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91

MAGAZINE

91 MAGAZINE

interiors / vintage / crafts

MARCH 2014


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91

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Editor’s Letter TEAM

Caroline Rowland

Editor & Art Director

Hannah Bishop

Sub Editor & Researcher

Pippa Blenkinsop Editorial Assistant

Welcome to issue 8! You may have noticed some changes around here, let me explain... It’s been necessary for me to have a long, hard think about the magazine’s future as I am expecting my first baby in July, and it seems these kind of life changing events make you re-evaluate your life, career and future! Producing the magazine is a huge labour of love, and I am truly passionate about creating it, but it has become clear that without an income it is no longer possible to continue improving on our content and making it the best magazine it can be. Closing was NOT an option, therefore this led to my decision to start charging a small fee for subscriptions. I understand this may be an unpopular change, but I hope that you, our lovely readers, will understand, and that it won’t deter you from sharing our passion for interiors, crafts and vintage in every lovingly produced issue. You can read more about the changes here. Thanks, as always, for your support. Lots of Love,

Gillian mackenzie Sub Editor

Caroline x x x new venture award winner 2012

91 Magazine is a Patchwork Harmony publication. All content is copyright of 91 Magazine and its individual contributors. Images can be used only with a link back to www.91magazine.co.uk and where possible, the contributors website. Cover Photograph : Louise de Miranda

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contributors

Melanie Barnes

Writer, blogger & maker www.geoffreyandgrace.com

Darla Champigny Lawyer and blogger www.casadari.com

Freya Dowson

Blogger & photographer www.nishaantishu.com

Emelie Ekborg

Florist, writer & photographer orainspiro.com

Michelle Grady

Writer and blogger www.eclecticthreads.wordpress.com

Corinne Lee-Cooke Illustrator www.violetlakestudio.co.uk 4


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Louise de Miranda

Lifestyle blogger 30smagazine.wordpress.com

Laura Pashby

Writer & blogger www.circleofpinetrees.com

Annabel Perrin

Surface Pattern Designer www.annabelperrin.com

Catherine Sprunt

Fashion & lifestyle writer www.catherinesprunt.com

Nancy Straughan

Textile and homeware designer www.nancy-straughan.com

Sophie Warren Smith

Writer & stylist www.sophiewarrensmith.wordpress.com

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Contents Page 8

Page 66

91 News

Page 10

Interiors: A serene and earthy abode

Shopping: Bake Pretty

Page 12

Page 26

Vintage Lovers Guide to Stockholm

History of Vintage: suitcases and trunks

Interiors: Buy vintage for kids?

Page 15

Page 30

Interiors: Indoor plants

Folksy Seller Spotlight: Butterscotch and Beesting

Page 21

Style Notes... from an industrial kitchen

Recipes: A oral feast

Page 40 Interiors: At Home in Love

Page 50

Designer Makes: Cloud Decoration

Page 54

Interiors: Using copper accents

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Page 75

Page 82

Page 96

Vintage Days: Fair reviews in Bath and London

Page 100

Ladies Online: Rose and Grey


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Folksy Seller Spotlight: Butterscotch and Beesting

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Recipes: A oral feast

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Interiors: At Home in Love

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Interiors: Indoor plants

Ladies Online: Rose and Grey

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Interiors: Using copper accents

50 100

Designer Makes: Cloud Decoration


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NEWS

Our top picks of the latest, most stylish buys for your home this season By Sophie Warren Smith

Cath Kidston’s new range for spring and summer is full of pretty and quirky goodies. This lovely Stanley lamp is named after Cath Kidston’s late dog, who has featured on a number of her designs. The base is ceramic and it comes with a white cotton shade. £68, www.cathkidston.com

Plumo always have a beautiful collection of homewares each season. We adore this chai tea set, which includes a set of six pretty fluted chai glasses in a white wire carrier. It’s ideal for those long summer evenings we all yearn for and is made from recycled and natural materials. £30, www.plumo.com Founded by brother and sister team, Joe and Bethan John, Decorator’s Notebook is a beautiful online store dedicated to stunning handpicked home accessories. Choose from cushions, throws, lighting, tableware and accessories; our favourite products are these gorgeous double sided picture frames - use them for old photos or create your own unique collage from items you find on your travels. There are two sizes with a choice of portrait or landscape. Small - £10, and large - £17. www.decoratorsnotebook.co.uk

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SHOPPING

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If you’re a lover of pretty birds then look no further than these decorative vintage style bird doorknobs from Pastel Lane. Perfect for updating a cupboard door or a piece of furniture, they feature a classic bird design with an antique effect finish. £12.50 for a pair, www.pastellane.co.uk

91 Magazine loves this divine tree table from Nordic House. Due to the nature of the design, each table is unique because of the tree slice. The legs and sides are painted in a soft, smooth white. Use as a side table for books and a simple vase of flowers. £59.95, www.nordichouse.co.uk

With a fabulous new store opening in Chelsea, London, the founder and creative director of Cabbages & Roses, Christina Strutt, is publishing her 8th book, ‘Living Life Beautifully’ this March. In this new book, Christina talks about how it all started with stunning photos of her home as well as artists and designers who have used Cabbages & Roses designs in their homes with great success. Published by Cico Books, available from all good bookshops and online. £25, www.cabbagesandroses.com Jennifer Collier creates household objects out of paper by bonding, waxing, trapping and stitching. Transforming items like old typewriters, shoes, vases, telephones, bags, binoculars and Super 8 cameras to name but a few. We adore this paper Singer sewing machine, made from vintage sewing patterns and their instructions together with grey board. Each item is unique. £650 inc UK p&p, www.jennifercollier.co.uk 9


BAKE PRETTY! Even if the results of your baking efforts aren’t so picture perfect, at least your utensils will be!

Pinnies in British Cloud and Sergeant Peppy, ÂŁ20 each, Betty & Walter


Dipped wooden spoons, £2.95 each, Rose & Grey

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Tea Towel, £12.50, Howkapow

Measuring jug, £20, Cath Kidston

Milk glass cake stand, £59.95, The Hambledon Muffin Pan, £36, Anthropologie

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Hannah Bishop takes us on a whistlestop tour of the Swedish capital’s best vintage and interiors stores. Illustrations by Corinne Lee-Cooke

Judits Second Hand Judit’s on Hornsgatan is a shop that combines vintage fashion and much loved swapsies. Offering a service to sell second hand items on people’s behalf means their stash of clothes ranges from beautiful vintage attire to the latest

trends that need a new home. And for the welldressed chaps, the brother store, Herr Judit, is fit for a Scandi king! The shop also sells vintage furniture and grooming products to keep him busy whilst you fill your wardrobe.

www.judits.se - Hornsgatan 75, 118 49, Stockholm

Svensk Tenn Since 1927, this has been a hub of Swedish interior design. Founded by Estrid Ericson & Josef Frank, the shop is like a museum exhibition with bundles of

inspiration. Swoon at the furniture and objects on sale, and there’s also a tearoom to quench your thirst. The bold iconic textiles and gorgeous wallpapers are worth every SEK, be sure to take home a selection to make your own crafty creations.

www.svenskttenn.se trandvägen 5, 114 51 Stockholm

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59 Vintage Store from across the decades. There’s no better feeling than finding that timeless piece which will last you a lifetime.

