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HARRY HAMLIN WORLD RENOWNED ACTOR, AUTHOR AND FAMILY MAN SITS DOWN WITH 909 FOR A CHAT

health matters BROUGHT TO YOU BY SARH

WHAT A DELIGHT!

MEET THE MOTHER DAUGHTER DUO OF MY DELIGHT CUPCAKERY

Family Friendly Ways to Spend Mother’s Day & Father’s Day

PITCHING FOR A GREAT SUMMER WITH THE QUAKES THE HISTORIC

GALLEANO WINERY

Hillside Fine Art CELEBRATES THEIR GALLERY’S ANNIVERSARY

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The experts at the Joint Replacement Center at San Antonio Regional Hospital can help bring back the joy in life’s movements. Find a joint expert to help keep you pain free and joyfully moving, visit:

SARH.org/JointExperts


M O D E R N D E N T I S T R Y, O L D FA S H I O N S E R V I C E

(909) 443-1055 318 N Indian Hill Blvd, Claremont, California, 91711 6

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We are located at the Claremont village on Indian Hill and Bonita

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from the publisher

Readers,

Mrs. Evangeline Grossman and Mr. Marc Grossman, Executive Publishers Photo by Sam Grossman

Welcome back to another issue of 909 Magazine. For our May/June issue we had the pleasure of getting to know the incredible Harry Hamlin. It’s an interview you don’t want to miss as we touch on his life, career, family and future projects. As well as an interview with Harry, we have some great articles for you to dive into including; Local Sips on the historic Galleano Winery, Saying Yes to the Dress, the delectable My Delight Cupcakery and for the baseball fans out there, The Quakes. As always, we try to keep you connected with our local health professionals from San Antonio Regional Hospital. This month SARH informs our readers on Orthopedic Medicine. Furthermore, Casa Colina offers advice on How to Make Sure Your Weight Loss Really Lasts and Life Performance Enhancement explains the importance of fitness. In this issue, we also have interesting reads on the Breed of the Month, Hillside Fine Arts, Kia Hybrids and the Top Mother’s Day and Father’s Day Tips. Thank you to our readers for your constant support and dedication. We love bringing you the news of our community and keeping everyone connected. Please enjoy as you read through our May/June Issue of 909 Magazine.

From our family to yours,

Evangeline & Marc Grossman T HE

magazine

TE A M

Executive Publishers

Art Director

Contributing Writers

Marc Grossman

Jovielle Ortiz

John Calderwood Karen Burns

Evangeline Fisher Grossman

David Grossman

Production Manager Chief Operating Officer

Matt Komoto

Jessica Ortiz

Destiny Lalonde

Juan Leal

Elaine Regus

Sales Executives Editors

Lisa Corsini

Lisa Corsini

Robby Blackmore

Evangeline Fisher Grossman

Serving Claremont, Upland, Rancho Cucamonga, Eastvale, Corona and surrounding cities.

Call to advertise 909-252-7224

Kristin Tomlin

Assistant to the Publisher Ryan L. Gales

909-252-7224

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909Magazine.com

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100 North Euclid Ave, Upland CA

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Contents TA B L E O F

10 LOCAL SIPS

GALLEANO WINERY: THE O L D E S T FA M I LY W I N E R Y I N T H E C U C A M O N G A VA L L E Y

18 PITCHING FOR A GREAT SUMMER C AT C H U P W I T H T H E QUAKES THIS SEASON

20 TOP 10 MOTHER’S DAY PAMPERING IDEAS

T H E B E S T T I P S F O R T R E AT I N G H E R L I K E A P R I N C E S S T H I S M AY

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TOP 10 FATHER’S DAY ACTIVITIES M A K E H I S D AY E V E N MORE SPECIAL WITH S O M E FA M I LY F U N

2017

24 HILLSIDE FINE ART C E L E B R AT I N G T H E L O C A L GALLERY’S ANNIVERSARY

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HEARTBEAT GALA

P O M O N A VA L L E Y H O S P I T A L I S RAISING FUNDS FOR THE STEAD H E A R T A N D VA S C U L A R C E N T E R

31 MONEY SENSE TWO PEOPLE, ONE S T R AT E G Y : R E T I R E M E N T AS A COUPLE

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MY DELIGHT CUPCAKERY THIS MOTHER DAUGHTER DUO FOUND THE RECIPE FOR SUCCESS

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Cucamonga Valley’s Historic Landmark Winery Celebrating 90 years of Winemaking & Grape Growing Gifts Wine Club Award Winning Wines Wine Tasting Daily Picnic Area

on the

cover

HARRY HAMLIN 909 Magazine gets Personal with World Famous Actor Harry Hamlin.

