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Temple City

Fall 2013 news events people

COMPLETE NEIGHBORHOODS

to PAGE 9

INSIDE!

RECREATION GUIDE PAGE 25

8 CITY CALENDAR

20 PLUGGING INTO CITY HALL

22 THE 21ST CENTURY LIBRARY


Learn all about the

NUTS AND BOLTS of your local government

2013 ★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

CITIZEN’S ACADEMY

CITIZEN’S ACADEMY is a free, interactive civic education program for those who live or work in Temple City, and are interested in learning more about City Hall. Participants meet with top staff every class to engage

APPLICATION DEADLINE

PROGRAM STARTS

various topics ranging from City finances and planning, to parks and recreation and economic development. Apply now

SEPT. 27

OCT. 1O

and become part of our next generation of community leaders.

For more information, visit City Hall or www.templecity.us

CITY OF TEMPLE CITY ★ 9701 LAS TUNAS DR., TEMPLE CITY, CA 91780 ★ (626) 285-2171


INSIDE THIS ISSUE 4 City Manager’s Message

8 City Calendar

The Big Picture

Upcoming meetings and events

5 Perspectives

9 Complete Neighborhoods A to Z

School time memories

Quintessential Temple City

6 Snapshots Capturing the community spirit

19 Counterparts Ish Kitchen

20 Plugging into City Hall

34

Ask City Hall

New ways to connect

22

9

The 21st Century Library

22 The 21st Century Library

34 Ask City Hall

Reading into our future

Rosemead Boulevard progress

25 Recreation Guide

36 People

Fall 2013 classes and activities

Kim Wunner, cancer survivor

Complete Neighborhoods A to Z Temple City Connect

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temple city

city manager’s message

TEMPLE CITY CONNECT is the City’s quarterly magazine that connects the community to City Hall.

Since our 32-page debut in spring of last year, we’ve strived to develop Connect Magazine into an informative tool that

EDITOR

helps citizens engage

Jose Pulido

in civic affairs. Now at 40 pages, we’re making

MANAGING EDITOR

improvements yet again with more coverage of ongoing and upcoming projects, and

Brian Haworth

an extended City Calendar (page 8) and Recreation Guide (page 25) that will better help readers participate in the process of building a great community.

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

As we found in putting together our “Complete Neighborhoods A to Z” list (page

Wendy Chung

9), a great community is much like the mosaic that graces this issue’s cover—the bigger picture, composed by a collection of individual pieces, is always greater than the sum of its parts. Nurturing one takes a massive production by various actors who bring different ideals, goals, knowledge and qualities to the table. While our high-performing government agencies provide quality neighborhood services; area nonprofits, service

WRITERS Stephanie Chan Steve Nathan Chelsea Pitcher

organizations, cultural institutions—even individual residents—help carry on local

PHOTOGRAPHERS

traditions and values.

Matthew Escobar Jerry Jambazian

One project that exemplifies the

A great community is much like the mosaic that graces this issue’s cover—the bigger picture, composed by a collection of individual pieces, is always greater than the sum of its parts. JOSE PULIDO, CITY MANAGER

value of collaboration is the City’s joint venture with the County of Los Angeles

TRANSLATOR

to modernize Temple City Library

Stella Yu

(page 22). In planning a possible new facility, both agencies are working with the public to determine local program and service needs. If you’ve got fresh ideas for a cutting-edge 21st century

CONTRIBUTORS Matthew Andrade Amber Lee Sabina Li Amy Lin

library, I highly encourage you to become part of the Library Services Visioning Committee and lead the conversation.

DESIGN

If all goes according to plan, this project could be part of a larger effort with the County

Fuel Creative Group

and Temple City Unified School District to consolidate facilities and carve a new heart of the city (page 23). As you begin exploring the diverse elements that make up a “complete neighborhood,” keep in mind that the following three issues will go more in-depth, breaking down

CITY COUNCIL Cynthia Sternquist MAYOR

the individual pieces that contribute to local quality of life—community, strategic

Carl Blum

government and built environment. In the meantime, stay active this back-to-school

MAYOR PRO TEM

season. At our Sept. 26 Town Hall (page 37), you’ll be able to design your own civic

Fernando Vizcarra

education with crash courses on economic development, community preservation and

COUNCILMEMBER

City budgeting. Also this fall, we’re kicking off round two of Citizen’s Academy (page 2), which gives participants a behind-the-scenes look at how City Hall coordinates services ranging from recreation to public safety. The more familiar we become with the ABC’s of complete neighborhoods, the closer we’ll be to achieving them. Plus, with the City taking a bold, new approach to finances and adopting a Priority-Based Budget (page 11), we invite you to join us in determining the projects and programs to be funded over the next few years. I’m sure you already have thoughts for how to “Make TC Happen” (page 13) so I hope to see everyone at our first meeting Nov. 21. Together, let’s build a stronger Temple City for the next 50 years.

Tom Chavez COUNCILMEMBER

Vincent Yu COUNCILMEMBER

COVER PHOTO The future’s looking bright. PHOTOS BY JERRY JAMBAZIAN City of Temple City 9701 Las Tunas Dr. Temple City, CA 91780 ©2013 City of Temple City. All rights reserved. If you have questions or comments regarding our magazine, please email us at connect@templecity.us.

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Fall 2013 www.templecity.us


temple city

perspectives

“WHAT DO YOU REMEMBER MOST FROM TEMPLE CITY HIGH?”

Nostalgic post-grads reminisce on the football games, dances and sometimes embarrassing experiences that prove if you can survive four years of high school, you can survive anything! BY MATTHEW ANDRADE

“Junior year of high school, I became captain of the varsity soccer team. That was also the year we went on to become TCHS’s first League Champions in the sport. Daryl Topalian was coach then, and he cried the day we won our last game to secure the title.” GUIDO, 25

“I’ve always found myself to be more antisocial when it comes to meeting people. But throughout high school, I’ve made numerous friends and become acquainted with people of all sorts. It’s allowed me to step out of my comfort zone and be a more confident person.”

“My favorite memories are definitely from my time in the Brighter Side Singers club. I loved performing, no matter where we were. It’s also how I met my wife, who was a singer with me.” SHANE, 38

“One day when it was raining, I decided to avoid the hallway crowds by walking down a grass slope on the south side of the 400 wing. I slipped and slid down the hill. Sadly, I arrived at the next class covered in mud.” MICHAEL, 36

“I was part of the second graduating class of Temple City High—1959. I remember when I took modern dance and did a brief amount of dancing in one of the shows. I can’t even recall the theme, but it was fun getting up there on stage. I was nervous, but it was a thrilling moment and I had a wonderful time!” CAROL, 72

WINONA, 17

“Football games and cheering on the Rams was always exciting.  I remember how the Fifth Quarter Dances were so much fun—just hanging out after the game and letting loose.” TRISH, 45

“One time I had to carry a large stuffed bear around campus all day. I made it in sewing class but it was far too big to fit in my locker.”

“I have many fond memories, but one that stands out is being part of the cast in our school production, ‘Carnival.’ We performed at the Mission Playhouse [in San Gabriel]. The theater was so old, beautiful and unique. It’s an experience I’ll never forget.” GAYLE, 59

“I particularly remember my teacher, Gene McCreadie. He taught Psychology and made it so interesting, I decided to pursue the field for my career. Now I’m a Guidance Counselor at TCHS.” DEANNE, 52

KIM, 49

GUIDO

TRISH

CAROL

SHANE

CHRIS Temple City Connect

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temple city

snapshots

SUMMER IN THE CITY WAS ALL FUN AND GAMES, WITH ACTIVITIES AND ENTERTAINMENT THAT GOT EVERYONE OFF THE COUCH AND TO THE PARK. IN FACT, TEMPLE CITY’S ENERGY WAS SO MAGNETIC—EVEN HOLLYWOOD COULDN’T RESIST PAYING A VISIT! 1

SUMMER PLAY-BY-PLAY

Braving the heat, locals took every opportunity to get out and play, enjoying mainstays like Concerts in the Park and Dining Under the Stars, or “roughin’ it” with tents and extreme sports at Camp-aPalooza. 2

“MOVE-MENT” TO LOSE IT

Twenty-five Temple Citians survived 10 weeks of pushups, jumping jacks and other muscle-building workouts during the Mayor’s “Biggest Loser” Fitness Challenge. 3

LIGHTS CAMERA ACTION

Temple City sat in as a Midwestern town for an upcoming Columbia Pictures horror comedy in which vampires, zombies and humans join forces against an alien attack. Look for City Hall on the silver screen in 2014!

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2

3

Temple City Connect

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temple city

city calendar

CITY CALENDAR FOR DETAILS, CALL (626) 285-2171.

FALL 2013

OCT

22

COUNCIL CHAMBERS 4 RENOVATION

SEPT

Thru Nov. 4

Council Chambers is getting a facelift! Check out the new digs at the Nov. 5 Council Meeting. Until then, we’re taking public meetings on the road. For locations, check www.templecity.us or call the City Clerk’s Office at (626) 285-2171, ext. 2317.

2021 HOUSING 23 ELEMENT UPDATE SEPT

7:30 p.m., Community Room How will the City meet local housing needs for the next eight years? What’s it doing to fulfill new state mandates? Join us for a special workshop to discuss the future of housing in Temple City.

DESIGN YOUR OWN 26 TOWN HALL SEPT

7 p.m., First Baptist Church

Want to learn about City government? Come to our Fall Town Hall for mix-and-match crash courses on what the City’s doing in Economic Development, City Finances and Community Preservation (page 37). OCT

10

OCT

19

CITIZEN’S ACADEMY Applications due Sept. 27 Ready to get schooled? Citizen’s Academy is back to train a second class of aspiring civic leaders. The seven-session program engages citizens in discussions on City Hall operations, functions and services. For more info or an application, visit www.templecity.us.

FALL FESTIVAL & CAR SHOW Noon-4 p.m., Temple City Park

OCT

23

Fall 2013

www.templecity.us

Council Chambers closes for renovation

5 Registration begins for fall classes

Flag football begins

21 Intramural sports begin 23 Public Meeting: 2021 Housing Element Update

Fall classes begin

26 Design Your Own Town Hall

8 Mini flag football begins 10 Citizen’s Academy begins

VETERANS APPRECIATION

This November, give thanks to our military men and women. If you know a vet who can use some help with yard work, enter them for our Nov. 9 lawn cleanup with Teen Zone. For info, call (626) 285-2171, ext. 2360. City offices close Monday, Nov. 11.

GOT PARKS? 7 p.m., Live Oak Park Community Center In a built-out community like Temple City, we had to be a little more creative when rethinking our Parks and Open Space Master Plan. With the study now wrapping up, see the project team’s recommendations for enhancing recreational facilities and programming.

MAKE TC HAPPEN 7 p.m., Live Oak Park Community Center The City’s looking for ways to improve the community. Got ideas? Brainstorm with us at the Nov. 21 meeting to help prioritize upcoming projects. We’ll reconvene Dec. 12 to share findings (page 13).

LIGHTS ON 6 TEMPLE CITY DEC

5-9 p.m., Temple City Park

Santa Claus is coming to town—and bringing plenty of snow, jolly holiday tunes, hot cocoa and cookies! Line up along Las Tunas Drive for the holiday parade, leading right up to the lighting of our 100' redwood tree (page 38). 8

OCTOBER

Think your holiday decorations are best ’round the block? Enter our contest in one of three categories to win fame, glory, bragging rights and gift prizes! For more info or an application, visit www.templecity.us.

12

Registration begins for flag football, volleyball

16 Registration begins for mini flag football

Applications due Dec. 5

NOV

Fend off the flu this season with a free vaccination. Shots are first-come, first-serve (page 33).

HOLIDAY HOME CONTEST

11

4 Fall STARS, Teen Zone begin (TCUSD schools)

12 Neighborhood Watch Meeting: Area 4

4

NOV

SEPTEMBER

8:30-11:30 a.m., Live Oak Park Community Center

NOV

Farm Fresh Food

Get stocked for the week with fresh, seasonal and regionally sourced produce.

FLU IMMUNIZATION CLINIC

website on 11/01/13 to experience added functionalities and enhanced user accessibility (page 20). Visit www.templecity.us.

21

Every Sunday, 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m., City Hall

With 96 sites of interest identified in last year’s historic resources survey, join the City in developing a policy for preserving local heritage.

1101 CITY WEBSITE LAUNCH 1 BETA What’s 1101 in binary code? 13. Test our new

Featuring children’s activities, craft vendors, collector cars and performances by Temple City High’s acclaimed vocal arts program—this harvest celebration is our pick for the best way to celebrate fall! Car show and craft vendor applications are available at Live Oak Park Annex and at www. templecity.us.

