TIME

FEE

9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

$245 $165

DANCE BALLET & TAP Shekinah Glory School of Dance

Students will be instructed in classical and modern dance technique from beginning to advanced levels, including barre work for advanced students. Tap and ballet shoes are required. DATES

LEVEL

7/11-8/29 7/11-8/29 7/11-8/29 7/11-8/29 7/11-8/29

Tots Tots Petite Beg. Jr.-Adv.

AGE

2 yrs. 3 yrs. 4-5 yrs. 6-8 yrs. 8+ yrs.

DAY TIME

FEE

F F F F F

$58 $58 $68 $68 $68

2:15-2:45 p.m. 2:45-3:15 p.m. 3:15-4 p.m. 4-4:45 p.m. 4:45-5:45 p.m.

7/10-8/28

10+ yrs. Th

DAY

TIME

FEE

3:30-4:15 p.m. 4:15-5 p.m.

$58 $58

LINE DANCE Bill Chang

Step into this old Western dance—with a twist! Learn basic line dancing set to country and non-country music. Level I for beginners, levels II and III for experienced dancers. DATES

LEVEL

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

7/7-9/15 7/7-9/15 7/8-9/9 7/8-9/9 7/9-9/10 7/10-9/11 7/11-9/12 7/11-9/12 7/11-9/12

Level I Level III Level II Level I Level I Level III Level II Level II Level II

15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs.

M M T T W Th F F F

$60 $60 $60 $60 $60 $60 $60 $60 $60

10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. 2:30-4 p.m. 7:40-9:10 p.m. 6-7:30 p.m. 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. 9-10:30 a.m. 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. 6:20-7:50 p.m. 8-9:30 p.m.

EDUCATIONAL BRICK Engineering Bricks 4 Kidz

Have loads of fun—and learn a bunch!—using LEGO® bricks to explore the worlds of engineering and architecture. DATES

AGE

7/9-8/27 7/10-8/28

5-7 yrs. W 8-11 yrs. W

DAY

TIME

FEE

2-3 p.m. 2-3 p.m.

$110 $110

Young learners sharpen their computer skills for creating reports and presentations using Microsoft Office. $10 supply fee due at first class.

Experienced pointe students will continue to advance their technique while developing discipline, confidence and grace. Instructor approval is required. DAY

6-8 yrs. Th 9-16 yrs. Th

AGI Academy

Shekinah Glory School of Dance

AGE

AGE

7/10-8/28 7/10-8/28

CHALLENGE YOUR COMPUTER SKILLS

BALLET PRE-POINTE & POINTE

DATES

DATES

TIME

FEE

5:45-6:30 p.m.

$45

DATES

AGE

7/11-8/22

6-14 yrs. F

DAY

TIME

FEE

10:45-11:45 a.m.

$113

COMPUTERS FOR SENIORS

BALLROOM DANCE

AGI Academy

Robert Chin

Have fun while learning the latest routines and techniques. Dances include the Cha-Cha, Rumba, Samba, Waltz, Tango and Foxtrot. Dance shoes required. DATES

LEVEL

AGE

DAY TIME

7/12-9/13

Beg./Int. 16+ yrs. S

FEE

11 a.m. -12:30 p.m. $58

Train for stage performance in ballet, hip hop, jazz and lyrical dance. Experience required. Choreography by a West Coast Nationals champion. AGE

8-16 yrs. Th

DAY

AGE

7/11-8/22

55+ yrs. F

DAY

TIME

FEE

11–11:45 a.m.

$79

AGI Academy

Shekinah Glory School of Dance

7/10-8/28

DATES

MATH WORKSHOP

COMPETITION DANCE PREP CLASS

DATES

It’s never too late to learn! Get hands-on practice with basic computer usage and word processing. $10 supply fee due at first class.

TIME

FEE

5-5:45 p.m.

$58

Learn new approaches to solving math problems. Students in the fourth through eighth grades get hands-on practice and assistance to review materials, advance in new topics, or prepare for tests. Also learn important time-management techniques to excel in math. $10 supply fee due first class. DATES

AGE

7/11-8/22

6-14 yrs. F

DAY

TIME

FEE

11:45 a.m.-12:45 p.m. $113

Temple City Connect

21

CLASSES

JAZZ

CHILD DEVELOPMENT


CRITICAL READING AND WRITTEN EXPRESSION

HATHA YOGA Michael Appleby

CLASSES

AGI Academy

Balance, strengthen, align and flex. A well-developed mind-body rapport brings better health and well being. Great for beginner and intermediate level students. Yoga mat required.

This course helps students strengthen critical reading and writing proficiency toward developing essential analytical skills. Students will identify information, ideas, and apply knowledge, biases and values to properly analyze a given text. $10 supply fee due at first class. DATES

AGE

DAY

7/11-8/22

55+ yrs. F

TIME

FEE

12:45-1:45 p.m.

$113

DATES

AGE

7/7-9/15

DAY

16+ yrs. M

TIME

FEE

7-9 p.m.