This little shop is an unsuspecting treasure trove of vintage dresses and jewels. The owner, a former seamstress, knows her stuff about precious fabrics and has a selection of styles

Hantverkargatan 59, 112 31 Stockholm

Coctail This shop is an explosion of colour, offering a mixture of homewares, fashion and fun kitsch gift ideas and serves as a pleasant reminder that Nordic style doesn’t always have to be minimal! It’s the perfect place to find those ‘colour-pop’ items to add a touch of personality to your interiors.

www.coctail.nu - Bondegatan 34, 116 33 Stockholm

Bulleribock This shop is like something out of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang! It’s full of beautifully crafted, colourful wooden toys that kids will adore and adults can treasure too. Bulleribock is a great place to buy a gift or souvenir with a touch of Nordic fun.

Facebook page - Sveavägen 104, 113 50, Stockholm

Grandpa These concept stores must be called Grandpa for a reason; you walk in and it’s like one big bear hug of nostalgia and style, with über friendly staff to make you feel at home. Mixing modern products with vintage finds - from industrial desk lamps to simplistic tees for both genders - it’s a shop where you can kit yourself out in a whole new outfit, and get some timeless homewares too. A life facelift!

www.grandpa.se Södermannagatan 21, 116 40 Stockholm Fridhemsgatan 4, 112 46 Stockholm 13


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SELLER SPOTLIGHT

Butterscotch and Beesting Interview by Pippa Blenkinsop

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ell us a bit about yourself. My name’s Camilla and I design textiles and homewares from my small attic studio in Sheffield. My company is called Butterscotch & Beesting, and tells the story of an imaginary circus through prints and patterns. I live in a house which is far from perfect with my husband, three children and two cats. When did you decide to start up your homewares business? When I first started Butterscotch & Beesting a couple of years ago I actually didn’t mean for it to be a homewares business. It started with the idea of making magical circus-themed treats for children, like wands, sweets and potion kits. But I found it was the grown-ups whose imaginations seemed to be captured by my stories and illustrations, and they were collecting the illustrations on my sweet packets because they wanted pieces they could keep. So I switched it around and concentrated on prints and products that people could have in their homes instead.

friend, the dashing ringmaster of the circus and a conjurer of international renown. Butterscotch & Beesting is the name of their circus - it’s sweet but with a little sting in its tail. What is it in particular that inspires you about the circus? I love the faded bright and bold imagery of the circus, as if it’s been designed to grab people’s attention but then worn away along its travels. I’m a sucker for muted brights (if there is such a thing!). I’m also a little bit obsessed with history, so setting my work against the backdrop of a magical circus means I can take it anywhere in the world, at any time. It lets me play with styles, periods, patterns and colours, and because the circus was home to all sorts of people and animals, there’s a limitless supply of characters too.

Where else do you draw inspiration? My inspiration lives on a diet of children’s books and Pinterest. There are so many illustrators and incredible designers that I wouldn’t have come across unless someone had pinned Tell us the story behind the name their work. I spent my childhood in Butterscotch & Beesting? art galleries and museums, but it’s not All my products tell the story of a very easy to visit all the places I’d like fictitious circus run by two characters anymore because we have three children called Betty Butterscotch and Bumblewick and I’m usually outvoted. Beesting. Betty is a former trapeze artist Who are your design heroes? who turned to a career in confectionery after developing a fear of heights (most Being the daughter of two Danes, I’d have to say Arne Jacobsen for unfortunate). Bumblewick is her best

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“It’s a very special thing when someone buys something you’ve made.”


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understanding design as a whole and fighting for the small details, Hans Wegner for making the one chair I will always lust after, the Wishbone Chair, and Bjorn Wiinblad for playing with material and illustration so masterfully.

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my phone and don’t go near my studio between the end of school and bedtime.

Do you think motherhood has had an effect on the work you create? Absolutely. It means I have my very own homegrown focus group! Watching the Why did you decide to sell through Folksy? way my children create so honestly, I was originally drawn to Folksy because without worrying about fitting particular trends or styles, has been hugely it was British, and although there are inspirational too. They make and draw loads of designers on there it still felt because it makes them happy. small and friendly. I’ve since been lucky enough to get a job there, and I’m blown What advice would you give to somebody away every day by how hard the team looking to start selling their creations works and how much everyone cares. online? One of the things that makes Folksy so Make something you are proud of. Do special, I think, is that it’s not a juried it justice by taking the best photograph site, so you can find a vast range of work across its pages, from professional you can of it, and describing it well. Then make sure people see it by telling them artisans at the top of their craft to about it. Don’t worry if success doesn’t people making at weekend because it happen overnight because more often feeds their soul. than not it takes time, but keep yourself You’re a mother of three – how do you out there, making, creating and sharing. balance this with the running of your It’s a very special thing when someone business? buys something you’ve made. I’m not sure I do. There’s a lot of guilt What does the future hold for Butterscotch running around my system! I always worry that I’m not doing enough, either and Beesting? for my work or my I would really love to design a range children, but I’m of Butterscotch & Beesting fabrics trying to be more and wallpaper that could be put into disciplined and production, and I’d also love to make not overlap more one-off ceramics pieces. But right the two, to now my work is in Liberty, which is a make sure dream come true, so I’m quite happy I put down living in the moment for a while.