FARMER’S MARKET

7:30 p.m., Community Room

NOV

NOV

EVERY SUNDAY

SAVING OUR HISTORY

Neighborhood Watch: Area 5

19 Fall Festival & Classic Car Show

Teen Halloween Dance (page 31)

22 Public Meeting: Historic Preservation 23 Flu Immunization Clinic 25 Teen Excursion: Knott’s Scary Farm (page 31) 31 Halloween Carnival (page 28)

Senior Health Fair/Halloween Lunch (page 32)

NOVEMBER 1 1101 City Website Beta Launch 3 Daylight Saving Time ends (2 a.m.) 4 Registration begins for Holiday Home Contest

Registration begins for winter basketball league

9 Teen Veterans Appreciation Lawn Cleanup 11 Veterans Day (City offices closed) 12 Public Meeting: Parks & Open Space Master Plan 18 Registration begins for Winter Camp, Winter Teen Zone 21 Public Meeting: Make TC Happen 28-29 Thanksgiving Holiday (City offices closed)

DECEMBER 2 Winter basketball begins 6 Lights On Temple City

STAY CONNECTED Get updates on City events @ConnectwithTC facebook.com/ConnectwithTC


temple city

feature

Complete Neighborhoods to You know it when you’re living in one—in which case Temple Citians are bona fide experts—but just what constitutes a great community? Here, we identify some of the key attributes that make our town a “Complete Neighborhood.” From the people and places that inhabit the land, to the traditions and cultures that comprise our collective spirit, get ready to count down quintessential Temple City, A to Z. BY WENDY CHUNG

Temple City Connect

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temple city

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Complete Neighborhoods

B | built environment

As our city progresses toward the future, we never fail to appreciate the past that’s brought us to the present. That includes the preservation of local sites and artifacts identified in the Historic Resources Survey, and celebration of community heritage through the City’s first-ever public art installations. Get involved at the upcoming Historic Preservation workshop Oct. 22, or a Public Arts Commission meeting the first Wednesdays of the month. –a. lee

From the Rosemead Boulevard Enhancement Project under construction (page 34) to the ongoing Parks and Open Space Master Plan, we’re in the process of preserving and creating the physical places and spaces for community to stay active, conduct business and thrive. On Sept. 26, join the Mayor and the City Council for the Town Hall Meeting (page 37) to learn what the City is doing in terms of budgeting, economic development and community preservation, in order to strategically fund, encourage and sustain attractive residential and commercial neighborhoods. Stay tuned for next summer’s issue, when we report on the City’s latest facilities upgrades—including pedestrian improvements and the 15 miles of incoming bikeways.

multigenerational (even multispecies) community fulfills the Temple City experience. So how does City Hall pay back? By providing services and opportunities for each population’s wellbeing. Take a look at how different community members access various programs, and check out our offerings yourself through our City Services contacts list (page 39). –m.a.

GRANDPA JOE loves a mini-vacation. With senior excursions, he’s able to take trips to numerous places all around Southern California. MOM loves cooking, but only with the freshest ingredients! On Sundays you can find her at the Temple City Farmer’s Market getting everything she needs to prepare the perfect meal.

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Fall 2013 www.templecity.us

DAD recently made the decision to join Neighborhood Watch. Now he’s sharing tips on everything from crime prevention to emergency preparedness. To get more involved with the City, high school freshman SALLY applied to become a Youth Committee member. Now she helps organize community events, from volunteer cleanups to the Bike Rodeo. Thirteen-year-old BILLY was far from having a boring summer. At Teen Zone, he socialized and participated in various activities—including field trips to the beach and amusement parks. He even plans to stay in the program throughout the school year.

There’s nothing like a tight-knit community where everybody knows your name. In the Winter 2014 issue, we’re covering the people, places, institutions and traditions that make Temple City home sweet home. In the meantime, keep busy with these three ways of getting more involved and fostering community. Can you think of any others? –a. lin PUBLIC MEETINGS There’s no better way to bond than over a discussion envisioning a brighter future for Temple City. Join us at a public meeting or workshop to engage ideas for improvements—we (usually) have snacks! Logon to www.templecity.us for a schedule of public meeting dates. COMMUNITY EVENTS We’ve got events

year-round, from Lunar New Year to Lights on Temple City—so bring your family, friends and neighbors. The more the merrier! See the fall City Calendar (page 8).

D | diversity We love diversity, and our multicultural,

GRANDMA BETSY—also famously known as Senior Bingo champion— goes every last Thursday of the month to play bingo at Live Oak Park. Getting there is not a problem with Dial-a-Ride transportation service.

C | community

Kindergartener VICKY just loves Halloween! This year, she’s dressing up as a mermaid to the annual carnival at Live Oak Park (page 28). Free games, tons of treats, and bike and toy raffles—sure beats trick-or-treating! Poor second-grader TOMMY. No one can ever seem to pick him up after school, but he’s too young for Teen Zone! Not a problem. STARS Club lets him participate in fun afterschool activities while he waits for his parents. SPOT the family dog doesn’t have to worry about the diseases going around—he got his vaccinations at the annual Rabies Clinic. And if he gets lost—no fears; he’s microchipped!

NONPROFIT ORGS Local service organizations and faith-based institutions often host community events and volunteer opportunities. From Parent Teacher Association and Boy Scouts, to Kiwanis Club and Sister Cities, find what moves you and get started volunteering!

E | education Bloomberg Business Week named Temple City one of the best places to raise a family, and parents know one reason why. All of TCUSD’s campuses are recognized as California Distinguished Schools, meaning they rank in the top five percent statewide. Temple City High was also recently named a Silver Medal School in U.S. News and World Report’s ranking of best high schools in the nation. Go Rams! Pasadena Star News/Keith Birmingham

A | arts and culture


[ a b c d e f g h i j k l m A to Z n o p q r s t u v w x y z ]

F | finances At a time when municipalities are emerging from a devastating recession, Temple City reports a solid and sustainable financial foundation. Not only does the City maintain a healthy Reserve Fund, but in light of the recent elimination of redevelopment agencies statewide, it’s also instituted an Economic Development Ordinance to allow for the continued funding of ambitious development projects. In continuing vigilant fiscal management and ensuring healthy finances into the future, the City will become one of the first municipalities nationwide to introduce Priority-Based Budgeting (PBB) into its City budget process. “Historically, Temple City and other municipalities have employed a traditional line-item approach,” reports Administrative Services Director Tracey Hause. “PBB moves toward a program-based budget that funds activities based on evolving priorities and community needs.” This system, she explains, results in greater efficiencies for the City and greater opportunities for public participation. Although residents may occasionally get passionate about what they perceive as excessive spending on projects they disagree with, the public

generally tunes out budget discussions because they are difficult to fully grasp without expertise in budgeting. Not so with PBB, suggests Hause, who says that by presenting information by programs and activities, rather than arcane accounting categories, it is much easier for the public to digest. Not only is it more transparent, but input from the community is considered an essential element to the success of any PBB-based system. “It forces you to take a hard look at what you do and why you do it, and evaluate whether a program is still relevant to current objectives and the community’s values,” explains Hause. “PBB also gives us an opportunity to leverage funds and, more importantly, redirect resources to programs important to the community.” Hause explains the process can lead staff to examine opportunities for alternative funding sources, such as grants, although she reports Temple City has already demonstrated exceptional performance with grant-writing— having so far captured $5.5 million, with an additional $6.9 million pending approval. A penchant for public engagement and innovation has placed the City at the forefront of financial best practices, further enhancing its ability to create complete neighborhoods. –S.N.

H | health isn’t just physique and numbers on a scale. That’s why the City offers a myriad of programs that promote overall physical, mental and social wellbeing. Check them out! –s.l. EAT HEALTHY Pick up fresh produce from the Farmer’s Market every Sunday morning (page 18).

G | government 2.0 We’re taking local government

CHALLENGE YOURSELF Train to your

physical best, whether on your own or for community events like the annual TCUSD 5K Run/Walk in spring.

to the next level with citizen

HAVE FUN Keeping active can be a blast!

participation. Dialogue with leading community progress.

Kids love the bounce-house mainstays at the City’s many community events held throughout the year.

Get started by enrolling in Citizen’s

EMPOWER OTHERS Don the purple

Academy to learn civics 101.

ribbon and join Relay for Life’s communitywide fight against cancer.

City Hall and take the reins in

Applications are due Sept. 27 and classes start Oct. 10 (page 2). Look for an expanded discussion on how we’re making City Hall more approachable in our Spring 2014 issue.

Events are typically held the last weekend of July (page 36). LEARN MORE Consult with the pros on healthy living. The annual trick-or-treat health fair for seniors is Oct. 31. Go booth to booth and pick up some useful wellness tips. TRY SOMETHING NEW Stimulate your senses with new experiences—martial arts perhaps? See the Recreation Guide on page 25. TAKE A DEEP BREATH With recent

regulations against smoking in public places, the City raised its grade from an F to A in the American Lung Association’s criteria for smoke-free policies.


temple city

feature

Complete Neighborhoods

I | i share the road

K | knowledge

Not long ago, regional transportation infrastructure was planned around cars. Today, we’re balancing the system by improving sidewalks, bikeways and transit facilities that not only promote an active lifestyle and reduce pollution, but entice drivers out of single-occupancy vehicles to experience the great neighborhood outdoors.

KNOWLEDGE IS POWER. EMPOWERED BY SUCH PROGRAMS AS STUDENT TOURS OF CITY HALL AND PUBLIC INFORMATION RESOURCES LIKE A NEW CITY WEBSITE BETALAUNCHING IN NOVEMBER, BIMONTHLY CITY MANAGER’S REPORTS AND CONNECT MAGAZINE, CITIZENS WHO WISH TO ARE WELL EQUIPPED TO PARTICIPATE IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT.

I J | joint ventures Teaming up with other agencies multiplies the City’s abilities and available resources to pursue ambitious new projects. Watch out for these three exciting partnerships that will help improve overall quality of life— enhancing civic facilities, elevating public information and uniting the community through service. CIVIC CENTER MASTER PLAN The City

is working with the County of Los Angeles on an effort to revitalize the area around Temple City Park, including possibly a new library building (page 22). BILLBOARD AWARENESS Axis Digital

Media has placed a new digital billboard at Rosemead Boulevard and Olive Street that will include City programming for public announcements and events. Read about this and other communications tools in “Plugging into City Hall” (page 20). BRUSH WITH KINDNESS San Gabriel

Valley Habitat for Humanity brings together the community to help low-income homeowners with house renovations. For more info on volunteering, or to enter your home as a project, visit www.sgvhabitat.org. Income eligibility requirements apply. 12

Fall 2013 www.templecity.us

K

L | locavore Consume local. Whether it’s regionally sourced produce or goods and services from Temple City businesses, spending locally not only supports your neighbors and fosters community interactions, but also bolsters tax revenues that sustain high service levels. To explore local businesses, visit the Chamber of Commerce at www.templecitychamber.com. Also keep up with our quarterly Counterparts feature (page 19).


[ a b c d e f g h i j k l m A to Z n o p q r s t u v w x y z ]

M | make tc happen

N | neighborhood appeal

Over the past several years, Temple City has been actively planning for the future, guided by nine City Councilidentified priorities: Vision and Long Range Planning; Sound Fiscal Policy; Public Health and Safety; Sustainable Infrastructure; Economic Development; Basic City Services; Redevelopment; Quality of Life; and Citizen Education and Communication. These categories have served as a means to guide decisionmaking and inform resource allocation for various projects and programs, ranging from parks and recreation to transportation and road improvements. While we’ve become a prepared community armed with data, ideas and planning documents—how will we make it all happen? With limited resources, what comes first? This fall, we’re launching a series of public engagement sessions and asking community members how and when to program exciting new projects and services. In the end, we’ll have a game plan of how to “Make TC Happen” over the next three to five years, that also includes a method of regularly tracking and reassessing progress over time. Get the conversation started at www.maketchappen.com. A community meeting will be held Nov. 21, with a subsequent gathering on Dec. 12.

Great neighborhoods start with great neighbors, and being a good neighbor can be rewarding—literally.

P | pothole patrol

Starting this fall, the City is launching its new Yard of the Quarter Awards to recognize the best homes and gardens in town. Taking pride in home maintenance isn’t just considerate of those who have to live next to you, but boosts the community’s overall curb appeal to help preserve property values. So pull on your gardening gloves and reap the benefits! Quarterly contests are held in three geographic areas, with winning homes selected by a judging panel. Homes must be in Temple City and entered through nomination. Judging for the “Fall Colors” contest is in October. Nominate your or your neighbor’s home by completing an entry form available at City Hall or www.templecity.us. For more information about the program and upcoming themes, turn to page 37 or call (626) 285-2171.

O O | out and about With a population of 35,558 and counting, our city’s comprised of a unique bunch of individuals. So get out and meet your neighbors! Every interaction helps build a stronger community. –S.L.

BECOME PART OF THE CITIZEN’S BRIGADE AGAINST BUMPY STREETS. REPORT POTHOLES TO THE PUBLIC SAFETY DIVISION FOR REPAIR WITHIN THREE BUSINESS DAYS. TOP MONTHLY PATROLLERS WIN RECOGNITION AND FREE GAS CARDS, WHILE THE REST OF US ENJOY A SMOOTHER CRUISE ALONG CITY STREETS. TO REPORT A POTHOLE, CALL (626) 285-2171, EXT. 2333, OR SEND AN EMAIL TO POTHOLEPATROL@TEMPLECITY.US. Temple City Connect

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temple city

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Complete Neighborhoods

Q

REIMAGINING TEMPLE CITY During the next two years, the City will be updating its General Plan, the document that creates a vision for Temple City’s built environment through 2050. It represents the best opportunity any community has to express its aspirations in broad strategic terms, focusing on ambitious long-range solutions. It is, in fact, an opportunity to re-imagine Temple City. According to State law, General Plans must include specific sections or “elements,” such as land use, circulation, housing, conservation and safety. But Planning Manager Geoffrey Starns reports that Temple City’s new General Plan will be innovatively organized by issues (e.g., revitalizing downtown, maintaining the character of our neighborhoods) in an effort to establish greater relevance to the public. The State of California encourages public participation in the preparation of General Plans, but in Temple City—where a tradition of citizen engagement is the cornerstone of every project and initiative—public participation will be an overriding factor. “This needs to

Q | qi Qi, pronounced chee, is Chinese for “life energy.” The traditional concept describes the force that circulates a larger body to link individual parts into a cohesive, functioning unit—much like the collective spirit that binds a community.