$45

FIT, FUN & RUN: YOUTH RUNNING CAMP Run4Life

FITNESS

Become a faster, stronger, and more flexible runner with fun training, drills and games. Participants will leave camp a more knowledgeable and fit runner. Athletic shoes required.

50+ CARDIO DANCE & STRENGTH TRAINING Amy’s Health & Fitness

Build strength through a fusion of low-impact, high-energy dance and exercise. Bring two light hand weights (2-3 lbs. each). DATES

AGE

7/14-9/7 7/16-9/9 7/14-9/7

50+ yrs. M 50+ yrs. W 50+ yrs. M/W

DAY

TIME

FEE

8:15-9:45 a.m. 8:15-9:45 a.m. 8:15-9:45 a.m.

$43 $43 $73

DATES

AGE

7/13-8/31 7/13-8/31

7-10 yrs. Su 11-14 yrs. Su

DAY

TIME

FEE

8-9 a.m. 9-10 a.m.

$65 $65

TOTAL YOGA BEAT STRESS AND TONE Amy’s Health & Fitness

Feel invigorated from the inside-out through a flowing series of dynamic poses. Great for beginner and intermediate level students. Fitness mat required.

60+ STRONGER SENIOR CORE FITNESS Amy’s Health & Fitness

DATES

AGE

Burn calories, reduce stress and build strength through the comfort of your chair and gentle stretching and relaxation techniques. Bring two light hand weights (2-3 lbs. each).

7/9-9/10

16+ yrs. W

MUSIC AND PRODUCTION

DATES

AGE

7/14-9/15

60+ yrs. M/W

DAY

TIME

FEE

9-9:45 a.m.

$35

7/9-9/11

16+ yrs. Th

TIME

FEE

7-8:30 p.m.

$50

Amy’s Health & Fitness

Burn calories and strengthen your heart while singing along to your favorite hits of the ’50s and ’60s. You’ll have so much fun, you’ll forget you’re exercising! Must register in person, space is limited. Class is free if enrolled in 50+ Cardio Dance and Strength training M/W and age criteria is met. AGE

7/11-9/12

60+ yrs. F

DAY

TIME

FEE

8:30-9:45 a.m.

$10

DATES

AGE

7/12-8/30

5-12 yrs. S

DAY

TIME

FEE

9-9:45 a.m.

$100

GROUP PIANO LESSONS Kids Music N’ Motion Staff

SENIOR FITNESS SWEATING TO THE OLDIES

DATES

$50

Students are taught basic theatre, improvisation skills and vocal techniques using music from major Broadway musicals. Performance for family and friends held at the end of the session. $25 materials fee due at first class.

Combine the intensity and power of kickboxing with the playfulness and fun of dance for a unique workout. Bring two light hand weights (2-3 lbs. each). Exercise mat required. DAY

FEE

7-8:30 p.m.

Kids Music N’ Motion Staff

Amy’s Health & Fitness

AGE

TIME

CHILDREN’S MUSICAL THEATER

KICKBOXING CARDIO DANCE CHALLENGE & STRENGTH TRAINING

DATES

DAY

Play with basic note recognition, master keyboard scales and learn music theory in a group setting. Each class includes keyboards for students. $25 materials fee due at first class. DATES

7/12-8/30 7/12-8/30 7/12-8/30 7/12-8/30 7/12-8/30 7/12-8/30

LEVEL

AGE

DAY TIME

Beg. Cont. Cont. Cont. Beg. Cont.

4-6 yrs. 7-11 yrs. 4- 6 yrs. 4-6 yrs. 7-11 yrs. 7-11 yrs.

S S S S S S

FEE

11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $115 12:30-1:15 p.m. $115 1:15-2 p.m. $115 2-2:45 p.m. $115 2:45-3:30 p.m. $115 3:30-4:15 p.m. $115

SLIM & TONE PILATES/RESISTANCE BAND TRAINING

MUSIC N’ MOTION—MUSIC CLASSES

Amy’s Health & Fitness

Trim your waistline with core exercises that also help stabilize your entire body. Yoga mat required.

Classes introduce children to instruments, orchestra, creative movement, singing, listening and rhythm. Each week children and parents will learn new songs including holiday, traditional, folk and multicultural music.

DATES

AGE

7/12-9/13

16+ yrs. S

22

DAY

Summer 2014 www.templecity.us

Kids Music N’ Motion Staff

TIME

FEE

DATES

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

8:45-10:15 a.m.

$50

7/12-8/30 7/12-8/30

18 mos.-4 yrs. 0-18 mos.

S S

$100 $100

10-10:45 a.m. 10-10:45 a.m.


SPECIAL INTEREST

HAPKIDO

KIDS IN THE KITCHEN

Son of Chong Martial Arts

Jennies Gym

Learn self-defense techniques including joint locks and kicks. Lessons also include breathing and meditation. Students must provide their own uniform, which may be purchased from the instructor.

Let’s get cooking! Little chefs will learn their way around the kitchen, practicing new skills, techniques and recipes. $25 materials fee due at first class.

