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91 MAGAZINE

interiors / vintage / crafts

DECEMBER 2014


91 MAGAZINE IN PRINT!

our special edition is now available to purchase individually for ÂŁ2.95 (INC. UK P&P) Our first ever print issue that was produced in collaboration with Mollie Makes is now available to buy on its own for just ÂŁ2.95. The 32 page special includes modern crafts you actually want to make, interiors you can acheive yourself without breaking the bank and interviews with creative folk that will inspire your own home, life and work. Get yours now via our website: www.91magazine.co.uk www.91magazine.co.uk/shop


91 TEAM

Editor’s Letter Greetings!

MAGAZINE

Caroline Rowland

Editor & Art Director

Hannah Bishop

Sub Editor & Researcher

CHARLOTTE MAGUIRE

Picture Researcher

charlotte hughes

Design Assistant

Gillian mackenzie Sub Editor

Welcome to the last issue of 2014. Where has the time gone?! Christmas is just around the corner, and while I generally steer away from an overly seasonal feel to our end of year issue, we do have a few little nods to the festive period. Our Winter Pastels feature will inspire you to opt for a softer look for your celebrations this year, including some beautiful DIY homemade crackers. We also have a free printable download to make your own gift tags or cards, which might just inspire you to try your hand at the art of calligraphy! Looking ahead to 2015, we take advice from three industry experts about what trends we should look out for. Or why not plan a post Christmas shopping trip to Lewes in East Sussex using our Vintage Lovers Guide? Have a cosy Christmas folks! Lots of Love,

Caroline x x x new venture award winner 2012

91 Magazine is a Patchwork Harmony publication. All content is copyright of 91 Magazine and its individual contributors. Images can be used only with a link back to www.91magazine.co.uk and where possible, the contributors website. Cover Photograph : Jemma Watts

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contributors

MELANIE BARNES

Writer, blogger & maker www.geoffreyandgrace.com

Darla Champigny Lawyer and blogger www.casadari.com

ruth garner

Blogger and writer www.ruthlgarner.com

Emily Georgiou MICHELLE GRADY

Journalist @EmGeo1

Writer and blogger www.eclecticthreads.wordpress.com

jeska hearne

Blogger and stylist www.blog.lobsterandswan.com

denise hermo

Illustrator www.dehum.com.ar

rosanna johnson

Styling assistant instagram.com/rosy.the.rose 4


holly jolliffe Photographer www.hollyjolliffe.co.uk

Corinne Lee-Cooke Illustrator www.violetlakestudio.co.uk

LEIGH METCALF

Blogger www.foundnowhome .blogspot.co.uk

KATHARINE PEACHEY

Photographer www.katharinepeachey.co.uk

laura sawyer

Interior stylist www.the-detail.co.uk

Catherine Sprunt

Fashion & lifestyle writer www.catherinesprunt.com

SOPHIE WARREN-SMITH Writer & stylist www.sophiewarrensmith. wordpress.com

jemma watts

Photographer www.jemmawatts.com

SIOBHAN WATTS

Photographer www.blesstheweather.com 5


Contents Page 8

Page 60

91 News

Page 10

Interiors: Layers of time...

Shopping: Bedtime buys

Page 12

Vintage Lovers Guide to Lewes

Page 15

Folksy Seller Spotlight: Mabel and Bird

Page 21

Style Notes... Trends for 2015

Page 29

History of Vintage: Retro kitchen units

Page 32

Interiors: Modern build, vintage vibe

Page 44

Designer Makes: Decorate with doilies

Page 50

Style: Winter pastels

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Page 70

Crafts: Kantha patched cushion

Page 74

Work / Life / Style: Geoffrey & Grace

Page 82

Crafty Days: Calligraphy Class

Page 88 Ladies Online: Clare Nicolson


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Shopping: Bedtime buys

Interiors: Modern build, vintage vibe

Interiors: Layers of time...

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Style Notes: Trends for 2015

Style: Winter pastels

Crafts: Kantha patched cushion

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Work / Life / Style: Geoffrey & Grace

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NEWS

Our top picks of the latest, most stylish buys for your home this season By Sophie Warren Smith Enamelware favourites Garden Trading have teamed up with design duo MissPrint to bring you this charming collection based on their original Muscat wallpaper. The collection includes a mug (£12.50 each), stove kettle (£30), milk pan (£25), canister (£16.50), milk jug (£12.50), and utensil holder (£14.50). All are available in both yellow and flint. www.gardentrading.co.uk

Launched this month, Swoon Lounge is a shiny new online store specialising in oneoff vintage objects, quirky accessories and handmade treasures. Started by Susan Cropper and Anthony Duncan-Smith who share a joint love of flea markets and travel, and both have a keen eye for the unusual. Susan is the founder and owner of Loop, a treasure trove of knitting supplies and textiles, and Anthony has a background in graphics and store design. This delightful merry-go-round with metal horses and pearl beads, £129.99, is a perfect example of what you’ll find online. www.swoon-lounge.com

With Christmas around the corner, it is time to seek out those beautiful and unusual decorations that sets your home apart. Perk up your mantelpiece or windowsill with a pair of these gorgeous Liberty print felt robins. They both come with the Wiltshire berry print on their chests. The small size priced at £17.95 and the extra large at £59.95. www.liberty.co.uk 8


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Rekki in Reykjavik is a new collection by Ella Doran. It features her synonymous graphic patterns and bold colour combinations inspired by her recent visit to Iceland. The range includes cushions, tea towels, placemats, fabrics and this striking Wood Grain Blue wallpaper printed on FSC high grade paper. Made in the UK, £150 per 10m roll. www.elladoran.co.uk

The Future Kept is husband and wife team, Jeska and Dean Hearne. Together they seek out beautiful and useful items that will last a lifetime and are made with love, thoughtfulness and detail. Their online store has a carefully curated range of lifestyle products, they are currently the only UK stockist of items designed by French painter and illustrator, Amelie Mancini. www.thefuturekept.com

Whether a wedding, birthday or Christmas present, ‘Gift Wrap Guru’ Jane Means has a new book out this month, showing you how to take any shaped gift and wrap it up into a gorgeous package for a loved one. Complete with a myriad of tips, you can achieve giftwrapping perfection with the help of this beautiful book, Giftwrapped by Jane Means, £20, published by Jacqui Small. www.janemeans.com 9