Visit the Butterscotch and Beesting Folksy shop


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ADVERTISING

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loves....

i heart vintage

pom pom galore jasmine white folk city

Country style living melody rose


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Style Notes...

from an industrial kitchen

Give your kitchen a utilitarian update with factory style furniture �nds and upcycling ideas

Words by Darla Champigny

Image: Zinc top table from Cox and Cox

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o matter the square footage or the culinary skills of its owner, the kitchen is a place where people naturally congregate. It plays host to a range of events, from the carefully planned dinner party to the impromptu chat and cuppa with a friend. Families often use it as the headquarters of the household: it’s where lunches are packed, homework is toiled over and diaries are coordinated. Yet it can also serve as a tranquil space to enjoy the newspaper alone in the early hours of the morning before the day’s hectic schedule creeps in. Whether your purpose is social or quite the opposite, there is something very inviting about the kitchen. But often, decorating this all-important room is a difficult task. Many are put off by the high prices and monotony of ready-made, built-in kitchens. However, if

you’re willing to work a little, search a lot, and experiment with repurposing, you’ll be able to create a warm and welcoming room - with a vintage vibe, unique pieces and a functional layout - within budget. If the kitchen is the headquarters of the house, then the table is the command centre. It’s a locale for meals, family meetings, and birthday parties; it’s even a spot where some businesses are born. Choosing the right table will often depend on the available space. Those who are lucky enough to have an eat-in kitchen should opt for a large table made from reclaimed wood. Local makers can be found by searching online. Splurge on this piece and keep the costs low with the accompanying chairs. If you have the patience, start to collect your chairs one by one from various sources; friends,

Images: Above left: Freestanding furniture and factory style lights in the kitchen at the Trelawney Farm guest house in NSW, Australia; Above right: S hooks hung from a metal pipe create that utilitarian look - House Doctor; Opposite: factory trollies are perfect for displaying kitchenware. Photo by Susanne Kings/meandalice.blogspot.com 22


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Image: This old trolley in the kitchen at Trelawney Farm guest house in NSW, Australia, has a hardwearing work surface plus added storage for pots, pans and other cookware underneath.


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family, flea markets, and even the skip. Once you have a “set” of four to eight, paint them all matching or coordinating colours to get a cohesive look. Distress them with some sanding or leave them as is. You could even use the same hue as an accent colour throughout the rest of the kitchen. For a smaller kitchen, choose your table wisely. You may require something that’s convertible so that it can be lengthened to accommodate guests and then folded away, fuss-free. Vintage Formica tables - which often come with unique, stencilled designs - have legs that are easy to attach and remove. Buy fold-up chairs that had a former life in a school or church; if you come across a fold-up bench with three chairs in a row, even better. Alternatively, go for a bench with drawers, which can double up as a storage unit. Counter space is also key. Some kitchens in their original state have very little worktop area. Get creative and search auctions (online or in person) for original shop counters. If you find a place that is going out of business, you might be able to source one at a very low price. Some units are long and straight, while others fit neatly into a corner. Most will have shelves underneath where you can keep cooking utensils and dinnerware. Place a couple of stools next to it and you have a breakfast bar too. A kitchen can never have enough storage

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space. If you have wall cabinets with space above, place lots of glass canisters in a row to create a striking display that also allows you to keep your store cupboard essentials fresh. If you don’t have wall cabinets, but do have free space, invest in an old Hoosier cabinet. This piece of furniture normally comes with drawers, built-in cabinets, and a sliding shelf at waist level that can also be used as a counter top. If you prefer open shelving, try a pigeonhole cabinet and make a charming display of mismatched saucers, cups and small dishes. For a mobile option, look out for an antique baker’s rack or library cart. Finally, your room needs some adorning. This is another aspect of the kitchen where creativity can keep costs low. If you’re trying to achieve a farmhouse feel, hang small gardening tools in a row along the wall. For a more industrial look, try hanging a piece of sheet metal as a notice board, or cover a portion of the wall with magnetic paint, to pin up children’s art, to-do lists and photos. Mount a curio box as a shelf for interesting knick-knacks or use it as a spice rack. Ultimately, choose objects that look pretty, yet also serve a purpose. For some, the kitchen is a place to gather round with loved ones; for others, it’s an escape from the goings-on in the house. Regardless of how it’s used, the kitchen is a significant part of any home that with a little effort and imagination, can be made as beautiful as it is useful.

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History of Vintage

a well travelled style statement Laura Pashby tells the nostalgic story of luggage and discovers why old suitcases and trunks should no longer be hidden away in the attic, but utilised and recognised for their versatility and aesthetic appeal.

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t is the irresistible lure of a story that draws us to vintage luggage. Every piece can conjure a tale, from an expensive Louis Vuitton steamer trunk, to a battered 1960s suitcase. It may be the poignant journey of a refugee, the humdrum existence of a travelling salesman, or the adventures of an

Image credit: Vintage green suitcase from Vintage Avocado on Etsy

explorer. A piece of luggage is far more than form and function; it is a receptacle of romance. The origins of luggage begin with the word itself: ‘to lug’ means ‘to carry with effort’. Its usage was first recorded in 1596, but luggage itself has existed


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Images: LEFT: Vintage suitcases from Scaramanga; RIGHT: DIY suitcase bedside table by 17Apart

in some form or another for far longer: people have always needed a means with which to transport their belongings. At the start of the nineteenth century, travellers were using trunks, which were generally made from thick, oil-treated cowhide stretched over a wooden frame. They needed to be strong and bulky in order to withstand travel by train or by horse-drawn coach, often on unpaved roads and in inclement weather. Wardrobe-style trunks, designed for lengthy ocean crossings, opened out into a personal bureau. These cumbersome pieces were sent on ahead of the affluent traveller and handled by servants and porters.

By the turn of the century, the increased personal ownership of motor cars necessitated radical changes to modern luggage. Travellers suddenly had the opportunity for spontaneity and freedom and they needed luggage that they could carry. Hard-bodied suitcases and smaller bags began to replace heavy trunks, some designed specifically to fit inside particular vehicles. Following the first trans-Atlantic passenger flight in 1927, weight became an important issue. A range of materials were used in order to try and achieve the desirable balance of lightness and strength. Then in 1954, American Tourister introduced moulded plastic luggage 27


a myriad of uses. You could buy a selection of suitcases and stack them in ascending order of size to use for storage, or choose one to be kept open in order to display particular treasures. A sturdy trunk is perfect as a coffee table A suitcase or trunk is often an intrinsic or hall seat and, in a child’s bedroom, a part of a person’s life; a symbol of their journeys. There is an unremarkable, plain trunk or suitcase makes for an intriguing blue, scuffed 1960s suitcase housed in the dressing-up box. Suitcases can even be Museum of London ‘Londoners’ collection. adapted into drawers, mounted on the wall as shelves, or given legs and turned It belonged to a Turkish Cypriot who into occasional tables. arrived in London in the early 1970s. It contained not just his belongings, but his If you are looking to buy a piece of memories too: ‘I cried on it when I was vintage luggage, keep an eye out in in desperation, and I enjoyed it when I charity shops, jumble sales, car boot sales was going to see my family with a lot or search online auction sites. It’s also of chocolate in it!’ The genealogy of a worth checking out your local auction vintage case is what makes each one house, where you can often find large unique and fascinating. trunks, or whole collections of suitcases, for a reasonable price. You may even When their travelling days are over, vintage trunks and suitcases can be be able to ask the auctioneer about their repurposed for origins and back-story.

ve s

Sty le

which was not just light, but also virtually indestructible. It was in the late 1980s that an airline pilot invented the wheeled cases which are so ubiquitous today.