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Fall 2013 www.templecity.us

R | reimagining

be the community’s plan, what they want to see their city develop into over the next 35 years. It needs to be their vision, not ours,” emphasizes Starns, who reports there will be many opportunities for residents to get involved in the process. In addition to community workshops, a citizen-based General Plan Advisory Committee will hold public meetings to receive input. “We’re not going into this with any preconceived notions. That’s why the community needs to be involved and express its views,” explains Starns. When people meet on the General Plan, it’s an opportunity to discuss pragmatic approaches to the City’s most pressing issues, as well as to dream about a community that embraces innovation and creativity. In September, a planning consultant will be selected by City Council to work with staff on the General Plan. Starns insists that whatever firm is selected will not only possess exceptional urban planning credentials, but will also be experienced in reaching out to a diverse population. –S.N.


[ a b c d e f g h i j k l m A to Z n o p q r s t u v w x y z ]

S | sustainability

What goes around comes around. Making ‘green’ choices can have big impacts at the local and global levels. Check out three of the City’s upcoming and ongoing eco-friendly initiatives. –a. lee

URBAN RUNOFF All drains lead to the

ocean—and when it rains, stormwater runoff can carry debris that contributes to marine pollution. To minimize the bad stuff washing into our drains, the City is instituting new policies to promote water diversion. For instance, adding landscaping along a water flow path could not only help filter pollutants, but sustain plants and green life. ENERGY EFFICIENCY The Energy

Efficiency Climate Action Plan adopted in January challenges us to reduce communitywide greenhouse gas emissions

by 15 percent come 2020. Steps we’ve taken to reduce consumption include switching to motion-sensor lighting in City Hall, swapping for a fleet of hybrid vehicles, and now using bikes for public safety functions. How are you going green? RECYCLING They may not look it, but

some benches at our parks are already on their second life—having lived their first as beverage containers! Soon, the City expects to install a new piece of playground equipment at Temple City Park, also recycled from used bottles and cans.

U | user-friendliness

TO ENSURE CITY HALL REMAINS TRANSPARENT, ACCESSIBLE AND USER-FRIENDLY, WE’RE MAKING TECHNOLOGICAL ADJUSTMENTS THAT RANGE FROM A SEARCHABLE ONLINE PUBLIC RECORDS DATABASE, TO A NEW E-GOV APP FEATURING CITIZEN REQUEST TRACKING.

V | volunteers In 2012, the City’s volunteers clocked in a total of 12,960 hours of service— equivalent to having an additional six full-time employees around City Hall working nine to five, and then some! Get started volunteering with the City by calling (626) 285-2171, ext. 2361. Tasks range from office duties and translation, to special event support. –s.l.

T | trading places Out with the old, in with the new. As our community evolves, we’re focused on rebuilding Temple City to accommodate changing demographic needs. Whether providing more park space for our growing senior and young family populations to exercise and play; modernizing development to attract regional shoppers and business investment; or building more safe routes for students to walk or bike to school, we’re in the process of developing our infrastructure with tomorrow in mind.

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Complete Neighborhoods

W

Give yourselves a pat on the back, Temple Citians—we collaborated our way into becoming one of the safest cities in the U.S. W | watching each other’s backs Give yourselves a pat on the back, Temple Citians—we collaborated our way into becoming one of the safest cities in the U.S. Partner programs with the L.A. County Sheriff’s and Fire departments have trained citizens to help as extra eyes and ears through Neighborhood Watch, and extra hands through Community Emergency Response Training (CERT). Let’s keep up the good work. To find your Watch Area, or get updates on the next CERT enrollment, call (626) 285-2171, ext. 2333.

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X | marks the spot Brian Haworth, Assistant to the City Manager/Economic Development Manager, often uses the term “place-making” when he speaks passionately about creating the sense of arriving someplace special. His goal along with that of other City staff is to generate memorable experiences in Temple City, whether through a commercial development, community plaza, concert series or piece of public art. “Creating a new library that accommodates today’s needs—that’s placemaking. Creating a vibrant downtown district that competes with Monrovia or Pasadena— that’s placemaking,” he insists. One opportunity Haworth notes is creating environments that keep younger residents engaged. “As we start reinventing Temple City, we’ve got to continue to attract a younger, affluent clientele with innovative new eateries and cultural venues,” he says, suggesting that people are craving places— and excuses—to gather. As such, the City is actively pursuing endeavors like the Las Tunas Drive and Rosemead Boulevard enhancement projects, which feature such

new attractions as outdoor dining spaces and public art, as well as cycling and pedestrian facilities. “The goal is to invite people out, whether to shop, dine, or simply relax and enjoy their surroundings,” Haworth explains. Beyond accommodating to local audiences, these improvements will likely also draw more exciting businesses to open shop in town and attract adventurous visitors to pay attention to Temple City. Ultimately, the idea is that putting Temple City on the map and raising awareness of local offerings will prove a valid economic development strategy, as it will generate sales tax revenues by encouraging people to spend locally— whether they are tourists from Taipei or couples from Santa Monica day-tripping into the San Gabriel Valley, even local residents who’d otherwise shop outside of town. As new business opportunities arise, the community’s diverse cultures will no doubt be an asset for inspiring memorable shopping and dining experiences. –s.n.


[ a b c d e f g h i j k l m A to Z n o p q r s t u v w x y z ]

Y | you

THE WHOLE IS GREATER THAN THE SUM OF ITS PARTS. A COMMUNITY IS MUCH MORE THAN THE INDIVIDUALS THAT COMPRISE IT. GET INVOLVED AND ENGAGE IN THE PROCESS TO SHAPE TEMPLE CITY INTO THE CITY YOU WANT IT TO BE.

Z

Z | zoning Unless you’re a developer—or have had the misfortune of getting embroiled in a land use controversy—most residents go through life never fully appreciating the significance of zoning. But as Planning Manager Geoffrey Starns notes, zoning is one of the most essential tools for maintaining a safe, efficient and attractive community. “The Zoning Code restricts specific land uses within distinct districts to protect public health and safety,” says Starns. “It helps ensure that planned buildings don’t negatively impact neighboring properties,

so you won’t end up having to live next door to a factory.” While Starns points out that Temple City’s high property values is partially a result of successful zoning, he also notes that regulations need to evolve with generational needs and market trends. For one, he notes the Sign Code section, which dates back to 1960. Not only is it technologically outdated—it mentions nothing about regulating digital signage—it is also so restrictive that it doesn’t allow businesses to be creative or expressive. He suggests this

suppression of good design is a particular handicap at a time when the City is attempting to make its downtown area more attractive to younger customers who respond to contemporary design. Other priorities for modernizing the Zoning Code include historic preservation and exploring mixed commercial-residential development in some parts of the city. In October, the City will open discussion to establish a Historic Preservation Ordinance, seeking public input on how to best approach the issue of protecting historic resources. While Starns has heard concerns from property owners fearing any possible restrictions, regulations are often not as onerous as some believe. In many cases, local governments will provide financial incentives to support preservation efforts. Aside from conserving existing properties, Starns notes that the City is considering integrating mixed-use in some parts of town in response to increasing market demand. “Younger people and baby boomers are downsizing from big houses and are interested in more urban, pedestrian-friendly living environments.” Planning the future Temple City therefore requires a balance of protecting existing single-family neighborhoods and providing opportunities for mixed-use to thrive in appropriate environments. As zoning matters are subject to public hearings, Starns encourages the public to take part in upcoming discussions. –s.n.

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Crisp fruits and veggies • Homemade honey • Baked goods Delectable desserts • Gourmet teas • Green plants • Fresh cut flowers

Temple City

FARMER's market

Stock your fridge with crisp autumn produce every Sunday morning at Temple City Farmer’s Market where an abundance of fruits and veggies awaits you. Sample homegrown fall flavors that are sure to make the perfect addition to your next holiday gathering. Visit City Hall for affordable and organic produce, specialty goods, and to-die-for desserts that will make your taste buds go wild!

Every Sunday from 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. • City Hall Parking Lot, 9701 Las Tunas Dr.

Get Figgy With It

EVERYONE KNOWS THANKSGIVING TU RKEY IS BEST SCRUMPTIOUS SID E DIS HE S THAT HAVE YOU SA HOURS BEFORE DIN LIVATING FOR NER. TEST OUT THIS RECIPE THAT’S SO IT’LL KEEP YOUR GU GO OD , SO MOUTHWATERING, ESTS COMING BACK FOR SECONDS— OR THIRDS AND FOUR THS! COMPLEMENTED BY

Fig-Apple Stuffing

1 pound Italian sausage, casings removed 2 cups chopped onion 2 Granny Smith apples, pee led, cored and chopped 3 stalks celery, chopped 2 cups apple cider

1 cup chicken broth 1 tablespoon fresh sage 1 tablespoon fresh thyme 1 teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon black pepper 4 figs, cubed 1 package dry stuffing mix

1. Preheat oven to 350 degree s. Prepare a 4-quart cassero le dish with non-stick cooking spray. 2. Cook sausage. In same pan , saute prepared onions, app les, figs and celery. Add apple cider, chicken broth, herbs, salt and pepper. Remove from heat. 3. Place stuffing mix in larg e bowl. Add sausage and veg gie mixture. Toss until moistened. Place in casserole dish, cover with alum inum foil, and bake for 30 minutes. Rem ove foil; bake 15 minutes long er. 18

Fall 2013 www.templecity.us


temple city

counterparts

WHAT’S A COMPLETE MEAL WITHOUT A DELECTABLE TREAT TO END? SATISFY YOUR SWEET TOOTH WITH OUR ROUNDUP OF DESSERTS IN TEMPLE CITY.

Kinda Asian-ish, Kinda Western-ish BY STEPHANIE CHAN BY STEPHANIE CHAN

ISH KITCHEN Hidden along Rosemead Boulevard is a Temple City gem designed to reflect a posh restaurant in Beverly Hills—at least that’s the experience co-owner Tracy Lac hopes to create for customers of Ish Kitchen. “We wanted people in this area to try something different,” says Lac who opened Ish with business partners Louis Phan and Kerry Matthew two years ago. “We wanted to bring a Beverly Hills style [atmosphere] to Temple City, but at half the price.” Unlike other Asian eateries in town, Ish stands out with its unique dishes, offering a bit of flavor from different countries by infusing popular plates into one. For example, Ish’s Mini Spicy Tuna Tacos take inspiration from Japanese-style raw spicy tuna rolls. Typically served with rice and wrapped in seaweed sheets, Lac serves her version Mexican-style in a hard taco shell. So where does Ish find inspiration for its distinctive concoctions? According to Lac, who was born in Nha Trang, Vietnam, it’s the combined past experiences of her and her business partners that led to their fusion-dining concept. “All three of us had experience working in restaurants, starting off as hosts, waiters, bartenders—I was a waitress—and eventually chefs. We didn’t go to culinary school, but we like to dine so we just combined all these different foods into our own menu.” And with such an expansive selection, it’s hard for Lac to recommend a favorite. As chef— and occasional server when regulars request to chat with the cook herself—her suggestion for deciding customers is to go by what they don’t eat. “Before I recommend something, I like to ask ‘what don’t you eat?’” says Lac. “If someone says they don’t eat beef, then I wouldn’t recommend the Beef Carpaccio Roll Up, even though it’s one of our most popular dishes, because it’s not something that that customer would enjoy. Everyone has different taste.” For newcomers who have yet to try Ish, customer favorites include the Ish Wings, described as “a little sweet, salty and spicy,” as well as the Shrimp Pasta cooked in homemade Uni Sauce—a dressing Lac makes herself with sea urchin.