Sleep tight

Photographer: Franรงois Kรถng / Stylist: Karine Kรถng

Our favourite bedtime buys for a stylish night in

Linen Duvet Cover, ยฃ245, Bodie and Fou


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Bed side cabinets, £350 (set of 2), HK Living

Table lamp, £179, Bloomingville

Cushion, €35, Zu Boutique Lambswool socks, £22, Catherine Tough

Throw, £139, Bloomingville

Hot water bottle, £41, Donna Wilson

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Jeska Hearne explores the historic market town of Lewes in East Sussex Illustrations by Corinne Lee-Cooke

Abigail’s Drapery This super friendly family-run store has shelves piled high with handcrafted natural textiles, fibres and fabrics, all sourced from local producers. Featuring everything from beautiful Alpaca fleeces and Merino wools for knitting, to craft accessories and kits for making garlands, it really is a crafter’s paradise. They also provide a quick and efficient alteration service – perfect for taking in the next vintage dress you buy!

www.abigailsdrapery.co.uk 19 High Street, Lewes, BN7 2LN

Flint This shop is located in a 14th Century building in the heart of Lewes. As well as an interior design service, the mother and daughter team sell all sorts of wonderful things. From handpicked collections of stunning clothes and accessories, to homeware, gifts, perfume and skincare products. They also offer a beautifully edited selection of books and vintagestyle fresh flower posies.

www.flintcollection.com 49 High Street, Lewes, BN7 2DD 12


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Closet and Botts A stunningly styled store that specialises in vintage, reclaimed and handmade homewares. I fell for the lovely range of vintage inspired dresses, hand poured candles and charming antique seed packets. The two lovely owners travel all over the UK and Europe in search of treasures to sell, so if you are looking for something specific then let them know and they will do their best to find it!

www.closetandbotts.com 196 High Street, Lewes, BN7 2NS

Flint Owl cafe

An amazing place to eat where a selection of breads, pastries, cakes and savouries can be enjoyed over a cup of tea or yummy Square Mile coffee. The cafe has a pared back, industrial feel whilst outside a delightful courtyard garden filled with birds and flowers is an idyllic spot to tuck into some seriously tasty seasonal food.

www.flintowlbakery.com 209 High St, Lewes, BN7 2DL

The Needlemakers A mini maze of specialist shops and a cafe all under the roof of an impressive industrial brick building. All retail units are home to makers, designers and dealers who sell either vintage, original and beautifully handcrafted products. It is a fantastic place for buying unique presents. The Seamstress is a workshop space that hosts craft courses for adults and children and Mary’s is a cheery studio shop full of beautiful things. It’s also the best place in Lewes to buy a proper bag of pretty sweets!

www.needlemakers.co.uk West Street, Lewes, BN7 2NZ

Pastorale Antiques Located in an old courtyard that has been a centre for antiques for over 30 years, Pastorale Antiques offers an eclectic mix of period, vintage, and occasionally modern furniture. The warehouse area has large and unusual pieces which the owners travel all over the UK and across Europe to source. The tree filled courtyard is also home to a cafe, where you can rest your feet in the shade whilst surrounded by beautiful things.

www.antiquessussex.co.uk- 15 Malling Street, Lewes, BN7 2RA 13


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loves.... buttel bears

Betty ZEE

warm pixie Finest Imaginary

heart vintage

southwood stores


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seller spotlight

We chat with Folksy seller and creator of Mabel and Bird, Emma Pearson, about her creative life as a screenprinter and selling online. Interview by Laura Pashby


Tell us a bit about yourself and what you do. My name is Emma, and I design and screen print textiles from my home studio in Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire. I’ve always been creative and even as a little girl was happiest when I was drawing or making something. I feel so lucky to be living a creative life – it spills over into everything I do from my little allotment to my passion for cooking. Being creative means you never stop learning. When and where did you learn to screen print? At The London College of Printing. I cherished my time studying there and I got a first class honours degree in Surface Design and Print Media. London fuelled my thirst to learn, and it still does – I get so excited every time I hop on the train to get a fix from our creative capital! What is it about screen printing in particular that appeals to you? Printing has been my passion since the age of twelve when I first cut into a piece of lino in my school art class. I can’t explain why, but it just seems to suit me – I like the flat quality of a print, its neatness and sharpness. I was always stuck between being a fine artist and a commercial designer, but screen printing allows me to fulfil both, and I love every process

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involved, from making stencils to pulling the ink across the screen. Are there any designers whose work you particularly love? There are so many talented people making and creating out there. I love Corrin Strain of Lloyd Loves illustrations, and adore the work of Le Train Fantôme. Both are beautifully made and packaged with so much attention to detail. Also, Anna Wiscombe makes beautiful wooden birds – her use of colour is exquisite. Could you describe your creative space for us? I keep my printing table in the garage which is a totally uninspiring space but it is functional and I don’t need to worry about getting ink everywhere. My studio on the other hand is kept very clean and tidy – it has white walls and shelves with a long desk for my sewing machine and drawing space. Can you talk us through your creative process? My creative process is completely driven by my mood. I tend to draw when something pops into my head because I find that if I sit down and give myself time to draw then nothing actually happens. Instead I find I am most productive when I’m creating as one new design can often spark another and more


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“

“

Using social media to direct peopl e to my shop has hel ped massively


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ideas seem to flow. I am inspired sometimes by the smallest of things – I definitely have a thing for clouds! What led you to start your own business, and how do you feel about selling through Folksy? I wanted to work for myself – I like making my own decisions and having my name put to my own creations – so I decided to start up an online shop. I like selling with Folksy, not only is it UK based – which is important to me – it is also easy to use and looks professional. Using social media to direct people to my shop has helped massively, and Folksy offers a smooth transaction process for my customers. What’s more I can run the shop from my studio and it’s open 24/7! What do you focus on when styling and photographing your products for your Folksy shop? I mostly focus on light and on keeping it simple with clean backdrops that let the product shine. It is so important to get this bit right, finding a style and being consistent. A chair I once rescued from a skip, which I now love, makes the perfect prop and appears in many of my photographs. Tell us about a day in the life of Emma Pearson No two days are ever the same. I