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fo hy p a gr redit: Nikki Kirk Photo

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Do check for makers’ marks. Brands such as Samsonite, Globe-Trotter and Hermès have been producing luggage for many years, and Louis Vuitton have a tradition of top-end luggage production dating back to 1854. Vintage luggage often comes with the odd dent or scratch, but cosmetic damage is part of the individuality of a well-travelled piece, adding to its mystery and charm. Cases may be embellished with personal initials or monograms, come with address tags attached, or have shipping labels pasted to the side. These tantalising hints of a previous life make vintage luggage so desirable. A suitcase or trunk is the perfect conversation piece: it tells its own story.


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\

A floral feast b

Photography and rEcipes by Emelie Ekborg

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aphazardly arranged in a jam jar to a single stem in a vintage bottle – flowers are a great way to style your living space. But what people often forget is that many varieties are actually edible and can look as decorative on the dinner plate. So next time you host a dinner party why not surprise your guests with a floral infused menu. Here are six recipes to inspire your own blossoming banquet!

Cloudy Clover Cordial serves 4 6 handfuls of red clover a handful of red rose petals 1 litre water Juice of 1 lemon 60 ml honey Place the clover and rose petals in a large bowl and pour over boiling water. Cover and leave for 10 minutes. Next, strain and add the lemon juice and honey. Stir and chill for 1 hour. Serve with ice.

RECIPES

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RECIPES

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Heavenly Chocolate Cake with Lilac Cream For this cake you will need three layers. The ingredients list below makes one layer. 100g butter 210g granulated sugar 2 eggs 1 tsp vanilla sugar 150g all-purpose flour 3 tbsp cocoa powder A pinch of salt 50g dark chocolate (70% or more) First melt the butter then in a large bowl, whisk together the eggs and sugar. In a separate bowl combine the vanilla sugar, flour, cocoa powder and salt. Add the melted butter to the egg and sugar batter followed by the dry ingredients and mix well until smooth. Melt the chocolate in a bowl over boiling water. Make sure no steam gets to the chocolate, otherwise it will become grainy. Once completely melted, add the chocolate to the batter and mix. Transfer the mixture to a loose base tin and bake in the middle of the oven at 175°C for 20 minutes. The cake should be quite sticky but not runny, so test it with a skewer to see if it’s ready. When baked, leave the cake in its tin and place on a rack to cool. To make the lilac cream: 1 litre cream 255g lilac sugar lilac petals (aprox 5-6 stems) for decoration Whip the cream and then sieve in the lilac sugar (making your own lilac sugar is easy - just put sugar and lilac petals together in a jar and leave for at least a week before then removing the petals). Then simply fold the lilac sugar into the cream without stirring too much. Assembling the cake: Make sure the three layers have completely cooled, otherwise the cream will melt. Put the first layer on a cake stand or plate and, using a spatula, spread over with a fairly thick layer of lilac cream. Place a second cake on top of this and spread with cream also. Then repeat the process with the third so that you end up with a layer of cream on top of the assembled cake. Finally, sprinkle lilac petals on top and put it the cake in the fridge for about 10-20 minutes before serving. 33


Lavender Infused Lemonade serves 4

1 litre water 170g granulated sugar 2 lemons 1 big bunch of lavender Wash the lavender and tie the bunch together with clean cotton string. Place the bunch upside down in a jug. Then, place the water, sugar and lemon juice in a sauce pan. Heat the saucepan to bring the liquid to a simmer and gently stir until the sugar has completely dissolved. Next, pour the hot lemonade into the jug with the lavender, making sure the lavender buds are completely submerged and cover. Leave the lemonade in the fridge overnight. Then remove the lavender and strain the lemonade. Serve with ice and decorate with some fresh lavender.

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Mandarin Marinated Chicken with Spicy Couscous and Nasturtiums serves 4 for the mandarin marinated chicken: 1 large chicken 100ml olive oil 2-3 cloves of garlic, chopped 2cm piece of ginger, chopped 1 tbsp chilli powder 1 tsp ras el hanout 1 tsp salt Black pepper 3 mandarins, zest and juice Fresh thyme To make the marinade, first mix all the dry spices in a bowl. Add the chopped ginger and garlic followed by the mandarin zest and juice. Then add whole pieces of fresh thyme and the olive oil. Mix well and set aside. Wash the chicken and place it in a large ovenproof dish. Cover the chicken with the marinade and leave it in the fridge overnight (or for as long as possible) to absorb the flavours. Then roast it in the middle of the oven at 200°C for 40-60 minutes. for the spicy couscous with nasturtiums: 655g couscous 1 1/2 tsp olive oil 1/2 tsp salt 500ml water 1 tsp turmeric 3 tbsp raisins 1/3 leek, chopped Approx. 10 nasturtiums This couscous salad can be served both hot or cold. Put the couscous in a large bowl. Add the olive oil, salt and turmeric and mix well. Boil the water and pour it over the couscous. Cover the bowl with a lid or a plate and leave for 15-20 minutes until the water has absorbed. Fluff the couscous up with a fork and fold in the leeks and raisins. Finally sprinkle the nasturtiums on top. 37


Rose Mousse with Crushed Dark Chocolate serves 4 1 egg white 40g granulated sugar 20ml whipped cream 75-100ml rose syrup 50-75g dark chocolate of good quality 4 rosebuds or rose petals Whip the cream until it forms drooping peaks and then stir in the rose syrup. Whisk the egg whites and sugar to a hard and rigid foam. Fold the egg and sugar mixture into the rose cream and stir gently. Divide the mixture between four glasses. Leave to set in fridge for about 30 minutes before serving. Chop the chocolate roughly with a big knife and sprinkle on top. Decorate with rosebuds or rose petals.


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Violet Martini makes 1 cocktail 45ml vodka 20ml lemon juice + 1 slice for coating the glasses 1 tsp violet syrup or violet sugar 30ml granulated sugar violets to garnish First prepare the glass. Rub the rim of the martini glass with a slice of lemon. Turn upside down and gently dip the glass into a tray of sugar so that it coats the rim then chill the glass in the fridge while you make the martini. Fill a cocktail shaker with ice cubes and add the vodka, lemon juice and violet sugar / syrup. Shake well and strain into the chilled martini glass. Finally garnish with violets.


