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SEPTEM BER 2014

GEORGE CLOONEY: America’s Sexiest Man Alive Is Getting Married and Taking On the Tabloids

LOCAL EVENTS:

We Have 24 Great Local Events, Shows and Things To Do This Month

CITY OF UPLAND:

The City Council Appoints Rod Butler as the New City Manager

NEW CAR REVIEW:

The 2014 Jaguar XJL Is Beautiful, Luxurious and Accomodating

serving rancho cucamonga, upland & claremont 909 MAGAZINE

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Care For Women’s Medical Group: Your community leader in Obstetrics and Gynecology

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Learn about our services at www.careforwmg.com 909 MAGAZINE

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Words

FROM THE

Publisher

A wide selection of all of our wines are available for purchase online or at the winery. Wine Tasting Available Daily Open 7 Days A Week 9 am - 5 pm Tours are available Sundays between 2pm – 4pm.

Another month has passed, and we are back with another great issue. We have been talking about it for the last few months, and we finally did it. The first issue of our 2nd magazine (which we call our West Edition) is now being direct mailed to every home, business and apartment in La Verne & San Dimas. We are starting at just 44 pages (we have to start somewhere) and will work hard to build up the page count and provide you with even more local information. We look forward to serving the community in San Dimas and La Verne. Readers should feel free to send us any comments, suggestions, or complaints. Our email address is below for your convenience. If you enjoy our magazine, please give us a “like” on our facebook page. Until next month,

Kathleen S. staff@909magazine.com

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Publisher Kathleen Sanchez Operations & Marketing Director Chris Scott Contributing Editor Sid Robinson Production Manager Jessica Ortiz Business Development Gladys Bonilla Jenny Wright Lisa Thorpe Diane Traw Rudi Groothhedde Art Director Jovielle Ortiz Contributing Writers John Gillison City Manager – Rancho Cucamonga Marty Lomeli City Manager – Upland

is your Personal Signature.... It is the Mirror to Your Self-Image

Tony Ramos City Manager – Claremont Don Kendrick Mayor of La Verne Blaine Michaelis City Manager – San Dimas Editorial Matt Komoto Contributing Photograhy Gary Byrd Brett Marks 909 Magazine is published 12 times a year. The entire contents of this magazine is copyrighted and may not be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the publisher. We reserve the right to edit, rewrite, or refuse material and we are not responsible for products that appear in this publication.© 909 Magazine 2014.

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For new patients after the completion of the exam, x-rays, and cleaning. Expires 9/30/14

7365 Carnelian Street, Ste. 111 • Rancho Cucamonga www.matejadds.com 909-989-5959


in this

CONTENTS

AUGUST 2014

41

Soheila Azizi Shares her Woman on the move network as it presents “Melodies and Memories”

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PAGE 10 City News

Take a look at what’s going on in and around the beautiful cities of Claremont, Upland & Rancho Cucamonga.

PAGE 16 Calendar of Local Events The West Coast’s Real Deal! Don’t miss the Pacific Street Car Association So-Cal Nationals at Auto Club Dragway! The NHRA Summit ET Racing Series also returns to Auto Club Dragway.

ISSUE

PAGE 29 Health & Beauty

Get great health info and find your next doctor, dentist, or health and beauty professional. We have an informative article from SACH in our Medical Corner

Off the market and heading to the altar? Who is the woman who turned the forever bachelor into her future husband? Find out what made him say “When they put my family and my friends in harm’s way, they cross far beyond just a laughable tabloid and into the arena of inciting violence.”

PAGE 22 Wine & Dining We have wonderful tips and suggestions from local Wine & Beer connoisseurs and this month a Dinning review on Giuseppe’s

PAGE 42 Car Review This month the Car Family shares their insight into the Jaguar’s XJL. Get the different perspectives from the young man/woman and the family mom/dad.

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in this

ISSUE CONTENTS

AUGUST 2014

G e n e va M o to r s i s o p e rate d w i t h i nte gr i t y a n d i s d e d i c ate d to exce p t i o n a l c l i e nt s e r v i ce a n d l o n g te r m re l at i o n s h i p s. We wa nt to e a r n yo u r t r u s t a n d co n n d e n ce by o ffe r i n g o n l y t h e h i g h e s t q u a l i t y ve h i c l e s a n d s e r v i ce ava i l a b l e o n t h e m a r k e t. W h e t h e r yo u a re l o o k i n g fo r a n exo t i c, l u x u r y o r f a m i l y a u to m o b i l e, yo u a re s u re to

n d s o m e t h i n g at o u r s h ow ro o m t h at w i l l exce e d yo u r ex p e c t at i o n s E xce p t i o n a l Fi n a n c i n g, rate s s t a r t i n g at 1 . 9 9 % o. a . c.

909939991991 1 0 4 4 0 C E N T R A L AV E . MONTCLAIR CA 91763 genevamotors.net

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Ask Kathy: Read as Kathryn Vaunnaker helps a woman with her melancholy attitude. Could it be electronics at fault?

PAGE 47 Education

Temple Beth Israel Preschool, St. Mark’s Episcopal School and Dove Day School all share great educational stories.

PAGE 50 Real Estate We have helpful real estate information with the top recent sales in Claremont, and Rancho Cucamonga, San Dimas and La Verne along with some great realtors who can help you buy, sell or get an appraisal for your home.


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I N S I D E

CLAREMONT Y O U R

C I T Y

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N E W S

Y O U R

M A G A Z I N E

Saying Goodbye to Some Wonderful Exchange Students from China

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he SLICE of Summer Program in Claremont finished off their summer saying goodbye to some wonderful exchange students from Weihai #1 High School in China. The program welcomed 39 teens from China. The students got to participate in numerous creative and innovative programs to help improve their skills. Jessica Marchant, the SLICE of Summer Program’s Administrator, stated, “Our goals for the students are for them to develop

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their English language skills, experience and deepen their understanding of American culture and our educational system.” They also got to see what it is like to live in California. The SLICE of Summer Program has been around for 10 years now and is a part of the Claremont Educational Foundation. Each year they try to find new ways to improve the program and this year they were pleased to invite the exchange students from Weihai #1 High School

to join the SLICE of Summer Program. “Students from the school have been coming to southern California for five years, but this is the first year that they have been a part of the Claremont Educational Foundation’s SLICE of Summer Program”, stated Marchant. It has been very successful and this past summer they really helped their Chinese exchange students learn more English and learn more about America. During their stay the students got to walk around the Village, they ate at some of the local restaurants, enjoyed some of the local events, and visited the colleges. They also got to go shopping, along with going to Disneyland and Universal Studios, and, of course, they got to enjoy some In-N-Out Burgers. Marchant explained that, “the excursions that the students went on were a combination of SLICE (led by Claremont High School teacher Jennifer Tsai), the CalSunshine program, and the host families”. While it took some time to help the students open up and relax, by the end of the program, even the shyest student was dancing and cheerfully interacting with everyone. “It is our sincerest hope that, through the SLICE of Summer Program, the students from Weihai #1 High School feel more connected to the U.S. through the friendships they’ve made and enriching experiences they’ve had,” said Jessica Marchant.


909-268-4526

WEDNESDAY - SATURDAY, 12PM - 6PM

California Representational Art in the Traditional Style

New Development in the Works The developers, D.R. Horton – Los Angeles Holding Co., Inc., are still waiting on final approval to add a second phase to their Serrano Phase I project. The Serrano Phase I project is a housing development project on the southeast corner of Mountain Avenue and Base Line Road. The new development would be at located 700 W. Base Line Rd. The project will be on 3.59-acres of land which is currently owned by the Claremont Unified School District. The School District used the lot for their service yard, but recently moved it to a new location. With the new location they plan

to add 40 homes to their Serrano project. They are already making 53 detached residential condominium units with their Serrano phase I project. This will make a total of 93 single-family detached condominium units. The City of Claremont’s Planning Commission and City Council have done an initial review of the project. A California Environment Quality Act was conducted and found that the project would not have a significant impact on the environment. One of the main concerns was to make sure that the developers would abide by the 15% inclusion

of moderate-income housing. The 40 condominiums will sell for market price except for six which will be reserved for moderate-income housing. This is not to be confused with low-income housing. Anyone interested in finding out more about the Serrano Phase II Project, can attend the second hearing held by the Planning Commission and City Council on Tuesday, September 9 at 6:30 p.m. The first hearing was held on July 15, 2014. More information can also be found on the cities website by visiting ci. claremont.ca.us or by calling (909) 399-5470.

C I T Y CO R N E R

Joe Lyons — Mayor

On July 15, 2014, the State Water Resources Board announced emergency water conservation reductions for outdoor watering. The City is working with Golden State Water to educate residents on the need for conservation and the potential fines associated with wasting water. The regulations prohibit each of the following: 1) The direct application of water to any hard surface for washing. 2) Watering of outdoor landscapes that cause runoff to adjacent property, non-irrigated areas, private and public

walkways, roadways, parking lots or structures. 3) Using a hose to wash a motor vehicle, unless the hose is fitted with a shut-off nozzle. 4) Using potable water in a fountain or decorative water feature, unless the water is recirculated. Customers seeking additional information or wanting to report water waste are encouraged to contact Golden State Water’s 24-hour Customer Service Center by calling 800-999-4033.

Representing eight California Art Club painters H I L L S I D E F I N E A R T. CO M

445 W FOOTHILL BLVD SUITE 101

C LAREMONT

Behind Trader Joes next to the Candlelight Pavilion

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UPLAND I N S I D E

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Upland National All-Stars Conclude Successful Postseason Campaign

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ne out away from playing for the Western Region championship and a trip to the Little League Baseball Senior Division World Series, Upland National Little League’s hopes were dashed by a late rally by Southern California champion Manhattan Beach. While Upland National All-Star team players, families and fans may remember their pair of hard-fought extra-inning heartbreaking losses that eliminated the team from the Senior Division Western Region tournament at John 12

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Galvin Park in Ontario, the success of the team of 15- and 16-year-old all-stars was the best in Upland National Little League’s 60-year history. The All-Star team’s run into August marked the first time any team representing Upland National Little League advanced to the Western Region tournament at any level. It also culminated a banner year for the league in which both its Major Division (11-12 year olds) and 9-10 year old All-Star teams captured California District 23 championships.

