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AUTUMN / WINTER 2013 91 MAGAZINE

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MAGAZINE

HOMES / STYLE / VINTAGE / SHOPPING / CRAFTS


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TEAM

Caroline Rowland

Hannah Bishop

Pippa Blenkinsop

Editor & Art Director

Sub Editor & Researcher

Editorial Assistant

Long time no speak! I must apologise for the long wait for this new issue. There’s been lots of exciting things happening over the last few months. The eagle-eyed amongst you might notice my name change - I got married in June and this was the main reason for the reduction in issues of the magazine as it took up quite a lot of my time! I also left my full time job to focus more on 91 Magazine and other freelance editorial work, which has been the greatest decision I’ve ever made, I am loving it! We’ve had a few changes to our team line-up too. Our Deputy Editor, Charlotte, has moved on to focus on her own venture - Her Way Through - a social enterprise offering project management services to women. We are so excited for her, and wish her lots of luck! We have welcomed Pippa to the team, who has been a wonderful help over the last couple of months. Without further ado, please dive on into our digital pages! We hope you love what we’ve put together - we’ve certainly enjoyed it! Lots of Love,

Caroline x x x new venture award winner 2012 91 Magazine is a Patchwork Harmony publication. All content is copyright of 91 Magazine and its individual contributors. Images can be used only with a link back to www.91magazine.co.uk and where possible, the contributors website. Cover Photograph : Elsa Young

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CONTRIBUTORS Shelley Louise Baker

Angie Browning

Lifestyle writer www.thelifeandtimesofShelleyBaker. wordpress.com

Food Blogger / Writer / Stylist www.dishesundressed.blogspot.com

Lucy Davidson

Rebecca Emery

Designer & Illustrator www.peasandneedles.co.uk

Print and Graphic Designer www.onesugarplease.co.uk

Grace Harvey

Alice King

Writer www.whenbettymetagnes. wordpress.com

Interior stylist www.aliceking.com


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Darla Champigny

Louise de Miranda

Blogger www.casadari.com

Lifestyle blogger 30smagazine.wordpress.com

Mattias Ermanbrix

Tiffany Grant-Riley

Photographer www.ermanbrix.com

Stylist www.tiffanygrantriley.co.uk

Kelly Lavender

Corinne Lee-Cooke

Lifestyle writer www.kellylavender.com

Illustrator www.violetlakestudio.co.uk

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CONTRIBUTORS Charlotte Love

Holly Marder

Illustrator & stylist www.charlottelove.bigcartel.com

Writer / Stylist / Blogger www.avenuelifestyle.com

Jenny Newman

Michael Sinclair

Illustrator & designer www.bonjourpony.com

Photographer www.michael-sinclair.com

Sophie Warren-Smith

Penny Wincer

Writer & stylist www.sophiewarrensmith.wordpress.com

Photographer www.pennywincer.co.uk


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Klara Markb책ge

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Chloe Mitchell

Stylst www.kakform.se

Lifestyle blogger www.flagonsatchel.wordpress.com

Kathryn Taylor Blogger www.creativememo.co.uk

Elsa Young

Michelle Young

Photographer www.elsayoung.co.za

Photographer www.mycreativephotography.co.uk

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Contents

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Page 10

Interiors & Style News

Page 12

Page 30

History of Vintage: Apothecary bottles

Shopping: Whatever the Weather

Page 34

Page 14

Page 44

A Vintage Lovers Guide to...Brighton

Global Gatherings: Home tour

Page 17

Page 54

Etsy Seller Spotlight: Ninainvorm

Designer Makes: Pom Poms

Page 25

Page 62

Style Notes from... a vintage bathroom

Style: Industrial Cool

A Green & Pleasant Land: Home tour


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30 Page 70

Capturing your Craft

Page 74

Style: Elements of the Earth

Page 84

Work / Life / Style: Homebarn

Page 97

Vintage Days Vintage fair visits

Page 100

A bit on the side: Soup recipes

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Page 110

Crafts: One pattern Three projects

Page 116

Style: Wonderwalls

Page 128

91 Magazine desktop 2013 calendars

Page 132 Ladies Online: Dee Puddy

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NEWS

Our top picks of the latest, most stylish buys for your home this season By Sophie Warren Smith Give your kitchen table a treat with Anthropologie’s new swirled symmetry dinner plate. Made from earthenware, the pretty design is handpainted and is part of the Studio Stoneware Collection which also includes a mug and side plate. £16, www.anthropologie.eu

Rowan & Wren’s beautiful Evie f luted jugs are made from delicately f luted porcelain that has been glazed on the inside, leaving the exterior matt. The jug is available in two gorgeous chalky shades - tea rose pink and dusky mint. Use as a milk jug or for a simple posie of f lowers. £42 each, www.rowenandwren.co.uk

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91 Magazine loves a bit of Pedlars, especially this large folding trestle table from their vintage staples collection. Originally used for village gatherings in Rajasthan, the tables have been restored and repaired - don’t be fooled by the ‘trestle’ aspect - they are built for permanent use as a kitchen table or desk. £395, www.pedlars.co.uk


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This cute starter craft kit would make an ideal Christmas or birthday present for crafters of any age. It comes in a pretty bird case and includes one pin wheel, one metre bias binding, one hippo or chick ribbon holder with an assortment of five ribbons, one card of multicoloured buttons, one fat quarter of fabric, and one paper sewing kit containing needles, threader, two safety pins and cotton thread. ÂŁ25.99, www.oakroomshop.co.uk

Old fashioned trunks have made a come back recently, we found this bright trio at Made. Each trunk has ornate fittings, handles and catches and are made from steel, so are very hard wearing. They also stack inside each other and are finished with a semi-glossy spray finish in yellow, orange and blue. ÂŁ109 for the set, www.made.com Berylune is a small independent shop in Leamington Spa and is run by sisters Emily & Amy. Both hail from a crafty background so it seemed natural for them to open Berrylune and fill it full of modern craft supplies, creative gifts and retro homeware. Upstairs they run craft workshops where you can learn everything from screen printing and dressmaking, to crochet and knitting. For more information check out their website. www.berylune.co.uk

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Whatever the weather Pretty precipatation homewares are hot right now! 91 Magazine shops around come rain or shine... Raindrop decals, The Modern Baby, ÂŁ11.95


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chopping board Magpie Miller, £20

cushion Freya Art, £22.56

lampshade The Modern Baby £15.95

tray Magpie Miller £20

pillowcase Colette Bream, £37.39

cushion The Modern Baby £24

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Snoopers Paradise 7 Kensington Gardens, North Laine, Brighton, BN1 4AL A visit to Snoopers Paradise is a great way to pass an hour or two on any breezy Brighton afternoon! Set in Brighton’s vintage-loving North Laine, this 90 stall strong store is certainly a Mecca for retro-lovers, vintage enthusiasts and those who generally love to snoop! From stumbling across kitsch time-gone-by toys and quaint and quirky crockery to discovering art deco mirrors and fabulous fifties furniture, you’re sure to uncover something you need in this nostalgic treasure trove. Be sure to enter via the store’s fun turnstile entrance too!