Photography: Aileen Allen Words: Catherine Sprunt

At Home in Love The home of Aileen Allen reflects her inspiring blog, At Home in Love, with its fresh airy feel and mix of crafty makes, flea market finds and high street accessories.


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merchandising assistant by day and interiors blogger by night, Aileen is the editor of At Home in Love, an interiors and lifestyle blog with daily posts about decor, design and doable DIYs, which have become some of the most special pieces in the home she shares with her husband, Ben. Married for three and a half years, they chose to settle in Edmonds, WA, 30 minutes north of Seattle. The waterfront of Puget Sound (an inlet of the Pacific Ocean)

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is a picturesque setting for the young couple, a charming town with ferries coming and going against a backdrop of mountains. Ben grew up nearby, and the pair spent time in Edmonds while they were dating, making it a sentimental place to start their married life. The first thing Aileen and Ben bought for their house was a sofa. It took two months to show up, during which time they spread blankets on the living

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room floor and camped out watching television shows (Downton Abbey and Modern Family are favourites), talking and reading favourite design blogs like sfgirlbybay and Decor8. It’s clear that everything in the house has been carefully collected over the years, from a metal globe from a San Diego flea market to little details like sweetgrass flowers bought from a roadside vendor in Charleston. Renting can often pose restrictive problems for the design-savvy homemaker itching to start the next

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project. Luckily for Aileen, fresh white walls lend the perfect backdrop to vintage treasures and modern pops of colour, like her leather pouf and beautiful pink velvet chairs. In the meantime, she adds non-permanent personal touches like the gold polka dots that adorn the fridge and inexpensive pom pom edging to her living room curtains (we will definitely be trying that one here at 91!) Working on a limited budget, Aileen has created a home to covet, mixing pieces from Pottery Barn, West Elm and Urban Outfitters with one-off


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antiques and impressive DIY projects. From dipped concrete book ends and wood palette wall planters to side tables made from old crates and wall shelves hung with leather belts. Aileen says the bedroom has been relegated to the bottom of the list as the lack of natural light means they spend more time in their bright and airy living room. But the result is a calming oasis with colour-coordinating 48

accessories and a pile of pillows that would look right at home in a boutique hotel. Despite being an avid fan of interiors blogs and Pinterest, Aileen prefers to find her inspiration from ‘real life’ for a more personal perspective. From a unique restaurant or shop window display, or design tips from her friends, Aileen is constantly inspired, relieving the itch to redecorate


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with regular reshuffles. By rotating artwork and mantelpiece displays, it can feel like a new space in minutes, while displaying things together in an unexpected way lends a touch of humour. As a blogger, Aileen often catches herself thinking her home isn’t cute enough or ready to feature, but as a 24-year-old on a tight budget, she says “I’m trying not to be too critical

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of myself, instead I want to be proud of the handmade, budget-friendly things we’ve done to make our house feel like a home”. By creating a home that focuses on the pieces the couple have collected during their years together, rather than designer furniture or expensive artwork, Aileen’s is a sentimental home, filled to the brim with wit and charm. www.athomeinlove.com 49


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Designer Makes... Cloud Decoration

` by Nancy Straughan

What you’ll need: • • • • • • • •

2 pieces of patterned fabric, 30cm x 20cm 2 pieces of plain fabric, 30cm x 20cm 3 pieces of coloured felt, 15cm x 15cm Needle & thread Sewing machine Pencil Wadding Download PVA glue the project

templates! 51


Using the templates cut out six stars and six rain drops from the felt, then cut out the two cloud shapes from your patterned fabric and two more out of the plain for the backing. When cutting out the cloud shapes, leave a 1.5cm seam allowance.

Step 1

Once you have turned both your cloud shapes right side out, use a pencil to really push out the curves to get them nice and neat. Now it’s time to stuff! Using wadding, gradually stuff the clouds making sure they are nice and plump. Once done, sew up the gap at the bottom on the machine or by hand.

Step 3

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Right sides together, place one patterned Step cloud and one plain 2 cloud on top of each other and pin. Using a sewing machine (or by hand) carefully sew around the curves of the cloud, making sure to leave a gap at the bottom flat edge so you can turn the cloud out. Cut small slits all the way around the curves so they turn out neatly. Do the same for the second cloud.


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Now your clouds Step are complete you 4 can begin attaching the stars and rain. Use a line of PVA down the middle of one raindrop shape and lay the thread down into the glue, then place another rain drop on top to seal in the thread. The thread should be around 20cm long so you can adjust the length later. Continue sandwiching the thread between all the felt shapes using PVA. Take a few minutes to consider the composition Step of your decoration. Then 5 using a needle and thread attach the rain drops along the flat edge of one cloud. In the gaps you can attach the stars. Using the needle and thread attach the second cloud to the top of the first.

Step 6

Create a loop of thread at the top of the cloud so you can hang it up anywhere in your home!

To order the fabric used in this tutorial visit: www.nancy-straughan.com

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Shiny happy details Copper continues to be the metallic element shining through in the style stakes. We show you how to update your interior with ashes of orange-y sheen


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Styling and words by Catherine Sprunt Photography by Freya Dowson


‘You Look Lovely’ print - The Calm Gallery / Bunny bust - Chloe Fleury / Rose postcard Paperchase / Copper circle postcard - Lovely Pigeon / Copper washi tape - Lovely Pigeon


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current favourite with interior designers and Scandi stylists, copper is an instant way to refresh a minimalist home. But we believe it shouldn’t be reserved solely for sparkling white interiors with clean lines. It is possible to create eye-catching metallic vignettes for real-life rooms. Incorporate subtle copper accents into your existing interior with these simple updates and crafty ideas.

create a gallery wall For a charming focal point, create a gallery wall to showcase your favourite art. Stick to a tonal colour palette, using copper accents to bring the look together. Add dimension and asymmetry to the display with copper polka dots. Stick copper washi tape to cardboard and cut out circles. Fix to the wall with blu-tac - perfect for renters!

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b mix copper with pretty p astels


b

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Copper-trimmed tray and copper candlestick holder as vase - H&M / Lightbulb lamp - BHS / Pencils - Paperchase / Copper wire - local DIY store / Copper greeting cards - Lovely Pigeon / Terrarium notepad - The Fox & Star

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wrap a plant pot in copper craft paper gor this simple update.