Players on the Senior Division all-star team were Ryan Phelps, Derek Castaneda, Kyle Keck, Tyler Seitz, Alec Perez, Alexis Paz, Cody Palhegyi, Logan Flanagan, Julian Alvarado, Skyler De Los Reyes, Raul Munoz, Adrian Mardueno, Marcus Salaz, Jared Speicher, Albert Perez and Jacob Beltran. Corey Seitz managed the team and was assisted by coaches Ed Carr, John Delgado, Ron Keck and Pete Perez. The Major Division all-stars were Elijah Buries, Troy Grabowski, Damien Loaiza, Eric Marrujo, Justin McFadden, Nick Miranda, Gio Molina, Jose Montoya, Vinnie Olagues, Josh Parker, Eric Rohrer and Michael Romero. The manager was Tom Shrouder and coaches Jeff Buries and Don Rohrer. The team mom was Coral Montoya. The 9-10-year-old all-star team consisted of Ryan Ash, Joseph Beeson, Jayson Garcia, Jeremy Giesegh, Grant Kerr, Mason Martinez, Dillon Merrill, Dustin Myhre, Matthew Perez, Samuel Salazar, Cooper Snell, Eathan Teague and Elvis Weeks. Bill Snell was the manager and the coaches were Chris Beeson and Eric Weeks. Upland National is the only Little League in the United States that for 60 years has never charged a registration fee to participate. Sponsorships, fundraisers and snack bar operations help the league to provide free baseball to Upland youth.


Rudy Muniz Memorial Field From the moment his oldest son took his first swings as a teeball player in 1995, to the time he managed his youngest son’s Senior Division All-Star team 16 years later, Rudy Muniz was the quintessential Upland National Little League baseball dad, coach, mentor, surrogate father and volunteer in every possible way. He often said that the thing that kept him happy through the daily ups and downs was going to the baseball field. Whether he was running practices, managing

great teams, watching another game, flipping burgers in the snack bar or leading a work party to clean and repair the fields, Rudy was happiest when he was on the baseball diamond. He loved teaching the boys and girls who played on his teams about baseball and life. And none of those students were more important to him than his own children Rudy Ray, Eric, Anthony and Ciera, as well as the many others who considered Rudy and Cindy to be their second set of parents. On July 8, 2011, Rudy died

tragically when a truck struck his motorcycle while he was on his way to the south field at Upland Memorial Park to manage the UNLL Senior Division All-Star team practice. That same field has been dedicated as Rudy Muniz Memorial Field to honor his many years of nurturing hundreds of young ballplayers and admirably and loyally serving Upland National Little League. Rudy lived baseball yearround, and for more than a decade coached teams comprised

mainly of Upland kids, all the while helping with the efforts to maintain, improve and renovate the field that now bears his name. Thanks to the tireless efforts of the UNLL leadership and members, and the generous contributions of loved ones, the field is now equipped with a new snack bar, scorekeepers booth, clubhouse, restrooms and storage facility. The ballpark serves as the main field for Upland National Little League’s Junior and Senior Division teams.

C I T Y CO R N E R

Rod Butler

The Upland City Council announced the selection of Rod Butler to the position of City Manager, effective September 29, 2014. This is the result of an extensive recruitment and selection process that produced over 50 candidates. Butler has close to 25 years of municipal management experience in California and is currently the City Manager of Patterson, California, a position he has held since February of 2011. Butler is a native of Upland who has a long record of service in Inland Valley Cities. In announcing the appointment, Upland Mayor Ray Musser said,

“We interviewed five finalists and were impressed with all of them. But Rod Butler’s range of experience, his knowledge of the Inland Valley, and his deep Upland roots made him the best fir for the position.”“I speak for the entire City Council when I say that we look forward to working with Rod in addressing Upland’s challenges and moving important projects forward.” The agreement carries an initial term of three years, with extension options available. Butler, 50, is single and currently resides in the Alta Loma area of Rancho Cucamonga.

Upland City Manager

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RANCHO I N S I D E

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Riding The Pacific Electric Trail

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M A G A Z I N E

The Pacific Electric Trail is a very popular bike path especially on the weekends.

here are currently around 50 miles worth of bike paths and lanes in Rancho Cucamonga. According to the city Web site, there will eventually be around 100 miles of bike paths and trails in the city. One of the more popular paths is the Pacific Electric Trail. This road trail follows along the Pacific Electric Railway, which was a railway from the coast to San Bernardino that operated until the 1950s. Through Rancho Cucamonga the Pacific Electric Trail stretches almost eight miles from

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Grove Avenue and Arrow Route up to Baseline and parallels ¾ of a mile south under the 210 Freeway. It passes underneath the 15 Freeway and then through Fontana. The total length for the bike path is over 20 miles and starts from the Los Angeles County line in Claremont to Rialto. When starting in Rancho Cucamonga, the path is continuous with few stop signs and intersections when going eastward. One local cyclist from Alta Loma who is familiar with the bike paths is Jerry Sgrignoli.

Sgrignoli enjoys cycling and during the year will train for a few events. These include the Multiple Sclerosis Bike MS Bay to Bay Event in San Diego in October, as well as the local Tour de Foothill in November. He usually rides about three times a week in Rancho Cucamonga, Upland and Claremont. Sgrignoli is familiar with the Pacific Electric Trail and does include it in most of his local rides. “I love riding the bike trail,” said Sgrignoli about the Pacific Electric Trail. “A typical Saturday I will ride it into Fontana, back through Rancho into Upland. Up Euclid Ave. to Baseline all the way through Rancho up to Wilson in Rancho and down through Victoria in Rancho Cucamonga. It usually is around a 45 mile ride. Most of it is thorough Rancho.” Personally, Sgrignoli likes to ride the path at night in Rancho Cucamonga. He also rides some of the other paths and lanes, but he will never ride bike lanes along Foothill Boulevard during the day or night. One change Sgrignoli would like to see is an extension of the bike path to go north up to the foothills. Currently there are plans to add four miles of Class 1 Bicycle Paths and Recreational Trails that go north of 8th Street. For recreationalists who haven’t been on the Pacific Electric Trail, weekends get very crowded. Have fun, share the path, or just be an early bird.


Rancho Cucamonga Ladies Gather for Books, Wine, and More! There is a group of 13 women in Rancho Cucamonga that meet up each month to share opinions on everything from fashion, careers, society, religion, dating, marriage, personal dreams and aspirations, but most of all they always discuss the book they read the month before. The Rancho Cucamonga Wine and Book Club was started in 2007 by Lisa Wright and her daughter Lauren Bowman. The Club members are all women, ranging in age and background. They’ve had weddings, births, milestone birthdays, engagements, heartaches, and most of all a love for literature, good wine and a lot of laughter.

The book selection each month is chosen in rotation by each member’s age. They sometimes host the meetings at their own homes, but they also meet at local restaurants, wineries, and even recently enjoyed a relaxing day on a Duffy Boat in Newport Beach. With their demanding schedules as Mothers, Wives, Professionals, and Grandmas, they still make time to sit down, enjoy a meal, sip some good wine, have great conversations and share a few laughs. “I like that everyone gets behind their turn to host, by serving lunch that sometimes reflects the flavor of the book such as southern, Italian,

or a specific type of wine,” said Lisa Wright. It is so important to make time to have that therapeutic “social time”. A book club provides a purpose, but more importantly, a reason to not allow life and busy schedules take over. “As a mother of two, I understand how easy it can be to loose touch with friends. I am so appreciative that we all make an effort to meet up every month. I always look forward to it,” stated Lauren Bowman All of the club members have similar feelings about the club. “I love the support and love we have all developed with one an-

other. Couldn’t imagine being in a better book club, never a dull moment,” said Michele Main. Charliene Blanchard commented, “I get to spend some ‘me-time’ with some of the best people I know.” Kristine Riopelle also mentions, “I love the fact that a bunch of women that are so different in every way can find one thing in common and have such a great time together every month.” When asked, the majority of the current members chose The White Queen, by Philipa Gregory as their most recommended book club pick.

C I T Y CO R N E R The Rancho Cucamonga Animal Care & Adoption Center is hosting its 5th Annual Furry Friends Festival and Pet Walk-A-Thon on Saturday, October 4, 2014, from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., at Central Park in Rancho Cucamonga. This event is organized by the many volunteers that support the Animal Center, along with Animal Center staff, and is one way in which the community can support the Animal Center and help raise funds for the many wonderful programs and services that helps pets in our community. Festivities will include a Pet Walk-A-Thon, animal

adoptions, food, vendor fair, kids activities, contests, raffles and more. Proceeds from the event will benefit the Animal Center’s life-saving community programs such as spay and neuter, foster care, and medical rehabilitation. If you have a pet, they are also welcome to come and enjoy the Furry Friends Festival. If you don’t have a pet, or are looking for a pet, please come and enjoy the Festival and consider adopting or fostering one of the many animals that are at our Animal Care and Adoption Center. For more information, go to RCPet.info.

John Gillison, City Manager Rancho Cucamonga 909 MAGAZINE

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LOCAL

entertainment LO C A L

E V E N T S .

A C T I V I T I E S .

FA M I LY

F U N

A N D

M O R E

ENT

NELL LEWIS PRES

RANDALL AND JA

STYX

AND THE MUSIC OF

September 12th – 8:00 pm | All seats $65.00

Box Office: 909.477.2752 • lewisfamilyplayhouse.com

Dennis DeYoung, founding member and lead singer of

Sail Away,”“Mr. Roboto” plus classic rock anthems, “Renegade,”

Styx kicks off the 9th season in a special one-night only per-

“Blue Collar Man” and more, this high-energy rock concert is

formance in “Dennis DeYoung and The Music of Styx. “ His

sure to have you dancing in the aisles!

live concert showcases all the Styx greatest successes spanning the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s. Featuring top hits “Babe,” “Come

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Styx is an American rock band from Chicago that became famous for its albums from the mid-1970s and early 1980s.


Calendar

of events

9/2: Rancho Cucuamonga Community Yard Sale. Visit for great deals on clothes, electronics, furniture and more. RC Family Resource Center. 8:00 am. 2:00 pm.

9/5: The Pomona College Dept. of Theatre collaborates with the theatre company, Ophelia’s Jump, to present Moises Kaufman’s 33 Variations. 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont

9/3: This is the last day for the San Dimas Farmers Market. Take the night off from making dinner and come and ennjoy! Last chance! 245 East Bonita Avenue, San Dimas.

9/5: Come and Enjoy many beautiful art exhibits on display at the Packing House for the First Friday Art Walk at the Claremont Village. 532 West First Street, Claremont.

9/4: Food Truck Thursdays from 5:30-8:30 pm. Held at the lower admin parking lot next to the NHRA Museum. Free parking. McKinley Ave. Gate 1, Pomona.

9/6-9/7: NHRA Summit Racing Series drag racing at Auto Club Dragway – 9300 Cherry Ave., Fontana. Races begining at 8:00 a.m. Dont miss the fun!

9/7: Be healthy inside and out with the Yoga For All Ages at the Life’s Bliss Foundation’s Vedic Temple YOGAM Center. Perfect for everyone in the family! 9720 Central Avenue, Montclair.

Auto Club Dragway is the only championship, quarter-mile premier drag racing facility in Southern California with plenty of events to keep your adrenalin pumping all year round. 9300 Cherry Ave., Fontana, CA or visit www.autoclubdragway.com.