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always start with a list, otherwise I would never know where to begin. Oh, and a massive cup of coffee of course! I like to print at least twice a week, and then I have ‘neat days’ when I do all of my sewing. I always do little jobs in the evening, like hand printing labels or ironing textiles I have printed that day. I also run printing workshops for kids in the school holidays and at weekends which I love – I always feel so motivated by their energy and imagination. What advice would you have for someone who was looking to start selling their work through Folksy? My advice would be to do your research, but not to get swallowed up in what other people are doing. Be yourself. Have a plan and give yourself a monthly target to hit so that you keep focused, productive and motivated. Also, don’t give up – work hard and believe in yourself. What does the future hold for Mabel and Bird? In addition to Folksy, I am lucky to be selling in so many amazing shops, from ‘Moonko’ in Sheffield to ‘Young Folk’ in Australia. The future is to keep printing and keep growing. Visit the Mabel & Bird shop: www.folksy.com/shops/MabelandBird

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ADVERTISING

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loves....

goody you choose

i heart vintage Ruby blue design

pretty dandy

ruby roost


Words by Darla Champigny

INTERIORS

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STYLE NOTES

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trends for 2015

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t’s only natural to take some time at year’s end to reflect on the past twelve months and prepare for what’s to come in the next twelve (in between rounds of turkey-eating and gift-opening, of course). In keeping with that sentiment, we consider the current and emerging trends of three popular home décor styles through the eyes of three industry experts.


The Modern Vintage Home Stylist, author and owner of homewares shop Caravan, Emily Chalmers, shares her thoughts on creating a perfect modern vintage home in 2015.

As the name suggests, in this home you’ll find vintage furniture paired with modern wares, accents, and colours. Old treasures may be freshened up with a new coat of paint or set of knobs, and furnishings come from a multitude of sources, including flea markets, boutiques, and department stores.

According to Emily, this phenomenon doesn’t look to be letting up anytime soon, with the creature trend only getting more popular. “Though animal wall decorations are certainly here to stay for a good few more years, I think we might move on to see larger, grander animals sitting in our gardens and by our doorways again.” Emily herself has a stone bambi in her We’ve seen some international garden, with plans to expand to a influences (e.g. kilims and Asian textiles) family, and includes on her Christmas show up in this style as well as list a moss dog from Abigail Ahern. various items found in nature. These include botanical (think To infuse a bit of this charm into your woodland creatures, such as own habitat, take a page out of Emily’s owls, foxes and badgers) book by sometimes relying on your gut and anatomical inspirations (or your heart strings) to guide you. (for example, hooks that are In sourcing products for Caravan, she shaped as hands and torso- goes after those things she lusts after inspired vases). or those which have “that instrinsic ‘Ooooooh’ factor.” This doesn’t mean This animal your place should be filled with loads adoration is of pretty nothings: it’s possible to reflected in the combine beauty and utility. On this, product range Emily says, “I do particularly love at Caravan, ornamentation when it’s combined with homewares shop a practical edge.” An example of this of stylist and is Caravan’s pineapple wall sconces: a author Emily Chalmers. perfect blending of the two concepts. 22


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This page: Logpile Wallpaper, £52 per roll from Roddy&Ginger / Opposite: Pineapple wall sconce, £99, Caravan / Previous page: Vintage Leather Brooklyn Chair, £795, Large Owl Vase, £36, Cockatoo Cushion, £75 all Rose & Grey


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The Design led home Interiors journalist and author, Charlotte Abrahams comments on what design lovers are currently coveting.

This is modern vintage’s younger, more polished cousin, featuring clean lines, bold statements, and architectural pieces. In this genre, high street fashion has been brought inside the house with a renewed love of graphic art and use of colour-blocking in everything from tea cups to walls. Interiors journalist and author, Charlotte Abrahams, predicts a more understated look going forward with an emphasis on “quiet furniture (simple in form and without any unnecessary adornment) beautifully made from natural materials (left in its natural state – i.e. wood with the bark on it, unpolished stone).” She points to Joseph James Hartley as a source for such goods. She also suggests that the gaining interest in craft and bespoke is creating a trend that’s the antithesis of itself: “one-off, quirky things which add personality to a home will become more important than on-trend pieces.” Some other décor highlights in the new year, include super-sized lights, patterned carpets, and juxtapositions of different materials.

To translate the above into tangible results at home, Charlotte recommends “seeking out designer-makers selling direct from their studios and finding local craftspeople – blacksmiths, furniture makers, upholsterers, etc., who will make things for you.” She adds: “Commissioning isn’t necessarily more expensive than buying ready-made.”

Oposite: ‘Nomadic, from Plantation Rug Company, / Right: Egg lights by Out There Interiors

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The handmade Home TV host and handmade fan Kirstie Allsopp tells us what crafty pursuits we should try our hand at this coming year.

This style evokes a cosy feeling and uses pieces that have been made by hand, whether those of its occupants or of a carefully chosen artisan. There’s been a surge of late in those wanting to create this type of abode. There’s a certain satisfaction that comes with crafting your own décor and building your own furniture. Supporting a hard working proprietor by purchasing a one-off chair or tea towel can make a person feel similarly content. Property expert, TV host, and avid crafter, Kirstie Allsopp, offers some thoughts on a straightforward project for 2015. “Tie dye is one of my personal favourites and so easy to

do. It’s a great one for kids too.” Her own sons spent an entire Sunday on this activity, resulting in a lot of matching pants and vests. Kirstie also suggests how to use splashes of colour in décor: “Fabric is where it’s at for me.” She reveals she is busy re-covering a lot of old chairs right now. “It’s a great way to freshen and brighten up a room, particularly if it’s a favourite piece with life still in it. It’s a clever way to add colour that can also be moved around, unlike a feature wall which you’ll be stuck with for a while.” To give your space a crafted, handmade look, try fabrics and start with a feature everyone has: windows. Kirstie says: “Window blinds are another brilliant way to add colour, and these can be rolled away as and when you feel like it. Markets are a great resource for fabric, and it doesn’t have to be expensive.” Finally, if you want to relive your childhood school camp memories, give tie dye another go. “You could try a table cloth or set of napkins. Trust me, it’s addictive!” Opposite: Bedding by Urban Outfitters Left: Forest Animal teatowels by Gingiber

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History of Vintage

The compact kitchen Emily Georgiou looks back at the popularity of the freestanding kitchen unit in the early 20th century and how they are making a modern day comeback.