Beyond Retro 42 Vine Street, Brighton, BN1 4AG Tucked away from Brighton’s busy streets and spilling lanes, the Beyond Retro warehouse is the only one of its kind outside of London. With an industrial feel, this vintage clothing haven has a great range, spanning all eras, from 40s bathing costumes, to 60s shift dresses to 90s f loral grunge trousers. Promoting sustainability and Brighton’s reuse and upcycling vibe, Beyond Retro’s designers have re-worked vintage pieces to create one of a kind easy to wear pieces for both him and her. www.beyondretro.com

Utility 28a North Road, Brighton, BN1 1YB

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Blink and you’ll miss this hearty home store in the hub of North new items that have a nostalgic no-nonsense nod to the Victoria brushes and enamel dishes - Utility is a must visit for understa useful kitchen items, the independent store is also a great place practical army blankets. www.utilitygreatbritain.co.uk


th Laine (pictured left). Proudly selling British-made an era - think glass jars, hardwearing home-cleaning ated retro home pieces. Mostly specialising in very e to find vintage-inspired screen prints and perfectly

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Berts Homestore 155-156, Western Rd, Brighton, BN1 2DA 10 Kensington Gardens, Brighton, BN1 4AL Brighton-based Bert’s (pictured left) have three shops across Brighton and Hove, and is the place to head for quirky retrofeel homeware. Whether you’re looking for bunting, blackboards or bread mix, Bert’s is bound to have it. An eclectic mix of bright and bold kitsch items, including f lamingo decorations, Russian doll lunchboxes and chilli pepper string lights, Bert’s is a must visit for anyone looking for interesting and unusual kitchenware. www.bertshomestore.co.uk

The Mock Turtle Tea Room 4 Pool Valley, Brighton, BN1 1NJ A perfect tea and cake pit-stop after an afternoon perusing The Lanes quirky boutiques, The Mock Turtle Tea Room is a Brighton institution. Loved by the original afternoon tea go-ers from the 30s and those who love a bit of nanna nostalgia in 2013, this sweet tea room is filled to the brim with delicious lovingly homemade cakes, traditional teapots and chintzy blue china. The place for a ‘proper’ cup of tea, stop by and spend time choosing from the endless array of classic cakes and grab a seat in the window to watch the world go by.

Compiled by Shelley Louise Baker Illustration by Corinne Lee-Cooke

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seller spotlight

Ninainvorm www.etsy.com/shop/Ninainvorm

Interview by Hannah Bishop

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utch ceramic designer Nina van de Goor sells her colourful and eclectic range via her Etsy shop. We have a chat to find out more about her work, creative background and running an online business.

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We love your designs – they’re so cheerful and colourful, what is your biggest inf luence when you create them? I’m inspired by colours and how they work together. When I begin working on a new design, the original colours and design of vintage ceramics are my starting point, then I mix those with fresh, new colours. From there, the rest of the design comes together. Designs and illustrations from the 1950s are a great source of inspiration and of course there’s so much in modern illustration, pattern and design that inf luence me too.

Have you always been creative? Yes I think so, but always in my own peculiar way! I’ve always loved to draw and have always been attracted to colours and interior design, but I’m not a typically ‘crafty’ person who can make anything. I’m terrible at things such as sewing and I don’t consider myself the ‘hands-on creative type’.

frustrating that I have so little time to work on them. My girls go to day care two days a week, so those are my working days. Blogging is something that I try to find time for during the evenings, because I like it so much, it is a simple outlet for smaller and larger creative ideas. Sometimes I’m just too busy to blog, but I return to it because it’s addictive - it keeps your creativity f lowing.

There’s a lot of optimism in your designs. Do you think your art is a ref lection of your curiosity with society and people? I don’t necessarily consider myself such an optimistic person, but in art and design I’m fond of colours, happiness and brightness. Ironically, my taste in music can be considered kind of ‘dark’ (singers such as Nick Cave or Leonard Cohen and bands such as Editors and Tindersticks). I like art and design to make people happy, to please the eye and answer to my sense of aesthetics. I don’t really look for something dark or difficult in design. For me, it’s not about a view of life and the world, but more about aesthetical preferences.

You’ve juggled studying, your Etsy shop, your family and a blog! How have you Nature seems to play a part in your managed to find a balance? designs, can you explain why? I finished university about six months after the birth of my daughter Rosa, who I think the shapes of nature are a source is now two and a half years old. Looking of inspiration for almost any designer, after two girls under three means finding because nature offers the blueprints for that balance is pretty hard. But being just about any design we can come up creative is what keeps me happy. I’m with, and usually does it much better always full of new ideas, it’s sometimes than we can!

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“the shapes of nature are a source of inspiration for almost any designer...”

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What is your workspace like? And student room and from there a general do you have a ritual to begin a new love for ceramics and tableware started to grow. I admired and collected all design? kinds of beautiful tableware (particularly We moved house just over a month ago vintage ceramics from the 1950s and and now I have the entire attic, which is 1960s), but gradually I wished I could a really nice space. I always play music create my own. I eventually found a to get me started. I usually choose the place where I could learn how to make ‘repeat’ setting and listen to the same my own ceramics using moulds - so not songs for sometimes hours at a stretch. traditional ‘pottery’ but a more modern It is almost meditative; listening to the approach. same music for hours helps me to get When did you start experimenting with into a creative f low. new materials and methods? Are there any artists or designers who About seven years ago I participated inf luence your style? in all kinds of classes in ceramics. I guess so! But it would be hard to say When I learnt about screen-printing on who these artists or designers are. I think ceramics I realised that that was what I we are all in the middle of a continuous wanted to do. So I took lots of screenf low of inspiration and ideas and from printing classes, specifically printing for this we choose what inspires us, ceramics and this is the technique that I whether consciously or unconsciously. still use most. But I also work a lot with There are so many designers, artists collage techniques, both on ceramics and illustrators that I admire; sometimes and on paper. they inf luence my artistic style, but definitely not all at the same time. Often What are the positives and/or negatives what I love in a design is something of having an online shop? that’s completely different from what I It’s just a lot of fun to ‘play shop’ and do myself! design everything according to your own What began your fascination with ideas, from products to photo styling, promotion and everything in between! ceramics? I also love the freedom to be able to I simply started as someone who loved take one creative thought, make it into bowls! I started collecting beautiful a product, and see what happens. Of bowls when I moved into my first course there are also negatives - you’re

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never ‘done’ because you can always do more: make more products, make better products, take better pictures, work harder on your promotion and online presence, spend more time developing new products and ideas, spend more time fine tuning your efficiency and workf low. It often feels like you never do enough, which is partly because a lot of this work is so nice and fulfilling. But even the loveliest of work can sometimes be too much and if you never stop it tires you out, so you must sometimes step back from the endless work that could be done.

What other online communities have been useful for your business, other than Etsy? In the past I used Flickr a lot and also my blog ninainvorm.punt.nl increased my online visibility. Besides those I’m a terrible fossil when it comes to social media; I’m not on Facebook or Twitter though I’m sure those platforms can be

of a lot of help for your business. I love Pinterest, but more for personal use than for publicity purposes.

What’s the biggest advice you can offer to new artists who are keen to set up an online shop? Stay true to your own style and what is close to you. Don’t try to do something that someone else already does, but try to start from what really belongs to you.

What’s next for Ninainvorm? After a long break because I had my baby and moved house, I’m ready to start working full speed again. I have a lot of ideas for new designs and illustrations, and I’d love to do some more projects related to children’s fashion. I used to write a blog on children’s fashion (coolkidsclothes.punt.nl) and I hope to pick that up again, because with two little ones, children’s clothing really inspires me right now!

Visit Nina’s Etsy shop Read her blog


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Stylist Emily Chalmers fixes vintage postcards to her bathroom walls as easily changeable artwork See Emily’s shop Caravan for quirky accessories. Photo: Hilary Walker

Style Notes... from a vintage bathroom

Tips and ideas to transform a bland bathroom into a sanctuary you will want to show off. Words by Darla Champigny


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v ery home has one and most guests see it when they come to visit. Why, then, is the bathroom not showered with the same love and attention as the other rooms when it comes to decorating? Perhaps, its signature features are to blame. A bathroom tends to be small, gets damp periodically and usually has few or no windows. Difficulties aside, it’s possible to make thrifty updates with new and vintage pieces to turn this vital room into one you’re proud to showcase.

give the room a light and airy feel, addressing any darkness and space issues. To tackle your walls, start by buying a stack of inexpensive frames in various shapes, sizes and shades. You could even purchase all of the same frame and spraypaint some in punchy or dark colours. Swap art, in the forms of old postcards, prints from mid-century textbooks and worn maps, in and out of them over time. Paper and ephemera collectables of that kind can be picked up for next to nothing at antiques markets.

The fact that bathrooms are often spatially-challenged is a hidden blessing. This means that there is less area to cover, making the beautifying process a less daunting task. Assuming you can’t (or don’t want to) redo the permanent fixtures, such as the bath, toilet, and sink, focus on the more changeable aspects. Break the room down into components: walls, storage and bits and bobs.