9/7: Be healthy inside and out with Yoga For All Ages at the Life’s Bliss Foundation’s Vedic Temple YOGAM Center. Perfect for everyone in the family! 9720 Central Ave., Montclair.

9/12: 2nd Story Gallery in September. Open to the public free of charge. Dont miss this event! Time: 5:30- 8:30 PM. Walker house.121 N. San Dimas Ave., San Dimas.

9/8: San Dimas HEROES Annual Golf Tournament. All day at Via Verde Country Club. This Year it will be Hawaiian themed! Sure to be a hoot! 1400 Avenida Entrada, San Dimas.

9/13: SCEDA, PRO GAS, S/C, S/ST, SCEDA Jrs join Auto Club Dragway for some of Southern California’s baddest bracket racing. Dont Miss it! 9300 Cherry Ave. Fontana.

9/12: Dennis DeYoung and the music of Styx. The Lead singer of Styx performs one-night only. Don’t miss it! 8:00 pm. Only at the Lewis Family Playhouse.

9/13-9/14: Come out for the Southern California Drag Racing Association and SoCal Super Street at Auto Club Dragway – 9300 Cherry Ave., Fontana.

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feature

A M E R I C A’ S

Sexiest Man Alive

Is Getting Married By: Cindy Rhodes

Despite more than two decades in the public eye, a pair of Academy Awards and a the kind of good looks that make grown women blush, George Clooney is proving to be among a new Hollywood movement that is bringing accountability to tabloid journalism. Angry doesn’t begin to express Clooney’s feelings when a British newspaper, The Daily Mail, reported that the Lebanese mother of his fiancée, Amal Alamuddin, objected to their wedding on religious principle. Relatives had joked about the death of the bride if she defied her mother’s wishes, the article said. “We have family members all over the world, and the idea that someone would inflame any part of that world for the sole reason of selling papers should be criminal,” Clooney said in a response published in USA Today. “When they put my family and my friends in harm’s way, they cross far beyond just a laughable tabloid 18

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and into the arena of inciting violence.” The Daily Mail removed the article but Clooney refused its apology, saying they knew it was a lie and printed it anyway. Even a noted humanitarian can occasionally prove that he is only human. He also proved that chivalry is not dead. Apparently, neither is the idea of marriage. And “husband” might be his most surprising role to date. Everyone believed him when he said he wasn’t the marrying kind, from Hollywood’s elite to the hordes of women that still refer to him as “The Sexiest Man Alive.” He’d tried it once in the late 80s, admitted he wasn’t very good at it, and swore he would not return to the altar. Word has it he even bet actress Michelle Pfeiffer $10,000 he wouldn’t get married. Then the consummate bachelor met human rights lawyer Amal Alamuddin.

Holding an eye-popping, seven-carat emerald-cut diamond, the two-time Oscar winner went traditional and got down on one knee, according to People Magazine, to propose to Alamuddin, 36, on April 22. A late September wedding is anticipated in Lake Como, Italy, where Clooney has a home. The rapid-fire announcements of his engagement and wedding has put everyone in a tizzy, from his high-powered show business friends, to members of the media that can finally obsess over someone other than Kim and Kanye, to the thousands of women from San Dimas to St. Tropez, whose fan-girl hearts are breaking now that “Gorgeous George” is off the market. Yet, as late as January, Clooney was steadfast in saying that wedding bells were just not in the cards for him. “I haven’t had aspirations in that way,” he said to Esquire, when asked


feature why he isn’t married. “I was married in 1989 (to actress Talia Balsam). I wasn’t very good at it. I was quoted as saying I’ll never get married again pretty much right after I got divorced and then I’ve never talked about it since.” Just who is this woman who brought the consummate bachelor to his knees – or at least one knee? Surprisingly, she’s a lot like Clooney himself. Born in Lebanon and raised in London, Alamuddin is an international human rights lawyer, a passionate crusader for causes she believes in and, frankly, easy on the eyes. Her exotic looks and effortless style has captivated fashionistas and style-watchers, much like Kate Middleton’s did when her engagement to Prince William was announced. Interestingly, their romance began over intellectual discussions regarding a satellite program over Syria. Both are politically astute and do not hesitate to champion a cause – her with her vocation, he with his star power. The romance stayed under the radar until just after Valentine’s Day, when Alamuddin and Clooney were spotted holding hands at a special White House screening of his most recent film, The Monuments Men. Confirmation of their engagement came from an unlikely source, the London-based law firm of Doughty Street Chambers. “The barris-

ters and staff of Doughty Street Chambers offer their best wishes and congratulations to Ms. Amal Alamuddin, a member of Chambers, and Mr. George Clooney on their engagement to be married,” the firm said in a statement. Alamuddin, 36, joined the firm in 2010 and later became a member of its international law team. The chief executive of the firm, Robin Jackson, included a personal message in the statement, saying “She brings a bright light to everything she is involved in and I am so delighted at her happy news.” An activist that is politically aware and can bring international attention to a cause he believes in, Clooney, 53, is known as much for his humanitarian efforts as his pair of Academy Awards. His love life has kept the Internet humming as he has dated a string of actresses, models, cocktail waitresses and a professional wrestling diva. Clooney had convinced his fans and breathless female admirers that the lovely co-stars or dates on his arm were nothing permanent. The only thing he seemed to be serious about was making movies. His clout in Hollywood as one of its most bankable stars allowed him to get a slightly bookish, less-than-blockbuster history lesson of a film like, “The Monument’s Men,” which was made with a roster of big-named stars.

He has also made his share of blockbusters, like the “Oceans Eleven” series, “Up in the Air,” and a turn as “Batman.” The son of former news anchor and game show host, Nick Clooney, and nephew of legendary crooner Rosemary Clooney, George started modestly in television on the sitcom, “The Facts of Life.” But it was his role as Dr. Doug Ross on “ER” that cemented both his acting skills and his ability to break hearts with his crooked grin and impossibly long lashes. As for his pending nuptials, Clooney is mum – putting that smirk to good use. Close friends like Brad Pitt, Cindy Crawford and her husband, businessman Rande Gerber, and future best man Matt Damon are thrilled and mildly dazed. Former girlfriend Stacey Keibler, who was a star of sorts herself in World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE), lived with Clooney until their breakup in July of 2013. Keibler has said several times she felt somewhat spurned by her former boyfriend. But Clooney’s detractors are few and far between. In fact, everyone seems thrilled for Clooney, including his mother, Nina, who told the Daily Mail “Amal’s a lovely girl. We weren’t at all surprised when they told us they’re engaged and we couldn’t be happier for them.”

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Calendar

of events

9/17: Come celebrate the City of La Verne at the fair with the La Verne Day at the LA County Fair. Fun for the whole family! 1101 West McKinley Avenue, Pomona.

9/18: Senior Book Club meeting on the 3rd Thursday of every month. If you’re a senior looking for fun, come! Must be senior adult readers. 10 - 11 am. James L. Brulte Senior Center.

9/18: This is the last day to register for the La Verne Fall Adult Slow Pitch Softball. Dont miss out on your chance! Come register and play at 1837 Wheeler Avenue, La Verne.

9/19: The Candlelight Pavilion will be showing the comedy Spamalot. This is a Tony award-winning comedy. 455 West Foothill Boulevard, Claremont.

9/18: Reader’s Circle Book Club. Meeting on the 3rd Thursday of every month. Open to all Adult Readers. 6:30 PM-7:30 PM. Archibald Library Story Theater.

9/19-9/20: Pacific Street Car Association SoCal Nationals at Auto Club Dragway! Don’t miss out on the fun! – 9300 Cherry Ave., Fontana.

COMING SOON TO

SEPTEMBER

Sept. 6-7: NHRA Summit Racing Series Sept. 12-14: SoCal Drag Racing / SoCal Super Street Sept. 20-21: Pacific Street Car Association Sept. 27-28: SoCal Drag Racing / SoCal Super Street

OCTOBER

Oct. 4: Street Legal Drags (race YOUR car for $20!) Oct. 5: Test & Tune Oct. 8-10: Frank Hawley’s Drag Racing School Oct. 11-12: Pacific Street Car Association Oct. 15-17: Frank Hawley’s Drag Racing School Oct. 18-19: Import Drag Racing Circuit Oct 25-26: NMCA World Street Finals

A U T O C L U B D R A G W A Y. C O M

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9/17: Come celebrate the City of La Verne at the fair with the La Verne Day. LA County Fair all day long. Fun for the whole family! 1101 West McKinley Avenue, Pomona.

9/19: Haven’t been to a magic show for a while? Check out the Dinner and Magic Show Starring the “The Phil Factor”. Will be a great event! Dont miss it! 4000 E. Ontario Center Parkway.

9/26: The Cruisin’ Brothers and Oldskool 66 Cruzers are putting on their monthly Historic Downtown Upland Friday Night Cruise. Dont miss this event! 9th St. and Second Ave., Upland.

9/20: Come out to Subiefest 2014 at Auto Club Speedway featuring a car show, vendor midway, autocross and more! More information online at www.subiefest.com

9/27: The Knights Of Columbus are hosting their 2nd Annual Car Show that will feature classics, hot rods, trucks, motorcycles. Dont miss this! 1150 W. Holt Ave, Pomona.

9/25: This will be the last day for September’s Thursday Night Farmers Market and Family Festival so bring the family by! D St. and Third Street; La Verne.

9/27-9/28: Southern California Drag Racing Association and SoCal Super Street at Auto Club Dragway – 9300 Cherry Ave., Fontana.


Ontario

Lion’s

America’s Original Comedy Showcase & Restaurant HISTORIC Downtown Upland

John Caparulo Sept 4-7

3 Days of Fun for All of the Family! October 24, 25, & 26

Mo’Nique Sept 12 & 13

Friday 3pm – 11pm Saturday 10am – 11pm Sunday 10am – 10pm

Tommy Davidson Oct 2-5

The Best Food & Beer Ever! Dance to Live Music All Day Entertainment Opportunity Drawings Vendor Booths & Carnival Rides

Pablo Francisco Oct. 16-19

Call (909) 484-5411 For Tickets! ontario.improv.com

Ontario Improv 4555 Mills Circle Ontario Mills, Ontario, CA 91764

Pre-sale ride tickets: (909) 982-8010 Information: www.coopermuseum.org This event is sponsored by UDOT, a joint venture of non-proot organizations in the Southern California area.

ONTARIO, CALIFORNIA

Come Celebrate the Bavarian Heritage with German Brats, Sauerkraut and A Cold Beer

Toys for Tots Collection

Bring an unwrapped toy to our Toys for Tots Booth and receive a FREE Non-Alcoholic beverage!