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CRAFTS

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c ng mobile n i a g h Y I D Materials:

our template // medium weight paper or card // copper craft paper // copper pipe // scissors // glue // sellotape // thread

1. Click here to download our template. Trace onto medium-weight sketchbook paper, cut out and repeat as many times as you wish. 2. Fold the template along the lines. Use glue or double-sided tape to secure the tabs to create the diamond. Tape a length of thread to the inside of the top point before sealing up the rest of the shape. 3. Trace one of the triangle sections from the template onto copper card and cut out the desired amount. Cover the bottom sides of the diamond. 4. Choose what you wish to hang your mobile from – we continued the theme with a copper pipe, but a tree branch would lend a rustic twist or an embroidery hoop would keep the look neutral. 5. Gather your diamonds together and decide how you wish to hang them perhaps in a single line, or clustered together at varying heights - then tie the threads to your anchor. 6. Loop some thread through the copper pipe and attach to the wall with nails. 65


A serene and earthy abode Natural elements and a subtle colour palette provide calmness and comfort in a Dutch family home. Words and photography by Louise de Miranda


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S

oothing colours and natural treasures give the three bedroom family home of Lizzy and her husband Roy a serene atmosphere. Keen to create a peaceful retreat and an airy, spacious home to raise their two children, the couple moved from a small 1920s property in a busy street to this house four years ago. Lizzy, who is a teacher by profession, knew exactly what decorative direction she would take. With a passion for interior styling she loves to create vignettes and cosy corners with handmade accessories and natural elements like branches, feathers, and pebbles. Luckily for Lizzy,


her love for birch wood is nurtured by her husband, who works in a nature reservation. An added bonus is that Roy has a knack for building items from the birch wood he brings home. The house balances earth hues of grey, white and sand with warm light wood and blends robust Scandinavian elements with country details. A cosy atmosphere was as important to them as functionality and Lizzy particularly loves the sitting room where the family

enjoys watching television together. In a large comfortable chair Lizzy likes to indulge in a spot of crochet. The various pieces of furniture are pulled together by a round crochet rug that Lizzy crafted herself, and other handmade items are dotted around - miniature wooden houses and stars made from branches strung together add personal touches. A pile of blankets offer comfort on chilly nights and a casual arrangement of side tables with a candle adds a pop of colour.


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A delicate floral arrangement with whimsical, pastel coloured flowers draws attention as it is set against the backdrop of a soft grey wall. “Flowers are the cherry on the cake in an interior. I go to a local florist where you can pick individual flowers to create your own still life. I prefer that over a large bouquet”, says Lizzy. The resourceful homeowner had a clever, but stylish idea for concealing the contents of the large armoire. She

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has lined the inside of the glass with black fabric and then writes inspirational quotes on the glass windows with a chalk pen. Their open kitchen is kept light and simple – the absence of overhead cupboards creates a more spacious feel. Lizzy and Roy wanted it to feel like a lively country house kitchen. They used a stone counter and covered the hood in a way that it blends in with the country style.


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A wooden bench near the dining table has created an interesting display, consisting of a compilation of decorative elements. The objects are contrasted with a rustic collection of birch wood pieces in a small treasure box. To make every day feel like a celebration, Lizzy made fabric bunting and combined it with a word banner with a sweet saying. The dining table is not only where the family eat, but also where the kids craft and colour, and where they gather together to talk through the day. It has been with them for twelve years now. “We like that it is old and distressed, the older the better”, says Lizzy. “The children should feel comfortable and free when crafting here”. The seating bench was made by Roy, and is covered with a felt fabric to add warmth and texture. The couple painted a vintage black board from an old school with

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magnetic paint - it serves as a board to leave notes and to pin up photos and drawings by the kids. In their sleeping quarters, the master bedroom is kept serene with crisp white walls and minimal accessories, but colour and texture have been added with a vintage chair and crochet throw. In their son’s bedroom, a forest inspired theme is present with pieces of handmade furniture. “Since we know he will outgrow his bed and desk quickly it was just as much a budgetary decision as a design preference to make the wooden desk and bed ourselves.” This stylish couple’s home is a reflection of what they love and who they are. Their interior shows that you can decorate and style your home simply by tapping into your creativity and personality, and going with what makes you feel most at home. 73


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loves.... Little Dreams Boutique

warm pixie

HUNKYDORY HOME

Photocraft

Finest ImaginAry

Munch Stuff


Vintage for kids

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Vintage musical toy, available on Etsy from French Find

to buy or not to buy?

Vintage lover Melanie Barnes investigates how practical, easy and safe it is to decorate children’s rooms with furniture and toys from bygone days.

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I

f, like me, you’re a vintage loving parent, then you may have found yourself asking these questions: how do I satisfy my desire to buy vintage items for my baby without compromising their health and safety? Is it possible to surround them with beautiful, old things that are pleasing on the eye, but are still safe and babyproof? William Morris once said: “Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful.” And ideally, I want all the useful things to be pretty as well. There is the tendency when one is expecting a baby - especially your first - to think the products you need to buy should be solely functional, practical and safe. The design and aesthetic of an item is often a secondary thought. When I

was pregnant with our little girl I knew immediately that I wanted to buy vintage things for her, but for many of you, the idea may not even have crossed your mind. I hope this article might persuade you that there is room for a little bit of vintage in every child’s life, and help you decide whether you can safely sneak some thrifty finds for children into your home. When comparing vintage to new – whether it be handmade, high-street or designer – there are many things to consider: safety, cost, quality, function, style, uniqueness, and how ‘green’ and ethically produced an item is. If you are careful and clever about what you buy, vintage scores well. I find that when comparing high street and preloved against these criteria, the latter tends to come out on top. There currently seems to be a shift in consumer attitudes with people now keen to know where something was made and whether it was made ethically. We have both the curse and luxury of choice, and can decide what sort of shopper we want to be. When having a baby, there are many important purchases to be made. From cots to car seats, books to baby grows and teddies to toys, the trick is knowing which is safe to buy pre-owned and which LEFT: Vintage alphabet blocks, available on Etsy from Long Since. RIGHT: Vintage crib from Les Petits Bohemes


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Image credit: Sofia Jansson / Mokkasin

“As well as keeping your eyes peeled for those little vintage finds, look out for bigger statement pieces”


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needs to be new. There are a few items that you should never buy second hand. NHS guidelines state that you should always buy a new mattress for a cot or crib. Additionally, a car seat must not be second-hand as it may have previously been damaged. For many parents-tobe, one of the major health and safety worries when buying vintage - both furniture and toys - is the use of lead paints. There are now kits available which allow you to test if paint contains lead or not. If your test is positive, Direct Gov advises that: “The easiest way to deal with lead paintwork, if it is in good condition, is to paint over it with a coat of modern paint. This will seal in the lead and prevent it from causing harm.” Alternatively, lead paint can be removed - guidelines can be found here. However, if you’d rather not do it yourself, then there are furniture and toys that have already been lovingly restored, but of course, this also comes at a price. Do your research so you know you are getting a fair deal. One of the biggest purchases you will make is a cot. It takes up a large part of the nursery, so has a big impact on style as well as getting daily use. But is it safe to buy vintage? Which?, the consumer website, recommends that you should “avoid an old family heirloom as