Another option would be to display several different types of the same object. Scoop up antique hand mirrors at little shops you come across on your travels. Hang them all on one wall, giving you both an art display and a locale for selfadmiration. After all, your bathroom is the one place where you can indulge in some vanity without others passing judgement. If you’re in want of objects with built-in brightness, decorate one surface with an array of vintage American number plates. They come in playful hues and can be found from online vendors peddling their wares on sites like Etsy and eBay. Or, try adorning your wall with an item that is both visually interesting and

The walls give a backdrop on which you can showcase your f lea market finds. Opting for a neutral or pastel colour, such as a clean white or duck egg blue, will provide more f lexibility and allow you to be bold with your other décor. It will also

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Yvonne, blogger at Yvestown, has used pastel shades, artwork and fresh lavender to make her downstairs loo an inviting room which is pretty and fresh.

“keep an enamel pitcher of fresh flowers on a shelf or in a corner� 27


Add interest with mirrors, small pieces of vintage furniture, quirky finds and pretty towels. Photos: clockwise from top left Cox & Cox, Hege Morris, Anthropologie

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able to provide wall storage. Mount nautical pulleys with hooks, all of varying sizes and use them to hang towels and dressing gowns. If the f loor space allows, invest in a cupboard, cabinet, or chest that has a door or drawers. It’s helpful to have a place to hide away private items. One creative, closed solution is an old, tin pie safe. It has shelves and the much needed door and could withstand spurts of dampness. Plus the neutral colour of the galvanised tin would work well with brighter decorative pieces elsewhere. If wall storage is more appropriate, opt for something that boasts dual purposes and replace the mirror above the sink with an antique medicine cabinet. To house prettier bathroom essentials, search out containers that put toiletries and linens on display. For example, an old lobster trap (sufficiently cleaned and perhaps lined with vintage fabric) would complement the shipping pulleys and is perfect for holding spare towels. Smaller articles, such as lotions and wrapped soaps, could sit nicely in a wire egg basket. No shelf or f loor space is needed for this: install a quirky hook to hang from.

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Finally, complete the room with some thoughtful touches. Add life to the space by keeping an enamel pitcher of fresh f lowers on a shelf or in a corner. Track down low-cost wares at markets and rummage through mismatched crockery lying around the house. Repurpose a large, vintage coffee tin as a bin and make a standalone saucer a soap dish. Personalise the room by swapping out drab drawer pulls for eye-catching hardware. If you’re unlucky sourcing vintage versions, look for hand-painted knobs at artisanal shops. For things you may want to buy new, such as a shower curtain and towels, search online or at local bath stores for retro f loral prints and crisp, white linens that can be easily laundered. The bathroom, being a high-traffic area, almost requires regular updates. These may be as simple as changing the f lowers and towels or a bit more complex like putting up wall art and repainting. Either way, the mutable nature of the bathroom is a good excuse to be more adventurous with design and will truly transform an unloved corner of the house to a sanctuary with soul.

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History of Vintage

A remedy for style Louise de Miranda finds out how antique apothecary bottles, once holding pills and potions, are now practical as well as pretty items for a modern home.

Photo: Elina Dahl


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n Doorwerth, a small city in the east of the Netherlands, The Pharmacy Museum houses a huge collection of antique apothecary bottles and other pharmaceutical paraphernalia. Museum owner, pharmacist Mrs Marianne Kisters, tells us she and her late husband started collecting the bottles fifty years ago. They started by collecting a few pillboxes from f lea markets and before long were acquiring batches of bottles from defunct pharmacies. The collection is still growing which led to an expansion of the museum underground five years ago. As

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a permanent volunteer and with the help of the foundation’s board, she has been able to continue the museum even after her husband passed away. “Ever since the time of the Egyptians, plant extracts, oils, perfumes and poisons have been stored in glass”, says Mrs Kisters. The Romans were skillful glass blowers and also stored their herbs and oils in bottles they’d made. She explains: “Glass and the pharmaceutical industry always stayed true to each other, particularly during the Middle Ages and the pharmacists even settled

Photo: 86vintage.com

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near herb gardens and monasteries for their healing qualities. When you see medieval woodcarvings of pharmacies, they often depict a pharmacy interior with handblown bottles. However, it wasn’t until the Victorian age that glass bottles bloomed as a daily storage solution.” Raw materials and f luids were stored in brown coloured bottles to prevent decomposition by light. The bottles were then labelled, usually with a Latin reference and closed with a stopper. Poisons were always kept in blue bottles so that pharmacists wouldn’t confuse concoctions. Bottle shapes, sizes and designs vary greatly. Balloon-shaped, narrow and thin, small and large, hand-blown or blow-moulded versions can be found. Various materials were used for sealing the bottles - until the late fifties most were closed with a cork, then later screw caps were used. Many bottles prior to the 19th century were lost, after all, glass is very fragile. But thankfully, there are still lots to be found and collectors f lock to thrift shops and antique markets to rummage stalls for unique containers. The most collectable

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versions are often found at auctions, or have become part of museum collections such as Mrs Kister’s museum in Doorwerth. You can also view collections at the Museum of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society in London or the Apothecary Museum in Heidelberg, Germany. Nowadays it’s not only collectors who hunt out these glass treasures; apothecary bottles have become much sought after items by homeowners for use as decorative and functional accessories in the home. They can add a pop of colour, texture and character to a display, and are practical storage solutions for everyday items. Whether you have a modern monochrome interior or a romantic rustic space, these historical pieces of glassware will easily blend with your style. Bottles come in varying conditions and often need a good clean, but don’t let this put you off! They usually come up well after soaking in soapy water and their rough condition tends to add character. Look out for interesting and often amusing labels, unusual shapes and colours and select an assortment of sizes to make a more eye-catching display. Placing them near windows so they catch the natural light is the perfect way to showcase their beauty.


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5 styling tips

Apothecary bottles

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Use larger jars and bottles to store kitchen essentials

2) Group different shapes and sizes on a tray and fill with single stem f lowers or branches

3) Place a single bottle next to a plain glass jar to emphasise its beauty and fragility

4) Remove garish packaging and store your make-up pads, guest soaps, or bath oil in them and for a rustic restroom

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Use as desk storage for brushes, pencils and paperclips


Industrial

Soften a rough industrial backdrop with cool, calming hues, soothing textiles and a touch of nature.


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Styling: Klara Markb책ge Photography: Mattias Ermanbrix


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Create a graphic pattern using coloured masking tape on rough wooden floor boards

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Group vintage glassware, cloches and delicate flowers for a feeling of luxury

Credits: blue cushion, approx £48; apple cushion (previous page), approx £55, both mimmistaaf.com; KARLSTAD sofa, £300, Ikea

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Contemporary, quirky artwork and cheerful soft furnishings give a lighthearted feel to this bedroom space. Make your own, or buy paper pom poms to contrast with the harder lines of the interior

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Credits: VANDRING SKOGSLIV duvet cover, £15, Ikea; hand knitted blue plaid throw, approx £192; Squirrel cushion, approx £30; owl cushion, approx £82; Robot print, approx £25; Pirum Parum print, approx £30, all mimmistaaf.com


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Continue the cool tones through to your table settings. Use maps as placemats and make co-ordinating place name ďŹ&#x201A;ags from coloured card and a match

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| | Make your own “sprinkles” pillowcase using fabric paint. We mixed blue paint with yellow and white to get the perfect cool colours

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Credits: Bedlinen, find similar at H&M Home; Mug, approx £11, Iittala

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Global gatherings

An eclectic and colourful home ďŹ lled with treasures collected from across the globe. We peek inside interior stylist and online shop owner, Nic Guymerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s London home that she shares with husband Dave.