Photo: From Kitchenalia by Vinny Lee, published by Jacqui Small


Freestanding kitchen units are synonymous with the devoted housewife from the first half of the 20th century, more specifically with the 1920s and 1930s. Sometimes known as Hoosier cabinets, named after the Hoosier Manufacturing Co. of New Castle, Indiana, they continued to rise in popularity until the ultra-modern fitted kitchen was introduced in the 1950s. The 1920s and 1930s kitchens had limited floor space and had to squeeze in laundry products such as ironing tables, washers and dryers, as well as cooking appliances. The idea of having this ‘all in one kitchen’ in the form of a cabinet can be traced back to the late 19th century. The Hoosier Manufacturing Co. and its president, John M. Maring, came up with a solution to the lack of storage space by producing and selling freestanding kitchen cabinets to homemakers. These design masterpieces provided both practical kitchen storage and a functional workspace, making it much more efficient for housewives of the time. They generally consisted of two top cupboards, with glass in an etched design or glass sliding doors, and a pull down enamel worktop to prepare food. Usually there was a bread board, flour

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sifter or rolling pin concealed within. They also had a larder section to store bread and cakes, and occasionally metal lined cupboards. The two large sections at the bottom were to store pots and pans, with drawers and extra cupboard space for cutlery, cooking utensils, crockery and other kitchenalia. All of this is of course a far cry from the modern kitchens we know today, but these fabulous freestanding kitchen units helped to lay the foundations for today’s contemporary hub of the home. The fitted kitchens of the 1950s were highly influenced by these freestanding cooking stations. The idea of utilizing space in one easy to navigate room was the inspiration for the compact and organised fitted kitchen. It turned

The Hoosier cabinet was designed to speed up cooking and kitchen chores by having everything required in one space.


Photo: Oodles and oodles

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it into a fully furnished room that looked as though it belonged, rather than a fragmented space. However, with today’s popularity for all things vintage, the freestanding kitchen is making a comeback. Perhaps this is because of more generous sized kitchens and open plan living, or simply the aesthetic appeal of freestanding cabinets. These multitasking pieces of kitchen history are now having a revival in the modern vintage home. If you are interested in sourcing one for your own kitchen. Blue Gate Products, part of the ‘Pride-O’-Home’ range, Hygena and Lebus are all great makes to look

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out for, but don’t be put off by an un-branded unit; chances are that the brand label has simply worn off at some point. As these pieces become ever more coveted, prices vary, and can range from £50-£300 depending on where you look. The more expensive ones tend to be restored, whereas the cheaper versions are more than likely in need of a little love. You can breathe a new lease of life with a little bit of hard work, and of course choose the paint colour yourself. If searching online, eBay is a good bet, but be sure to keep your eyes peeled when out and about in antique shops or car boot sale. You could get lucky like I did and find one discarded on the street. If it’s outside a house, always make sure to ask before taking it. These timeless design classics evoke strong memories from childhood for many people. My mother recalls her grandmother, Nannie Annie, having one such unit in her kitchen. She vividly remembers the glass sundae dishes and the silver top sugar shaker that were stored behind its doors, and reminisces of afternoons spent rolling out pastry for jam tarts on the enamel pull down work top. These beautiful kitchen cabinets have stood the test of time and are just waiting for you and your family to rediscover them and create new memories in your home.

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Words by Ruth Garner Photography by Katharine Peachey 32


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modern build,

vintage vibe

The London home of interiors and crafts blogger Katy Orme proves that it is possible to mix modern architecture with vintage style decor. 33


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rom the outside, Katy Orme’s London home, which she shares with partner Jules and dog Otto, is like any other purpose built new-build: minimal and modern. But all this changes when you step through the door into a bright, airy and characterful flat.

Always a fan of decorating, Katy started at a young age: “When I was 11 my parents said I could paint my bedroom, so I painted it peach and sponged lighter peach onto it. I got obsessed, and every year I painted my bedroom a different colour. I painted our family kitchen and living room too.”

Having moved here four and a half years ago, Katy chose this two-bed flat because of its enviable location, close to Maltby Street market, and its gorgeous light. “New-builds often have tiny windows, and if you aren’t facing the right direction there is no light whatsoever, but this flat was completely different. Plus it has an amazing roof terrace!”

Katy’s priority was to make the plain new-build flat into a grown-up retreat, with heaps of character. “That’s the problem with the vast majority of new-builds that you go into, they’re so generic. People have this white box and fill it with a package of furniture. So I wanted to inject a bit of colour and personality.” With limited funds, previous pieces of furniture were


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reused and given a new lease of life. The sofa, now one of Otto’s favourite spots to snooze, used to be hot pink but is now covered in a classic blue stripe fabric, blending in beautifully with the space. Filled with eclectic and vintage finds, it’s easy to forget that you’re in a new-build property. With nods from many different styles and eras, including mid-century dining chairs, a Victorian dining table and a Turkish rug from Etsy, Katy’s home is full of personality. Hearing about the providence of these pieces of furniture is a fascinating tale of


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hand-me-downs and eBay bargains. “When I went to university, my next door neighbour asked if I needed any furniture and offered me her old kitchen chairs. At the time I didn’t really like them but took them anyway. I nearly left them when I graduated, but thankfully I didn’t as they are my absolute favourite now!” Her bureau is another treasured possession, a gift from her parents on her seventh birthday. And sitting proudly in the bedroom is a chair previously owned by Katy’s granny, a lovely reminder of happy days spent visiting her. Covered in a beautiful Sanderson fabric, “it desperately needs to be reupholstered, but I can’t bring myself to do it, it will lose all the character!” It’s not just the furniture that is a reminder of the past, though. All the

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knick-knacks around the flat also have a story, from painting pots with her sister as a child, to photographs of her parents at the opening of their first restaurant. A letterpress drawer hangs on the living room wall, in each space a trinket and an associated memory. Here, the past is celebrated and unlike many home accessories, these mementos will never date or lose their charm. Never the same for all that long, recently the flat has seen its carpets turfed out, making way for light grey painted MDF boards, and the home office has had a major makeover too. “I’m quite proud of it, because we made the desks and painted the floor. I also like that it’s a little oasis away from the vintage stuff. It’s clean and quite different. It’s my favourite place

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to be, as long as Jules is keeping it tidy!” It’s from her home office, which she shares with Jules, that Katy now writes her blog, Apartment Apothecary, fulltime, creates sewing commissions for magazines, and also runs her home makeover business. When looking for inspiration, she pops into antiques stores, visits the fourth floor at Liberty, and browses sites like Pinterest and At Mine for inspiration. Asked if she has any tips for people about to embark on a home makeover, she says: “It’s best to start with a totally blank canvas, in terms of the walls and floors, and from there add in pieces of furniture that you like. It’s also good to

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have something that unifies everything, whether it’s keeping all the floors the same, or having one colour which threads through everything. If you have quite eclectic tastes and you pile it all in together it can look confusing, but if you have some sort of unifying element you can get away with mixing things up a bit.” So what’s next on the home project front? “I want to rip up the carpet in the bedroom and paint the floor white, and I think that’s it. After that, I just want to move, I want to have a period property. That’s my dream!” As and when this dream comes true, I’ll be first to invite myself round to be inspired by what Katy did next.