DATES

LEVEL

7/8-9/11 7/8-9/11

Beg. 5-9 yrs. Int./Adv. 9+ yrs.

AGE

DATES

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

DAY TIME

FEE

7/9-8/27

5+ yrs.

W

$53

T/Th 3-4:15 p.m. T/Th 4:30-5:45 p.m.

$80 $80

LITTLE PICASSOS

4:45-5:45 p.m.

Jennies Gym

JU-JITSU & JAPANESE SWORD Rojen Recreation

Learn the fundamentals of traditional martial arts—Judo, Aikido, Kendo—and the weapons of self-defense. Second hour of instruction covers the basics of Iaido, the art of Japanese swordsmanship. DATES

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

7/11-9/12

15+ yrs.

F

$61

7-8:30 p.m.

Explore the imagination with art! Children will use a variety of mediums to explore the foundations and concepts of the creative field. Students must provide their own smock. $25 materials fee due at first class. DATES

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

7/9-8/27

5+ yrs.

W

$48

3:30-4:30 p.m.

SPORTS

JU-JITSU & KARATE

GYMNASTICS & TRAMPOLINE

Rojen Recreation

Rojen Recreation

Build strength while learning martial arts techniques for self-defense. Lessons include Judo, Aikido, Kendo and Karate.

Young gymnasts will learn basic tumbling skills and exercises on the balance beam, bars, vault and trampoline. New students will be evaluated and grouped by ability.

DATES

LEVEL

FEE

DATES

AGE

DAY TIME

7/8-9/11 7/8-9/11 7/8-9/11

New 8-12 yrs. T/Th 6-7 p.m. Grn. Belt+ 8-12 yrs. T/Th 7-8 p.m. All levels 13+ yrs. T/Th 8-9 p.m.

$61 $61 $61

7/12-8/30 7/12-8/30 7/12-8/30

4-7 yrs. 7-15 yrs. 13+ yrs.

S S S

AGE

DAY TIME

LITTLE KICKERS JU-JITSU

KINDERGYM

Rojen Recreation

Rojen Recreation

Teaches self-esteem and discipline through age-appropriate martial arts lessons. DATES

LEVEL

AGE

DAY TIME

7/11-9/12 7/11-9/12 7/11-9/12

New 5-7 yrs. F Ylw. Belt+ 5-7 yrs. F All levels 8+ yrs. F

4:30-5:15 p.m. 5:15-6 p.m. 6-7 p.m.

FEE

$49 $49 $56

MINI KICKERS JU-JITSU Rojen Recreation

FEE

10:30-11:30 a.m. $71 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $71 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $71

Kids are not the only ones allowed to have fun, since parents get to come too! You’ll learn forward rolls, back rolls, handstands and more with your kids. Together, you’ll walk the balance beam, swing on bars and jump on the trampoline! One parent per child must attend each class. DATES

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

7/12-8/30 7/12-8/30

9 mos.-2 yrs. 3-4 yrs.

S S

$71 $71

9-9:45 a.m. 9:45-10:30 a.m.

TENNIS ACADEMY

Participate alongside your tot as they learn the basics of Ju-Jitsu, focusing on balance and safety.

TJP Tennis Professionals

NIPPON KEMPO KARATE

Have fun while preparing for match play. Challenge yourself with physically demanding court workouts and drills. Tennis shoes required. Bring a racquet and new can of three tennis balls to the first class. (*Advance students may enroll in the extended class, including competitive match play from 9-9:50 p.m.)

Do Mar

DATES

LEVEL

Develop respect, discipline and confidence through this self-defense system based on punching, kicking, blocking, joint locks and ground combat.

7/7-8/25 7/7-8/25 7/9-8/27 7/9-8/27 7/9-8/27 7/11-8/29 7/11-8/29

Beg./Int. 8-12 yrs. Int./Adv. 8-13 yrs. Beg. 14+ yrs. Int. 14+ yrs. Adv./Team* 14+ yrs. Beg./Int. 8-12 yrs. Int./Adv. 8-13 yrs.

DATES

LEVEL

AGE

7/11-9/12

New 2-4 yrs.

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

F

$49

3:45-4:30 p.m.

DATES

LEVEL

7/7-9/15 7/9-9/10 7/7-9/15

Ylw. Belt+ 5-10 yrs. M 5:40-6:25 p.m. New 5-9 yrs. W 5:40-6:25 p.m. All levels 7+ yrs. M/W 6:30-8 p.m.

DAY TIME

FEE

$34 $34 $55

AGE

DAY TIME

M M W W W F F

FEE

6-7 p.m. $85 7-8 p.m. $85 6-7 p.m. $85 7-8 p.m. $85 8-9/9-9:50 p.m. $85/125 6-7 p.m. $85 7-8 p.m. $85

Temple City Connect

23

CLASSES

SELF-DEFENSE AND MARTIAL ARTS


Youth Sports The City offers skills and league programs for youth ages 3.5 years and up. Register online through ActiveNet at www.templecity.us, or in person at Live Oak Park Community Center. Unless otherwise noted, cost includes an award, t-shirt and $10 administrative charge.