GUPPY HOUSE Dig into Guppy House’s mountain of shaved ice with condensed milk and mix-ins like fruit, red bean, taro and boba. Or, go more decadent with the thick brick toast served with a side of ice cream and drizzled in chocolate and creamy peanut butter sauces. 5747 Rosemead Blvd. (626) 285-0288 www.myguppyteahouse.com

CAFÉ ROULE Order a cup of coffee to complement a perfectly torched crème brulee or piece of organic cheesecake at Café Roule. Did we mention there’s free Wi-Fi? 9153 Las Tunas Dr. (626) 872-1188 www.caferoule.com

TEA STATION Sip on brown sugar milk tea for a liquid-based treat at Tea Station. Add in chewy aloe vera, sweetened beans or various jellies for a unique textural experience. 9578 Las Tunas Dr. (626) 291-5688 www.teastationusa.com

CLOVERLEAF COFFEE & BAKERY Let’s talk buns—bread buns. Choose from a wide selection of pastries at Cloverleaf Coffee & Bakery, from taro croissants to custard vanilla buns. The display case of individual cakes and tarts is also sure to delight. 9475 Las Tunas Dr. (626) 285-0100

Ish Kitchen 5612 Rosemead Blvd., (626) 309-1338 www.ishkitchen.com

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temple templecity city feature feature

Let’s get dig-i-tal, dig-i-tal! Flex those civic engagement muscles and get active in City Hall

PLUGGING INTO CITY HALL

with our interactive tech tools featuring new ways to access public information and services. So bust out your smart phones and boot up your laptops—it’s time to plug in. BY WENDY CHUNG AND CHELSEA PITCHER

ON THE WEB

Your virtual City Hall, aka www.templecity.us, is getting a facelift. Look forward to a new modern interface and user capabilities to help you better find information and keep up with City affairs.

PLATFORM

It’s City Hall at your fingertips. Get interactive with express access to public services and information. Report an issue or request a service anywhere, anytime through your mobile device.

Our beta test site goes live on Nov. 1—that’s 1101 for the techies—with official launch on Dec. 25. It’s our gift to you!

DOWNLOAD

Once our website is live, we’ll roll out our mobile app in early 2014. New year, new app!

Don’t ever skip another beat. Sync your personal calendar with ours to get reminders for important public meetings and City events.

CALENDAR

Can’t remember if that meeting you wanted to attend was on Monday or Wednesday? Open up the calendar for quick and convenient reference.

Informed involvement is a piece of cake with enhanced access to agendas and documents, frequent updates from the new Connect blog, and the ‘Notify Me’ subscription manager.

Wish your errands would run themselves? At least you can save a trip to City Hall by requesting services directly online. Soon, you’ll be able to book facilities and submit forms without stepping outside your home.

Share Temple City with friends and family by sending photo gallery images as virtual postcards! Link them by social media or email and help them discover our community.

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ON THE GO

Fall 2013

www.templecity.us

ENGAGE

Unable to reach us during normal business hours? No fear—shoot us a direct message through the app and we’ll get back to you by email or phone.

REQUEST

You’re out on the town and see something amiss—pothole, graffiti, etc.—report it on the spot. Even if it’s a Saturday and City Hall is closed, snap a picture, geotag it and send it to us. We’ll be sure to follow up—you can even track our progress directly on your phone.

SHARE

Crowdsource your way to community improvement. When you geotag your request, staff can visualize frequently reported areas and issues to help prioritize resources.


CONNECT WITH CITY HALL CITIES ARE GETTING INTO THE SOCIAL MEDIA GROOVE AND POSTING JUST AS OFTEN AS YOUR AVERAGE TEEN—IF NOT MORE! WITH REAL-TIME UPDATING AND UNIQUE DIALOGUING CAPABILITY, SOCIAL MEDIA ALLOW USERS TO SHARE INFORMATION AND ENTER CONVERSATIONS—MAKING IT THE PERFECT GOVERNMENT 2.0 TOOL. PLUS, WITH YOUNGER GENERATIONS NOW ARGUABLY SPENDING MORE TIME ON THAN OFFLINE, THESE FAST (AND FREE!) PLATFORMS ALLOW CITY HALL TO REACH AND ENGAGE AN ENTIRELY NEW AUDIENCE.

TECH GLOSSARY APP Short for ‘application,’ refers to downloadable programs for mobile devices that perform specific functions. E.g., mapping, social media, gaming, etc. BLOG Abbreviated from ‘web log,’ refers to websites that host regularly updated entries of information including news briefs and photos.

CROWDSOURCING A method of

SOCIAL MEDIA TWITTER A little birdie told me you can follow @ConnectwithTC to get bite-size morsels of #TempleCity news in 140 characters or less. Mention us in a tweet, and we will surely tweet right back atcha! FACEBOOK Find and “like” our page at www.facebook.com/ConnectwithTC to be in the know on everything Temple City, from upcoming events and meetings to community photos and random fun facts. (Come on—you don’t want to have our followers from Australia, India, Taiwan, Japan, Turkey and Poland out-know you when it comes to local news!) INSTAGRAM

Add your Kodak moment to the local stream of submitted photos by hashtagging #TempleCity, or tagging us @ConnectwithTC.

NEXTDOOR “Knock knock.” Nowadays, conflicting work schedules and family life can keep neighbors from exchanging little more than a quick “Hello!” While it doesn’t substitute personal interaction, Nextdoor is the next best thing allowing users to share information ranging from Neighborhood Watch to upcoming block parties. So log on to www.templecity.nextdoor.com and see “who’s there!”

interaction in which a host encourages user response to generate an ultimate solution or end product.

E-GOV Short for ‘electronic government,’ refers to the use of digital technologies by public agencies for such functions as civic engagement, service delivery, etc. FOLLOW Pertaining to Twitter, refers to the act of subscribing to a user’s tweets.

GEOTAG Used on various social media sites to geographically correlate posts and photos with specific locations. E.g., Doing tai chi—at Temple City Park HASHTAG Used on various social media sites to allow users to share and track conversations about a hashtagged subject. E.g., #TempleCity rocks! LIKE Pertaining to Facebook, refers to the

OTHER WAYS TO KEEP UP WHETHER YOU’RE LOOKING FORWARD TO AN UPCOMING EVENT OR RESEARCHING HISTORIC TEMPLE CITY, WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED. DIGITAL BILLBOARD If you haven’t already noticed, a digital billboard has just arrived at the corner of Rosemead Boulevard and Olive Street. As part of a partnership with Axis Digital Media, the City is able to use the platform for public announcements. Plus, with Rosemead Boulevard a significant commuter highway, this unique opportunity will bring all eyes on Temple City. PUBLIC RECORDS Believe it or not kids, once upon a time, City Hall operated without computers—which means that today, we have roomfuls of paper-only typewriter-generated public records. Tech savvy local-history buffs rejoice as we’re digitizing them all into a searchable database of past meeting minutes, ordinances, resolutions, etc., that you’ll be able to access online by summer 2014.

act of subscribing to a user’s posts. Also a positive response to a post.

NEWS FEED A collection of updates from followed users, usually accessed through the homepage.

SOCIAL MEDIA Refers to various online communications platforms focused on community-based input and collaboration, social interactions and content sharing.

TAG Used on various social media sites to allow users to label and identify posts with certain individuals, locations, conversation topics, etc. See also geotag and hashtag. TWEET A Twitter post. Also used in verb form in reference to creating tweets. Temple City Connect

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temple city

feature

THE 21ST CENTURY LIBRARY The public library is hardly obsolete. In fact, it’s just now coming of age.

BY STEVE NATHAN

If you haven’t been to a public library in a while, chances are your nostalgic memories need some freshening up. Gone is the Dewey Decimal System file cabinet, replaced by a computer catalog. The main collection of books is now multilingual—and shrinking as the use of e-books grows. Even the librarians no longer fit the familiar image of the austere, bespectacled lady, as they are represented today by a diverse, tech-savvy bunch. Though you still can’t make too much noise in the library, entire spaces are dedicated to interactive events, with some sites even brewing caffe lattes. The neighborhood library isn’t what it used to be, nor are its users. But properly designed, well-programmed libraries can accommodate evolving needs to remain valuable cultural, social and educational institutions. As part of the Civic Center Master Plan, an effort to revitalize the area around Temple City Park, the possibility of updating local public library resources to 21st century standards has emerged as an exciting possibility. The Role of Library Margaret Donnellan Todd, who has been County Librarian for the massive County of Los Angeles Public Library system since 2001, is extremely upbeat about the future. The role of the library in American life is

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Fall 2013 www.templecity.us

hardly diminishing, she says. Even in a digital age that packs a massive virtual collection of reading materials into an e-reader no thicker than your average magazine. “The more our digital collection expands, the more users can access our resources, and our physical

buildings get busier,” reports Donnellan Todd. “Thirty years ago, many users would drop in for 15 to 20 minutes, but now they come to stay.” The concept of the library as that “third place”—not home, not school— is very appealing not only to students but working adults as well. “People still like to browse,” says veteran library consultant Linda Demmers, who is conducting a joint Library Needs Assessment for the City and the County Library. She explains that the demise of brick-and-mortar bookstores has made the library an even more important place to scratch that browsing itch. The love of browsing is not something appreciated only by older generations, she says, emphasizing that even kids raised in a wireless world enjoy perusing books and publications. “Parents still prefer bringing their kids to read, for the tactile experience of turning the page,” she says. Nonetheless, our fondness of browsing and page-turning is not holding back the digital revolution. As Donnellan Todd reports, downloads of the County’s books, music


and magazines from the “virtual library” amounts to an enormous circulation that, if compared against the County’s 85 physical libraries, would rank eighth overall. But the technological transition from page to screen is only part of the changing character of the local library. An equally transformational trend is the increased amount of programming offered. Beyond reading and discreet socializing, the neighborhood library now fosters overt interaction and engagement, with a full calendar of workshops, films and demonstrations for every age group. For one, the West Hollywood library features storytime with professional actors reading to children through a program sponsored by the Screen Actors Guild. Meanwhile, the Los Angeles Opera visits seven or eight branches each year, with its singers performing and explaining arias to young people. Other special guests include magicians, yoga instructors, puppeteers, aroma therapists and animal trainers at facilities throughout the County system, of which Temple City Library is a part. These events draw standing room only attendance and are particularly valuable cultural experiences for those who would otherwise not have the opportunity. To Jing Li, Community Library Manager at Temple City Library since December 2012 and decade-long Temple City resident, library resources are a vital asset. “The library is becoming a more popular place because of technology. Now we offer more services and programs to the community,” she says, noting that many guests enjoy computers, Wi-Fi, downloadable books, audio-books, music and magazines—all free of charge. “Before I worked for Temple City Library, I used to bring my twin girls every week for storytime, and on Saturdays to play with the toys and computers. I can tell that the library plays an important role in their lives and they’ve developed the love of reading,” says the proud mom. Evaluating Local Needs With a great school district and safe neighborhoods, Temple City naturally attracts families that place a high priority on education. While noting that “a community that values education for its children usually equally values its libraries,” Demmers is quick to point out that communities will vary greatly over the role their libraries should play.

According to Donnellan Todd, while she’s seen both predominantly-Asian and lowerincome Latino communities share tremendous enthusiasm for libraries, the two populations differ in how vocal they are. “Many less affluent Hispanic communities also value libraries, but they may not yet have discovered their voice.” She also notes that many immigrants are unfamiliar with the American public library concept, in which services are free and available to everybody. In some parts of the world, libraries are viewed as strictly adult environments limited to serious research. In determining what priorities are important—more books in a native language, for example—

Donnellan Todd concludes, “Demographics won’t tell you the answer; you have to ask.” To identify the priorities of Temple City library users, Demmers is now working with the City and County to conduct a Library Needs Assessment, gathering input through a community survey and visioning committee. Data will be used to help plan future library services, programs and facilities—including different scenarios for a new building to be based on various considerations like physical requirements and funding levels. Despite her years of experience, Demmers admits the results of these surveys can be surprising. When conducting simultaneous

BIG IDEAS MAY CARVE NEW ‘HEART OF THE CITY’ While many look forward to what could be a new library, City Manager Jose Pulido is thinking bigger picture and promoting the Civic Center Master Plan—an effort that could potentially see the City, Los Angeles County and Temple City Unified School District (TCUSD) joining forces on an ambitious project that features a new library, City Hall, community center and school district headquarters. “It would become the heart of the City— something we don’t currently have,” says Pulido, who favors pursuing the project as a Public-Private Partnership (P3). In one ideal scenario, the three public entities would contribute funds and/or land, to be constructed by a for-fee private developer. The resulting Civic Center would then be owned and managed by a newly formed single-purpose entity (SPE). “This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that doesn’t come around often,” says Pulido, noting that once built, new structures stay in place for 35 to 50 years. “We have the unique chance to come together as a community to rebuild our city for the next generation, which includes our school children.” Upon his arrival to Temple City in 2009, Pulido recalls being astonished during his first tour of TCUSD headquarters. “I remember thinking it was an antiquated building, and that had really outlived its use and needed modernizing. There were very few windows, and the restrooms were being used as storage space. In my opinion, it didn’t reflect the district’s high academic performance standard,” he said, suggesting that this could be an ideal opportunity for TCUSD to join the project and occupy a first-rate facility that aligns with its impressive academic achievement. If fully maximized, the project could involve a new school district

headquarters and possibly even a mixed-used development on what is currently TCUSD property. Adding to the vision for a combined civic space, County Librarian Margaret Donnellan Todd believes there may be an opportunity for the three entities to share common event space to thereby reduce overall construction and operating costs of a new library. A large auditorium, she says, could conceivably serve as City Council Chambers, School Board meeting room, and a venue for special presentations at the library. As Donnellan Todd points out, some innovative examples of joint facilities already exist in her library system—including Westlake Village and Agoura Hills. She cautions, however, that these situations require a commitment to coordination from each of the participating jurisdictions. Conceptual site plans have been prepared by Gonzalez Goodale Architects for variations on a multijurisdictional Civic Center Master Plan. A project of the magnitude envisioned by City leaders could potentially cost more than $30 million, but could instantly become an iconic gathering place for the community—integrated with the existing green space of Temple City Park and the upcoming Las Tunas Drive downtown revitalization plan. By providing state-of-the-art facilities that reflect the excellence of the respective institutions involved, Pulido is convinced the new Civic Center could enhance the image of Temple City, while making government more efficient and accessible. “For this to be successful, we will need everybody to participate and will need our community’s support,” he says. For the project to continue, all parties must concur. And if that happens, says Pulido, community meetings to discuss the project could happen as early as next year.