Check out Katy’s blog: www.apartmentapothecary.com 43


Designer Makes... Decorate with doilies

` by Melanie Barnes


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C

rocheted and lace doilies are easy to come by at markets and car boots sales, often for next to nothing, but if they remind you of Aunt Betty’s coffee table (not a bad thing in our eyes!) here are three updated ideas to make use of these intricate items to decorate your home.

`

What you’ll need: doily // embroidery hoop // craft feathers // strips of suede // vintage fabric scraps // fabric glue // scissors // extra thick thread

r e h c t a reamc

D

1. Cut your vintage fabric into long strips 5cm wide & iron a 1cm hem just on one side. 2. Take your embroidery hoop apart, place the inner circle aside and place a fabric strip next to the hoop screw, making sure the tucked under edge is on the left, and glue the strip to the hoop. 3. Wrap the fabric around the hoop, making sure you pull it tight as you go. Apply glue occasionally, and also at the end to secure. 4. Place your doily inside the hoop, and weave the thread in and out of the outer most part of each scallop, then wrap once around the embroidery hoop. Do this for each scallop. 45


5. Play with the tension of the thread until the doily is stretched and taut. Tie in a knot to fasten and wrap the ends several times around the embroidery hoop screw to finish, cut off the loose ends. 6. Tie feathers to pieces of suede and cut to the desired lengths. 7. Tie the suede lengths to the bottom of the dream catcher and finally tie one last piece of suede to the top of the dream catcher to hang.

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g n i g n a H basket

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What you’ll need: doily // embroidery thread (various colours) // old vintage tin or an empty food tin // wooden beads

1. Using 5 colours of embroidery thread, cut into ten equal lengths, two lengths of each colour, pair up and tie all the threads together in a knot leaving 5cm at the end.

2. To plait the threads, place something heavy on the end of the threads such as a pile of books. Take the outer most thread on the left (blue) and bring it under the next thread (gold), then over the next thread (pink). Do the same on the other side, green thread under the white thread and then over the next thread. You should see a pretty pattern forming. Try to keep the threads flat, so your plait is neat. Tie off in a knot leaving 5cm at the end. 3. Tie the embroidery thread to every other scallop of your doily. Tie all the plaits in a slip knot, at the desired length, leaving a little loop. Tie extra knots in the plaits, right next to the loop then trim off the excess.

4. Using two of the left over threads, tie to the loop and then thread your beads and use the remainder of the thread to hang up the plant hanger. Place your empty tin inside, and add a plant or some flowers. 47


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1. In a large bowl dissolve some laundry starch in water, and add two table spoons of craft glue. Dip the doilies into the mixture then hang on the line to dry. Once dry, cover with a tea towel and press with an iron.

What you’ll need: selection of doilies // piece of wood // starch // craft glue // invisible thread // felt in various colours // needle // scissors // paper // pencil // bowl

2. Draw some shapes on a piece of paper - leaf, circle, flower, star, heart etc. Cut these out to make paper patterns. Pin the paper patterns to your pieces of felt and cut out. 4. Tie all three threads to the piece of wood. Wrap another length of invisible thread around the centre of your mobile and tie in a knot, adjust to the desired length to hang.

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3. Sew the pieces of felt on to the invisible thread, spaced at regular intervals. Use a needle to attach the thread to one of your doilies, adjust to the desired length. Add invisible thread to the two other doilies.


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Winter pastels Freshen up your interior scheme this winter with cool pinks, soft greens and icy blues. Seasonal decorating with a difference.

Photographer: Jemma Watts / Stylist: Laura Sawyer / Styling assistant: Rosanna Johnson 50


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,

Lyle Console Table, £2,090, Pinch / Bobby Floor Lamp, £60, Habitat / One Two Tree DIY Christmas Tree Poster, £25, One Must Dash / Fan print, £24 from Habitat / Decorative Wooden Peg Clips (set of 20), £3, Paperchase / Metal Peg Noticeboard, homemade by Stylist using 10mm Mild Steel in black, £14.70 p/3m, Metals4U / Glazed Geometric Vase, £29, Rockett St George / Mia jewellery box, £21, Habitat / Tree Cards (set of 8), £10, Unique & Unity / All other Christmas Cards, from a selection at Paperchase / Pom Pom Makers (Set of Four), £7, Berylune from Not On The High Street / Wool, £6.50, Wool and the Gang from John Lewis / Perpetual Calendar, £60, Unique & Unity Rose Pink Dining Chair, £169, Rockett St George / Smooth Concrete Curve Vase, £89, Marks & Spencer / Snowberries, £7.50 p/bunch, Dennis Edwards 020 7498 5655 / Bronze Wrapping Paper, from a selection at Paperchase


Studio 4 Seat Sofa, £2,055, Content by Conran / Slate 1958 Armchair in ‘Sloane’ Designers Guild fabric, £585, Oliver Bonas / Clement Coffee Table, £1185, Rockett St George /Blaze Cushion by Margo Selby, £84, John Lewis / Open Weave Blanket Scarf, £80, Whistles / Rug , £120 IKEA / Double Grey Floor Lamp, selection at John Lewis / Tree Cards (set of 8), £10, Unique & Unity / All other Christmas Cards, from a selection at Paperchase / Hive Vase (on side table), £34 coffee table), £118, Jonathan Adler / Dunas platter, £30, Habitat / King Protea flower, £2 from Dennis Edwards 020 7498 5655 / Double Sided Wrapping P


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, Pinch / Clyde Side Table, £585, Pinch / Rose Dot Cushion (on armchair) by Hay, £79, Unique & Unity / Harlequin Geometric Cushion by Niki Jones, £84, p, £50, Habitat / Turquoise Eyeshadow Plate, £24, Unique & Unity / Handmade Swallow Side Plate, £26, Rockett St George / Plate hangers, from a 4, West Elm / Magnolia branches, £4 a bunch, Dennis Edwards 020 7498 5655 / Clear Black Bauble (on side table), £4.75, Paperchase / Bulb Vase (on Paper (on gifts), £5, Rockett St George