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they may not meet with current safety standards” and always look for the current British Standards safety mark. Further guidelines are available here: www.which.co.uk Ultimately, the primary purpose of any baby equipment has to be safety and functionality. It is pointless buying a vintage highchair, as charming as it may be, if it does not satisfy its desired function. Ideally, you want to see these purchases in person and try them out. You don’t need to be an expert here, just use your common sense; look it over, check it works, and that it feels safe to you. Often you will find that great care was taken with the craftsmanship of a vintage piece and the fact it has stood the test of time is a tribute to its quality. We all know babies love to put things in their mouths, so it is of paramount importance that the toys you give to your child conform to today’s safety standards. So whether the toy is brand new or second hand, there are various safety symbols to look out for. Examples of these and what they mean are here: www.which.co.uk When shopping for vintage toys – most of which were probably made before lots of these safety symbols were

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introduced - how do we know whether they are safe for our children? Toys that I played with in the 70s and 80s were safe enough for me at the time, but are they still safe for my daughter to enjoy today? Whilst it is the law for today’s toy designers and manufacturers to meet certain safety standards, ultimately, it is for us as parents to decide what’s best for our children. One vintage toy may be safe, whilst another may not. Think about whether there are any small parts that could be potential choking hazards and consider what the toy is made from; would there have been toxic materials present during manufacturing? If you are at all unsure, then it is safest for that toy to be kept solely for decorative display or possibly supervised play. This

is primarily for the child’s benefit, but partly for the toys too, as some items could well be antiques - or have the potential to be. If you think vintage toys may be too risky, don’t worry; there are alternatives. Some longstanding toy manufacturers, such as Fisher Price, are now re-launching a variety of their old designs. Their ‘Classics Range’ includes reproductions of vintage pieces popular in the 50s, 60s and 70s, so you can achieve that retro look in your nursery without the worry that the toys do not meet today’s safety standards. As well as piece of mind, the benefit of these is that you will also save time searching for that ‘perfect find’. Look out for other vintage style items as

LEFT: Zigzag baby blanket, available on Etsy from Tag and Tibby RIGHT: Wooden truck, available on Etsy from This Vintage Thing 80


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well as traditional handcrafted wooden toys from independent sellers, which will also help you to achieve the aesthetic you desire without any concerns. There are many other ways to bring some vintage style into baby’s bedroom, which come minus any safety concerns. For example, there is a great range of vintage style bedding available, from handmade cot bumpers to patchwork quilts made with vintage fabric. I have often bought old sheets in charity shops to transform into pretty floral bedding for my daughter. Collect a range of vintage children’s books, which can be picked up for next to nothing and try being clever with your choice of artwork. I found some old vintage snap cards

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with great graphics, that now make for a unique visual display on my daughter’s bedroom wall. As well as keeping your eyes peeled for those little vintage finds, look out for bigger statement pieces, such as a vintage rocker or an antique chest of drawers. There are many reasons to love vintage: the sense of history, the fact you have bought something unique, the thrill of a bargain, and the treasure hunting aspect that comes with finding that perfect piece. But when it comes to the safety of your children, be sure to do your research; arm yourself with information, and work out what you feel truly comfortable with. Happy nursery planning!

where to buy... Online shops selling vintage for kids: House of Young Winters Moon Molly Meg Online marketplaces: Etsy eBay Folksy Fisher Price classics range available at Amazon

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the green, green plants of home In her latest book, The House Gardener, Isabelle Palmer shares her ideas and tips for creating a beautiful oasis of indoor plants, from terrariums to hanging baskets to herb gardens.


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“Allow a living

wall of art to take centre stage in a

daring display, which exhibits a wealth of different textures.”

=

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“How wonderful to wake up to the sight of pretty leaves

tumbling over the edges of a suspended glass container.�

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“A striking way to set your plant displays apart is to add a splash of colour by painting the containers.”

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“A stunning combination of different leaf shapes and colours really makes this

bathroom arrangement

stand out from the crowd.�

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“Preserve special memories of vacations

by the sea by keeping them in beautiful

mason jars.”

=

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“Is there a better or more rewarding way to enhance your cooking than using freshly picked

herbs, such as rosemary and thyme, which you have grown yourself?�

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The House Gardener by Isabelle Palmer is published by CICO Books and is available from rylandpeters.com


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vintage days

91 Magazine gets out of the ofďŹ ce to check out some of the best vintage events happening around the country - and for a spot of shopping too of course!


SHOPPING

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Bath Vintage & Antiques Market WHEN: 1st and 3rd Sundays of each month from 9.30am-4pm WHERE: Gr�n Park Station, Bath, BA1 1JB Website: www.vintageandantiques.co.uk

Review and photos by Laura pashby Beneath the vaulted glass roof of the disused Green Park railway station in Bath is the perfect location for a Vintage and Antiques Market. On the first and last Sundays of the month, this light and atmospheric space is filled with traders and their heritage wares. When I visited, I found goods from a glorious mix of eras on display. A grand gilt-edged mantelpiece mirror stood beside an orange Anglepoise lamp; a box of black and white Victorian portrait photographs sat upon a smooth Ercol coffee table. There was plenty on offer to brighten up dull walls, with framed prints, posters and all manner of paintings ranging from oil-painted landscapes to kitschy kittens. I rifled through old suitcases overflowing with linens, eiderdowns, and patchwork coverlets, and lingered over a tattered chesterfield armchair draped with tartan blankets. Appealing kitchenalia included distinctive Cornishware, Meakin coffee services, striped pudding basins, enamel jugs, collections of mismatched teacups and bundles of tarnished silver cutlery. My eye was also drawn to a stylishly

displayed stall of goods imported from French brocantes.