YOUTH SPORTS

BASKETBALL Dribble your way down the court this summer! This program teaches the rules, strategies and fundamentals of the game—dribbling, passing, shooting and defending—while emphasizing fun, sportsmanship, fair play and teamwork. Practices will be held in the gym and outside basketball courts at Oak Avenue Intermediate School. All divisions are co-ed except for the girls division, ages 8-12. Register now. DATES

AGE

LEVEL

DAY

TIME

FEE

6/28-8/15 6/28-8/15 6/28-8/15 6/24-8/14 6/24-8/14 6/24-8/14

8-12 yrs. 10-12 yrs. 10-12 yrs. 8-9 yrs. 8-9 yrs. 13-15 yrs.

Girls Beg./Int. Int./Adv. Beg./Int. Int./Adv. All

W/F W/F W/F T/Th T/Th T/Th

4-5:30 p.m. 5:30-7 p.m. 7-8:30 p.m. 4-5:30 p.m. 5:30-7 p.m. 7-8:30 p.m.

$75 $75 $75 $75 $75 $75

MEET THE INSTRUCTOR Amanda Hillis, 18 West Coast Nationals Dance Champion How did you start dancing? My mom put me in dance for fun. I actually started here at Live Oak Park. I fell in love with it and been dancing ever since. How did you start teaching? I started as an assistant at ten, so it’s been about eight years. I went to a studio in Glendora, but the teacher also taught at Live Oak Park and she asked me to assist her. Eventually she moved away, I kind of took over the classes and have been teaching ballet, tap, jazz and hip hop ever since. How was it to win the West Coast Nationals dance title? It was incredible. It was exciting for us to be put on the map, and since we’re all from small towns, to win, it was just exciting. What do you enjoy the most about your class? Encouraging students to pursue their dreams. That’s the goal—to see them enjoy it and have fun and advance. It’s really exciting. What do you do outside of teaching? Dance is my life, but spending time with my husband would probably be my favorite thing. He’s in the Marines so we don’t get to spend that much time together.

PUNT, PASS & KICK AUG. 23, 10 A.M., LIVE OAK PARK Does your kid dream of making the NFL draft? Boys and girls ages 6-15 compete in punting, passing and place kicking, advancing through various local and sectional competitions. Athletes who prove their skills may win a chance to represent a pro National Football League team at the 2014 National Championships. Register at the event. Proof of age and a parent/guardian signature are required.

INTRODUCTION TO HARDBALL Batter’s up! Boys and girls learn basic batting, fundamental skills and rules in this introductory program designed to encourage sportsmanship and foster appreciation for the game of baseball. Practices prepare kids to move on and participate in the next Little League season. Register beginning Aug. 1. DATES

AGE

DAY

TIME

FEE

8/25-10/1

6-8 yrs.

M/W

4:30-5:45 p.m.

$65

MINI SPORTS CAMP Get your youngster familiar with different sports in an environment that improves their fundamental skills and encourages sportsmanship. Each two-week session is devoted to a different sport, including T-ball, flag football, basketball and soccer. Medals are awarded after each session, and those who complete all four sessions receive a distinctive plaque. Practices and scrimmages are held at Live Oak Park. Enroll in all four sessions for the special rate of $85. Register now. DATES

AGE

SPORT

DAY

TIME

FEE

6/24-7/3 6/23-7/2 7/8-7/17 7/7-7/16 7/22-7/31 7/21-7/30 8/5-8/14 8/4-8/13

3.5-5 yrs. 6-7 yrs. 3.5-5 yrs. 6-7-yrs. 3.5-5 yrs. 6-7 yrs. 3.5-5 yrs. 6-7 yrs.

T-Ball T-Ball Flag Football Flag Football Basketball Basketball Soccer Soccer

T/Th M/W T/Th M/W T/Th M/W T/Th M/W

5-6:45 p.m. 5-6:45 p.m. 5-6:45 p.m. 5-6:45 p.m. 5-6:45 p.m. 5-6:45 p.m. 5-6:45 p.m. 5-6:45 p.m.

$30 $30 $30 $30 $30 $30 $30 $30

MINI T-BALL Introduce your little ones to America’s favorite pastime with Mini T-Ball! Young boys and girls learn basic batting skills in this program designed to encourage sportsmanship and foster an appreciation for the game of baseball. Practice takes place at Live Oak Park. Register beginning Aug. 1. DATES

AGE

DAY

TIME

FEE

8/25-10/1

3.5-5 yrs.

T/Th

4:30-5:45 p.m.

$65


Youth & Teens FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL (626) 285-2171.

YOUTH COMMITTEE REWIND As part of the May 10 Rosemead Boulevard GO Grand Opening Festival, Temple City Youth Committee presented “The Great Rosemead Boulevard Scavenger Hunt” to introduce residents to the corridor’s new features, from bike lanes and public art, to pedestrian amenities and new street trees. Download the map online at www.templecity.us to see the challenges and learn about Temple City’s new complete street!