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Words : Chloe Mitchell / Photography: Elsa Young 45


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ehind the grey-painted door of a North West London terrace you’ll find the home of Nic Guymer; a senior accessories buyer turned interior stylist. Nic’s former career in fashion sent her to all four corners of the globe, scouring f lea markets as she travelled. A born treasure hunter, it was to these far-f lung lands that she returned for holidays, shipping back endless irresistible goods that have made her home

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the treasure-filled emporium of global goodness that it is today. Nic shares her three bedroom Victorian railway cottage with husband David Turner - a retoucher for a top fashion photographer by day, and Nic’s partner in interiors crime by night. Together the couple scout, shoot, and retouch the stock for their online shops, Wooster and homemade candle brand, The Seventy Seven Society; a ref lection


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of their home and evident love of all is injected with lime. The painted things colourful and eclectic. wooden stairs are lined with exotic, yet understated wallpaper; the spare The stylish pair have called the room houses a stash of fabric found historic 1890s property home for over time and a bold bedspread the past seven years. That time from Morocco takes pride of place has been spent lovingly restoring in the master bedroom. Prized the cottage to its former glory. possessions can be found in every Nicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passion for layering colour corner of every room. When it onto a white backdrop is prominent comes to Nicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s style, no stone is throughout; the open plan living left unturned. In the garden, scatter and dining room is brought alive by cushions cover the antique bench shots of fuschia and the bijou kitchen imported from Bali. Cascading

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... the spare room houses a stash of fabric found over time

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lobelia lines the windowsills and From the bovine heads brought painted woodwork makes even the back from Mali, to the handmade cushions found in Delhi, everything practical, beautiful. in Nic and Dave’s home tells a story. But it’s not just finds from around Among the veritable feast of finds the globe that furnish Nic and are the glass baubles hanging in the Dave’s home. Nic’s been gathering bedroom that Nic considers some treasures since the age of 16, using of her most treasured possessions. her Habitat staff discount to buy “I bought them in Cape Town and furniture and accessories as a they contain South African f lora and student. As well as prized pieces fauna. I was waiting for the perfect found online “when eBay was still place to display them and the cheap”, some of their furniture was antlers (which previously resided in free. “I stole our dining table from the garden festooned in fairy lights) my Mum and our tulip chairs were fitted the bill.” salvaged from a skip, sanded down and repainted by a car painter. We Nic and Dave’s home is a heartreupholstered another set of dining warming reflection of their vibrant chairs from Dave’s parents, adding personalities, wild sense of adventure cushions for comfort and colour.” and unquestionable creative talents.

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Check out Nic and Daveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s online shops: www.woostersource.com www.seventysevensociety.com Seventy Seven Society candles will also be available to buy at Anthropologie stores this Autumn.

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Designer Makes....

Lucy from Pea


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as and Needles // Pom Poms

Lucy Davidson explains a simple tutorial for making pom poms and then shares four ideas to make use of them!

What you will need: Wool Scissors Cardboard Pencil Drinking glass or mug Cotton reel

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Make a pom pom... Trace around the glass or mug onto your cardboard. This will roughly be the size of your pom pom. Cut this out. On the same piece of cardboard, trace around a cotton reel in the centre and cut out. 1

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Repeat so you have two rings.

Holding the two pieces of cardboard together, start wrapping your wool round and round. 3

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You will need to do this until there is only a small hole left. If you have lots of scraps of wool, this is a perfect way to use them all up.


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Carefully push your scissors through the wool so you can cut between the two rings of cardboard. Cut all the way around. 5

Once you have finished cutting, take another piece of wool about 30cm long and slip it in-between the 6

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two pieces of cardboard. Tie a knot, making sure itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really tight. Now carefully slip the two pieces of cardboard off the wool. You are left with your pom pom. 7

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Trim to make it a perfect ball.

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headband

Using a plain headband, attach three pom poms by tying them to the band. You can add more than three if you are feeling adventurous.

wall hanging Using a piece of doweling, measure out how many pom poms you will be able to fit. Once you have made these pom poms, hang them to the doweling using wool in a colour of your choice. Attach some tassels to either end of the doweling to stop the pom poms slipping off. Don’t forget to tie a piece of wool to the top to hang from the wall.

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dreamcatcher

Wrap wool around the inside ring of an embroidery hoop, you can always leave this plain if you prefer. Using a piece of wool about a metre long, start looping round the ring following the example above. Keep the knots tight but not too tight. Once you reach the centre of the ring, pull the wool tight and tie a knot - this will form the webbed ring. Make five pom poms to hang from the bottom of the ring, attach using the left over wool. You can hang a tassel from the top, or if you prefer, you can hang feathers or some beads.

flowers To decorate some twigs from the garden why not make a pom pom flower. Make a few pom poms and then use a glue gun to stick them to the ends of the twigs. Wrap wool around the twigs to add extra decoration. Place in your favourite vase.

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Words and Photography by Holly Marder

A green and pleasant land The Dutch home of Sarah Krug and her boyfriend Hugo is a serene space inspired by Scandinavia and Sarahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s love of the colour green


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chool teacher Sarah Krug feeds her love of interiors and art through decorating her newly renovated home, that she shares with her boyfriend, Hugo. Their combined appreciation of the northern European lifestyle

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and a laid back aesthetic that largely relies on light has given their home a distinctly Scandinavian feel. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We love the peace and serenity of the Scandinavian countries we have visited, which was the kind of feeling that we wanted

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to bring into our home”, Sarah we wanted to achieve by opening the space out”, Sarah says. They says. then went about removing tired After purchasing their three storey and yellowing varnish from the home last year, they promptly gave f loors, old wallpaper adorned the place a much needed facelift. with sunf lowers and outdated They began by removing a wall Spanish features. dividing the kitchen and living room to create one large open As light plays such a crucial role space that would promote cooking, in the Scandinavian aesthetic, entertaining and relaxation. “A they infused their home with home cooked meal shared with muted colours and a carefully friends is, for me, a large part of curated collection of furniture the Scandinavian lifestyle, which and accessories to keep their

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living space light and airy. As an artist, Sarah has always loved working with colour. But the couple decided that a less experimental colour palette was just the ticket to creating the calm space they were seeking. One colour, however, that continues to make an appearance, is green. “I just love the combination of white wood and a touch of green, which has always been my colour”, Sarah says. From pistachio to pastel to camo, this girl is crazy

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about the hue that is said to represent serenity, peace and also creativity. Against the crisp and clean backdrop of her Netherlands home, Sarah skillfully blends the old with the new. “Because I love the Scandinavian look, I’m a huge fan of Ikea,” she admits. “But I love to balance those newer items with old pieces that have a story behind them.” When it comes to furnishing her home, Sarah enjoys

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;We love the peace and

serenity of the Scandinavian countries we have visited....

â&#x20AC;?


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nothing more than the thrill of the chase. Uncovering treasures at markets, second hand stores and online marketplaces always spells adventure for this lover of all things vintage, antique and retro. The vintage dining table has become one of their most treasured items. “We love the craftsmanship behind old Danish design. It’s really well made, so it will last another 100 years.” The handcrafted Snowpuppe lamp overhead is another favourite piece and its modern design contrasts well with the retro table. Adorned with stenciled trees in green and blue, Sarah’s living room curtains instantly reminded her of some her parents once had. The pattern adds texture to the large living space without being overwhelming. Sarah uses pattern elsewhere in her home to bring warmth, texture and a sense of

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nostalgia. “I love patterns from the 60s, but in a modern colour palette”, she says. Her studio is where Sarah indulges in her passion for art. “I wanted to create a space where I could be creative and messy at the same time.” Her space features an old chest inherited from a family member that was found in an old goat shed in the south of the Netherlands and dates back to the 18th century. The little drawing desk is a cherished item that was made by her grandfather. Sarah personalised the little stool with a knitted cover. Still in the process of creating their perfect nest, Sarah and Hugo appreciate nothing more than enjoying their space with loved ones. “Home for us is a place where we can be happy together, but also a place where people can feel at home too.”

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Capturing your craft 91 Magazine spends the day with photographer and entrepreneur Lyndsey James, at one of her photography and styling workshops for indie businesses.