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surveys for Mill Valley (just north of San Francisco) and San Marino, she expected responses in the two high-end communities to mirror one another. But Mill Valley was adamant about an emphasis on non-fiction and research materials, while San Marino respondents demanded more popular fiction. “If you only scratch the surface lightly, you’d think they’d come out the same,” Demmers says, noting this experience underscores the importance of conducting local surveys. Warning against assumptions, Donnellan Todd notes, “With different communities, even those with similar characteristics, you’ll get different answers to the same question.” For instance, ethnically equivalent communities may respond varyingly to adding materials in their native language. And despite being in the digital age, not everyone embraces technology. For a new branch in Topanga, County Library administrators expected a strong preference for a cutting-edge, high tech environment, but surveyed residents were most vocal about comfortable seating. Demmers has also seen senior citizens surprise anyone who might assume their needs are less sophisticated than those of students or young professionals. “They are very outspoken and don’t like being pegged as simply favoring large typeface books,” she says. In reality, seniors are technologically savvy and if they need assistance with technology, the librarian is the first person they choose to consult. Most importantly, the community library must suit the local lifestyle. Case in point, respondents to a survey conducted in the neighboring communities of Acton and Agua Dulce, a rural area of Los Angeles County, insisted on a hitching post outside the building—so they could ride their horses to the library.

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The Building Clearly, the library as an institution has changed dramatically since the current Temple City Library was completed in 1962, and any new facility must address those changes. Not only must the building be wired for the 21st century, it must offer adequate space to accommodate the diverse array of activities demanded by today’s library users. Some people come to seek solitude and silence, while others come to enjoy human interaction or be entertained. “There’s one group that stays for hours; then there’s the grab-and-go crowd who know exactly where to find what they’re looking for, scan it at a self-service counter and be gone before their short-term parking expires,” says Demmers. Accommodating those disparate types of customers in a single structure is not only an operational challenge, but an architectural one as well. Because of technology, the library never truly closes. “As a reflection of our 24-hour society, people reserve books at two o’clock in the morning or sit outside the library at midnight connecting to the building’s Wi-Fi,” says Donnellan Todd, who welcomes even the most unconventional uses of the library. “We tend not to be judgmental about how people use our libraries,” she says. “These are taxpayers, so the public library should be what they want it to be, not what we decide it should be.” As part of the Library Needs Assessment, Demmers will also be developing different space needs options for a new building to integrate into a possible Civic Center revitalization (page 23). “When we design a facility, in addition to considerations of public

uses, we look for spaces with clean sight lines so we don’t have to do any babysitting,” says Donnellan Todd, who explains that nooks and crannies require additional staff supervision whether people are seated there or not. And two-story structures tend to be more labor-intensive, while outdoor spaces, if they can be appropriately landscaped and secured, are attractive to users in sunny Southern California. At the moment, the project is in its preliminary stages and the County Library has yet to identify a capital budget. However, while the size and price tag of a possible new building are unknown, the City is starting to explore how a proposal might proceed. One particularly attractive option is to combine resources with the County, and possibly Temple City Unified School District. Such a scenario would allow all three agencies to modernize facilities at a lower, shared cost. In other communities, new facilities have also been made possible through philanthropic donations. Stay Engaged As Demmers notes, the ultimate role and design of any future new library will be determined by the public—its users. For that reason, residents are highly encouraged to become involved in the process as it moves forward. Results for the Library Needs Assessment Survey will be available on the City’s website by the end of September. Interested community members are also invited to join the Library Services Visioning Committee to lead discussions and generate fresh ideas for modernizing programs, collections and facilities. Members must be able to commit to attending two meetings at the library on Sept. 12 and Oct. 3. Public attendance is also encouraged. For more information, contact the City Manager’s Office at (626) 285-2171. CHECK IT OUT See what activities and services are available at Temple City Library. Visit in person at 5939 Golden West Ave., call (626) 385-2136 or log on to www.colapublib.org/libs/templecity.


recreation guide

DON’T JUST STAND THERE! GET YOUR BODY MOVING AND YOUR BRAIN THINKING WITH STIMULATING PROGRAMS AND CLASSES WITH OUR PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT.

CLASSES

Sign up for classes in person, by mail or online at www.templecity.us starting Sept. 5. Registration forms can be obtained at Live Oak Park Community Center, 10144 Bogue St. Incomplete applications or checks may result in failed enrollment. Space is limited, so reserve your spot early! For more information, call the Parks and Recreation Department at (626) 579-0461.

SPORTS

Get Active!

temple city

Classes begin the week of Sept. 23 at Live Oak Park unless otherwise noted. No classes will be held on Oct. 31, Nov. 11, 28 and 29. Please note that class schedules and prices are subject to change.

TABLE OF CONTENTS YOUTH & TEENS

CLASSES Child Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Dance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Educational . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Music and Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Self Defense and Martial Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Special Interest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 SPORTS PROGRAMS Skills and League Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 YOUTH & TEENS Teen Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 SENIORS

SENIORS

Senior Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Senior Excursions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

FALL FESTIVAL OCT. 19 TEMPLE CITY PARK

CLASS KEY

ACTIVE LIFESTYLE

FREE

EDUCATIONAL

NEW

Temple City Connect

25


CHILD DEVELOPMENT

HIP-HOP DANCE Shekinah Glory School of Dance

CLASSES

LITTLE STARS

Learn to pop, lock and groove with heart-pumping choreography taught by a West Coast Nationals champion.

Recreation Leaders

Bond with your tot through song, game, stories and crafts in this parent participation class. CODE

DATES

AGE

DAY

9630

9/24-12/5

2 yrs. T/Th

TIME

FEE

9:30-10:45 a.m.

$100

CODE

DATES

AGE

9729 9730 9731

9/24-11/12 9/24-11/12 9/24-11/12

5-7 yrs. T 8-11 yrs. T 12+ yrs. T

DAY

TIME

FEE

3:30-4:15 p.m. 4:15-5 p.m. 5-5:45 p.m.

$58 $58 $58

TINY TOTS

JAZZ

Sarah Nichols Tiny Tots

Shekinah Glory School of Dance

Toddlers can build social skills, make new friends and learn independence while experiencing music, art projects and group activities. Children must be at least three years old and potty-trained by the first class. In-person registration required; bring proof of birth date and immunization record.

Instruction in traditional jazz dance includes proper technique, stretching and muscle conditioning. Jazz shoes required.

CODE

DATES

AGE

DAY

9631 9632

9/25-12/16 9/24-12/12

3-5 yrs. M/W/F 3-5 yrs. T/Th

TIME

FEE

9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

$370 $260

CODE

DATES

AGE

9649 9650

9/26-11/21 9/26-11/21

6-8 yrs. Th 9+ yrs. Th

DAY

TIME

FEE

3:30-4:15 p.m. 4:15-5 p.m.

$58 $58

LINE DANCE Bill Chang

DANCE

Step into this old Western dance—with a twist! Learn basic line dancing set to country and non-country music. Level I for beginners, levels II and III for experienced dancers.

ADULT JAZZ/TAP Shekinah Glory School of Dance

Taught by a West Coast Nationals champion, this class will help you master jazz and tap dance. CODE

DATES

AGE

9633

9/26-11/21

8+ yrs. Th

DAY

TIME

FEE

6-6:45 p.m.

$58

BALLET & TAP Shekinah Glory School of Dance

Lively music and classical dance steps introduce children to the art of dance from beginning to advanced levels, including barre work for experienced students. Ballet and tap shoes required. CODE

DATES

LEVEL

9634 9635 9636 9637 9638

9/27-11/15 9/27-11/15 9/27-11/15 9/27-11/15 9/27-11/15

Tots Tots Petite Beg. Jr.-Adv.

AGE

2 yrs. 3 yrs. 4-5 yrs. 6-8 yrs. 8+ yrs.

DAY TIME

FEE

F F F F F

$58 $58 $68 $68 $68

2:15-2:45 p.m. 2:45-3:15 p.m. 3:15-4 p.m. 4-4:45 p.m. 4:45-5:45 p.m.

BALLROOM DANCE

CODE

DATES

LEVEL

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

9641 9642 9643 9644 9645 9646 9647 9648

9/27-12/20 9/27-12/20 9/24-12/17 9/23-12/16 9/26-12/12 9/24-12/17 9/25-12/11 9/27-12/23

Level II Level III Level II Level I Level II Level I Level I Level II

15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs. 15+ yrs.

F F T M Th T W F

$60 $60 $60 $60 $60 $60 $60 $60

6:20-7:50 p.m. 8-9:30 p.m. 7:40-9:10 p.m. 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. 9-10:30 a.m. 6-7:30 p.m. 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.

EDUCATIONAL BRICKS 4 KIDZ Bricks 4 Kidz

Have loads of fun—and learn a bunch!—using LEGO® bricks to explore the worlds of engineering and architecture. CODE

DATES

AGE

9651

9/23-10/29

6-10 yrs. T

DAY

TIME

FEE

3:30-4:30 p.m.

$85

Robert Chin

COMPUTER ADVENTURES ALL AGES

Have fun while learning the latest routines and techniques. Dances include the Cha-Cha, Rumba, Samba, Waltz, Tango and Foxtrot. Dance shoes required.

AGI Academy

CODE

DATES

LEVEL

AGE

DAY TIME

9639

9/28-11/21

Beg./Int. 16+ yrs. S

11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

FEE

$55

This course is designed especially for learners who are interested in sharpening their computer skills in Microsoft Office applications—Word, PowerPoint and Excel. $10 supply fee due at first class. CODE

DATES

AGE

Shekinah Glory School of Dance

9654 9734

9/27-10/25 11/1-12/6

8-14 yrs. F 8-14 yrs. F

Prepare for stage performance in ballet, hip-hop, jazz and lyrical dance. Experience required. Choreography by a West Coast Nationals champion.

COMPUTERS FOR SENIORS (ENGLISH)

COMPETITION DANCE STYLE

CODE

DATES

9640 9/26-11/21

26

AGE

DAY

8+ yrs. Th

Fall 2013 www.templecity.us

DAY

TIME

FEE

8-9 p.m. 8-9 p.m.

$89 $89

TIME

FEE

AGI Academy

5-6 p.m.

$58

It’s never too late to learn! Get hands-on practice with basic computer usage and word processing. $10 supply fee due at first class. CODE

DATES

AGE

9652 9732

9/27-10/25 11/1-12/6

50+ yrs. F 50+ yrs. F

DAY

TIME

FEE

11:15 a.m.-12 p.m. 11:15 a.m.-12 p.m.

$59 $59


SUN-MOON YOGA

AGI Academy

Michael Appleby

Learn and master basic computer usage and word processing skills for users fluent in Mandarin or Cantonese. $10 supply fee due at first class.

Balance, strengthen, align and flex. A well-developed mind-body rapport brings better health and well-being. Yoga mat required.

CODE

DATES

AGE

9653 9733

9/27-10/25 11/1-12/6

50+ yrs. F 50+ yrs. F

CODE

DATES

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

9664

9/23-12/2

16+ yrs.

M

$60

DAY

TIME

FEE

12:30-1:15 p.m. 12:30-1:15 p.m.

$59 $59

TOTAL YOGA BEAT STRESS AND TONE

DEBATE AND PUBLIC SPEAKING

Amy’s Health & Fitness

AGI Academy

Boost academic success by developing debate and public speaking skills through oral communication and argumentation training. $10 supply fee due at first class. CODE

DATES

AGE

DAY

9655 9735

9/27-10/25 11/1-12/6

10-14 yrs. F 10-14 yrs. F

TIME

FEE

7-8 p.m. 7-8 p.m.

$89 $89

Feel invigorated from the inside out through a flowing series of dynamic poses. Great for beginner and intermediate level students. Fitness mat required. CODE

DATES

9660 9/25-11/27

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

16+ yrs.

W

$50

CHILDREN’S MUSICAL THEATER

45+ CARDIO DANCE & STRENGTH TRAINING

Kids Music N’ Motion

Amy’s Health & Fitness

Build strength through a fusion of low-impact, high-energy dance and exercise. Bring two light hand weights (2-3 lbs. each). CODE

DATES

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

9656 9657 9658

9/23-12/2 9/25-11/27 9/23-12/2

45+ yrs. 45+ yrs. 45+ yrs.

M 8:15-9:45 a.m. W 8:15-9:45 a.m. M/W 8:15-9:45 a.m.

$43 $43 $73

Amy’s Health & Fitness

Burn calories, reduce stress and build strength through the comfort of a chair and gentle stretching relaxation techniques. Bring two light hand weights (2-3 lbs. each). CODE

DATES

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

9659

9/23-12/2

60+ yrs.