YOUTH & TEENS

SUMMER STARS & TEEN ZONE SLEEPING IN IS NO FUN. GET OUT FOR SOME REAL ADVENTURE! WEEKLY FIELD TRIPS | DAILY ENRICHMENT ACTIVITIES | RECREATIONAL GAMES | TEAMBUILDING EXERCISES

Don’t miss this year’s grand finale trip to Catalina Island! REGISTER AT LIVE OAK PARK ANNEX OR CALL (626) 285-2171, EXT. 2360.

STARS Club (Grades 1–5) Cleminson Elementary School and TBA Teen Zone (Grades 6–9) Live Oak Park Annex Monday thru Friday, 7 a.m.–6 p.m.

Session I: June 23–July 18 $210, or $255 with field trips Session II: July 21–August 22 $170, or $281 with field trips

*One-time non-refundable $10 administrative fee is included. Lunch and snacks not provided. Field trips are optional, with incidental expenses at the responsibility of the attendee. Destinations include Corona Del Mar beach, Santa Monica Pier, Hurricane Harbor, Adventure City, Magic Mountain, Knott’s Berry Farm and Raging Waters. Sites are closed on Friday, July 4.

Temple City Connect

25


Senior Programs

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL (626) 579-0461.

AARP DRIVER SAFETY

LINKAGES PROGRAM

JULY 7–8, 8:30 A.M.–12 P.M., $15–$20

FIRST & THIRD MONDAY OF THE MONTH, 10:30 A.M.–12 P.M.

The AARP Driver Safety Program is the largest and most respected refresher course. This session features a new curriculum to help those 55 years and older tune up their driving skills and adjust to normal age-related physical changes. Classes are offered at Live Oak Park Community Center. $15 for AARP members, $20 for non-members. Fee is payable by check at the first day of class. Pre-registration is recommended.

Free case management services are available to frail seniors (ages 60 and older) and adults with disabilities (ages 18 and older), affording them the ability and independence to remain safely at home and in the community. In addition to onsite services at Live Oak Park Community Center, services are also available by appointment. For more information, contact the YWCA San Gabriel Valley at (626) 214-9465.

SENIOR BINGO LAST THURSDAY OF THE MONTH, 1–3 P.M. Studies show that bingo can enhance memory skills and improve concentration. Play free at Live Oak Park Community Center— it’s fun and all games are played for prizes!

SENIOR LUAU JUNE 19, 4:30–7:30 P.M., $10

DIAL-A-RIDE AT YOUR SERVICE

SENIORS

Effective July 1, Southland Transit, Inc. (STI), will assume duties as the new service operator for Temple City Dial-A-Ride (DAR). The company has a proven track record for outstanding customer relations and transportation operations in neighboring cities including Arcadia, Rosemead, El Monte and Alhambra. Having run the City’s DAR program between the ’90s and early 2000s, STI is pleased to be working with the Temple City community once again.

SENIOR LUNCH WEEKDAYS, 11 A.M., $2 DONATION Seniors over 60 years of age are invited to Live Oak Park Community Center for a hot lunch, activities and socializing with friends and neighbors. Monthly menus are available at the Community Center and on the City’s website, www.templecity.us. Hot tea and coffee are available for just 25 cents per cup—best price in town! Reservations are required 24 hours in advance by calling (626) 579-0461.

LET’S HIT THE ROAD

SENIOR SUMMER COOL DOWN

• DAR is a shared-ride, curb-to-curb transportation service for residents of Temple City and approved unincorporated County areas. • Members must be 60 years and older, or under with a physical, psychological or developmental disability. • Residents may schedule rides anywhere within Temple City; or limited destinations in El Monte, Arcadia, Rosemead and San Gabriel for doctor appointments, hospital, government and adult daycare facilities, convalescent homes, churches, the Westfield Shopping Town and Home Depot (9700 Lower Azusa Rd.).

JUNE THRU AUGUST, 1–3 P.M.

For more information, or to become a member, call (626) 285-2171, ext. 2360.

26

Aloha seniors! Join us for an evening of exciting Polynesian entertainment and delicious BBQ. Don’t forget to don your favorite Hawaiian dress or shirt. Participants must be 60 years or older. Pre-registration for the event is required. For more information, call (626) 579-0461.

Summer 2014 www.templecity.us

Beat the heat with activities at Live Oak Park Community Center, free for seniors 60 years and older. JUNE 18: SUMMER BLOCKBUSTER & ICE CREAM Escape rising temperatures with a summer classic and an icy cold treat.

JULY 16: KEEP COOL CRAFT Take a break from the summer sun to express your creative side.

AUG. 20: BUNCO BONANZA Bring your pals to this extreme Bunco bash and compete for great prizes.


Senior Excursions The City offers one-day excursions to local and nearby destinations. These day trips show off the incredible diversity of attractions in Southern California, and range from tours and shows to dinners and shopping. Registration is taken on a first-come, first-paid basis at the Live Oak Park Community Center. For more information, call (626) 579-0461.