Words and Photography by Kathryn Taylor


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or a new generation of talented crafters, artisans and business owners, photography and product styling can often be the deal breaker when it comes to successfully selling your wares, especially online where the customer is unable to see the product in person. The question is, is it possible to create beautifully shot and styled images without being a professional? Lyndsey James has a photography career spanning over ten years and experience running various small businesses, including a gift shop and coffee house. A well qualified photographer, she wanted to share her knowledge with others. This led to her setting up photography and styling classes. She tells us, “We all know that good quality and inspiring images sell more products, so to see my attendees go on to improve their sales as a result of the workshop is so rewarding.” For those who attend the workshops, their day is usually spent at the end of a winding country lane. Quaint English countryside retreats and rural settings oozing rustic charm, provide the locations for Lyndsey’s creative classes. Described by one lady as “a spa day where you learn” - beginners with little or no camera experience can

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quickly learn how to improve their photography and styling in a relaxed environment with like-minded people. Self empowerment and a philosophy which encourages you to see with your eyes, rather than to depend on your lens, are at its heart. With her comforting and relaxed teaching style, it’s perfectly ok for students to refer to the shutter release as ‘the big button’, and Lyndsey describes how the course was designed specifically for beginners with no professional equipment, “Many people come with SLR or bridge cameras, but it’s still possible to achieve stunning results with classic compacts. Whatever camera you have, it is nothing to be scared of.” Over a constant supply of freshly brewed coffee, the group share their own experiences. As beginners trying to photograph their products from home, the common feeling is that of frustration and loneliness. Based on these needs, Lyndsey has created a course which shares real tricks of the trade and technical lessons, delivered in a fun and manageable way. She explains how building confidence is about being brave with your equipment and following through with oodles of practice. Here Lyndsey shares some easy steps to get you off the starting block:

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* Always use natural light. Camera f lashes can produce harsh shadows which look unattractive. Find your ‘f lash off’ button and head to the nearest window or open door to use daylight as your source. * Invest in a tripod. Even for the tiniest of compacts a tripod can be used to give greater stability and reduce camera shake. It’s also a good discipline to perfect when styling as your camera will stay in place while you alter backdrops and props. * Consider composition. Aim to lead the viewer’s eye to your product and be bolder when it comes to positioning off centre. Always consider where your product and props sit in each frame.

product hoping to achieve a desired look, often resulting in confusion. Too many props or those that are irrelevant can be off-putting”, she says. Styling is about storytelling, if you create handmade cushions then a beautiful chair placed within the entrance of a doorway draped in complimentary fabrics sells the image of a personalised home. Displaying equipment such as a trusty sewing machine can also illustrate perfectly the process behind the products. For smaller items consider textured backdrops, complimentary colours and the addition of naturally found props which link to how it has been made or could be used. For example, an old kitchen cupboard door, steaming coffee pot and baked cookies are the perfect props to accompany your handcrafted pottery.

“It’s all about standing out from the crowd”, says Lyndsey “many people have a talent for making beautiful things but if you can’t capture them Every scene is at the mercy of your in an image you risk being lost to the own imagination, just remember to be consistent and ref lect the story of your masses.” brand. If you can achieve an aspirational The workshop aims to empower but shot of your product, the customer is not just through improved technique. more likely to want to own it. Balanced beautifully between the practical and creative, Lyndsey also If you think you are in need of some shares insights from her styling photography tips or an injection background. “Simple styling is about of styling know-how this course enhancing, never distracting”, she tells wraps both experiences into one in a the class, stating that less is definitely professional but approachable way, so more. “For years I have seen crafters why not take a trip up a winding country throw in any old find alongside their lane and see what you discover! Find out more about Lyndsey’s workshops on her website: www.lyndsey-james.co.uk

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“Simple styling is about enhancing, never distracting”

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Elements of the earth

Mix together our planets natural materials to create a tablescape with richness and warmth that wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cost the ear th

Photography: Michelle Young // Styling: Tiffany Grant-Riley


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s summer comes to a close and our thoughts turn to the autumn and winter months ahead, it’s the perfect time for bringing friends and family into the warmth of your home and spending precious time together. Embrace chunky knits, crisp mornings and hearty casseroles and breath in those unmistakable smells of open fires and earth filling the air. Whilst cosy and snug indoors, create a perfect tablescape for your guests. Incorporate natural elements and reusable décor to bring a little of nature’s magic into your home. Using a palette of fresh whites, soft greens and warm, ref lective copper (a top trend for this year) follow our thrifty DIY tips and styling ideas to give your table a naturally beautiful update with added sheen.

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get busy with a can of copper spray paint and update some old bowls and cutlery...


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cut circles from copper sheets for a polka dot wall...

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DIY:

Rustic Wreath place setting

YOU WILL NEED: • Cherry ruscus branches • 2mm thick copper coloured florist’s wire • Florist’s tape • Wire cutters

• • • • •

Scissors Copper sheet Decorative edged scissors White chalk pen Cotton string

Step One: Attach the base of the stem to the copper wire with the tape. Step Two: Gently wind the stem of the leaves around the copper wire then shape it into a ring ensuring you leave enough length at each end to twist the ring shut. If you’re unsure of how big you want your wreaths, use a dinner plate as a guide.

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If you’re unhappy with the way your leaves are sitting, move them or add in some more by tucking them into the twist. But just remember, rustic is what we’re aiming for here!


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2 Step Three. Next, tie your cotton ribbon bow over the closure twist to finish off the wreath.

Step Four. To make the copper name tags, simply write the name of each guest onto your copper sheet in white chalk pen leaving enough space between each one and roughly 3cm at the front of each name (youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need this length to attach it to your wreath). Cut out each name with the decorative scissors and simply fold the front of the tag over the wreath to attach.

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loves....

Pom Pom galore Look lIke love

Mabel and Rose

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Country Style Living


work/// life/// style// We meet homeowners whose home interiors inspire, inďŹ&#x201A;uence and reďŹ&#x201A;ect their professional workspace.

Wilkie Family

Home Barn Little Marlow, UK


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Words : Caroline Rowland Photography: Michael Sinclair


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estled in the pretty village of Little Marlow in the Buckinghamshire countryside, is Home Barn. With its modest, wood panelled entrance, the 17th century tithe barn seems unassuming, but step inside and the most spectacular of timber interiors greets you, and may just take your breath away with its rustic charm and the treasures that await your perusal. A listed building, the structure is pretty much exactly as it would have been when used for agricultural use, but now, instead of hay bales and farming machinery, every corner is filled with an abundance of vintage delights.

Sally and Sarah Wilkie and their husbands. All sharing a passion for interiors and a love for vintage and antiques, a shop was their dream, and the old barn was the perfect backdrop for creating a unique shopping experience. It took them two months to clear the space of dead Christmas trees, pumpkins and other agricultural items, and without wanting to interfere with the rustic feel of the building, they simply added some power points and light fittings to transform it into a working retail space.

The interior is huge and open plan, but Sally and Sarah have managed to design areas within the barn The ramshackle barn was acquired that feel like individual rooms. This back in 2010 by sisters-in-law, has created a more defined and

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ďż˝is page: Area in the barn styled to represent a home oďŹ&#x192;ce Opposite: Home Barn entrance; jars containing vintage haberdashery items

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�is page: �e colourful kids area in the barn Opposite: various vintage beauties for sale


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homely feel thus making it more manageable to browse. From a desk with task lighting and plan chests forming an office area to a kitchen space displaying dressers and cupboards accessorised with vintage kitchenalia, their styling demonstrates ideas that can be translated to their customers’ own homes. A colourful corner filled with vintage toys and children’s books is also perfect for the kids to play in whilst parents browse the rest of the barn, making everyone feel right at home.

inspiring to their visitors, many who travel from across the country just to visit the shop. Their passion for vintage is clear and they tell us that they only buy items for Home Barn that they would have in their own homes. And when we pop by Sarah and Mark’s 100 year old cottage, it’s clear their love for interiors and unique vintage finds is a way of life, not just a job.