M/W 9-9:45 a.m.

$35

KICKBOXING CARDIO DANCE CHALLENGE & STRENGTH TRAINING Amy’s Health & Fitness

Combine the intensity and power of kickboxing with the playfulness and fun of dance for a unique workout. Bring two light hand weights (2-3 lbs. each). Exercise mat required. CODE

DATES

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

9661

9/26-12/12

16+ yrs.

Th

$50

SENIOR FITNESS SWEATING TO THE OLDIES Amy’s Health & Fitness

Burn calories and strengthen your heart while singing along to your favorite hits of the ’50s and ’60s. You’ll have so much fun, you’ll forget you’re exercising! Must register in person, space is limited. DATES

9662 9/27-11/15

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

60+ yrs.

F

Free

8:30-9:45 a.m.

SLIM & TONE PILATES/ RESISTANCE BAND TRAINING Amy’s Health & Fitness

Trim your waistline with core exercises that also help stabilize your entire body. Yoga mat required. CODE

DATES

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

9663

9/28-12/7

16+ yrs.

S

$55

8:45-10:30 a.m.

Students are taught basic theater, improvisation skills and vocal techniques using music from major Broadway musicals. Performance for family and friends held at the end of the session. $25 materials fee due at first class. CODE

DATES

9675 9/28-10/25 9676 11/1-12/7

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

5-13 yrs. 5-13 yrs.

S S

$65 $65

9-9:45 a.m. 9-9:45 a.m.

GROUP PIANO LESSONS Kids Music N’ Motion

60+ STRONGER SENIOR CORE FITNESS

7-8:30 p.m.

7-8:30 p.m.

MUSIC AND PRODUCTION

FITNESS

CODE

7-9 p.m.

CLASSES

COMPUTERS FOR SENIORS (CHINESE)

Hit that key with basic note recognition, keyboard scales and music theory foundation in a group setting. Each class includes keyboards for students. $25 material fee due at first class. CODE

DATES

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

9679 9680 9681 9682 9683 9684

11/1-12/7 9/28-10/25 11/1-12/7 9/28-10/25 11/1-12/7 11/1-12/7

4-6 yrs. 4-6 yrs. 4-6 yrs. 7-10 yrs. 7-10 yrs. 7-10 yrs.

S S S S S S

$65 $65 $65 $65 $65 $65

12-12:45 p.m. 1-1:45 p.m. 1-1:45 p.m. 1:45-2:30 p.m. 1:45-2:30 p.m. 2:30-3:15 p.m.

INTRO TO BAND Kids Music N’ Motion

Experiment with different types of instruments, and learn music history and theory in this exploratory course. Students will gain the knowledge necessary to be successful in band or ensemble music. Materials and instruments supplied by Kids Music N’ Motion. CODE DATES

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

9737 9738

5-8 yrs. 5-8 yrs.

S S

$65 $65

9/28-10/25 11/1-12/7

5:15-6 p.m. 5:15-6 p.m.

MUSIC N’ MOTION CLASSES Kids Music N’ Motion

Classes introduce children to instruments, orchestra, creative movement, singing, listening and rhythm. Each week children and parents will learn new songs including holiday, traditional, folk and multicultural music. CODE DATES

LEVEL AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

9665 9666 9669 9670

Infant Infant Preschool Beg.-Pre.

S S S S

$55 $55 $55 $55

9/28-10/25 11/1-12/7 9/28-10/25 11/1-12/7

0-2.5 yrs. 0-2.5 yrs. 2.5-5 yrs. 2.5-5 yrs.

10-10:45 a.m. 10-10:45 a.m. 11-11:45 a.m. 11-11:45 a.m.

Temple City Connect

27


y Tons of Cand Bingo

mes a G l a iv n r a C Free

Bike & Toy Raffles

Giant Inflat able Slide

WHEN THE FULL MOON RISES, LIVE OAK PARK WILL BE TRANSFORMED INTO A HAUNTED EXTRAVAGANZA FOR THIS YEAR’S HALLOWEEN CARNIVAL! FROM YOUNG WITCHES AND GOBLINS, TO PIRATES AND SUPERHEROES–ALL ARE WELCOME TO JOIN US FOR AN EVENING OF SPINE-TINGLING FUN!

Thursday, Oct. 31, 6:30-8:30 pm . Live Oak Park . 10144 Bogue St. CITY OF TEMPLE CITY • 9701 LAS TUNAS DR., TEMPLE CITY, CA 91780 • (626) 285-2171


PIANO, PIANO! Music, Math & More

CODE

DATES

LEVEL

AGE

9693 9694

9/23-11/18 9/23-11/18

Beg. 5+ yrs. Int. 7+ yrs.

DAY TIME

FEE

M M

$80 $80

4-4:30 p.m. 4:30-5 p.m.

DATES

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

9706 9707

9/25-11/13 9/25-11/13

4-7 yrs. 8-12 yrs.

W W

$53 $53

4-5 p.m. 5-6 p.m.

LITTLE PICASSOS Jennies Gym

Kids Music N’ Motion

Explore the imagination with art! Children will use a variety of mediums to explore the foundations and concepts of the creative field. Parents with kids ages 2-4 are required to attend class. Students must provide their own smock. $25 materials fee due at first class.

Learn to read music notes and master the treble clef scale—before you know it, you’ll be on your way to strumming cool island tunes! Ukuleles provided to students for class use. $25 materials fee due at first class. (*For continuing students.)

CODE

DATES

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

9708 9709

9/23-11/13 9/23-11/13

2-4 yrs. 5-8 yrs.

M M

$48 $48

UKULELE LESSONS

CODE

DATES

9687 9/28-10/25 9688 11/1-12/7 9689* 11/1-12/7

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

5-8 yrs. 5-8 yrs. 9-13 yrs.

S S S

$65 $65 $65

3:15-4:30 p.m. 3:15-4:30 p.m. 4:30-5:15 p.m.

4-5 p.m. 5-6 p.m.

SPORTS GYMNASTICS & TRAMPOLINE Jennies Gym

SELF DEFENSE AND MARTIAL ARTS

Young gymnasts will learn basic tumbling skills and exercises on the balance beam, bars, vault and trampoline. New students will be evaluated and grouped by ability.

HAPKIDO

CODE

DATES

AGE

DAY TIME

9710 9711 9712

9/28-11/18 9/28-11/18 9/28-11/18

4-7 yrs. 7-15 yrs. 13+ yrs.

S S S

Son of Chong Martial Arts

Learn self-defense techniques including joint locks and kicks. Lessons also include breathing and meditation. Students must provide their own uniform, which may be purchased from the instructor. CODE

DATES

LEVEL

AGE

9698 9699

9/24-12/12 9/24-12/12

Beg. 5-9 yrs. Int./Adv. 9+ yrs.

DAY TIME

FEE

T/Th 3-4:15 p.m. T/Th 4:30-5:45 p.m.

$80 $80

JU-JITSU & KARATE Jennies Gym

Build strength while learning martial arts techniques for self-defense. Lessons include Judo, Aikido, Kendo and Karate. CODE

DATES

9695 9/24-12/12 9696 9/24-12/12 9697 9/24-12/12

LEVEL

AGE

DAY TIME

All levels 13+ yrs. T/Th 8-9 p.m. New 8-12 yrs. T/Th 6-7 p.m. Grn. Belt+ 8-12 yrs. T/Th 7-8 p.m.

FEE

$61 $61 $61

LITTLE KICKERS JU-JITSU Jennies Gym

Teaches self-esteem and discipline through age-appropriate martial arts lessons. CODE

DATES

9700 9/27-12/6 9701 9/27-12/6 9702 9/27-12/6

LEVEL

AGE

DAY TIME

New 5-7 yrs. F Ylw. Belt+ 5-7 yrs. F All levels 8+ yrs. F

4:30-5:15 p.m. 5:15-6 p.m. 6-7 p.m.

FEE

$49 $49 $56

KINDERGYM Jennies Gym

Kids are not the only ones allowed to have fun, since parents get to come too! You’ll learn forward rolls, back rolls, handstands and more with your kids. Together, you’ll walk the balance beam, swing on bars and jump on the trampoline! One parent per child must attend each class. CODE

DATES

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

9713 9714

9/28-11/16 9/28-11/16

9 mos.-2 yrs. 3-4 yrs.

S S

$71 $71

9-9:45 a.m. 9:45-10:30 a.m.

TABLE TENNIS L.A. Table Tennis Association

Learn table tennis from the pros! Former U.S. Olympians and National Champions teach rules and proper techniques. Dress in athletic wear and light shoes, and bring your own paddle. Equipment is available for purchase onsite. All classes are held at the L.A. Table Tennis Association facility, 10180 Valley Blvd., El Monte. CODE

DATES

9715 9/10-11/12 9716 9/14-11/16 9717 9/15-11/17

AGE

DAY TIME

FEE

6+ yrs. 6+ yrs. 6+ yrs.

T 7-8:30 p.m. S 2-4 p.m. Su 3-5 p.m.

$190 $250 $250

TENNIS ACADEMY

NIPPON KEMPO KARATE

TJP Tennis Professionals

Do Mar

Develop respect, discipline and confidence through this self-defense system based on punching, kicking, blocking, joint locks and ground combat. AGE

FEE

10:30-11:30 a.m. $71 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $71 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $71

CODE

DATES

LEVEL

9703 9704 9705

9/23-12/2 9/25-11/27 9/23-12/2

All levels 7+ yrs. M/W 6:30-8 p.m. New 5-9 yrs. W 5:40-6:25 p.m. Ylw. Belt+ 5-10 yrs. M 5:40-6:25 p.m.

DAY TIME

FEE

$55 $34 $34

SPECIAL INTEREST KIDS IN THE KITCHEN Jennies Gym

Let’s get cooking! Little chefs will learn their way around the kitchen, practicing new skills, techniques and recipes. $25 materials fee due at first class.

Have fun while preparing for match play. Challenge yourself with physically demanding court workouts and drills. Tennis shoes required. Bring a racquet and a new can of three tennis balls to the first class. (*Advance students may enroll in the extended class, including competitive match play from 9-9:50 p.m.) CODE

DATES

LEVEL

9718 9719 9720 9721 9722 9723 9724 9745*

9/23-11/18 9/25-11/12 9/23-11/18 9/27-11/15 9/27-11/15 9/25-11/13 9/25-11/13 9/25-11/13

Beg./Int. 8-12 yrs. Beg./Int. 8-12 yrs. Int./Adv. 10+ yrs. Beg./Int. 8-12 yrs. Int./Adv. 10+ yrs. Beg. 14+ yrs. Int. 18+ yrs. Adv./Team 18+ yrs.

AGE

DAY TIME

M W M F F W W W

FEE

6-7 p.m. $85 3:30-4:30 p.m. $85 7-8 p.m. $85 6-7 p.m. $85 7-8 p.m. $85 6-7 p.m. $85 7-8 p.m. $85 8-9/9-9:50 p.m. $85/125 Temple City Connect

29

CLASSES

Learn to read piano notes and play basic songs. Bring a three-ring binder and 20 sheet protectors to the first class.

CODE


Sports Programs

FLAG FOOTBALL Our premier co-ed flag football league is now enrolling! This no-contact sport helps young athletes develop new skills and build confidence, while also learning teamwork and sportsmanship. Teams are grouped by grade and school attended, with divisions for third and fourth, and fifth and sixth graders. First team meeting and practice is Sept. 9, 3:30-4:30 p.m., at the registered site. Practices are two days per week, with league games starting Oct. 5. Star players move on in the Temple City All-Stars team for intercity competition. Fee includes a team jersey, instruction, league play and an individual trophy. Register now at Live Oak Park and STARS Club locations. For more information, call (626) 579-0461.

SPORTS

BASKETBALL Winter’s just around the corner—it’s time for young hoopsters to warm up for the upcoming season. Our co-ed program provides a fun, safe and positive environment for aspiring ballers to develop skills, while also learning fair play, teamwork and sportsmanship. Participants will be grouped into teams by age and skill, with divisions formed to match competition. Special rule and gameplay modifications are made to accommodate player size and ability. Practices are typically twice a week at the registered site, with one or two games played each week. League competition begins Jan. 4, with games typically on Saturdays at Oak Avenue Intermediate School (Oak Avenue) Gym and Temple City High School Gym. Evening games for upper divisions are weekdays at Oak Avenue Gym. Star players move on to the Temple City All-Stars to play in the intercity league. Fee includes instruction, league play, jersey, individual trophy and $10 nonrefundable administrative charge. Registration begins Nov. 4 at Live Oak Park Community Center and STARS Club locations. Application form and payment will be due at registration. CODE DATES

AGE/GRADE SITE

DAY TIME

FEE

9613 9614 9615 9616 9617 9608 9609 9610 9611 9612 9618 9619 9620 9621 9622 9623 9624 9625 9626 9627 9628 9629

3.5-5 yrs. 3.5-5 yrs. 3.5-5 yrs. 3.5-5 yrs. 3.5-5 yrs. 1st-2nd 1st-2nd 1st-2nd 1st-2nd 1st-2nd 3rd-4th 3rd-4th 3rd-4th 3rd-4th 3rd-4th 3rd-4th 5th-6th 5th-6th 5th-6th 5th-6th 5th-6th 7th-8th

M/W M/W M/W M/W T/Th M/W M/W M/W M/W M/W M/W T/Th T/Th T/Th T/Th M/W T/Th T/Th T/Th T/Th T/Th T/Th

$65 $65 $65 $65 $65 $65 $65 $65 $65 $65 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95 $95

30

12/2-3/15 12/2-3/15 12/2-3/15 12/2-3/15 12/2-3/15 12/2-3/15 12/2-3/15 12/2-3/15 12/2-3/15 12/2-3/15 12/2-3/15 12/2-3/15 12/2-3/15 12/2-3/15 12/2-3/15 12/2-3/15 12/2-3/15 12/2-3/15 12/2-3/15 12/2-3/15 12/2-3/15 12/2-3/15

Fall 2013 www.templecity.us

Cleminson Emperor La Rosa Longden Live Oak Emperor La Rosa Longden Cleminson Live Oak Cloverly Emperor La Rosa Longden Cleminson Live Oak Cloverly Emperor Longden Cleminson Live Oak Oak Ave.