DON’T MISS THIS 3-DAY CLASSIC CAR SHOW! CLASSIC CARS, LIVE MUSIC, AND TONS OF FAMILY FUN ON HISTORIC EUCLID AVENUE IN DOWNTOWN ONTARIO! Feel the past come to life as amazing hot rods, muscle cars, custom and classic vehicles park & cruise on Historic Euclid Avenue in Downtown Ontario, CA. Enjoy over 2 miles of tree-lined streets filled with music, fabulous food and celebrity appearances. Don’t miss this great family event! For information: 800-867-8366.

SEPTEMBER 19-21, 2014 Visit Us @

Route66CruisinReunion.com In partnership with the following sponsors

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w&d wine & dining

California’s Beautiful and Unique Edna Valley By Mary Forgey, Proprietor, Third Street Wine Shop, 2142 Third Street, La Verne, CA A recent visit to Central California’s Edna Valley wineries reinforced the idea that each wine region (appellation) has its own qualities and characteristics. Each winery in this region, though they are located in the Valley, are within five miles of the Pacific Ocean. This means there is a reliable cooling influence from the ocean, which adds to the area’s unique character. The cooling influence moderates the temperatures in this area. So, temps are rarely really hot or cold. You have a consistent growing season, which allows for balanced fruit and quality from year to year. The soil in this area also has considerable ocean influence – ancient sea fossils and minerals are found here, and this gives an additional layer of uniqueness to the wine. Because of the steady ocean influence on the land, the area has become well known for the Chardonnay and Pinot Noirs produced here. These varietals are often delicious from this area, but they are not the only offerings worth noting. We found wonderful dry Riesling, Pinot Gris, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. The wines here do have a character that is slightly different from the other growing regions in the state. And the people who produce these wines and work in the wineries identify themselves as separate from other regions. They know that their wines are unique – not as hot and meaty as Paso Robles , and not as cool and mild as Santa Barbara or Mendocino. The area has a long history of winemaking, dating back to 1780, two years after Father Junipero Serra founded Mission San Luis Obispo. The padres grew grapes and made them into sacramental wines and wine was also the table beverage of the padres. According to records of the period, some missions produced very ordinary wine and some produced wine worthy of praise. I am betting that Mission SLO had some nice wine with which to celebrate Mass! Modern wineries have only been in this valley for about 30 years. Today, there are fewer than three dozen wineries in this area, and they are united by the common terroir and their common spirit. While we did not visit all (or even most) of the area wineries, some of the notable ones were: Talley (a large, productive farm and a winery); Autry Cellars (a small operation with huge heart); Saucelito Canyon Vineyards (beautiful grounds, excellent wine, knowledgeable people); Tolosa (modern, excellent picnic area and top notch wine); and Wolff Vineyards (charming, lovely, excellent wine). This area is easily accessible from the coast – you can stay in Pismo Beach, Avila Beach or Shell Beach. That way, you can drink in California’s spectacular coastline as you sip some superb California wine!

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At Home at Claremont Craft Ales

By: Sid Robinson

Boar’s Head Deli Wine Club Wine Tasting Create Your Own Wine Custom Labels

Private Room, Outside Seating, and Dining Available “I have this theory that the very first batch of beer that you make as a home brewer dictates what happens the rest of your life, beer-wise.” Such is the thinking of Simon Brown, one of the founders and owners of Claremont Craft Ales. Brown and wife Emily, along with partners Brian and Natalie Seffer, put their own passion for home brewing to good use when they established the city’s first and only craft brewery in 2012. Just over two years later with a successful business that continues to grow rapidly, Simon Brown and Brian Seffer carry their passion for home brewing into their Claremont Craft Ales operations. “We both started as home brewers and we want to give back to the home brewing community,” says Brown. “We didn’t want to forget our roots and we want to make sure everyone realize that we’re still just home brewers. We just happen to have a 100-gallon system now instead of a 10-gallon system.” From the time it opened, CCA has been a meeting place for home brewers to try new craft beers, get advice about home brewing and share their own concoctions “The brewery community is awesome and we want to be part of it,” says Natalie Seffer. “Since opening day, a large number of our customers are home brewers,” says Brown. “During that first year, every day somebody would come up to us and say they were a home brewer and then ask us to show them around or ask for advice. We loved that and were excited to share our knowledge with them. If you

come in and ask for a tour, you’re going to get one.” The home brewing industry is experiencing a growth parallel to that of the craft beer world, with home brew stores popping up and more people diving into the hobby. To offer their support, Claremont Craft Ales has held an annual home brew competition during both years of its existence, with winning brewer earning the opportunity to have his or her beer brewed and served at CCA. The winning entry from 2013 was renamed “Sweet Nothings” and became part of the tasting room’s regular beer rotation. This year’s winners were announced at a ceremony at the brewery in July. The Best in Show was awarded to Steve Bernard, who will have his winning Pumpkin Ale added to the brewery’s offerings this fall with a name still to be determined. Bernard’s entry caught the judges by surprise. “We make beers we like, but we generally don’t like pumpkin beers,” says Brian Seffer. “But it won. We all got around to drinking it and it was fantastic. It was an IPA before it was a pumpkin. It was very well done. Our winner is excited to come and make beer here, and we’re excited.” The first runner up was Will Labrie for his Cherry Saison, followed by the team of Dylan Smith and Chris Kwok for their Imperial Chocolate Coffee Milk Stout. Donny Consla won both the third runner-up and honorable mention awards for his Flanders Red and Brandy Barrel-Aged Christmas Ale, respectively.

Sid Robinson authors a blog, “Sips, Suds and Spirits” (www.sipssudsspirits.com) that examines the beverage industry. He is a local strategic communications and public relations consultant with The 20/20 Network.

8916 Foothill Blvd. Ste K3 Rancho Cucamonga 909-481-5050 909 MAGAZINE

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Giuseppe's

OPEN 7 DAYS Mon thru Thur: 11am to 9:30pm Fri and Sat: 11am to 10pm Sunday 11am to 9pm 24

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Dining REVIEW

Giuseppe’s

By: Dean Rullan

The Hidden Treasure of Upland Hidden at the top of Euclid in Upland, stands a quaint little restaurant called Giuseppe’s. There they serve Mediterranean kabobs and Italian cuisine; a blend of foods that complement each other perfectly. Italian cuisine consists of a mix of European influences including Greek and roman cuisine, while Mediterranean cuisine is food influenced by lands adjacent to the Mediterranean Sea. So it is only natural both can work influencing one another in a restaurant. The restaurant started seventeen years ago with just Italian food and first serving as take-out only. Eleven years after opening they expanded and opened a dining room and as of three years ago they added a banquet hall. Mac, the owner of Giuseppe’s, bought the restaurant from the Giuseppe brothers. He kept the original owner’s name and the same quality Italian food and has come to be considered a third Giuseppe

brother. My wife and I had our own expectations. Usually with long standing restaurants, they begin to “slip” and you see it from the atmosphere down to the food on your plate. This was not the case at all. Clean rooms and from when I peeked as the kitchen door opening and closing, spotless. The atmosphere was intimate with candles on the tables and low lighting. It’s a perfect place for a gathering, with the banquet room and large tables. When my wife and I sat, most of the tables were filled by groups/families. You know, food is better with good company. That afternoon we were served a two course meal. We started with an appetizer; a basket of flat bread that may look like a crisp brittle cracker, but it’s soft, pliable, and made in house. Mac called it Giuseppe’s flat bread, served with hummus and eggplant. After, we had lasagna made with tender la-

sagna noodles, baked with meat sauce, full grown tomatoes, onions stuffed with ricotta, mozzarella, and parmesan, along with garlic bread. Next, boneless chicken breast kabob which was marinated skewered and cooked on an open flame served with Basmati rice, grilled tomato and pita bread. This restaurant doesn’t believe in frying, and cooks with little oil. They are a responsible restaurant that thinks about its patrons and rely on the natural flavors. This is a trend that should be adopted by all restaurants. They are reasonably priced with their plates serving up hearty portions of food with outstanding flavors. The staff is friendly and clearly cares about the business. Their food and service is impeccable and clearly a reason why it has been successful for so many years. He’s not just cooking for customers but as if it is for family.

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H E I G H T S R E S TA U R A N T B A R . C O M

O P E N D A I LY  1 1 : 0 0 A M

P R I VAT E D I N I N G R O O M FOR ALL SPECIAL OCCASIONS FULL BAR

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ITALIAN Happy Hour Daily 11am - 8pm All Day Sunday and Monday Live Entertainment Tuesday - Saturday

1645 Mountain Ave.- Upland

909.981.2924

NW Corner of Mountain & 16th St. in Stater Bros. Shopping Center

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Cafe Calato 909-482-1870

We Deliver Mon - Sat $20.00 minimum

Free Order of Garlic Knots

*Delivery Charges Added

FREE

with Purchase of 2 or more entrees

Like us on Facebook and recieve a FREE order of garlic knots!

119 Harvard Ave. Claremont | www.thelastdropcafe.com

BUY 1 GET 1

Free Boba Sunday’s

Any Drink we make

with the purchase of any ice drink

50% OFF

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Get $5 Off Your Total Bill of $30 or More.

Expires 9.30.14

Upscale Banquet Hall With Full Bar

Perfect Spot for Special Occasions, Weddings, Anniversaries, Birthdays, Office & Company Parties Your Choice of Food, Decorations & Centerpieces at VERY REASONABLE PRICES!

F U L L C AT E R I N G AVA I L A B L E !

For Full Catering & Banquet Rooms Call (909) 900-7608

On Purchase of $2000 or More. Celebrate Your Special Occasion with Us

965 W. Foothill Blvd, Upland

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909.982.3616

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Buy One Entrée Get 2nd Entrée of Equal or Lesser Value FREE Max Discount $8

aroma- gr ill.com 909 MAGAZINE

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HEALTH MATTERS Brought to you by San Antonio Community Hospital

EVEN HEALTHY PEOPLE NEED A FLU VACCINE Influenza (flu) is a contagious disease which affects the lungs and can lead to serious illness, including pneumonia. Influenza can also require hospitalization. Every flu season is different and people can be affected differently. We often hear that those with compromised immune systems should be vaccinated, and that is true. Thousands of people in the U.S. die each year of the flu or its complications. Most of those who die are the elderly, young children, or people with a weakened immune system. But it’s also important to note that even healthy people can become very sick from the flu and need to be hospitalized. Flu season in the United States typically begins as early as October and can last as late as May. During this time, the flu virus is circulating in the population. An annual seasonal flu vaccine is still the single best way to protect yourself and your loved ones from contracting the flu.

How do flu vaccines work? Flu vaccines cause antibodies to develop in the body about two weeks after vaccination. These antibodies provide protection against infection with the viruses that are in the vaccine. The seasonal flu vaccine protects against the influenza viruses that research indicates will be most common during the upcoming season. 30

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Is the flu vaccine safe? Yes, the flu vaccine is safe. Hundreds of millions of people have received flu vaccinations for more than 50 years with a very good track record. Each year, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) works closely with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other partners to ensure the highest safety standards for flu vaccines.