Sarah and Mark moved to the property 10 years ago, after craving a more relaxed pace of life away from their previous Central London Along with the rest of their creative lifestyles. Along with their two team, the pair constantly restyle young children they settled here the barn to keep it fresh, sharp and and completed their family with

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L to R: Sarah & Mark’s kitchen; Vintage items that didn’t make it to the shop; �eir living / dining area

Gracie, their distinguished English Setter, not long after moving in. The cottage was initially dark and small, with deep aubergine walls downstairs and canary yellow upstairs, but the couple have transformed it into a light filled and spacious family home. They added a large extension with big windows and roof lights and created a pale backdrop against which their collection of vintage furniture and treasures could shine. With much of their possessions ref lecting the Home Barn vintage aesthetic, the couple admit they have had to meet in the middle when it comes to styling their home;

therefore Mark’s background in graphics is also evident. They mix the rustic, aged look with cleaner lines confidently, and also incorporate unique finds from their travels, such as some lovely blue metallic bottles they recently picked up on holiday in France, which still contain lead shot for wild boar hunting. Family life is also blended with their interiors, as the children’s artwork which they’ve created using vintage letterpress, old stencils and lino-cutting are displayed throughout. From the family home to the family business, Home Barn truly has a welcoming and relaxed feel, and Sarah tells me that they’ve even

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�is page: Sarah and Mark’s home office Opposite: �eir son’s bedroom, vintage treasures and Gracie, the family dog


�is page: �e bathroom, stocked with vintage apothecary bottles Opposite: Natural elements mixed with vintage finds in the living room


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built lasting relationships with their suppliers, “We have normally met their wives, children and dogs and they have been to our homes.” With this kind of rapport, their suppliers often show them what they have before taking it to market, ensuring that Home Barn’s stock is top quality and ‘best of the bunch’.

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Even if you can’t make it to the shop itself, the website is well stocked and the products are well photographed, so you can experience a little slice of Home Barn magic from the comfort of your own sofa! www.homebarnshop.co.uk

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FOLK CITY

melody rose pretty dandy

Betty & Violet i heart vintage

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vintage days

91 Magazine gets out of the office to check out some of the best vintage events happening around the country - and for a spot of shopping too of course!

Newcastle Does Vintage Event: Newcastle Does Vintage, 24th August 2013, Theatre Royal, Newcastle

Reviewed by: Grace Harvey

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howcasing some of the finest vintage and craft traders in the North-East, Newcastle Does Vintage packed tins full of ribbons and boxes bursting with buttons into every nook and cranny of Newcastle’s iconic Theatre Royal. Between nostalgic homeware and fashions, and innovative handcrafted treasures, I truly felt like a small child in a sweet shop… on Christmas day!

Following their last visit to Newcastle earlier this year, the quality of the vendors was once again, outstanding. Each stall I passed soon became my new favourite, and while I tried hard to remain ‘strictly on business’, my purse quickly relented to the charm of Totes Adore’s teacup candles and the nostalgia of Yesteryear Shed’s original vintage adverts.

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Every turn led to another corner crammed with beautiful fashion and interior accessory stalls, which catered for all budgets whether you were looking for a thrifty find or a pay-day splurge. Owleyes took centre stage with their fabulous vintage stamp earrings and jewellery, while Nowhere Near New’s collection of 1940s-1970s clothing and accessories represented the epitome of nostalgic chic. Although ultra feminine tea-dresses, brogues and pretty scarves decorated every wall of the theatre, organisers had ensured that the chaps were not forgotten. Catering for the Victorian dandy in all of us, Al’s Musique

Boutique is the finest purveyor of vintage paraphernalia for the everyday gentleman, offering pieces which are both charming and unique. As all antique addicts know, seeking out these treasures can be thirsty work, but fortunately Hattie’s Wine was on hand for some light libations. Equipped with the Hattie’s hat box, the girls gave wine tasting a vintage twist by encouraging visitors to match Hattie’s splendid handpicked wines to a variety of historic head ware! From start to finish, Newcastle Does Vintage delivered what it promised: vibrant and unique treasures that quintessentially define high-quality vintage.

For more Britan Does Vintage events around the country visit the website:

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decorative living fair Event: decorative living fair, 18th septemeber 2013, chelsea old town ha�, london

Reviewed by: pippa blenkinsop

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offering exactly what you’d imagine - the finest in vintage, handmade and upcycled home wares and accessories to decorate your living space. Most sellers hail from East Sussex but some had travelled as far as Gloucestershire and Cornwall. It was clear when I arrived that their journey’s had paid off, as vintage enthusiasts already clustered around stalls and on opening stall Wood Pigeon, numerous French antiques were already plastered with sold labels. Indeed this set a precedent for the whole show, with French style being a common theme - Blue Linen Whilst the location may have been Cupboard, Nikki Page and Chloe different, the quality of the stalls Antiques were all present selling remained as exceptional as ever, gorgeous provincial finds from faded raditionally held in the grounds of Eridge Park, Kent, the annual Decorative Living Fair, this year, turned biannual, making its debut in London on the 18th of September. Due to its immense popularity, organiser Caroline Zoob traded in the manicured lawns and country vistas for the equally spectacular setting of Chelsea Old Town Hall which, with its highly ornate interior, boasting original oil paintings, marble columns and chandeliers, is the perfect backdrop for such an array of beautiful treasures.

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f loral linens to shabby white washed As fairs go it’s less an opportunity to furniture. rummage for thrifty finds and barter for bargains, but more tailored to buyers Other specialist stalls included Kitty’s looking for expertly sourced, off the peg retro kitchenalia, featuring bright 1960s pieces and reworked, unique items. Pyrex drinking cups, jelly moulds and Sara Jane from Home Front Vintage a 1950s kitchen cabinet, plus Folk at transforms screen printed silk maps, Home, whose array of utilitarian goods originally designed for pilots in the First provided a refreshing contrast to the World War, into stunning soft furnishings predominantly pretty. Some sellers and gifts. Similarly Dee Puddy (our had opted for a more eclectic mix with Ladies Online featured shopowner on products ranging from dainty dolls page 132) creates delightful footstalls house furniture and hand crocheted by upholstering rustic wooden crates, collars to a giant 32 inch clam shell and and Betty and Violet’s handmade china a huge hand painted wooden carousel dolls are adorned with an assortment model – every child’s dream! of vintage lace, jewellery and trinkets. Stalls spread out into the f lanking corridors too – and something the gardeners amongst us wouldn’t want to miss: King John Nursery, dealing in all things old and horticultural, as well as f lorist Wild and Willow whose creative display of heather in old suitcases and hydrangeas in weathered zinc buckets, looked good enough to eat.

Also in attendance was interior stylist Selina Lake, selling signed copies of her most recent book and sharing tips on how best to display the day’s purchases. To round off your vintage experience there was the town hall’s charming Victorian cafe to enjoy that essential pot of tea and slice of homemade cake after a hard days shopping!

Fo�ow the Decorative Living Fair on Facebook to find out about future events. S� more images from our visit on our blog, Patchwork Harmony 100


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Recipes and photography by Angie Browning

A bit on the side Even if your dietary requirements deny you bread rolls, you can still enjoy a fantastic side with your soup. Our gluten free soups and sides will see you right through winter into next summer!

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Roasted butternut squash A

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s we all know, the best thing about eating soup is dunking in a crouton or a chunky piece of

bread. If you are following a gluten free diet this doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean you have to forego this pleasure! These recipes will show you some really delicious gluten free sides to accompany your heart warming bowl of soup. So slip on some cosy socks, put on a good DVD and sit back and relax with one of these soups and simple gluten free side dishes. They are the perfect, comforting combinations for cold autumn nights.

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soup

Roasted butternut squash soup with sweet fennel

Ingredients

•1 butternut squash •2 large carrots •1 medium red onion •1/2 fennel bulb •2 tablespoons olive oil •1l of hot chicken or vegetable stock •sea salt and pepper to taste •thyme leaves (optional) •1 tablespoon honey •crème fraîche to serve

Method fennel and carrots as these will cook before the butternut squash. Discard Cut the butternut squash in half the thyme sprigs, if using. lengthways and scoop out the seeds. Scoop the butternut squash f lesh out of Place cut-side up on a baking tray. the skin (discard the skin) and put into a Cut the carrots in half and then half again, large saucepan, together with the other then the red onion. Next cut the fennel in veggies. Add the stock, bring to the boil half and lay them all on the baking tray and simmer for 15 minutes. with the butternut squash. Add the honey, salt and pepper to Drizzle all the veggies with a little oil taste. and sprinkle with salt and some sprigs Leave to cool before ladling it into a of thyme leaves if available. stand mixer or just use a hand mixer to Bake for 55–60 minutes or until the blend until smooth. butternut squash is just fork soft and starting to brown. Check half way Serve with crème fraîche on top, with through and remove the red onion, some freshly cracked black pepper. Preheat oven to 200°C (gas mark 6)

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side

Gluten free cheddar scones Ingredients

Method

•225g Doves self-raising gluten free f lour •1 teaspoon gluten free baking powder •1/4 teaspoon salt •100g unsalted butter •1 egg •100g cheddar cheese, grated •100ml milk

Pre heat the oven to 200°C (gas mark 6) and line a baking tray with baking parchment paper.