Next market: 30th March 2014

Lovers of vintage fashion would appreciate the racks of fake furs, military jackets and brightly-coloured Welsh wool coats. I spotted riding boots, t-bar shoes, and rows of gorgeous frocks. To accessorise: leather handbags, silk scarves, strings of beads and sparkling brooches. There were also sheaves of retro sewing patterns, tubs of vintage buttons and reels of pretty trim. Rummaging can be thirsty work, but a friendly mobile coffee van was on hand, and the excellent Green Park Brasserie, also on site, serves breakfasts and Sunday lunch. Personally, I am a magpie for analogue cameras, and I was tempted by a beautiful Super Capta. The ice cream coloured Olivetti typewriters were also hard to resist. In the end, I spent just a couple of pounds, on a small knitting basket lined with ditsy floral fabric, but next time I have a Sunday to spare, I will definitely be returning! 97


London’s Vintage Furniture Flea WHEN:2nd March 2014 WHERE: York Ha�, 5 Old Ford Road, London, E2 9PJ Website: www.judysvintagefair.co.uk

Review by pippa blenkinsop photos by caroline rowland On the sunny first weekend in March the award-winning Judy’s Furniture Flea returned to the charming location of Bethnal Green’s York Hall. For not just one day but two, the 1920s leisure centre, and legendary boxing venue, played host to the more relaxed sport of ‘vintaging’; though being crammed with like-minded vintage lovers meant we did find ourselves fighting our way through to have a proper browse from time to time. Most of the furniture on offer was midcentury. Varnished teak sideboards, plywood chairs and Formica drop leaf tables were supplemented by more commonplace enamelware jugs, vintage tins and branded 80s milk bottles and occasionally a rare gem of a design classic would shine through such as an Eames chair in mint condition or the original Paul Hennington pendant lamp we spotted. Whether you’re a lightweight bargain hunter or heavyweight collector there was 98

Next event: 6h july 2014 something for everyone. Of the over 45 sellers exhibiting, some had travelled as far as Newcastle, but most were local Londoners. Particular 91 favourites were the Enamelama and Emma Loves stalls where we were drawn to a mint green retro fan and floral barkcloth lampshades which Emma makes herself. Like Emma, many traders were experts in their field and clearly knew their stuff. Alex, a specialist in vintage maps and educational posters said, “it’s so quirky” about a 1950s summer scene print she had for sale. “It was designed to stimulate dialogue in children, but I love how it appeals to adults too”. On the opposite side of the galleried main hall, a collection of filing cabinets, factory lighting and hospital units were an indication of one seller’s passion for industrial style. Phil Taylor travels across Europe collecting unwanted utility


SHOPPING

furniture and fittings before returning to his workshop where he painstakingly restores each one, stripping them down to enhance their industrial look. For those more partial to country style there was a scattering of rustic pieces. I was tempted by the stamped tea chests – fantastic thrifty coffee tables at just £30 – as well as some weathered wooden bottle crates and French

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preservation jars in an array of jewel green shades. After a good rummaging session we decided to stop off at the tea stall. The queue was long, but a glimpse at the table of supersized sponges quickly convinced us to wait it out. The red velvet cake was a tasty choice, and light enough for me to return to the retro ring for round two!

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Lyndsey Goodger


CREATIVE BUSINESS

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Ladies Online This issue we meet Lyndsey Goodger, founder and proprietor of online store Rose & Grey. Interview by Michelle Grady

What inspired you to set up Rose & Grey? I’m a homebody and love being surrounded by interesting and beautiful things. It had always been a dream to set up an interiors boutique that would inspire people when decorating their homes. I wanted to create an online shop with a personal feel, like that of a local boutique, with a friendly voice at the end of the phone. What did you do before? I was acquisitions manager in the Channel 4 DVD department. It was an exciting job – we worked with the talent to produce content and design and manufacture their DVDs. I worked

mostly on comedy, with artists such as Peter Kay, Jimmy Carr and Leigh Francis, and generally had a right laugh. Has your background in media helped you with starting your own business? There are elements that I draw on at Rose & Grey. Our department got involved in marketing campaigns, photoshoots and PR. Plus, it was a creative role and I got to work with some really dynamic, interesting people, which gave me the drive to start something new. How long did it take you to set up Rose & Grey? What research did you do? Rose & Grey was set up on a

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“I once drove a chair on an eight-hour round trip to London to feature in a shoot.�


CREATIVE BUSINESS

shoestring. When it launched in 2008, I had just had my second child. Ollie was only six weeks old, but I worked while he was sleeping. Rose & Grey went live in October after about six months of sourcing, branding and setting up the website. I scoured magazines, researched online and gathered a list of suppliers to get an exact idea of what I wanted to sell. It’s an ongoing, organic process. How did you go about promoting the business? Initially, it was a matter of finding out who to contact at each magazine or paper – I compiled a list and sent out regular press releases featuring new product ranges. Being as flexible and willing as possible definitely helped – I once drove a chair on an eighthour round trip to London to feature in a shoot. We’ve now got some great relationships with the press. We also ran an AdWords campaign right from the start, which really helped to get things moving. Five years on and we still have a long way to go, but brand awareness grows year on year and we’re now implementing a thorough marketing strategy. We’ll always rely on the press and bloggers though they’re really important to us.

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support for Rose & Grey whilst also working for a charity called Business in the Community. However, he is moving over full time to take the business forward and run our new warehouse. I focus on the brand, product selection and imagery. We’ll both be managing directors – it’ll be fun bickering on a day-to-day basis over who manages who. What does a typical work day hold for you? I’m lucky enough to be able to drop my children off at school before heading into the warehouse for 9.30am. In the morning I focus on the operational side of things, crosschecking that orders are going out on time and our customers are happy. In the afternoon I move onto creative tasks like sourcing products, working on marketing ideas and planning newsletters. I have meetings with our editor Antonia and work on our SEO and social media plan, and sometimes I’ll organise a photoshoot or meet with the web designers. I feel blessed to have such an enjoyable job.

Where do you source your products? We visit as many trade fairs as we can at home and abroad. My favourite is Maison et Objet in Paris. It’s huge and You run the site with your husband Guy always has some unique finds. Next – do you each have a set role within the year we’re planning a trip to India to buy directly from there with our own business? Guy, up until now, has been providing designs.

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What makes Rose & Grey unique? We specialise in vintage and industrial-style products with a Scandinavian feel. We have three rules we follow when choosing our products: all items need to be beautiful, interesting and practical. What challenges have you faced? In the first few months of trading we decided to sell at an event locally, and spent £3,000 paying for the stand and setting it up. Unfortunately, it was totally the wrong audience and a big financial loss. Getting the logistics right was hard too – it’s so important that the customer has a good experience with their furniture delivery. It’s taken us a while to perfect it, but we’re now really happy with our choice of courier. What advice would you give to someone who is considering setting up their own online shop? I believe in achieving the perfect mix of great products, great branding and a great customer experience - get those three things right from the start and there’s no reason to fail. Don’t get downhearted when things go wrong, which they inevitably will, instead put your energy into what you can do to make it better. Have faith and passion for your business and constantly keep it moving.

www.roseandgrey.co.uk 105


Pattern design: Annabel Perrin

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91 Magazine is a

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91 Magazine - issue 8