, For a space saving alternative

Christmas tree, decorate magnolia

branches with your favourite baubles


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OPPOSITE: Slate 1958 Armchair, as before / Rose Dot Cushion, as before / Turquoise Eyeshadow Plate, as before / Handmade Swallow Side Plate, as before / Vase, as before / Clear Black Bauble, as before / Vintage Classics Sense & Sensibility by Jane Austin, £7.99, Oliver Bonas / Mint Stag with Silver Antlers Decoration, £25, Paperchase / L’espresso Cup by Lenneke Wispelway Ceramics, £25 from Smug / Christmas Card, from a selection at Paperchase / Grey dip Scandi Decorations (set of 3), £10, Paperchase / Geometric Porcelain Tree Ornaments (set of 3), £19.95, Nordic House / Aurora green iridescent sequin bauble, £5, from Habitat / Pom Poms used as baubles, handmade by Stylist LEFT: all details as before (page 51)

wool pom poms make

the perfect adornments

,

for your tree and gifts 55


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, , DIY

handmade crackers

Coordinate your table top decorations with your Christmas presents and decorations, while giving your guests some extra special gifts. Personalise the crackers by adding nametags to each.

you will need: wrapping paper snap pulls toilet roll tubes ribbon gifts to go inside How to make: • Place a snap pull in the inside of a toilet roll tube. • Fill the tube with presents. • Wrap the tube in wrapping paper. • Tie off the ends with ribbon.

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update chair cushions

with some bright ribbon to match your colour scheme.

These can be changed with the seasons - pastel yellow

for spring perhaps?

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Shelving, £2,350, Pinch / Avery Chair (right), £450 Pinch / Whitstable Three Legged Chair (left), £195, Heals / Vintage Table, Stylist’s own, for similar try Smug / Cohen Medium Pendant Light, £130, Heals / Recycled Cardboard Ceiling Light, £23, Rockett St George / Conran Geometrical Jacquard Cushion, £25, Marks & Spencer / Geneva Aegean Cushion, £30, Heals / Pom Pom Knitted Throw (used as rug), £69, Marks & Spencer / Grosgrain Ribbons, £1.75 from a selection at Paperchase / Notch Nude & Light Brown Throw (on bottom shelf), £178, Heals / Top Shelf: Modern Wood Ombre Vase, £34, West Elm / Whale Tail Sculpture, £34, West Elm / 2nd Shelf from Top: Container, £100, Smug / Sea Urchin Vase, £45, Maud Interiors / One Tree Hill Storage Jar, £47, Maud Interiors / Fairtrade Straight Earthenware Jug, £12.95, Rigby & Mac / 3rd Shelf from Top: Cracker, handmade by styling assistant, using wrapping paper from Paperchase / Decorative bowl, £35, Habitat / Pom Poms in bowl, handmade by stylist / Metropolis Chalk Set, £30, Habitat / Succulent, £2.50, Porters Foliage 020 7720 3015 / 4th Shelf from Top: Dessert Plates, £5, Heals / Bowl, £8,Heals / Hares Cosmetic Bag, £30, Smug / T for Tea Pot, £72, Heals / Bottom Shelf: Vase, £44,West Elm / On Floor: Cambridge Satchel, £125, Paperchase


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Photography: Holly Jolliffe Words: Darla Champigny

layers of time... Stacy Sirk and her husband researched the history of their home to guide them when decorating and styling the space. We find out more about this unique approach and its wonderful results.

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ever has a home’s exterior better concealed a collection of bright conversation pieces than Stacy Sirk’s Regency terraced house in Brighton. Kerbside, one sees a beautifully kept, grey building with stark white trim and a perfectly contrasting soot black door. Once inside, visitors walk through rooms of colourful, intriguing, and thoughtfully selected furniture laid out against a neutral walls. An eclectic mixture of bargain finds, repurposed wares, and handcrafted goods, the house is testament to the impact that creativity, elbow grease, and love can have on an interior. The style of the interior was led by the

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house itself. Stacy, a retail buyer, visual merchandiser, and stylist says, “I peeled back the house to reveal anything original still there.” Indeed she and her husband have put much time and effort into researching the property and understanding its history. They know such details as the occupations of earlier inhabitants, (among these are a missionary and a commercial brownie baker). Since obtaining deeds dating back to 1823, they hold information on every changing of hands. Interestingly, the couple sought inspiration from these deeds when choosing the colour palette for their home. “At first glance they look like black writing on old parchment, but on closer inspection you notice bright red wax seals, indigo stamps,


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lots of gold and yellow as well as white, grey, cream, a pale putty colour, and a chocolate brown.” says Stacy. These hues are reflected in the very first room encountered after entering the house through the front hallway. The kitchen with a dining area is one large, L-shaped room. Stacy found some original paint remaining on the walls, so rubbed back the area with some fine sanding and patience to reveal multiple shades of green, turquoise, yellow, cream, mustard, tan and grey tones. The dining space also boasts a fun mix of hanging lights made from glass shades, metal fittings, and old ceiling roses that Stacy collected piece by piece on her travels and had wired with a twisted flex. Her love of independent designer-makers is also reflected in small details, such as the Nick Fraser pipework candle holder that makes a simple centrepiece for the table. The living room, two old reception rooms combined together, carries on the main principles used throughout. Respect the house, invest in materials, and re-love old pieces. The floorboards are original, with a twist. Stacy and her husband reversed them to expose a “new” joist-marked surface and the tiles are from Spain. The furniture in this room is enough to inspire the most sceptical of repurposers while the artisanal touches add a cosiness and quality. The sofa and chair have been covered in old Afghan kilim rugs. A cupboard now housing a bar, music system, and desk

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was formerly lift doors from a local hotel. The two coffee tables, with antique mirrors as tops, were made from a rubbish bin and sewing machine stool. On the lower ground floor is a guest and TV room. Yellow chairs found on the street, a roll of wallpaper discovered in the loft and some cute wool mushrooms from a craft fair in Paris contrast well with the fireplace, which though modernised, has large portions of the old fixture left exposed for a rustic look. On the top floor, both the master bedroom and Stacy’s son’s room host a number of repurposed pieces. In her 66

son’s room, Stacy has mounted a set of drawers found in a skip as a bedside table, atop which sits a lamp fashioned out of an old bouillon cube container. Above his bed hangs an oil painting of a flower, with the painting facing the wall. When Stacy returned home from buying the work, she realised that the backing board was an original sign for the Volk’s Electric Railway in Brighton. Now, she uses both sides as art. Lastly, jar lights with a red flex sit against a stormy wall, a paint effect Stacy achieved by mixing powder pigment into the plaster. In the master bedroom, a meaningful headboard and cleverly made bed take centre stage. The headboard