Then add the milk a little at a time, mixing together in cutting movements with the butter knife until it comes together Sift together the f lour, and you have a soft baking powder and dough. salt in a large mixing Turn out the dough bowl. onto a board sprinkled Rub the butter into the with gluten free f lour f lour mixture using and pat down and roll your hands until the into a dough about mixture becomes fine 1 inch thick. Cut out scones with a cookie breadcrumbs. cutter. Stir in the cheese (reserving enough to Place on a baking tray, sprinkle on top of the brush the scones with scones before baking). milk and sprinkle with leftover cheese. Crack the egg in a separate cup and mix Bake for 15 to 20 mins until nicely browned. together. Make a well in the centre of the f lour mixture and mix in the egg with a butter knife.

Cool on a rack. Serve warm, cut in two, spread with butter, then dip in your butternut soup.

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soup side 91

Classy tomato and basil soup

Parmesan crisps

Ingredients

Ingredients

•2 tablespoons olive or rapeseed oil •1 large white onion, diced •4 garlic cloves, minced finely •700ml vegetable or chicken stock •tin chopped tomatoes with basil •3 tablespoons pure tomato paste •cracked black pepper •2 teaspoons of red wine vinegar •2 teaspoons sugar •3 tablespoons double cream

•1 cup finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese

Method Heat the oil in a large saucepan and add the onion. Soften over a medium heat, and then add the garlic, stirring until lightly browned and softened.

Stir in the red wine vinegar and sugar and season with cracked black pepper.

Turn off the heat and let it cool before ladling it into a stand mixer, or Add the chopped just use a hand mixer tomatoes to the pan to blend until smooth. and stir in the tomato When ready to serve, paste. heat gently. You can Make the stock in a enjoy it as it is here, or large jug and add to for extra creaminess the saucepan, bringing add 2 tablespoons of the mixture to a boil. double cream to the Turn down the heat whole mixture and and simmer for 5 – 10 ladle one tablespoon on top of each bowl. minutes.

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Method

Heat the oven to 180°C (gas mark 4), then for each crisp place a heaped spoonful of grated cheese into a cookie cutter ring set on parchment paper on a baking sheet. Spread cheese evenly .Repeat for each round. Remove the cookie cutter before baking. Bake in a pre-heated oven for 6-8 minutes until the cheese begins to bubble and turn a rich golden brown. Serve immediately on a paper towel lined plate while still warm and crisp. Cut a few rounds of fresh tomato and lay on top with pieces of basil.

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soup

Sweetest green pea soup Ingredients •50g unsalted butter •1 medium white onion, diced •1 clove garlic, minced finely •900g frozen peas •1l vegetable stock •100g crème fraîche •15 – 20 mint leaves, chopped finely •salt and pepper to taste

Method

Heat the butter over a medium heat in a large saucepan and then add the onion and garlic and soften gently.

Make the stock and set aside in a large jug. When the onion is soft, stir in the frozen peas. Add the stock and bring the mixture to a rolling boil. Turn down the heat and simmer for around 10 minutes. Turn off the heat and stir in the chopped mint and the crème fraiche. Leave to cool before ladling it into a stand mixer or just use a hand mixer to blend until smooth. If necessary, season with salt and pepper to taste.

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Smoked salmon toasts with cucumber dill cream cheese Ingredients •smoked salmon (a few slices) •cucumber, diced finely •1 spring onion, diced finely •sprigs of chopped dill •tub of cream cheese •1 gluten free crusty roll •1/2 a lemon •pepper

side Method

Preheat oven to 160°C (gas mark 3) and add the diced cucumber, spring onion and chopped dill to a bowl with half the tub of cream cheese and mix well. Set aside.

olive oil. Bake in the oven for about 10 minutes or until starting to golden. Remove from the oven and cool.

Spread the toasts with the cream cheese mixture, lay on top slices of smoked Cut a few rounds of the gluten free roll, salmon and drizzle with lemon juice lay on a baking sheet and drizzle with and cracked pepper.

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Beetroot and apple soup Ingredients •2 tablespoons olive oil or rapeseed oil •300g beetroots (raw) •1 small red onion •thyme sprigs •1 large eating apple •500ml vegetable or chicken stock •chopped f lat-leaf parsley

Method

soup

Pre heat the oven to 200°C (gas mark quarters. Add to the saucepan. 6) Remove the skin of the apple and Place the beetroot and apple on a add the apple, sliced into quarters, baking tray, lined with parchment into the saucepan as well. paper. (you’ll need this to protect your tray as beetroot can stain!) Bring the mixture to the boil and then Drizzle with oil, salt and pepper and turn down the heat and simmer for 10 bake, covered with a sheet of foil for minutes. Season with salt and pepper around 30 – 40 minutes or until fork and add a few sprigs of thyme. soft. The skins should be able to be Take the soup off the heat, remove removed easily. Leave to cool. any sprigs of thyme and cool slightly Meanwhile, add a tablespoon of oil before ladling it into a stand mixer or to a large saucepan and soften the just use a hand mixer to blend until smooth. diced onion. Add the stock. Remove the beetroot from the oven and scrub off the skin of the beetroot with a paper towel and chop off the roots if there are any, slice into

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When ready to serve, heat again gently, taste and season with more salt and pepper if required. Ladle into bowls and sprinkle with parsley.


side Goats curd croutons Method Pre heat oven to 160°C (gas mark 3)

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Ingredients •olive oil •2 slices gluten free wholegrain bread •tub of creamy spreadable •French goats cheese •cracked black pepper

until starting to golden. Leave to cool.

Lay the slices of gluten free bread on Spread with a layer of the goat cheese. a baking sheet and drizzle well with Finish with cracked black pepper. Cut olive oil. Bake for about 10 minutes or into croutons.


one

pattern

three

projects Stationery brand Bonjour Pony has designed one snazzy pattern and three ways to use it especially for 91 Magazine. Just download the pattern ďŹ le, print it out and then choose between a wall art project, wrapping ideas or jar decorating... or try all three! Project designs and photos by Jenny Newman

click here to download the pattern ďŹ le


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1 animal wall art Step 1 Print out the Bonjour Pony pattern called ‘rabbit & bird cutter guide’ from page 3 of the PDF. Use a thick card such as matte 300gsm. Step 2 Using a scalpel or scissors cut the shapes out. Careful with the birds legs they are a bit tricky and she needs both of them! Step 3 Add white tack on the back or anything else you feel comfortable with on your wall and stick them up. TIPS! Why not incorporate them with a picture frame as if the bird has just landed to perch, like in our photo. Perfect for a nursery or child’s bedroom, or for jazzing up a book case. Use ‘just pattern’ from page 4 on the PDF to create your own shape or animal.

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2 jam jar decoration

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Step 1 Print out ‘just pattern’ from page 4 of the PDF. Use matte card 300gsm again or a lighter paper stock if you prefer.

Step 4 Stick the strip around the jar using a piece of double sided tape.

Step 5 Use the shape that you cut out as a gift tag - make a small hole and thread Step 2 Once you’ve selected the jar you some ribbon or elastic through it to tie wish to decorate, measure the height round the jar neck. and circumference then cut a strip from the pattern using a scalpel and Step 6 To decorate the lid, use some of shapes a cutting mat or scissors. from page 2 of the PDF. Step 3 Fold the strip in half and cut a triangle TIPS! out on the fold so when you open Experiment with different sized jars it there is diamond shape window and the various craft elements we creating a little peek inside at whatever have included on the PDF. Mix and is in your jar whether it is sweets, match the patterns and shapes, add buttons and ribbons to decorate. buttons or homemade chutney.