GASLAMP FOOD AND WINE FESTIVAL (SAN DIEGO) JUNE 8, 9 A.M.–7 P.M., $49 “Taste of Gaslamp” is downtown San Diego’s favorite gastronomic adventure and urban food safari! Your ticket is your passport to the Gaslamp Quarter for a sampling of specialties from more than 30 local eateries. Some locations are only open to adults ages 18 or older. Excursion is open to all ages.

PAGEANT OF THE MASTERS JULY 11, 3 P.M.–MIDNIGHT, $62 Watch art come to life during the Pageant of the Masters show at Laguna Beach’s Festival of Arts. This year’s theme “The Art Detective” will reveal how mysterious riddles were unraveled and lost treasures were found using clues hidden in the world’s greatest masterpieces. Enjoy dinner on your own. Admission is included for the performance at 8:30 p.m.

U.S.S. IOWA TOUR AUG. 16, 8:45 A.M.–5 P.M., $52 Experience life at sea through a self-guided tour of the Battleship U.S.S. Iowa, known as the “World’s Greatest Naval Ship.” Explore the crew’s living quarters and decks, as well as the onboard museum and gun exhibit. Tours are not ADA accessible. Lunch is included at the 22nd Street Landing Seafood Grill & Bar.

AQUARIUM OF THE PACIFIC & BUBBA GUMP’S AUG. 30, 8:30 A.M.–5 P.M., $55 Discover what lives under Southern California waters at the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach. Get up close with penguins, visit the Shark Lagoon, and learn about inhabitants of the deep ocean floors. Dinner is included at Bubba Gump’s Shrimp Company, followed by boutique shopping at Shoreline Village. NOTE: Trips may be canceled or changed at the City’s discretion. Refunds will be offered only if a replacement is found and notification of cancellation is provided at least ten days in advance of the trip. PHOTO POLICY: Please be advised that all participants involved in any City of Temple City (“City”) programs or special events are subject to being photographed. Such photographs may be used by the City without an obligation to provide compensation to those photographed.

RONALD REAGAN PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY JULY 22, 8:30 A.M.–5 P.M., $61 Step aboard Air Force One at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and Library, featuring photographs of President Reagan’s early life, interactive multimedia exhibits and an exact replica of the Oval Office. Explore the Library’s temporary “Baseball!” exhibition with over 700 rare artifacts and iconic memorabilia from Major League Baseball. BBQ lunch buffet included.

SENIORS

Temple City Connect

27


temple city

people

Every summer, six local high school students travel down under as part of a student exchange with the city of Hawkesbury, Australia. The program is part of Temple City’s Sister City Association, led by husband and wife duo Steve and Nancy Terry. Having taken several groups of young ambassadors to Australia, these two long-time residents strongly believe the value of international travel in exposing teens to new experiences and helping them develop into understanding adults. As this year’s ambassadors prepare for a four-week trip of a lifetime, Nancy shares why she thinks the organization is important for the community, and invites residents to join the 2015 trip to Australia. BY WENDY CHUNG

Nancy and Steve Terry SISTER CITY AMBASSADORS


Tell us about yourselves. How long

Why do you think Sister City is so

have you been in Temple City?

important for the community and

We have lived in Temple City since we got married in 1974, so it’s been 40 years. We’ve always loved the small town atmosphere here. Lifelong friends are made in this town— and you can’t go to Ralphs without seeing someone you know!

local youth?

How did you get involved in Sister Cities?

In 2000, our daughters were almost out of high school, so I was finishing my involvement with Girl Scouts and PTA. I was looking for other ways to become more active in the community and found Sister City. We were asked to be a host family when the first group of Australian students arrived in December 2000. We ended up hosting again the second year, and one of our daughters participated as an exchange student. I ultimately joined the Sister City Board in 2002, and Steve followed in 2010. Tell us about Temple City’s Sister City associations. Who are our Sister Cities

Sister Cities International has been around since 1956, and it was originally established to promote global peace, prosperity and humanitarianism through cultural exchanges. Locally, the relationships developed have allowed our ambassadors to share ideas, gain an international perspective and increase their understanding of global issues. The purpose and hope of the youth exchange program is to provide young people with an opportunity to visit a foreign country, and through that visit, have a life experience that will continue to influence their personal lives as they develop into adults and help create a more understanding world. Plus, one of the best things about the Temple City Sister City program is all of the family-oriented volunteers who are deeply interested in the community and its youth. We have fun potlucks and celebrations, and always enjoy getting to know new families.

and what do the relationships entail?

At this time, we have two sister cities: Magdalena de Kino, Mexico since 1964, and Hawkesbury City, Australia since 1984. We have an annual student exchange with Australia where we send six students every summer and Hawkesbury sends six students in the fall. The program includes a four-week homestay, attendance at a secondary school, community activities, and some travel and visits to attractions like museums and theaters. There are also adult trips every two to three years that includes all of the above—except the school attendance, of course!

What’s been your favorite experience traveling to Australia?