3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 4-5 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 4-5 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 5-6 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 3:30-4:30 p.m. 5-6 p.m. 7-8 p.m.

CODE DATES

GRADE SITE

9480 9481 9482 9483 9484 9485 9486 9487 9488 9489

5th-6th 5th-6th 5th-6th 5th-6th 5th-6th 3rd-4th 3rd-4th 3rd-4th 3rd-4th 3rd-4th

9/12-11/16 9/12-11/16 9/12-11/16 9/12-11/16 9/12-11/16 9/12-11/16 9/12-11/16 9/12-11/16 9/12-11/16 9/12-11/16

DAY TIME

Cloverly M/W Emperor M/W Cleminson M/W Longden M/W Live Oak T/Th Cloverly M/W Emperor M/W Cleminson M/W Longden M/W Live Oak T/Th

FEE

4-5 p.m. 4-5 p.m. 4-5 p.m. 4-5 p.m. 4-5 p.m. 4-5 p.m. 4-5 p.m. 4-5 p.m. 4-5 p.m. 4-5 p.m.

$75 $75 $75 $75 $75 $75 $75 $75 $75 $75

MINI FLAG FOOTBALL Mini Flag Football is back! Enroll your little ones to learn basic throwing, catching and kicking skills. Flag football is a safer alternative to tackle football that involves pulling of flag belts rather than physical contact, and serves as an ideal environment for young ones to develop athletic skills. Practices are twice a week with games played Saturdays, 3:30-7 p.m. Fee includes instruction, a t-shirt and individual trophy. Registration begins Sept. 16 at Live Oak Park Community Center. For more information call (626) 579-0461. CODE DATES

9478 9479

AGE

SITE

10/8-11/21 3.5-5 yrs. Live Oak 10/8-11/21 6-7 yrs. Live Oak

DAY TIME

FEE

T/Th 4-5 p.m. T/Th 5-6 p.m.

$65 $65

INTRAMURAL SPORTS Attention seventh and eighth graders! Come join our brand new intramural sports league, featuring flag football for the boys and volleyball for the girls. Practices and games are held Saturdays. Fee includes instruction, games, t-shirt and an individual trophy. Register now at Live Oak Park Community Center.

CODE

SPORT

9726 9727

Volleyball 9/21-11/16 7th-8th Oak Ave. S Flag Football 9/21-11/16 7th-8th Live Oak S

DATES

GRADE SITE

DAY TIME

FEE

12-2 p.m. $35 6-8 p.m. $35


Youth & Teens STARS CLUB AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAM SEPT. 4–JUNE 20 MONDAY-FRIDAY, 2:30-6 P.M., $100/MONTH

Get crazy after school with crafts, games and special events at Stars Club, open to K-6th graders of Cleminson, Cloverly, Emperor, La Rosa and Longden Elementary Schools. Payment of first month’s fee and a nonrefundable $10 administrative fee is due at the time of registration. For more information or to register, call (626) 285-2171, ext. 2360.

TEEN ZONE AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAM SEPT. 4–JUNE 20 MONDAY-FRIDAY, 2:30-6 P.M., $150/YEAR

Seventh through ninth graders can hang out after school at the Teen Zone for gaming, activities and field trips, or get ahead in school with homework help and a computer lab. Payment of fee and a nonrefundable $10 administrative fee is due at the time of registration. For more information or to register, call (626) 285-2171, ext. 2360.

YOUTH COMMITTEE

SKY ZONE

TEEN EXCURSIONS Brave Knott’s “Scary” Farm or jump around at Sky Zone trampoline park during our excursions just for teens ages 13-16. Register at Live Oak Park Annex at least ten days before the trip.

FOURTH THURSDAY OF THE MONTH, 6 P.M.

TRIP

DATE

TIME

FEE

Who says young people can’t make a difference? Young residents are encouraged to attend Youth Committee meetings to stay informed and speak up about City news and projects. First meeting is Sept. 6 in the Community Room.*

Knott’s Scary Farm Sky Zone

10/25 11/27

6 p.m.-12 a.m. 1-4 p.m.

$40 $20

*Meetings are typically held in Council Chambers, but during renovation, September and October meetings will be temporarily relocated to the Community Room.

PHOTO POLICY: Please be advised that all participants involved in any City of Temple City (“City”) programs or special events are subject to being photographed. Such photographs may be used by the City without an obligation to provide compensation to those photographed.

YOUTH & TEENS

HALLOWEEN DANCE SATURDAY, OCT. 19, 7-9 P.M. Flaunt your costume at the spookiest dance and carnival in town! Arcade games, laser tag and an inflatable obstacle course will make for a hauntingly good time! The event is open to sixth through ninth graders. $10 PRESALE TICKETS OR $15 AT THE DOOR FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL (626) 285-2171, EXT. 2360.

Temple City Connect

31


Senior Programs FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL (626) 579-0461.

AARP DRIVER SAFETY SEPT. 9 & 10 AND NOV. 4 & 5, 8:30 A.M.–12 P.M., $12–14 As you age, driving proficiency becomes increasingly important. The AARP Driver Safety Program is the largest and most respected refresher course, designed to help those 55 and older tune up their driving skills, allowing for normal age-related physical changes. Classes are offered at Live Oak Park Community Center. $12 for AARP members, $14 for non-members. Fee is payable by check at the first day of class. Pre-registration is recommended.

LINKAGES PROGRAM FIRST & THIRD MONDAY OF THE MONTH, 10:30 A.M.–12 P.M. Offers free case management services to frail seniors (ages 60 and over) and adults with disabilities (ages 18 and older), affording them the ability and independence to remain safely at home and in the community. In addition to onsite assistance at Live Oak Park Community Center, services are also available by appointment. For more information, contact the YWCA San Gabriel Valley at (626) 214-9465.

SENIOR BINGO LAST THURSDAY OF THE MONTH, 1–3 P.M.

Even around the scariest time of year, Temple City’s seniors are not afraid to come out and play—especially when there are spooktacular events! OCT. 31, LIVE OAK PARK COMMUNITY CENTER

“TRICK OR TREAT” HEALTH FAIR

Studies show that bingo can enhance memory skills and improve concentration. Play free at Live Oak Park Community Center–it’s fun and all games are played for prizes!

9 A.M.-NOON Go booth-to-booth at our third annual health fair to gather treats from vendor exhibits and pick up information on healthy living. Healthcare providers will be onsite to provide free health screenings and information.

SENIOR LUNCH

SPOOKY HALLOWEEN LUNCHEON

WEEKDAYS, 11 A.M., $2 DONATION

NOON Join us for a spooky Halloween luncheon featuring costume and table decorating contests, prizes and more. Celebration is hosted as part of the senior lunch program. Reservations required by Friday, Oct. 26. Call (626) 579-0461 to register.

Seniors over 60 years of age are invited to Live Oak Park Community Center for a hot lunch, activities and socializing with friends and neighbors. Monthly menus are available at the Community Center and on the City’s website, www.templecity.us. Hot tea and coffee are available for just 25 cents per cup–best price in town! Reservations are required 24 hours in advance by calling (626) 579-0461.

SENIOR BIRTHDAY RECOGNITION

SENIORS

Senior Halloween Spooktacular!

Do you know a senior turning 80, 90 or 100 years old? Nominate them for special recognition in celebration of longevity. Applications are available at the Live Oak Park Community Center. For more information, call (626) 579-0461.

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Fall 2013 www.templecity.us


Senior Excursions The City offers one-day excursions to local and nearby destinations. These day trips—which show off the incredible diversity of attractions in Southern California—range from tours and shows, to dinners and shopping. Registration is taken on a first-come, first-paid basis at the Live Oak Park Community Center. For more information, call (626) 579-0461.

SOAK IN SUNSHINE AT BIG BEAR LAKE SEPT. 16, 8:30 P.M.–6:30 P.M., $47 Spend a day in the great outdoors at Big Bear Lake. Lunch will be provided at Boo Bear’s Restaurant in Big Bear Village. After, step aboard the Big Bear Queen for a picturesque cruise and lake tour, followed by a short stroll around the village. Cruise admission included. Registration deadline: Sept. 2.

MURDER MYSTERY EXPRESS & LUNCHEON NOV. 9, 9:45 A.M.-6 P.M., $79 All aboard the Fillmore Western Railway for a three-course luncheon and lots of laughter as a less-than-serious mystery story unfolds. Play detective and help solve a murder, or sit back and enjoy the entertainment aboard the Family Murder Mystery Express. Registration deadline: Oct. 3.

FREE FLU SHOTS OCT. 23, 8:30–11:30 A.M. The City of Temple City, County of Los Angeles and Monrovia Health Center will host a seasonal flu clinic at Live Oak Park Community Center. Over 300 free vaccinations will be offered on a first-come, first-serve basis. Shots will be administered to those without health insurance, or those whose healthcare provider does not offer flu vaccines. Participants are asked to wear short sleeves. Ages 18 and under must be accompanied by an adult. For more information, call (626) 579-0461.

INDIO INTERNATIONAL TAMALE FESTIVAL DEC. 7, 8:30 A.M.–5:30 P.M., $15 If you love tamales, you won’t want to miss the Tamale Festival! Every year, hundreds of thousands of tamale enthusiasts descend on Old Town Indio for this popular holiday event—ranked by Food Network as one of the top 10 All-American Food Festivals nationwide. Highlights include a festive parade, carnival, Mexican Folklorico dancing, and of course, a sampling of every type of tamale imaginable! Trip also features a quick stop at Hadley’s Orchard in Cabazon for some shopping and browsing. Registration deadline: Nov. 27.

SPEND THE DAY AT OAK GLEN OCT. 4, 9:30 A.M.–5 P.M., $40

SENIORS

Visit Riley’s Farm, nestled in the apple growing foothills of historic Oak Glen. Enjoy a special luncheon featuring Riley’s famous homemade chicken potpie and learn the fine art of candle making, all set to a backdrop of autumn fall foliage. Finally, shop till you drop at Parrish Pioneer Ranch before returning home. Registration deadline: Sept. 27.

NOTE: Trips may be canceled or changed at the City’s discretion. Refunds will be offered only if a replacement is found and notification of cancellation is provided at least ten days in advance of the trip. Temple City Connect

33


temple city

ask city hall

ROSEMEAD BOULEVARD PROJECT

Temple City Connect addresses questions from residents on a wide variety of City activities, projects and policies, keeping you connected, engaged and educated. In this issue, we respond to inquiries about the ongoing Rosemead Boulevard project.

What is the construction on Rosemead Boulevard?

MOVING FORWARD

RAIL ROAD

For those unfamiliar, work underway on Rosemead Boulevard is part of a $20.7 million effort to revitalize the existing corridor into a “complete street.” Construction will bring brand new sidewalks, the City’s first bike lanes, traffic enhancements and transit improvements—all designed to promote a safer environment for all roadway users. Meanwhile, added attractions like public art, outdoor dining opportunities and hundreds of new trees are intended to encourage new life and activity, drawing visitors to rediscover Temple City. Work began in January of this year, and full completion is expected by summer 2014.

Major concrete work underway Major concrete work completed

At near completion, the southern project limit is virtually unrecognizable from a few months ago, with added trees and greenery and new pedestrian lights. Public art, bus shelters and other sidewalk furniture like bike racks and garbage receptacles, will be installed in the coming months.

34

Fall 2013

With brand new sidewalks being built along the corridor, community members are finally able to enjoy strolling along a continuous pedestrian path on Rosemead Boulevard. Prior to the project, existing sidewalks were either too narrow for practical use or nonexistent.

www.templecity.us

As crews continue road construction, artists are busily designing the City’s first-ever public art for Rosemead Boulevard. Among the proposed works is this sculpture concept by Daniel Stern that symbolically reaches out, inviting community members to step boldly into the future together. Read more about the artists and their pieces in our Winter 2014 issue.


next summer?

Construction is on schedule and on budget. What’s completed so far, and what’s remaining for construction?