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has been decorated using a vintage souvenir tablecloth featuring the local attractions in Brighton which has then been framed by tweed (to represent England) and velvet (to represent Regency). The bed itself is built from leftover wood from the building work and old, cast iron tennis net post footings. It is accessorised on both sides with shallow brioche tins that have been wired and made into hanging lights. On the other side of the room, the fireplace is surrounded by lovely curiosities: a wallpaper print block depicting children by the seaside that was found in a junk shop hangs above as art, map paper Mary Jane shoes made by artist Jennifer Collier

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rest on its mantel. Large, metal brackets like those seen on the outside of houses in Amsterdam serve as candle holders at its base. Having lived in and loved this quirky property for twenty years, Stacy has now moved on to embark on an exciting new challenge. She’s now working on a new project in Amsterdam, which she says is very different in style with “much more white, much more a mix of vintage with bang-on contemporary design.” No doubt, when it comes to decorating her current abode, she’ll continue to follow the same design instinct of letting the house itself lead the way.

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Photography: Chris Middleton

make a...

Kantha Patched Cushion by Beci Orpin

Kantha quilts originate in India and are made from layers of brightly coloured recycled saris, which are patched together and then stitched over the top with rows and rows of tiny running stitches. This creates a beautiful texture to the quilt, and no two are ever the same. Here Beci Orpin shows us how to make a downsized version in the form of a cushion using the same technique. Beci’s cushion is approximately 50cm square, but you can make yours to any size you prefer.

You will need: • Fabric for front (I used two main panels for the front and lots of scraps for the patches) • Fabric for back • Iron

• Pins • Needle • Thread - various colours • Sewing machine and thread • Cushion stuffing

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Step 1

Step 2

Arrange your background fabric panels and fabric patches on a flat surface. Move the pieces around until you are happy with the composition.

Iron down the hems of each of the fabric patches.

Step 3

Step 4

Pin together the two main fabric panels for the front. Sew the two pieces together using a tiny running stitch.

Pin the patches in place on top of the front panels. Sew in place with running stitch.

Step 5 Once all the patches are sewn in position, start sewing rows of running stitch over the whole panel. Stitch several rows using one colour of thread, then change colour and sew several more rows. Continue in this manner, alternating the thread colour. 72


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Step 7 Push the needle in and out of the fabric several times before pulling the thread through. This speeds up the stitching process a little and also produces a nice texture. Cut the back panel to size, leaving 1.5 cm for seam allowance. Pin the right sides together and sew around the sides on a sewing machine, leaving an opening of about 10 cm on one side for the stuffing.

Step 8 Remove the pins and turn the cushion cover right sides out. Add the stuffing. Pin the open hole together, turning the edges of the fabric under, then close the hole with hand stitching.

Make & Do by Beci Orpin (Hardie Grant, ÂŁ20.00)

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Words and photos by Leigh Metcalf

work/// life/// style// We meet homeowners whose home interiors inspire, influence and reflect their professional workspace.

Melanie Barnes Geoffrey and Grace Worthing, UK


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W

hen designer and maker Melanie Barnes realised she needed more space for her growing sewing label, Geoffrey and Grace, she sought out something just a little bit different, and found it in a traditional beach hut on Worthing seafront. Just 300 metres from the iconic art deco Worthing pier and pavillion, ‘Margot’, the adorably named beach hut turned makery and shop, is one in a series of what are now called the East Beach Studios. A welcome addition to Worthing, the studios provide artists and crafters with a space for both making and selling. Melanie shares Margot with three other talented local makers: Louise Tyler, Ellie Bond and Sally Whiting, and says of the hut, “it’s lovely to have somewhere to go to make and create, and a space

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to escape to. It can be such a peaceful place to be.” Despite her petite frame at just 3m by 2.2m, Margot is dressed with a delightful selection of colourful and playful handmade housewares, accessories and clothes. The makers’ vibrant products, many of which have retro prints that compliment the homespun styling of Margot, combine to create a lovely balance of vintage and modern. Although the space is shared, Melanie says the styles of the four makers it serves “complement each other really well”, so much so that “some people come in and think it is all made by one person!” Lou works mostly with crochet, Sally’s main love is lampshades, Ellie makes characters with fabric, and Melanie makes clothes and

Above: Handmade products for sale inside and out at Margot, the beach hut Melanie shares with 3 other makers.

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Melanie loves to mix vintage with handmade items both in the shop and at home

accessories. They share responsibility for Margot equally and try to balance running it with their otherwise busy lives.“All four of us are mums and we are all aware that for this to work we need to support and cover for each other when necessary” says Melanie. Stepping into Melanie’s cosy home, you can sense her passion for handmade and vintage stretches beyond the boundaries of her studio, Margot. She shares her two-bedroom Victorian mid-terrace house with husband Leo, daughter Bailey, and cat Ingie. They moved to Brighton ten years ago, 76

and four years later headed west to Worthing so they could buy a home in a more affordable area. “We love living by the sea and Worthing is a great town, plus it has charity shops a-plenty. You can still pick up a good bargain here, whereas it’s almost impossible to do that in Brighton” says Melanie. Now happily settled, when they first moved in, the house was far from a comfortable home. “We bought it as a little bit of a project” Melanie remembers, “there were very old carpets in every room – the kitchen


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Retro patterns inspire Melanie’s handmade designs

needed replacing, as did the bathroom, and it was in a very tired decorative state. The garden also required a lot of work as it was so overgrown.” But they could see the potential in the house; “It has such a lovely aspect and original fireplaces in the bedrooms” says Melanie. She adds, “I’m one of those people that when viewing a house can’t resist peeling up a little bit of carpet to see what state the floorboards are in.” Filled with ideas and inspiration, Melanie and Leo took to renovating their home. They removed the carpets, raised the floor and ceiling in the kitchen and bathroom, knocked

out a wall, and moved the back door, which they replaced with French doors. “Having rented for a long time, we were both a bit frustrated with not being able to truly make somewhere feel like our own” admits Melanie. Not only did Melanie and Leo uncover the bones of the house to make it their own, they also made their mark on the interior by infusing their personal history with their passion for all things pre-loved. Melanie explains that, “how the house looks is lead by the things we have been given – there is definitely a ‘make do and mend’ aspect to my 77


This page: Melanie loves the abundance of charity shops in Worthing for sourcing pre loved finds for her home. Opposite: A display of family photos reminds Melanie of her relatives around the world.