Without a doubt, it’s the people. Everyone who returns from Australia comments on how friendly and welcoming the people are over there. Beyond that, seeing kangaroos in the wild, petting a koala and climbing the Harbor Bridge are some unforgettable highlights. Are the ambassadors starting to get excited for their trip in July?

Our six students are anxious to meet their host families and start making new lifelong friendships. Some of them are even looking forward to trying Vegemite! FOLLOW SISTER CITY DOWN UNDER Keep up with the students’ travels in Australia by following the City’s Facebook at www.facebook.com/ConnectwithTC, or watching for articles in Mid Valley News.

HELLO, MATE! If you’d like to meet wonderful people with a great accent, join Sister City on their next trip to Australia in 2015! STUDENT AMBASSADOR

Entering high school sophomores learn about the exchange program during school registration. Prospective ambassadors attend a series of informational meetings and must complete an application process, including two letters of recommendations and an interview. ADULT AMBASSADOR

Learn more about Temple City’s next adult trip by contacting Sister City President Steve Terry at (626) 285-7995 or sgbktr@yahoo.com. And don’t forget to drop by and say “hi” at the Sister City popcorn booth during Concerts in the Park!

Temple City Connect

29


temple city

ask city hall

Temple City Connect addresses questions from residents on a wide variety of City activities, projects and policies, keeping you connected, engaged and educated. In this issue, we share summer reminders and tips.

Bike Lanes As you enjoy the new bikeways around town, remember to practice safe riding and abide by the rules of the road. Per the California Vehicle Code, which includes laws relating to bicycle use, cyclists have the same rights and responsibilities as vehicle operators—meaning they must travel in the same direction as traffic, follow all street signs and traffic rules, and use lights in the front and rear of their bikes while riding at night. When dismounted, cyclists should walk their bikes on the sidewalk, but otherwise must ride in the street. For safety, wear protective gear like helmets and reflective clothing, and do not use headphones in both ears. Drivers should also remember to share the road and look out for cyclists, pedestrians and other roadway users on the street. For more bike safety resources, visit www.templecity.us.

Street Sweeping With weekly street-sweeping service beginning on July 1, residents are reminded of new parking rules on neighborhood streets. Parking restrictions will be in effect one day a week, one side of the street at a time, for five-hour periods from 6-11 a.m. or 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Residents should review

30

Summer 2014 www.templecity.us

Ask City Hall signs posted at the beginning of their block for exact hours. Starting July 1, those in violation of the posted parking restrictions may be cited and subject to fines.

On days of extreme heat, remember to stay hydrated and avoid strenuous outdoor activity. Summer Heat On days of extreme heat, remember to stay hydrated and avoid strenuous outdoor activity. Live Oak Park Community Center is open daily from 8 a.m.-10 p.m. for free air-conditioned relief. Also check on any elderly family members, neighbors or young children who may be extra sensitive to high temperatures. Before using your pool this season, make sure it is properly equipped for safety. Install a safety gate, or check the batteries on pool alarms. Do not leave toys in the pool, as they may attract children or pets, and never leave children unattended poolside.

Fireworks The City allows Safe and Sane fireworks to be discharged only on July 4 from noon to 10 p.m. Those discharging fireworks outside of permitted hours may be cited for a minimum $500 fine. Violators found in possession of illegal fireworks may be cited a minimum $1,000 fine. For a list of accepted fireworks, visit www.templecity.us. To report illegal firework activity, call the Temple Sheriff’s Station at (626) 285-7171.

Going Out of Town If you are heading out on vacation, make sure your home does not become vulnerable to targeted burglaries. Because uncollected mail can tip off criminals that your house is unoccupied, contact the U.S. Postal Service and newspaper subscriptions to request a hold on mail. If you are expecting deliveries, arrange to have items picked up promptly by family, friends or neighbors. Also consider asking your neighbors to keep an eye out for suspicious activity. You may also request vacation drive-by patrol from Temple Sheriff’s Station by calling (626) 285-7171. GOT QUESTIONS? For any questions or comments, call City Hall at (626) 285-2171.


temple city

city services

QUICK CONTACTS

City Services

SCHOOL DISTRICTS ALL TELEPHONE NUMBERS ARE 626 AREA CODE UNLESS DESIGNATED.

Emergencies

Employment

Pothole Patrol

911

285-2171, ext. 2330

285-2171, ext. 2333

Request immediate sheriff, fire department or ambulance assistance to protect life or property.

Apply for a City job and learn of other government employment opportunities.

Report a pothole for repair within three working days.

Environment

Public Safety (Temple Sheriff’s Station)

Animals

285-2171, ext. 2333

285-7171

285-7187

Learn about water, recycling and energy conservation programs.

Form a Neighborhood Watch group, request increased patrolling and obtain police reports.

Call to report a lost pet and stray or dead animals; get or renew a license. Building and Development 285-2171, ext. 2301

Obtain permits and inspections for repairing, remodeling or adding onto your home or business.

Facility Rentals 285-2171, ext. 2361

Reserve one of our facilities for sports team practices, birthday parties and private events. Hotlines

Public Records 285-2171, ext. 2317

Review or request copies of City records and documents.