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3 make a gift box Step 1 Print out the ‘pattern & gift box cutter guide’ from page 1 of the PDF. Use a thick card such as matte 300gsm. Step 2 Using a cutting mat, scalpel and metal edged ruler, cut out the box template making sure you only cut along the solid lines. Score along the dotted lines using the back of the blade or the back of some scissors.

Step 4 Stick double-sided tape on each of the four f laps. Then stick to the side of the box. Step 5 Decorate your gift box using the ‘craft elements’ on page 2 of the PDF.

TIPS! Use some of the ‘craft elements’ as gift tags and fasten them to the box. Add ribbon, gold elastic, or bright coloured buttons for Step 3 Fold along the creases where extra embellishment and decoration. you have scored.

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Check out the Bonjour Pony range of cards and prints in Jennyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s online shop: www.shop.bonjourpony.com

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wonderwa�s Finding storage space at home can often be a challenge, but not everything has to be hidden away in cupboards and drawers. Utilise your walls to create quirky solutions that will also look wonderful. We share four ideas to get you started in the kitchen, bedroom, bathroom and craft room!

Photography: Penny Wincer / Styling: Alice King


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bedroom It seems a shame to own beautiful accessories that get hidden away when you are not wearing them.

Here an old glassless frame, destined for the bin has been re-worked into a padded noticeboard. A stiďŹ&#x20AC; backing panel was covered with wadding and the fabric held in place with lattice ribbon attached with paper butterďŹ&#x201A;y clips. Then brooches and badges were pinned onto the fabric to create an eclectic display.

Vases from a selection at Zara Home and Ikea; Wallpaper is handmade using envelope paper.

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kitchen wa� mounted crates and tins Make friends with your local greengrocer & ask them to put aside crates that would otherwise be discarded. Here we’ve used blue plastic mushroom crates, which are the perfect size to store mugs, bowls and other kitchen items. This idea is super simple, cheap and it’s easy to add more crates as and when you find them. Mount on the wall using strong nails or hooks either in a regimented or random arrangement. An added bonus is that hooks can be hung from the holes, creating hanging storage too. Collect used tin cans, paint them and decorate using bright washi tape and simply secure to the wall using neon cord for a contemporary look. These are great for light kitchen accessories like cutlery and even fresh herbs.

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Enamelware items by Riess; Mini metal bowls from John Lewis; Paper straws from Pearl & Earl; White ceramic mixing bowl from Sainsbury’s; Tea towel from Designers Guild, Ceramic egg container from Heals


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bathroom upcycled shelves and hooks This simple and clever bathroom storage cabinet is in fact an upcycled wooden wine crate. It has been lightly white washed on the outside to bring out the grain, whilst the inside has been lined with fake wood wallpaper to give a fun update. These hooks have been salvaged from the interior of an old, abandoned wardrobe. A quick lick of paint and these hooks make a great storage solution for hanging all those essential bathroom bits and pieces. As an alternative to a shop bought towel rail, keep an eye out for vintage wooden ladders. Slightly unsturdy ones are often abandoned, but with some TLC they can be refashioned into a space saving but stylish towel stand.

Inside cabinet lined with Habitat wallpaper, Lace design towel by Scion, Tassel towel from Zara Home.

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embroidery hoop pockets

craft room Utilise your sewing supplies by turning them into quirky storage! Dye some cotton fabric by folding it in diďŹ&#x20AC;erent ways and dipping the edges in a saucer of water soluble dye. Then, using a variety of embroidery hoops, use one piece of fabric to create the pocket and another as the backing and pull taut. These are perfect for lightweight equipment that you need close to hand rather than having to look through drawers and boxes, plus they create a colourful wall display!

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Selection of fabrics sourced from Liberty and John Lewis. Mini sewing machine and boxes are vintage. .


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2013 desktop calendars

designed by Over the next few pages you can download our beautiful desktop calendars for your computer, phone or tablet device. This issue we have October - December, the last of Charlotteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lovely calendars for 2013! Just click on the calendar image to download it. Make your screen pretty!

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december 131


Ladies Online

More and more women are taking the plunge and setting up their own business. With the internet making this easier than ever, many of these businesses are being run solely online. We meet some of these inspiring women who have made cyperspace their marketplace.

Dee Puddy Garden and Interiors Interview by Kelly Lavender

D

ee Puddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passion for creating beauty both indoors and out, led to her setting up shop over 10 years ago. We find out how her business has evolved, where she finds inspiration and how she goes about sourcing her beautiful range of decorative and functional homewares. 132


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How long have you been running I think following this route means you are able to sell with conviction as you your online shop? have faith in your products. It also I started out around 10 years ago but means you develop a coherent style somewhat differently to how I am now. and customers will come back to you Initially I sold at lots of small fairs. In for that very reason. many ways it was a great way to kickstart my business as my experience Have you always had a love of interiors was fairly limited so it let me in gently and gardening? to the world of retail. A great friend, Harriet Campbell of Hunter Gatherer, I was very lucky to grow up in a big who Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d met through working at the family â&#x20AC;&#x201C; I am the youngest of nine various fairs, was taking the plunge - and I spent a lot of time outdoors. and exhibiting at the Country Living My father had a random approach to Fair in London and encouraged me to gardening that somehow produced join her. This proved to be a good great results. It was his enthusiasm move as it reinforced how much I enjoy that got me into gardening. My mum dealing directly with my customers cooked anything that was there and and helped to reach a wider audience. available for a family of nine, and The website launched in 2007, but it now, when time allows, I love sowing, wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t until 2008 that it became a full growing and then cooking my own e-commerce site due to the demand produce. All the things I love - design, interiors, cooking, outdoors, gardens of customers wanting to buy online. and vintage, overlap in so many ways. What inspired you to set up the I love practical, well made pieces and functional design as well as natural business? materials and the colour palette The foundation of my business, like associated with them. I also love all many people, is based on what I like. the little details and quirky finds. I try

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not to get too caught up in big trends as inevitably they change, so it’s nice to try and carve out a style of your own and therefore a unque selling point for your business.

Tell us about how you source your stock and where do you search for inspiration?

have interesting pieces. I absolutely love the diverse range of people that I meet from all over Europe and farther afield. Language may be a barrier at times, but you always get by with sign language and a smile. The internet has now become a huge resource. There’s so much fantastic inspiration to be found via stylists and interior blogs. Aside from that, I confess to collecting random pieces of natural materials from holidays and days out. I’m usually the ‘naughty child’ dawdling at the back with my head down looking for a special piece of weathered wood, odd feathers or worn coloured glass. I take them home and add them to windowsill jars.

I never stop looking for vintage, handmade and new products. I’m also developing some of my own exclusive and quite functional products. Partly because that’s what I like, but also because I think people want less throwaway items. Over the years I’ve built up a network of dealers in this country and abroad. Many now know what I’m looking for What do you love most about running and will often contact me when they your own business?

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Independence, plus the freedom to choose and follow my instinct. I love my customers - there is nothing more gratifying than someone sending me a thank you email when they are happy with the products and service. I also love meeting new people - over the years I’ve gathered a really eclectic range of friends. This wouldn’t have happened without my business.

How important is social media to the success of your online business? I love the spontaneity of social media. It’s an instant way of letting your customers know what’s happening. It also adds personality to your business - I think we all like to find out about people, how they live, what they like and dislike etc.

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What advice would you give to anyone considering setting up their own online shop? From a creative perspective, it’s essential to have good quality imagery. A well photographed product can convey so much. Customers like to see detail as well suggestions for use and display. Practical advice, make sure to keep your paperwork in order. The best thing I ever did was to get a bookkeeper! Assessing figures and cash f low helps to make for a more efficient business. If you are working from home, it’s important to have a separate space to close the door on at the end of the day. Finally, be very prepared for how much it can take over your family and personal life.

Visit Dee’s website to view her full range: www.deepuddy.co.uk 135


Pattern design: Rebecca Emery

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91 Magazine is a

Patchwork Harmony

publication. All content is copyright of 91 Magazine and its individual contributors. Images can be used only with a link back to www.91magazine.co.uk and where possible, the contributors website.

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91 Magazine - Issue 7