Who should get vaccinated? The CDC recommends everyone who is at least 6 months of age should get a flu vaccination. While everyone should receive the flu vaccine this season, it is especially important for those who are at high risk of developing serious complications (like pneumonia) if they get sick with the flu. Those include: • People with certain medical conditions including asthma, diabetes, and chronic lung disease. • Pregnant women. • People younger than 5 years (and especially those younger than 2), and people 65 years and older. • People who live with or care for those mentioned above, healthcare workers, and those who have frequent contact with infants less than 6 months old.

Does the flu vaccine work right away?

It takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body and provide protection. That’s why it’s better to get vaccinated early in the fall, before the flu season really gets underway.

Can the flu vaccine give me the flu?

The flu vaccine cannot cause flu illness; however, it can cause mild side effects that may be mistaken for flu. For example, some people may feel achy, have a mild fever, and may have a sore arm at the injection site. People vaccinated with the nasal spray flu vaccine may have a stuffy nose and sore throat. These side effects are NOT the flu. If experienced at all, these side effects are usually mild and last only a day or two.

I’m healthy, won’t I bounce back quickly if I get the flu?

Even healthy people can experience serious complications from the flu and can spread it to others. Even if you bounce back quickly, others around you may not be so lucky. Older people, young children, pregnant women, and people with medical conditions are at especially high risk from the flu. Don’t be the one spreading flu to those you care about.


An annual seasonal flu vaccine is still the single best way to protect yourself from contracting the flu.

Is it better to receive the flu shot or the nasal spray?

The flu vaccine comes in two forms: a flu shot and a nasal spray. Your healthcare provider can recommend which of the two forms you should receive. The flu shot contains killed (inactive) viruses and is approved for people age 6 months and older. The nasal spray flu vaccine uses live, weakened flu viruses. It is approved for healthy people age 2 through 49 years. It should not be used in those who have asthma or children under 5 years of age who have repeated wheezing episodes. It also should not be used in pregnant women.

Do I need a flu vaccine every year?

A flu vaccine is needed every flu season. First, the body’s immune response from vaccination declines over time, so for optimal protection,

you should receive a flu shot every year. In addition, because flu viruses are constantly changing, the formulation of the flu vaccine is reviewed each year and sometimes updated to keep up with the changing flu viruses. Every year, doctors treat patients with a multitude of excuses as to why they didn’t receive a flu shot. As flu season gets into full swing, emergency rooms become flooded with patients who have contracted the seasonal flu, stretching resources and attention. For this reason alone, consider a flu shot this year. Flu is preventable. Make a difference by protecting yourself and those around you in the community. For your convenience, San Antonio Community Hospital is making it easy to get a flu shot this year. In fact, you don’t even have to get out of your car!

Free Drive-Thru Flu Clinic Friday, October 3, 2014 7 am – 10 am (or until supplies last) Sierra San Antonio Medical Plaza 16465 Sierra Lakes Parkway Fontana, CA 92336

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If every day is a battle with mysterious pain and fatigue, you may have Fibromyalgia. Perhaps you’ve been told that there’s nothing wrong with you. Yet your body is telling you, “Something is not right.” At the Casa Colina Fibromyalgia Center, a board-certified rheumatologist will evaluate you for what is referred to as “the invisible illness” because it is often overlooked. If you have this chronic disease, you’ll receive specialized medical care, plus an opportunity to enroll in a wellness program to better manage its symptoms with a variety of non-impact exercises, educational information, stress-reduction techniques, and a monthly support group. The symptoms of Fibromyalgia are common, but the way we treat them is quite uncommon. To schedule an appointment, please call 909/596-7733, ext. 3500.

Discover what is possible. 255 East Bonita Avenue (at Garey) 32

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Pomona, CA

www.casacolina.org


W H AT I S F I B R O M YA LG I A ? B y D i a nne W hiting, MA, PT, Ca sa Col i n a Hos pit al

Fibromyalgia (FM) reportedly affects six to ten million Americans, and the actual incidence is estimated to be two to six percent of the general population, with women being affected more often than men. The symptoms associated with FM significantly affect a patients’ quality of life and can lead to extensive use of health care services. Fibromyalgia is experienced as a chronic, widespread pain condition accompanied by fatigue, tenderness,

sleep disturbance, decreases in physical functioning, and disruptions in psychological and cognitive functioning (for example, memory problems, diminished mental clarity, mood disturbances, and lack of well-being). The pain of Fibromyalgia is often increased by a variety of factors which may include exercising too much, being in one position for too long, “normal” activity (cleaning house, cooking, doing laundry), increased stress, and sometimes by even very light touch. People often experience excessive sensitivity to touch, bright lights, loud noises, and fragrances as well as heightened reactions to cold and heat. Exercising, walking too far, and moving too much may cause people to avoid activity for fear that their pain will increase. This increased pain may often last from several hours to several weeks. People diagnosed with Fibromyalgia often state, “It’s like I have the aching flu all the time, night and day.” This constant, aching pain can lead to frustration, mood swings, depression and general discouragement about not being able to do the things they used to

do. It becomes difficult not only for the person with Fibromyalgia but also for their family and friends. In order for people to successfully live with Fibromyalgia it is important for them to learn appropriate techniques for exercising and a variety of skills to manage the pain and its many symptoms. At Casa Colina Hospital in Pomona, medical doctors specializing in Rheumatology / Fibromyalgia treat patients and supervise wellness programs that include exercising in a warm-water pool, Yoga, Tai Chi, general exercise, educational classes in symptom control and stress reduction techniques, and general physical and occupational therapy support for individual medical issues. Casa Colina also offers two support groups (Adults and Teens) that offer educational and personal support for people of the community who have been diagnosed with Fibromyalgia. There is no charge for these monthly support groups. To learn more, please call 909/596-7733, ext 3661.

General & Family Medicine • Practicing general and family medicine in the Inland Empire for more than 30 years • Board Certiied in Geriatric, General & Emergency Medicine • Same day appointments • Now accepting new patients

Dr. Gilbert Zini

(909) 982-1888

8283 Grove Avenue | Suite 106 | Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730 909 MAGAZINE

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Redhill Dental WHITE FILLINGS GUM DISEASE TEETH WHITENING

The Ultimate Guide to a Great Smile in 6 Steps

ORTHODONTIC BRACES DENTAL IMPLANTS COSMETIC DENTISTRY

Can you spot the dental implant?

Step 5: Are you going to replace that tooth?

NELSON BUTAY, DDS

LENH PHUI, DDS

Live Your Life Smiling

Thank You Inland Empire! You’re the best patients a dentist could have. You’ve worked hard and sacriiced a lot to get where you are. Now it ’s time to take care of your smile to sum up all your success! Here at Redhill Dental our caring dentist use a simple philosophy : eliminate dental decay and prevent them from reoccurring. Then use cosmetic dentistr y, or thodontics, and dental implants to suppor t optimal dental health. Our number one concern will be to help you keep your teeth for the rest of your life and provide the kind of dentistr y that we would provide for our own family. Dentistr y that will help you to be healthy, excel in life, and live your life smiling. • • • •

Saturday and Evening Appointments, no missing school or work 0% Interest Payment Plans, for affordable monthly payments Free Dental Consultations, to talk about your dental problems Courtesy Insurance Determinations, to discuss your insurance beneets Call us today. We will be happy to discuss how we can give you the smile of your life. If you call before September 30, 2014, you will receive:

1) A Free dental implant consultation to discuss your dental options 2) Complimentary dental implant x-rays (a $345 value)

"After getting my dental implant, I am more conndent. I love the results. It looks very natural." - Elsa G. (Moreno Valley, CA) 1490 E. FOOTHILL BLVD. | SUITE B | UPLAND | 909 9858989

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Losing your tooth can be embarrassing. You might be willing to endure pain and risk infections in your mouth to avoid being seen with a missing tooth. I understand why you feel that way. People with missing teeth have been portrayed in a negative way on television. And it’s an easy way to poke fun at you, especially if someone doesn’t like you. There’s also the inconvenience of going to the dentist, possibly missing work, and your fear of having the tooth extracted. I understand that too, but… Waiting is the worst thing you can do. A dental infection can become life threatening in a matter of hours because of the surrounding soft tissues: throat, eyes, and brain. If an infection spreads to these areas of the body, it’s considered a medical emergency and you will need to go to the emergency room. You can be hospitalized for a tooth infection. Procrastination can also lead to bone loss around the tooth and

shifting of the teeth. The longer your teeth have been infected, the harder it will be to replace with a satisfactory esthetic result. Fortunately, dental implants can replace missing teeth. A dental implant is a metal titanium root substitute that can be used to replace a tooth. It can mimic the natural appearance of a tooth emerging out of the gums. Your teeth are like diamonds. Traditional tooth replacements require neighboring teeth to be ground down in order to attach a prosthetic tooth. You want to avoid grinding a tooth down, if it’s possible. A dental implant supports itself, so healthy neighboring teeth don’t have to be ground down. This keeps teeth strong and distributes the biting force on more teeth. Step 5 is to replace missing teeth. There are 6 Steps to a Great Smile. Next month I’ll discuss Step 6: Cosmetic Dentistry, You May Not Need It.

LIVEYOURLIFESMILING.COM | REDHILLDENTAL@GMAIL.COM


pomona valley

C E C I L I A S E R A F I N I - S M I T H | 2 X H E A RT AT TA C K S U RV I V O R A fitness buff and mother of four, Cecilia Serafini-Smith is always on the move. When chest pain, arm numbness and nausea stopped her in her tracks (twice), she knew just what to do. She insisted on going to the PVHMC Heart Receiving Center. Our expert cardiac team quickly identified her blocked arteries and stented them. Today, she’s filled with gratitude for the lifesaving care she received. While our Stead Heart and Vascular Center has earned national recognition and certifications, it’s patients like Cecilia who truly motivate us. Learn more about our award winning care and the patients who inspire it. pvhmc.org | 909.865.9858

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Overwhelmed Struggling -OR-

WITH LIFE’S PROBLEMS?

Hablamos Español Chinese and Cantonese Speaking Therapist

WE CAN HELP!