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The vintage and handmade vibe continues in daughter Bailey’s room, from toys to clothes to books.

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Margot’s doors open out to a lovely view of Worthing’s seafront

style.” Many items were inherited from Melanie’s maternal grandparents, Geoffrey and Grace (who inspired the name for her sewing label). “I love it when furniture and items are passed down – things are all the more special if they have a family history.” She adds, “It gives it a sense of connection that you just couldn’t replicate from a new piece of furniture. I like things to have a story and to look a little loved.” The cot in Bailey’s room previously belonged to Melanie and her siblings, and their Ercol chair used to belong to Leo’s grandmother. These close family ties are further reflected in a lovely wall of family photos in their dining room. With relatives spread around the globe, Melanie says, “it’s nice to be reminded of family”, and

the old photos are “full of nostalgia and the childhood pictures are full of memories.” Though they love their little house, which was the perfect size when they bought it, the Barnes family now feel they have outgrown the property. “I currently do all my sewing on our breakfast room table, but the busier I get, and the more Bailey grows, the more apparent it becomes that I do really need a work room” says Melanie. For now, this simply means more time at Margot, meeting her customers and enjoying the perfect sea view. Visit Melanie’s website: www.geoffreyandgrace.com 81


crafty days

91 Magazine gets out of the office to check out some of the best crafting events happening around the country this issue we try our hand at the art of calligraphy


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quill london calligraphy class Review by catherine sprunt / photos by siobhan watts

F

rom DIY wedding details to chalkboard menus, it’s safe to say that the art of calligraphy is back in fashion. Popping up everywhere from my favourite blogs and cafés to my daily instagram feed, I felt like it was high time to try it out for myself. Quill London sells a covetable stock of charming notebooks and cards, whimsical decorative accessories and modern wedding stationery, I trust their expert authority and so signed up to the Introduction to Modern Calligraphy class. Tucked away in the back room of Islington’s charming The Blacksmith & The Toffeemaker pub, the class is geared towards complete beginners. An intimate gathering of around 20 students is taught by one of two instructors, Imogen Owen or Chiara Perano.

Quill provide all the essentials: a beautiful alphabet to trace, pen, nib, ink pot and reams of practice paper. My teacher for the day, Imogen, gathered the class around the big central table for an introductory demonstration. Imogen showed us how to apply and withhold pressure with a series of short, uniform strokes before sending us back to our seats to try it out for ourselves. Up until this point, I’d had visions of beautifully etching out my name in perfect penmanship on the first attempt, I was mistaken – it is certainly not as effortless as Imogen made it look! Offering one-on-one advice to each member of the group, Imogen examined our practice sheets to see where we might be going wrong – I was applying too much pressure with my heavy-handed downward strokes and vice-like grip. Feeling somewhat 83


confident with single strokes, we moved onto tracing the template alphabet. Our aim was to make the letters uniform and the strokes straight and sharp, before giving some freehand writing a go. Before the class, we were told to think of a word or phrase we would like to practice on the day – I chose my name, so I could create some custom stationery, and I spent the next half hour trying to figure out how to make my surname look somewhat

attractive. It’s quite easy to completely lose track of time as you try to perfect your flourishing script. Thankfully Quill provide a lovely selection of cakes - a welcome respite from the intense concentration, plus a chance to flex our stiff hands and realign our crosseyed expressions. The morning session whizzed by and we left with promises of regular practice – I’ll let you know how those letterheads are going!

For more info about calligraphy classes with Quill London check out their website: www.quilllondon.com/classes 84


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Click here to download our FREE calligraphy printable!

Printable designed by Imogen Owen for Quill London (www.imogenowen.com)


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Click here to download our FREE calligraphy printable!

Printable designed by Imogen Owen for Quill London (www.imogenowen.com)


Ladies Online We catch up with Clare Nicolson to find out how she manages her design business from day to day. Interview by Michelle Grady

Clare Nicolson


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How long have you been designing? Since I was a kid, but I have been doing it professionally for ten years now. How did you go about setting up your business? I set up in 2004 with the aid of The Prince’s Scottish Youth Business Trust who helped me to get a business plan together and work out the financing. I had all the creative knowledge and enthusiasm, but needed a little help with the business side of things. What inspires your designs? Lots of things, but I particularly love florals, and birds feature a lot in my designs. I also look to vintage prints from the 60s and 70s as they’re so bright and colourful and always inspire me to create.

What does a typical day entail for you? I don’t normally have a day that’s exactly the same as the last, which I love. One day will be a design day, where I will work on new ideas or tweak old ones. On another day, I will either be prepping or styling for a photo shoot. In between all that I’ll be answering emails, packing orders and tackling all the other little jobs that need doing. Where do you source your materials? My prints are digitally printed by a lovely independent print house. They have a great selection of materials and I spend a long time looking through sample books to find the right paper for the prints.


What is your favourite aspect of being a designer? I love that my time is flexible and I can decide my own schedule. When I get an idea, I just get started straight away, no matter what time of day or night. It’s wonderful to be creative every day and for that to be your job! What difficulties has your business faced? There has been ups and downs in the last ten years. I noticed a huge shift in buying patterns at the start of the economic crisis, especially with selling to shops as sadly a lot of them went out of business. How do you market your products? I don’t currently pay for any advertising, instead I use social media to promote my products and the brand, especially Instagram. I’m sure paid ads work sometimes, but I think it’s more 90

personal to show people the products being made, or in a real-life setting. How are you looking to develop your design business in the future? I downsized the business a few years ago to concentrate on producing my prints rather than a huge selection of cushions and homewares, but I do hope to grow again in the future – I’d love a stationery and ceramics range. What advice would you give to designers who are considering setting up their own business? Be true to your own style and don’t try to follow trends too much. Build up a good social media network to showcase your designs and give your brand personality. Finally, always design what makes you happy, otherwise you won’t enjoy it. www.clarenicolson.com


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Pattern design: Denise Hermo

Visit our website: www.91magazine.co.uk

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91 Magazine - issue 11  

Home tours, how to decorate with pastels in winter and interior trends for 2015. Published by Patchwork Harmony.

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