Per standard construction phasing, work was intentionally sequenced to maximize efficiency while minimizing impacts to the public. In the case of Rosemead Boulevard, the idea was to first complete tasks that involve the greatest degree of coordination and inconvenience to the public—e.g., construction of new sidewalks, driveways and bump-out bicycle buffers that require lane closures—before proceeding with less intensive activities, like installing sidewalk pedestrian lights. In this way, disruptions are minimized as much as possible, while also allowing the project team time to perform necessary coordination like commissioning and fabricating public art, ordering street furniture, etc. As of September, center medians are finished, with reconstruction activities mostly complete in the southerly project area between Las Tunas Drive and the Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) underpass. Some corner locations remain unpaved, pending installation of public art. Work is now in progress on the northerly sidewalk areas between Callita Street and

Hermosa Drive. Crews are replacing sidewalks and driveways, constructing new bumpout bicycle buffers, planting new trees and landscaping, and installing pedestrian lights. Remaining work throughout the boulevard include installation of new street furniture (i.e., bike racks, garbage receptacles, seating nodes, etc.), bus shelters, and the City’s first public art pieces which are now being designed. Later this year, the street will also be resurfaced and restriped from its current temporary striping. The public is also reminded that Rosemead Boulevard between UPRR underpass and Callita Street remains a construction zone until all work is completed. Can we use the bike lanes yet?

With the bump-out bicycle buffers complete and traffic now reopened on Rosemead Boulevard south of Las Tunas Drive, the bike lanes are accessible; however, users are cautioned that the corridor remains a construction zone. Traffic striping and signage to delineate the bike lanes will occur later this year. I’ve noticed some new traffic light mast arms. Will there be new traffic signals? When will they start operating?

As part of the project, there will be two new signalized intersections and pedestrian

L A S T UN

How do I keep up with construction progress?

There are several ways to keep up with Rosemead Boulevard progress. Sign up for weekly construction and traffic advisories issued every Friday, by texting ROSEMEAD to 888777 or emailing rosemeadblvd@ templecity.us. Regular status updates are provided in the City Manager’s Report, accessible at www.templecity.us, on the first and third Friday of every month. And if you’re on the road, tune into AM 1690 in Temple City, Monday through Friday for the week’s traffic information. New messages broadcast every Monday in English, Mandarin, Spanish and Cantonese. FOR MORE INFORMATION about the Rosemead Boulevard Enhancement Project, log on to www.rosemeadblvd.com. To report a concern or speak directly with a project representative, call the hotline at (626) 476-7376.

N

ROSEMEAD BLVD.

R. AS D At Rosemead Boulevard and Las Tunas Drive— intersection of the City’s two main arteries, and also a major local commercial hub—corner sidewalks are being widened to provide more public space for pedestrian activity and outdoor dining opportunities.

crosswalks near Broadway and at Garibaldi. These lights are expected to begin operation after project completion, sometime by next summer. In the meantime, Rosemead Boulevard users should exercise caution and obey all posted signage, as the street remains a construction zone.

CALLITA

Is the project on schedule to finish

New medians include double-headed streetlights, relocated and consolidated from the sidewalks. The lights feature energy-saving photoelectric technology that automatically shut off during daylight. Also new are added trees and landscaping planted all along the corridor.

With the southerly project area mostly complete, reconstruction is now focused on the northerly zone between Las Tunas Drive and Callita Street. Activities include concrete work for new sidewalks, as well as installation of new pedestrian lights.

Temple City Connect

35


temple city

people

SURVIVOR

Kim Wunner BY STEPHANIE CHAN

If you took part in July’s Relay for Life at Temple City High School, chances are you might have met, or at least heard of Kim Wunner. During her opening speech as this year’s co-chair for the 24-hour event, the longtime Temple City resident shared why she wanted to help the community “fight back” against cancer—especially having previously suffered from illness herself. After being diagnosed with lobular breast cancer in November 2011, Wunner underwent months of chemotherapy and radiation, as well as a double mastectomy. Now, the cancer survivor is healing with proper medication, while staying busy as a wife, mom, catering manager at Pomona College, and participant in a medical study. While the process to recover wasn’t always easy, Wunner shares how having a community helps one heal and why leading the second annual Relay for Life was important to her.

How did you first get involved with

What kind of support did you receive

Relay for Life?

as you went through cancer?

Last year, I was asked if I’d be interested in being on the committee. However, I was still going through my treatment and even though I felt good and was doing great, I wasn’t up to the task. So instead, my girlfriends put together a team for me. I enjoyed it so decided to get involved.

I have what I call my “guardian angel”—she was a friend of mine through PTA. She experienced everything I had gone through, except she was about a year to 18 months ahead of me. So she helped guide me along the way. My girlfriend also asked if I would be interested in having a party to shave my head. They thought it would bring up my spirit, so I said yes. That was my worst fear—losing my hair. My fear wasn’t going through the cancer because there’s so much treatment nowadays. For some reason, I feared losing my hair. We called it the “Pink Ribbon Party.” Everybody got their little glass of champagne and we toasted. One of the girls had her hairdresser come and literally shave my head. Actually, my older son and five of his friends had all shaved their hair two days before so that I wouldn’t have to go through it alone.

What did you hope to achieve as this year’s co-chair?

I felt we needed to get more people involved and raise more funds. We wanted to double the amount of teams and revenue. I also wanted to make sure people were aware of the resources out there, like the American Cancer Society which donates wigs for patients who need them and also runs cancer support groups. How did you guys

Besides your fear of losing hair, what was

end up doing?

the hardest part about the experience?

We met our goals. Our goal was to have 26 teams—we had 27, and we also raised more than our targeted $50,000. Seeing the community unite and embrace it was exciting.

I think the hardest part was telling my family—having to reassure them I’d be ok. What was your motivation to fight this battle?

I told myself, “I’m not going to let it get to me. I can beat it. I just have to push forward.” I took it as an “I don’t have a choice,” and I needed to get through it. There was no reason to feel sorry for myself. Also, since I’ve always been a very active person, I wanted to stay that way. Now that you’ve won the fight against cancer, do you plan to continue your involvement with building cancer awareness?

I’m actually in a study with UCLA Oncology, where I got my chemotherapy treatments. The program examines the long-term effects of a certain drug for women who are more at risk of developing cancer again. LEARN HOW to get involved in the Temple City Relay for Life Committee by contacting Kim at kimwunner@yahoo.com, or visiting www.relayforlife.org/templecityca.

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Fall 2013 www.templecity.us


SURE, YOU’RE FAMILIAR WITH COMPLETE NEIGHBORHOODS... BUT WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT BEAUTIFUL ONES? Introducing Temple City’s Residential Yard of the Quarter Awards. Participate in themed contests every quarter to win recognition as the best looking homes and gardens in town. Make a proud homeowner’s day by nominating their seasonal masterpieces for an award. A judging panel determines winners, who receive Council recognition and are bestowed the coveted Yard of the Quarter sign.

FALL COLORS (OCTOBER) | READY FOR THE HOLIDAYS (DECEMBER) | SPRING IS IN THE AIR (APRIL) | WATER WISE (JULY)

For more information, call City Hall at (626) 285-2171, or log on to www.templecity.us.

City Hall Coming To A Neighborhood Near You

TOWN HALL MEETING THURSDAY, SEPT. 26, 7 P.M. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH (6019 S. BALDWIN AVE.)

Schedule 7 p.m. Introduction 7:15–7:50 p.m. Session 1 7:55–8:30 p.m. Session 2

This fall, join the Mayor and City Council for a unique Town Hall meeting where you choose what you want to learn. Customize your civic curriculum by selecting two of three sessions that break down City budgeting and finance, community preservation and economic development.

It’s a design-your-own crash course on City Hall! Refreshments provided. Call at least one week in advance to arrange for childcare and translation services.

CITY OF TEMPLE CITY ★ 9701 LAS TUNAS DR., TEMPLE CITY, CA 91780 ★ (626) 285-2171 Temple City Connect

37


s t h g i L on

Temple City FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6 5-9 P.M. TEMPLE CITY PARK

VISITS WITH SANTA

100-FOOT

REDWOOD TREE LIGHTING CITY OF TEMPLE CITY

HELP LIGHT UP LAS TUNAS DR. FOR THE HOLIDAY PARADE

CALL (626) 285-2171 EXT. 2361 FOR INFORMATION

SNOW MUCH FUN

FUN CRAFTS PARADE AT 7 P.M.

9701 LAS TUNAS DR., TEMPLE CITY, CA 91780

(626) 285-2171


temple city

city services

QUICK CONTACTS

City Services

SCHOOL DISTRICTS ALL TELEPHONE NUMBERS ARE 626 AREA CODE UNLESS DESIGNATED.

Emergencies

Employment

Pothole Patrol

911

285-2171, ext. 2330

285-2171, ext. 2333

Request immediate sheriff, fire department or ambulance assistance to protect life or property.

Apply for a City job and learn of other government employment opportunities.

Report a pothole for repair within three working days.

Environment

Public Safety (Temple Sheriff’s Station)

Animals

285-2171, ext. 2333

285-7171

285-7187

Learn about water, recycling and energy conservation programs.

Form a Neighborhood Watch group, request increased patrolling and obtain police reports.

Call to report a lost pet and stray or dead animals; get or renew a license. Building and Development 285-2171, ext. 2301

Obtain permits and inspections for repairing, remodeling or adding onto your home or business.

Facility Rentals 285-2171, ext. 2361

Reserve one of our facilities for sports team practices, birthday parties and private events. Hotlines

Public Records 285-2171, ext. 2317

Review or request copies of City records and documents.

Help keep Temple City looking great by reporting:

Recreation and Parks

Business Assistance

(800) 252-4613

285-2171, ext. 2303

Abandoned Shopping Carts

Find out how to start or expand a business, and how to do business with the City.

(800) 794-7384

Graffiti Removal

Participate in our many recreational and cultural activities; report maintenance needs at City parks.

285-5240

Illegal Construction (after hours)

Seniors

Community Involvement 285-2171, ext. 2317

Housing

Learn of upcoming public meetings, volunteer opportunities and how to serve on a City commission.

285-2171, ext. 2303

Community Preservation

Get information on rehabilitation programs, homeownership opportunities and landlord/tenant rights.

285-2171

Mayor and City Council

Improve your neighborhood— report property maintenance issues, illegal construction and garage conversions.

Let them know what you think! 285-2171, ext. 2322

Schedule a meeting 285-2189

Dial-A-Ride (First Transit)

Leave a suggestion, comment or complaint

Request shared transit service for seniors and the disabled.

Parking

285-2171, ext. 2361

285-2171, ext. 2333

Establish membership; general inquiries

Ask about residential parking permits and parking tickets; report nuisance vehicles on public streets.

286-2456

Schedule service Elections and Voting 285-2171, ext. 2317

Register to vote, get information on election dates and find out how to run for City public office. Emergency Preparedness 285-2171, ext. 2333

Receive training to handle an emergency situation or local disaster.

Permits and Licenses 285-2171, ext. 2300

Find out what is required to improve your property, operate a business and conduct special events. Planning and Zoning 285-2171, ext. 2303

See what you can do with your property and what developments are planned in your neighborhood.

285-2171, ext. 2361

579-0461

Stay active and healthy with our lunch program, recreational classes and referrals to wellness providers. Streets and Sidewalks 285-2171, ext. 2333

Request street or sidewalk maintenance; report broken street lights, traffic signals and signs. Trash and Street Sweeping (Athens Services) 336-3636

Report service problems or make a special service request; get help with billing. Tree and Median Maintenance 285-2171, ext. 2361

Get a street tree; report maintenance issues on street trees and medians. Youth 285-2171, ext. 2360

Learn about after school programs, day camps, sports leagues and recreational activities.

Arcadia Unified 821-8300 El Monte City 453-3700 Rosemead Unified 312-2900 Temple City Unified 548-5000

MASS TRANSIT Foothill Transit District (800) 743-3463 Metro Transportation Authority (323) 466-3876

RESOURCES Chamber of Commerce 286-3101 Temple City Library 285-2136

UTILITIES AT&T (800) 288-2020 Charter Communications (866) 499-8080 Southern California Edison (800) 655-4555 The Gas Company (800) 427-2200

WATER DISTRICTS California American Water Company (888) 422-5269 East Pasadena Water Company 793-6189 Golden State Water Company (800) 999-4033 San Gabriel County Water District 287-0341 Sunnyslope Water Company 287-5238 CAN’T FIND WHAT YOU NEED? We’ll find it for you! Just call (626) 285-2171.

Temple City Connect

39


COUNTRY COMES TO THE CITY AT OUR FAMILY-FAVORITE HARVEST CELEBRATION CLASSIC CAR SHOW | ARTISAN CRAFT VENDORS | PUMPKIN PATCH PETTING ZOO | FACE PAINTING | CHILDREN’S BOUNCE HOUSE | RAFFLES SPECIAL PERFORMANCES BY TEMPLE CITY STUDENTS Car show and craft vendor applications available online and at Live Oak Park Annex.

CITY OF TEMPLE CITY ★ 9701 LAS TUNAS DR., TEMPLE CITY, CA 91780 ★ (626) 285-2171 City of Temple City 9701 Las Tunas Dr. Temple City, CA 91780

Presorted Standard U.S. Postage PAID San Gabriel, CA Permit No. 10016

ECRWSS

POSTAL CUSTOMER TEMPLE CITY, CA 91780


Temple City Connect Fall 2013