Offering:

Individual and Group Therapy for Children Individual and Group Therapy for Adolescents Individual and Group Therapy for Adults Wellness Groups and Individual Sessions Family Therapy Couples Counseling Parenting Sessions ACC E P TA N C E CO U N S E L I N G S E RV I C E S , I N C . R A N C H O C U C A M O N G AT H E R A P Y. C O M

909 7677572 8 1 8 N O R T H M O U N TA I N AV E , S U I T E 2 0 3 UPLAND, CA 91786

Accepting Most Major Health Insurance Companies, Medicare and Medi-Cal Our masters-level licensed therapists specialize in a multitude of therapy areas, including therapy for adults, children and teenagers. If you, or a loved one, are experiencing difficulty with life situations, therapy may be part of the solution. 36

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Ask

K AT H Y

I have been feeling down for quite a while now. Nothing really sets it off, I just feel blue and not like myself most of the time. I recently went away for the weekend with my family and we did not bring any electronics. While I was away I didn’t feel down at all, but the feeling is back now that I am home again. Do you think that electronics are making me sick or sad somehow? - Anonymous 909 Reader Dear Reader, Melancholy, Dysthymia and Depression have become all too common in our modern world. Many professionals in the field of mental health believe that this Depression Epedemic has stemmed from the breakdown of community. As a society, we have become disconnected from one another. This is partially due to traffic, stress, work hours, etcetera. However, perhaps the biggest offender is the overuse of electronics. All too often we engage in virtual relationships as opposed to communicating with the people who are around us. This leads to more impersonal and less emotionally satisfying relationships. When one spends time engaging in virtual relationships, he/she is devoting time to these “friends” at the expense of the relationships that truly matter. If you think about it, the people who are in your physical environment are typically closer to you on an emotional level than a “Facebook friend”. However, many of us spend more time engaging in solitary activities involving electronics and virtually socializing than communicating with those who matter most to us. Humans have the tendency to assume that the world around us will stay constant, that those who we are close with will always be there and that our emotional connections will remain strong. In reality, if we do not nurture these relationships, they will become less close and less mutually fulfilling. I would recommend that you put away electronics for a few hours each day and try to reengage with the people around you. I would also suggest that you ask your family members and friends to do this when you are with them. Re-engaging with friends and family may help you to feel more like yourself again, may offer an opportunity for you to talk about what is bothering you and to gain some emotional support. Research in the field of Psychology shows us that a strong emotional support system is strongly correlated with recovery from issues such as Depression. Such research also shows that a strong emotional support system is highly correlated with life satisfaction and happiness in general. Kathryn Vannauker is a Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist & the CEO of Acceptance Counseling Services, Inc. Please call 909 767 7572 for an appointment with Kathryn Vannauker or one of her associates at Acceptance Counseling Services, Inc. If you have a question that you would like for Ms. Vannauker to respond to in the next edition of 909 Magazine, please email no more than 3 sentences to acceptancecounseling@outlook.com. Ms. Vannauker will not respond to every email submitted by readers, but will choose one reader’s question to answer in the magazine each month. Although Kathryn Vannauker does offer in-person clinical treatment as a Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist, the intention of this article is only to provide general mental health information. You are the final arbiter of the information you receive & should act accordingly. Always consult your own doctor or therapist before making any decisions about your treatment or therapy. The information in this article should be considered “as is” & may not apply to your particular situation. There are no warranties regarding the information herein, either expressed or implied.


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MARC GROSSMAN

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lawtalk

By: Soheila Azizi

Are You Prepared To Face Elder Law Issues?

ALL YOUR LEGAL NEEDS CAN B E TA K E N C A R E O F I N O N E P L A C E

L AW O F F I C E S O F S O H E I L A A Z I Z I A N D A S S O C I A T E S , P. C . & C . A . M . S . I N C .

Soheila Azizi Exper ienced Tr ial Law yer

C I V I L L I T I G AT I O N FA M I LY L AW DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

It is my personal and professional experience that dealing with elder issues can be one of the most challenging tasks one faces during a lifetime. Although a myriad of programs and benefits are available for many, lack of education and expertise in deciphering complex laws relating to these benefits makes them almost inaccessible. This article can only touch upon a few issues of concern and is intended to trigger a more expanded inquiry and search by the readers. Government Benefits: Almost everyone knows about Social Security Retirement (SSR) benefits available to individuals based on their work history and age of retirement. What is not known to many is the challenging road to receiving the Social Security Disability (SSDI) benefits which often requires perseverance, and most likely legal representation, when the diagnosis of disability does not squarely fit the definitions provided by the law. A whole separate area of benefits are available to elders, the blind or disabled, merely on the basis of financial need and per a Supplemental Security Income (SSI) eligibility criteria. Health and care programs are also available through Medicare (National Health program for 65 and older, or younger if received SSDI for 24 months), Medi-Cal (for low income seniors), Nursing Home Medi-Cal (subject to eligibility criteria), In-Home support Services (IHSS), and Veterans Aid & Attendance (A & A) Pension. Healthcare and Financial Decisions: Many tools are available to allow the elderly to maintain control over their own health and financial decision for as long as they are in full command of their mental faculties. Using such tools as Power of Attorney for Health Care (PAHC) and Durable Power of Attorney For Financial Matters (DPAFM), can bring long lasting peace of mind if the right agent is selected. Unfortunately, in the absence of these documents, the individual’s friends and family members, or conservators and agents appointed by a court, may become the decision maker for the elder person or their estate. Plan early to consult experts in the areas of Elder Law and avoid undesirable consequences and inevitable conflict.

Soheila Azizi, Esq. and Women On The Move Network

Invite You To Attend an Informative Workshop On: September 12, 2014 12:00-1:30 PM (Brown Bag, Must RSVP)

C R I M I N A L L AW

Finding Your True Powers; A Woman’s Highest Calling!

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Call Today at 909-484-9992

MEDICAL MALPRACTICE ELDER ABUSE GUARDIANSHIP DIVORCE/CUSTODY/SUPPORT ARRESTS/DUI

The Law Talk column is intended to provide free and general legal information to all 909 Readers. Ms. Azizi is a local legal practitioner whose community service and volunteer work includes providing legal information to general public. Email Questions to Soheila@909magazine.com 909 MAGAZINE

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Women

Melodies

on the

Move Network

and

Memories

-PRESENTS-

Women on the Move is pleased to announce this year we will hold the 4th Annual Gala event on September 6th, “Melodies and Memories”, in Upland. So please remember, you’ll want to clear your schedules that evening, hold your calls, and make sure you do all important things early that day- everyone loves Gala! For nearly a decade WOMEN ON THE MOVE NETWORK has carried out a variety of activities, conferences, special topic luncheons and seminars on themes related to gender equality. As we all know, Women on the Move Network has big ideas and bigger plans. Youth development programs are in full swing at three different sites in Rancho Cucamonga, and there

are plans to expand this year. In addition, we sponsor two public events to support WOTMN’s interests and provide information and opportunities for service in the larger community: a conference for teen girls in the summer, and a larger conference in recognition of International Woman’s Day next March. Since we are totally dependent on donations of funds for our operating budget, as well as the selfless service of a number of volunteers, each year we hold a Gala Fundraising event in September, with the goal of securing a significant portion of the money needed to carry out our activities. Last year’s event was a great success and we are expecting an even bigger turn out this year.

LET’S HELP RAISE FUNDS FOR WOMEN ON THE MOVE NETWORK, MENTORING & GIRL EMPOWERMENT PROGRAMS:

Who’s Your Hero?

-A N D -

Junior Women on the Move

Donations can be sent to: Payment by Check: To: Women on the Move Network P.O. Box 2725 Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91729

Payment by Credit Card or Paypal: Go to: WOTMNETWORK.org and click “Donate Now” Fill in the amount, along with account information.

We are a 501 (c) (3) organization. $50.00 of your ticket price plus any additional donation you make is tax deductible, and will be greatly appreciated.

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Jaguar’s XJL: Athletic and Accommodating By The Car Family

When is a Jaguar not a Jaguar? Trick question and the Jaguar XJL Portfolio has the answer. Simply put, Jaguar has drastically changed the traditional Jag’s appearance and running gear. No longer is there wood trim everywhere and the sometimesreluctant engine has been replaced by a “let’s play” supercharged V6 engine with an eight-speed automatic transmission that is willing and able to straighten your spine whenever the need arises. This Jaguar rocks. The refined six-cylinder power plant is a model of nobility, with just a touch of aggression when you call on the big cat’s 340 horsepower. Driving in a civil manner, the fuel economy has a 16/24-mpg city/ highway rating. We averaged 22 mpg in mixed driving in very hot weather. However, it is very difficult not to fall in love with the acceleration of this big cat and so your 42

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mileage will probably vary based on your mood. This is an agile vehicle that claws the road as few other sedans can. The brakes are excellent and you get the feeling that there is really nothing this vehicle can’t handle. The price starts around $85,000 for the five-inch-longer XJL Portfolio edition we tested, but if you can live without the cool rear seat and extra legroom you can save several thousand dollars. Options can drive the price over $100,000, but once inside you are going to know what you paid for. It is elegant and as close to Architecture Digest as a car can be. Mom’s View: In appearance, it is simply gorgeous. It makes one swoon and is definitely eye candy for the masses. Its price is at the edge of those in the 909 area code’s income level, but lease deals are attractive

and competitive with any sophisticated luxury sedan. The interior is sporty, clean, and a bit flashy. Some instrumentation is quite novel, such as the round, chrome gear selector that pops out of the center console. Very novel and easy to master, but it can get very hot in the sun. Safety-wise, the Jaguar is loaded with intelligent airbags most everywhere; seats that have active whiplash protection; blind spot monitoring; electronic brake distribution; rear view camera and more as befitting its price. Be warned that the large touch screen monitor runs the show, so don’t leave the dealership without a run-through. The trunk is large, but the opening is limited. The XJL has a panoramic, heat reflective glass roof that extends the length of the car. The night lighting was first-rate with adaptive headlights that even illuminate corners. Bottom line for me was


the workmanship, pride of ownership and, of course, the attention. Dad’s view: Slovenly, hardly. This is a tidy, dynamic sedan with a back seat fit for the Queen. Driving at all times is lively and secure. We tested the supercharged, six cylinder version, which is the only engine you can get with the optional allwheel drive, and it was plenty powerful. A 510-horsepower V8 version is available for those wanting to toast the tires with fivesecond 0 to 60 times. The performance goes with the XJL’s contemporary styling and make it very appealing to those who want to stand apart from the ubiquitous German competition. The XJL version offers a plethora of features that include front seats that are heated, cooled and massage you. The use of aluminum and aircraft style materials and bonding techniques are just part of what you are paying for, but don’t forget the many unseen features such Cornering Brake Control, which helps

in taking sharp corners, the automatic leveling control, or the stop-start feature that saves gas. The brake pedal feel was a little soft and the option list a little dear. My advice is do your homework so you know what features you want before you go to the dealer. I highly recommend the illumination and the entertainment packages. The Jaguar is unique in that it incorporates class and performance and certainly a wonderful reward for a job well done. Working Woman’s View: Portfolio is an appropriate name for this luxury convenience, as it may require a look at your investments before you buy. On the other hand, you truly get what you pay for and this Jaguar is both distinct and heavily laden with features that coddle you. For example, you can get an 825-watt audio system and those in the back seats can be entertained with eight-inch monitors and wireless headphones. This Jaguar is worth

it and there is always the inner glow you get from driving a Jag. Son’s View: I’m still looking for work in the computer field, but still have time to assess a truly great technology systems, and this Jaguar has them. The GPS has traffic alerts and the optional Meridian is prime. There are also satellite radio, interactive voice control, Bluetooth, and a media hub with inputs for iPod and MP3 players. The sound quality is dynamic, thanks to 20 speakers, including two subwoofers. Some of the features require time to learn so don’t leave the showroom without a thorough tutorial. The XJL is class. Family Conference: In a world where luxury sedans are designed to show one’s appreciation for the better things in life as well as having the means to pay for it (most luxury cars are leased due to tax code attributes), the Jaguar stands alone as a bargain and a beauty. 909 MAGAZINE