Help keep Temple City looking great by reporting:

Recreation and Parks

Business Assistance

(800) 252-4613

285-2171, ext. 2303

Abandoned Shopping Carts

Find out how to start or expand a business, and how to do business with the City.

(800) 794-7384

Graffiti Removal

Participate in our many recreational and cultural activities; report maintenance needs at City parks.

285-5240

Illegal Construction (after hours)

Seniors

Community Involvement 285-2171, ext. 2317

Housing

Learn of upcoming public meetings, volunteer opportunities and how to serve on a City commission.

285-2171, ext. 2303

Community Preservation

Get information on rehabilitation programs, homeownership opportunities and landlord/tenant rights.

285-2171

Mayor and City Council

Improve your neighborhood— report property maintenance issues, illegal construction and garage conversions.

Let them know what you think! 285-2171, ext. 2322

Schedule a meeting 285-2189

Dial-A-Ride (Southland Transit, Inc.)

Leave a suggestion, comment or complaint

Request shared transit service for seniors and the disabled.

Parking

285-2171, ext. 2361

285-2171, ext. 2333

Establish membership; general inquiries

Ask about residential parking permits and parking tickets; report nuisance vehicles on public streets.

286-2456

Schedule service Elections and Voting 285-2171, ext. 2317

Register to vote, get information on election dates and find out how to run for City public office. Emergency Preparedness 285-2171, ext. 2333

Receive training to handle an emergency situation or local disaster.

Permits and Licenses 285-2171, ext. 2300

Find out what is required to improve your property, operate a business and conduct special events. Planning and Zoning 285-2171, ext. 2303

See what you can do with your property and what developments are planned in your neighborhood.

285-2171, ext. 2361

579-0461

Stay active and healthy with our lunch program, recreational classes and referrals to wellness providers. Streets and Sidewalks 285-2171, ext. 2333

Request street or sidewalk maintenance; report broken street lights, traffic signals and signs. Trash and Street Sweeping (Athens Services) 336-3636

Report service problems or make a special service request; get help with billing. Tree and Median Maintenance

Arcadia Unified 821-8300 El Monte City 453-3700 Rosemead Unified 312-2900 Temple City Unified 548-5000

MASS TRANSIT Foothill Transit District (800) 743-3463 Metro Transportation Authority (323) 466-3876

RESOURCES Chamber of Commerce 286-3101 Temple City Library 285-2136

UTILITIES AT&T (800) 288-2020 Charter Communications (866) 499-8080 Southern California Edison (800) 655-4555 The Gas Company (800) 427-2200

WATER DISTRICTS California American Water Company (888) 422-5269 East Pasadena Water Company 793-6189

285-2171, ext. 2361

Golden State Water Company (800) 999-4033

Get a street tree; report maintenance issues on street trees and medians.

San Gabriel County Water District 287-0341

Youth 285-2171, ext. 2360

Learn about after school programs, day camps, sports leagues and recreational activities.

Sunnyslope Water Company 287-5238

CAN’T FIND WHAT YOU NEED? We’ll find it for you! Just call (626) 285-2171.

Temple City Connect

31


Summer Concert Series

JUNE

18

UNFOLD YOUR LAWN CHAIRS, LAY OUT YOUR BLANKETS AND ENJOY THE SWEET SOUNDS OF SUMMER!

JUNE

TEMPLE CITY PARK WEDNESDAYS 7-9 P.M. INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION WITH WARTIME RADIO REVUE

JULY

2

Arrive at 6 p.m. to kick off a night of star-spangled fun with hotdogs, the Patriotic Picnic Contest and a throwback WWII USO show!

25 JULY

JULY

9

16

THE WISEGUYS Big Band Standards

TOM NOLAN BAND Rock and Soul

TOMMY TASSI & THE AUTHENTICS Classic Oldies

PHAT CAT SWINGER

Vegas Style Swing

JULY

23

CAPTAIN CARDIAC & THE CORONARIES ’50s & ’60s Rock N’ Roll

BEATS & EATS WITH BRIAN LYNN JONES & THE MISFIT COWBOYS JULY

AUGUST

6

NATIONAL NIGHT OUT WITH THE ANSWER Classic Rock Make it an All-American family outing with classic rock music, food, and a meet and greet with your public safety team!

30 Country Order up at the food trucks starting at 5:30 p.m. before enjoying a high-energy country rock show!

AUGUST

AUGUST

13

27

THE CATILLACS Rock N’ Roll AUGUST

20

RAYMOND MICHAEL Elvis Tribute

Brought to you by:

FORTUNATE SON John Fogerty and Creedence Clearwater Revival Tribute

Temple City Tennis Club

Connect with us:

City of Temple City 9701 Las Tunas Dr. Temple City, CA 91780

Presorted Standard U.S. Postage PAID San Gabriel, CA Permit No. 10016

ECRWSS

POSTAL CUSTOMER TEMPLE CITY, CA 91780


Temple City Connect Summer 2014