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12K MILES A YEAR | .15 CENTS EXCESS MILES PENALTY Offer expires September 30, 2014

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16444 South Highland Avenue, Fontana, CA 92336 Off the 210 Fwy at Sierra 44

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2014 NISSAN SENTRA S CVT 2 AT THIS SPECIAL OFFER

OFFER $2995 DRIVE OFFS | 36 MONTHS

$141 +tax

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Offer expires September 30, 2014

HOME OF BOTTOM LINE PRICING (909) 574-2288

16444 South Highland Avenue, Fontana, CA 92336 Off the 210 Fwy at Sierra 909 MAGAZINE

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Relax With Some

Cars, Coffee, and Crusin Brothers

By: Matt Komoto

Every Sunday the Cruisin Brothers Car Club meets in Downtown Upland by the gazebo for their weekly Cars and Coffee. For their Sundays there’s no special preparations, no trophies, no awards. Cruisin Brothers just drive in, park and it’s just car guys hanging out and telling stories. They are there from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. every Sunday. They do their thing in the morning before the general public gets there and they’re out to then have breakfast. This group mostly focuses on cars and hanging out instead of rules and regulations. These can cause a hindrance to a relaxed environment, and can be a turnoff for joining chartered clubs. The Cruisin Brothers are not a “legitimate” club but are more a fellowship of car owners. “Most of our membership are people who don’t want to be in a club, or that are in a club and don’t like the club,” said Cruisin Brother Godwin Osifeso. “So that is why we are not a formal club. Because we just hang out. We don’t have deals, we don’t have rules. We just have a social agenda.” Their group’s social agenda is to give back to the community in four ways. The first is to revitalize Downtown Upland. Their Cars and Coffee and events are there to give people a reason to go downtown and patronize businesses while there. The second is to help with the restoration of 46

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the Historic Cucamonga Service Gas Station that was originally built in 1915. Third is to support the automotive technology program at Chaffey College. The fourth goal is to support Central Elementary School District and raise money to help teachers and students. Cruisin Brothers come from all over the Inland Empire. These can include truck drivers, software writers and architects. Osifeso, the Crusin Brother we spoke to, is an architect that designed the new stadium at Alta Loma High School. He is also drawing plans to renovate the American Legion Hall 79 with no charge for his architectural services. The Cruisin Brothers started their fellowship last June at this Riverside American Legion Hall. Osifeso is described by others in the group like a miniature Leno with his cars. He collects Ford Mustangs, Shelby Cobras, Ford Galaxy wagons, and 51’ trucks. These and countless more can be seen at their casual events. The Cruisin Brothers plan to start a monthly evening car show every fourth Friday. It will include trophies, entertainment and will be for the whole family and not just for the guys. Later this month, they will have a three day car show with their Cruisin’ Reunion in Ontario. Cruise in for the Cruisin Brothers and see countless classic cars.


L O C A L

SCHOOLS & EDUCATION P R I VAT E S C H O O L S - S C H O O L E V E N T S - E D U C AT I O N A L I N F O R M AT I O N

L E T T H E M S E E YO U C Y P H E R Wake up to the opportunities for inviting a young child into the math process you use during regular routines and you are transforming their relationship with “school work”. If they don’t see us using math how are they to know it’s not just important to their teacher. The adults at home give school subjects a real life context. The simple calculations we make to adjust what time to go to bed, or how much we can accomplish after work are math moments that can include a child. Just pointing out to young passengers at the beginning of a drive how long you will be traveling, or giving them an ETA will engage them. A warning; consider carefully how much policing you can tolerate before you point out speed limit

signs. They will rat you out if you have a lead foot. Next time you eat out, share the check with your child, have them see the total and count out the money. Older children can figure the tip and count the change. Some motivated youngsters will likely take it even farther and figure out that two or three sushi nights equal a new game system. Voila, your kids just put you on a budget. Now it’s time to cook. Have them identify the fractions and find the proper measure. If that’s too easy, double or halve the recipe. How about that BBQ? How big do you want your burger? Which is bigger? The 1/3 pound or 1/4? If that’s too advanced, start with

unsliced pizza or pie. Need activities for younger children? Have them pour their own drink (start with water). The estimating of volume and capacity are math concepts and having them choose containers for the left overs will provide learning experiences. Allow yourself time. Enjoy the interactions. Use gentle corrections or, when possible, allow the child to have a miscalculation and be gracious if they catch you in a mistake. Allow their thoughts and contributions to matter. Always keeps in mind that nothing we do at school packs the punch that parental interactions do. You are their first and most important teachers.

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C H O O S I N G A P R E S C H O O L F O R YO U R C H I L D

Deborah Pruitt Temple Beth Israel Preschool You might find yourself in a situation where your baby is 3 months old and it’s time to return to work, or you might have a 4 year old and you’d like him to have a year of preschool before entering kindergarten. Whatever your child’s age is, considering a preschool enrollment can be overwhelming. There are so many options and so much to consider. Parents have the opportunity to choose what option is best for your child and your family.

Finding the right child care means doing some homework. Friends and neighbors might give recommendations, and there are some great online tools to use. Parents can visit school websites and sites like: Google places and Great Schools. The first thing to research is about school specifics such as; hours it’s open, the cost, the ages of children it serves, it’s location and your travel time. Secondly, it’s important to understand that not all childcare is the same. Programs vary based on ownership, like public Headstart, State or school district programs, for profit or non-profit centers, parent cooperatives, preschools on college campuses and family day care homes. One thing remains the same, all child care programs, whether home or facility, need to be licensed by the California Dept. of Social Services, to me basic requirements. Early childhood education also encompasses a broad base of philosophies and curriculum. A school might follow the California education standards, a whole child developmental focus, the Montessori Method or faith-based curriculum, for instance. After doing some research, it’s then time to visit preschool programs. When scheduling a

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visit, there will be time for an orientation and tour of the site. Parents will be able to visit the facility and see if it’s child-centered, warm and inviting, clean and safe. This is the time to ask questions about the program such as: What is the child-teacher ratio? How do the teachers and parents communicate? Do children have to use the toilet independently? As you visit preschools, be aware of how you feel about the program. Consider if the environment feels welcoming, if the children are happily engaged in activities and how the teachers relate to the children. The early years are so very important in establishing a good foundation for your child’s development. Young children grow so rapidly; they need positive, caring guidance both at home and at school. Fundamentally, choosing a preschool means that the fit between home-school needs to be right for your child and family. Once you feel that your priorities are met, you’ll feel relaxed knowing that your child will be in an early childhood program that he/she will thrive in as they grow and develop.

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, Dignity and R

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For over 32 years, Carden Arbor View School has provided K-8th students with an excellent education and is also one of the top-rated independent, non-sectarian schools, in the Inland Valley. Call for a tour and student assessment today.

A Free K-12 Public Charter School

Specialize in Independent Study | Individualized 1-on-1 instruction Schedule flexibility | Individual pacing | CAHSEE preparation | Credentialed staff 48

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Small class size-10: 1 Student/teacher ratio Foreign languages-French, Latin, Spanish Focused learning-Science, Technical Skills and Math Arts and Music, Intramural Sports Debate Team, After School Enrichment Programs Summer School Programs A.M. & P.M. Childcare

Carden Arbor View School 1530 N. San Antonio Avenue, Upland, CA 91786 909-982-9919 www.cardenarborview.org


I T I S N OT T H E D E S T I N AT I O N , B U T T H E J O U R N E Y

Mark J. Ravelli Head of School Saint Mark’s Episcopal School Every Californian should experience the scenic 17 Mile Drive on Pacific Coast Highway south of San Francisco. The trek is the perfect illustration of the adage, “it is not the destination, but the journey.” The same can be said of your child’s school years; like the coastal drive, education has many twists and turns, and

views that may be beautiful from a distance and frightening up close. Most life lessons take place not upon reaching the destination, but during the journey. The Cherokee lesson, “Two Wolves” provides a road map for all of life’s journeys. In the story, a Cherokee tells his grandson that, in each of us, a battle is waged between two wolves. One wolf represents Evil: it is anger, envy, jealousy, sorrow, regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority, and ego. The second wolf represents Good: it is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, kindness, benevolence, empathy, generosity, truth, compassion, and faith. After thinking for a moment, the grandson asks, “Which wolf wins?” To which the old Chero-

kee simply replies, “The one you feed.” Teachers lead their students on an incredible journey filled with adventure and beauty. Along the way, there will be stops and detours, and a few bumps in the road, but we stay true to course. As we begin a new school year, keep the Good Wolf in mind, and enjoy the ride.

ENGINEERING FUTURES SOUNDING THE BELLS SPARKING DEBATE GROWING PHILANTHROPY CULTIVATING LEADERS

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Our traditional preschool through 8th grade liberal ar ts education and caring environment suppor t exploration and creativity, honor diversity, and foster the building of community, character, friendships, and minds. This is a joyful, comfor table, respectful, and challenging school where students become eager, successful, and conndent learners. Our students are encouraged to take risks, follow their passions, explore new interests, and ser ve their community.

330 East 16th Street

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Upland, CA

|

909.920.5565

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www.stmarks-upland.org 909 MAGAZINE

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R E A L E S TAT E

LO C AT I O N , LO C AT I O N , LO C AT I O N By: Don Mowery, CAL BRE#0119357 Those famous three words in real estate. Believe it or not, I have been appraising since 1989 when appraisal reports were completed on a typewriter and I glued my photos onto pre-printed forms. This article has not been written to tell you how old I am feeling, but it is written to share my years of experience and my input on how location can impact you in different market conditions. Question number 1. Have you ever seen a home located on a busy corner that is always for sale? The 14th Edition of The Appraisal of Real Estate defines external obsolescence, as the diminished utility of a structure due to the negative influences from outside the site, is incurable on part of the owner, landlord, or tenant. Say what? Factors that are located outside your property’s

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boundaries can cause a loss in your value! The most common example of external depreciation is when a single family home is located on a street with a high level of traffic. Other examples of adverse locational factors are homes located adjacent to a commercial building, an apartment building, being located near an airport, power plant, high tension power lines, water treatment facility, or even being located next to an unsightly home. An example on how to determine the external depreciation/loss to a property is to analyze recent similar sales of home with a similar factor and homes that do not have this problem. Okay Mr. Rocket Scientist, share with me your formula that you create with your years of experience! While I do not have

a magic formation for you, I do have an observation that I would like to share. My observation is that a negative impact on a property with an adverse locational factor is less during a period of increasing market values, versus a period of declining market values. When demand is strong and there is a limit supply of homes, buyers will typically diminish a negative factor outside of the property’s boundaries. However, when there are a large amount of available homes to purchase a.k.a. as an abundant supply, the negative factor is magnified. Therefore, when you are purchasing a home be sure to consider the location of the home, what surrounds it today and what may be around in the future as well. Make sure to choose a local knowledgeable real estate agent.


C O V E T E D E X E C U T I V E E S TAT E ! Prestigious neighborhood in nor th Claremont. 6 B\R with private baths. Aprox 4,807 SF on half acre lot with inviting pool & relaxing spa. Private maid or guest quar ters in separate downstairs wing. Enormous kitchen/family room w/ 2 islands & replace, librar y, formal living room. Seperate formal dining w/ butler ’s pantr y, magniicent master suite w/ mountain views, plus upstairs game room or study. A FLOOR PLAN DESIGNED FOR GRACIOUS LIVING!

Sprawling semi- custom single story with yard designed for outdoor enjoyment!

Remodeled kitchen makes cooking easy!!!

4 BR, 3 BA, Approx 3,300 SF w/ brand new carpeting on nearly 3/4 acre in Rancho Cucamonga. seperate living room & dining w/butler’s pantry, enormous kitchen/ family room combo w//replace, island, granite , walk-in pantry & more!! Huge, gated RV parking, covered patio, pool & spa w/mountain views.

Bright & open 2 story boasts 3 br, 3 BA, approx 1,438 SF. High ceilings, kitchen/ family room combo, mountain views, great cul-de-sac location in Rancho Cucamonga. $ 399,800. Fast escrow works here!

Great buy!! Hurry on this one!

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Price reduced!!! Excellent north Alta Loma neighborhood offers 4 BR, 3 BA, approx. 2,285 SF on cul-de-sac with gated RV parking-- room for boat too!! Remodeled kitchen with granite, updated doors & windows. Large backyard has covered patio, mountain views & plenty of lawn for outdoor activities. $549,000

Alta Loma Estate high on the hillside, 4 BR, 3BA, Approx 3,111 SF on over 1/2 Acre. Inside nd elegant spiral staircase, soaring ceilings, kitchen w/ granite, stainless steel appliances, island & W/I pantry. Master suite has jacuzzi tub & balcony w/ views. Sparkling pool & spa highlight the backyard. $869,000

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909-946-6633 | GushueFamilyRealtors.com 909 MAGAZINE

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FOOTHILLS HOME SALES 720 W Silver Tree St, Claremont 3 Beds, 3 Baths, 2,792 Sq. Ft. On the market 122 days. Sold for $636,600.

501 N Indian Hill Blvd, Claremont. 5 Beds, 2 Bath, 1,895 Sq. Ft. On the Claremont market 4 days. Sold for $825,000.

844 Yuba Lv, Claremont. 5 Beds, 4 Baths, 4,162 Sq. Ft. On the Claremont market 217 days. Sold for $1,380,000.

1041 Eastglen Dr, La Verne. 5 Beds, 2 Baths, 1,832 Sq. Ft. On the La Verne market 87 days. Sold for $530,000.

674 Bluefield Dr, Claremont . 4 Beds, 2 Baths, 1,925 Sq. Ft. On the Claremont market 19 days. Sold for $649,000.

924 Fenn Ct, Claremont. 5 Beds, 4 Baths, 3,638 Sq. Ft. On the Claremont market 146 days. Sold for $855,000.

655 Adirondack Ln, Claremont. 6 Beds, 6 Bath, 5,158 Sq. Ft. On the Claremont market 2 days. Sold for $1,400,000.

1800 Baseline Rd, La Verne. 4 Beds, 3 Baths, 2,267 Sq. Ft. On the La Verne market 80 days. Sold for $530,000.

870 Lawrence Cr, Claremont. 4 Beds, 3 Baths, 2,300 Sq. Ft. On the Claremont market 63 days. Sold for $652,000.

2658 San Angelo Dr, Claremont 4 Beds, 3 Baths, 2,614 Sq. Ft. On the market 120 days. Sold for $945,000.

4447 St Cloud. Claremont. 5 Beds, 7 Baths, 5,629 Sq. Ft. On the Claremont market 1day. Sold for $1,615,000.

915 Bellgrove St, La Verne. 4 Beds, 2 Baths, 1,752 Sq. Ft. On the La Verne market 19 days. Sold for $533,000.

2374 San Joaquin Ct,Claremont 4 Beds, 3 Baths, 2,160 Sq. Ft. On the Claremont market 64 days. Sold for $697,500.

794 Via Santa Catarina, Claremont. 3 Beds, 3 Baths, 2,884 Sq. Ft. On the market 27 days. Sold for $985,000.

1913 Canopy Ln, Claremont. 3 Beds, 3 Baths, 1,637 Sq. Ft. On the Claremont market 4 days. Sold for $508,000.

4802 Chamber Ave, La Verne. 4 Beds, 3 Baths, 2,412 Sq. Ft. On the La Verne market 115 days. Sold for $557,000.

246 Armstrong Dr, Claremont. 4 Beds, 2 Baths, 2,364 Sq. Ft. On the Claremont market 116 days. Sold for $690,000.

1630 Tulane Rd, Claremont. 4 Beds, 4 Baths, 4,122 Sq. Ft. On the market 41 days. Sold for $1,020,000.

1958 Valentine Cr, La Verne. 3 Beds, 3 Baths, 1,570 Sq. Ft. On the La Verne market 34 days. Sold for $519,000.

6859 Oriole Ave, La Verne. 4 Beds, 3 Baths, 2,283 Sq. Ft. On the La Verene market 7 days. Sold for $570,500.

1348 W Baseline Rd, Claremont 4 Beds, 3 Baths, 3,150 Sq. Ft. On the Claremont market 84 days. Sold for $775,000.

887 Yuba LN, Claremont. 5 Beds, 4 Baths, 5,037 Sq.Ft. On the Claremont market 25 days. Sold for $1,350,000.

2608 Hanawalt St, La Verne. 4 Beds, 2 Baths, 1,790 Sq. Ft. On the La Verne market 24 days. Sold for $520,000.

5175 Old Ranch Rd, La Verne. 3 Beds, 2 Baths, 1,488 Sq. Ft. On the La Verne market 49 days. Sold for $585,000.

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FOOTHILLS HOME SALES 1275 Deventer Dr, La Verne. 3 Beds, 3 Baths, 2,111 Sq. Ft. On the La Verne market 54 days. Sold for $670,000.

5527 Sagebrush Ct, Rancho Cucamonga. 4 Beds, 3 Bath, 2,871 Sq. Ft. On the market 221 days. Sold for $612,000.

6376 Stable Falls, Rancho Cucamonga. 4 Beds, 3 Bath, 2,284 Sq. Ft. On the market 10 days. Sold for $684,600.

5131 Sunstone Ave, Rancho Cucamonga. 5 Beds, 4 Baths, 4,700 Sq. Ft. On the market 399 days. Sold for $818,320.

1166 Oak Knoll, La Verne. 3 Beds, 2 Baths, 2,165 Sq. Ft. On the La Verene market 16 days. Sold for $700,000.

12249 Split Rein Dr, Rancho Cucamonga. 4 Beds, 3 Bath, 2,862 Sq. Ft. On the market 30 days. Sold for $617,500.

12562 Melody Dr, Rancho Cucamonga. 5 Beds, 5 Baths, 4,140 Sq. Ft. On the market 15 days. Sold for $690,000.

12607 Del Rey Dr, Rancho Cucamonga. 5 Beds, 6 Baths, 4,780 Sq. Ft. On the market 30 days. Sold for $880,000.

5404 Via De Mansion, La Verne. 4 Beds, 3 Baths, 1,975 Sq. Ft. On the La Verne market 29 days. Sold for $715,000.

14152 Henderson Dr, Rancho Cucamonga. 5 Beds, 4 Baths, 3,298 Sq. Ft. On the market 16 days. Sold for $635,000.

5100 Sanchez Ct, Rancho Cucamonga. 5 Beds, 4 Baths, 3,339 Sq. Ft. On the market 76 days. Sold for $690,000.

10207 Monaco Dr, Rancho Cucamonga. 5 Beds, 5 Baths, 3,493 Sq. Ft. On the market 46 days. Sold for $950,000.

7275 Monterey St, La Verne. 4 Beds, 3 Bath, 2,504 Sq. Ft. On the La Verne market 28 days. Sold for $874,000.

8303 Bella Vista Dr, Rancho Cucamonga.3 Beds, 3 Baths, 2,211 Sq. Ft. On the market 99 days. Sold for $645,000.

12966 Banyan St, Rancho Cucamonga. 5 Beds, 3 Baths, 2,630 Sq. Ft. On the market 65 days. Sold for $700,000.

143 W 5th St. San Dimas. 3 Beds, 1 Bath, 1,142 Sq. Ft. On the San Dimas market 52 days. Sold for $460,000.

5463 Rotary Dr, La Verne. 4 Beds, 3 Bath, 3,307 Sq. Ft. On the La Verne market 92 days. Sold for $910,000.

12250 Lacebark Dr, Rancho Cucamonga. 4 Beds, 3 Baths, 3,335 Sq. Ft. On the market 35 days. Sold for $657,000.

12922 Banyan St. Rancho Cucamonga. 4 Beds, 3 Baths, 2,719 Sq. Ft. On the market 49 days. Sold for $750,000.

1697 Via Alegre, San Dimas. 4 Beds, 2 Baths, 1,875 Sq. Ft. On the San Dimas market 47 days. Sold for $515,000.

7120 Vista De Oro, La Verne. 4 Beds, 5 Baths, 4,509 Sq. Ft. On the La Verne market 142 days. Sold for $1,050,000.

12201 Richfield Dr, Rancho Cucamonga. 4 Beds, 3 Baths, 2,954 Sq. Ft. On the market 167 days. Sold for $660,000.

12577 Del Rey Dr, Rancho Cucamonga. 6 Beds, 5 Baths, 4,027 Sq. Ft. On the market 48 days. Sold for $750,000.

1419 Calle De Oro, San Dimas. 4 Beds, 2 Bath, 1,580 Sq. Ft. On the San Dimas market 46 days. Sold for $575,000.

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