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A RARE GEM HIDDEN IN BEAUTIFUL VENICE BEACH

THE PERFECT DRESS + THE P E R F E C T D E S T I N AT I O N = T H E PERFECT WEDDING

LUXURY LIVING

SAY YES TO THE DRESS

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In Every Issue

PROJECT THINK

1 3 L AW C O R N E R

HELPING CHILDREN REACH THEIR POTENTIAL

2 6 H E A LT H M AT T E R S 29 CASA COLINA 4 2 T H E C A R FA M I LY 48 CALENDAR

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Listed in the National Register of Historic Places

Open 7 days a week 9am- 5pm

951-685-5376 4231 Wineville Road, Mira Loma, Ca 91752

W W W. G A L L E A N O W I N E RY. C O M

Old Vines Make Better Wines Taste history in a glass everyday at the Historic Galleano Winery 909 MAGAZINE

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Local Sips

Galleano Winery W RITTEN BY K RI STI N A TOM LIN

G

alleano Winery, Mira Loma, is the oldest continuously owned and operated family winery in the Cucamonga Valley, beginning with Domenic Galleano to current owner Don Galleano. Don’s son, Domenic (the great grandson of the founder) takes part in the family business and is head winemaker of Galleano Winery. Hidden between stark industrial buildings in Mira Loma, is the little sanctuary of Galleano Winery, where locals and travelers alike can quench their thirst. Known for their affordable, fruit forward, jammy Cucamonga Zinfandels, and their highly-awarded dessert wines (a perfect souvenir from the Cucamonga Valley), the vast selection of options leaves plenty to taste and savor. Galleano Winery has enjoyed a long relationship with the Cucamonga Valley, earliest plantings dating back to 1918—many of the vines of the Lopez Ranch Vineyards are around 90 years old. It is from these old vines that the prominent Sonoma County winemaker, Carol Shelton sources her grapes for the highly awarded “Monga Zin.” Shelton praised Galleano’s old vine Zinfandel for their unique flavors and characteristics typical of vines that struggle against the heat of the summer and the winds of Santa Ana. The earliest vines were planted between 1918 and 1930 at the height of Prohibition, where the Galleano family made sacramental wine. Officially opening its doors in 1933, Galleano preserves much of its history throughout the grounds of the winery and the old vine Zinfandels they produce. The oasis, that is Galleano Winery, is littered with desert flowers, succulents, herbs, and tropical plants. The towering trees, surrounding the tasting room and guest spaces provide ample shade during warmer 10

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Local Sips

days. Guests are invited to wander the grounds and take a sip in the covered patio area on wine barrel furniture or enjoy a picnic in one of the many picnic tables in the grassy areas. Antique farming tools are scattered throughout the grounds as if naturally part of the landscape. Wander in the right direction and you can catch a glimpse of the vineyards just behind the tasting room Open daily for tastings, guests can enjoy the friendly hospitality of the cozy tasting room, where usually one of the winemakers is pouring at the bar. While snacks are available, guests are invited to bring food and enjoy wine and company—life’s simple pleasures. Tours of the winery and facilities are offered on the weekends, and groups of 8 or more are asked to call ahead of time. 4231 Wineville Rd, Mira Loma, CA 91752 (951) 685-5376, www.galleanowinery.com.

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Law Offices of MARC GROSSMAN WEFIGHT4YOU.COM

Trust Integrity Respect

w w w. w e ďŹ g h t 4 y o u . c o m

Bankruptcy | Personal Injury | Family Law | Criminal Defense | Civil Law | Workers Comp

Call Now!

855-LOMG-911

1 0 0 N E U C L I D AV E , U P L A N D, C A


LawCorner B Y D AV I D M . G R O S S M A N

What You Need to Know About Nursing Homes you go for recovery from an acute event or rehabilitation. As a resident, your right and the rights of family members are very different then patients in a hospital. Most nursing homes provide excellent care of their residents and assure the highest care. However, the statistics continue to show that abuse or neglect of the patients in nursing homes is very high – up to 1 in 6 nursing home residents may be the victim of abuse or neglect every year. A congressional report showed that an examination of nursing homes records showed that nearly 1 in 3 nursing homes were cited for violations that had the potential harm to cause senior injury to a resident.

Attorney David M. Grossman E S TAT E P L A N N I N G & ELDER LAW SPECIALIST

Over 4.0 million adults are living in a skilled nursing facility, nursing home, and other long term care facilities in the United States. Over 40 percent of all adults will enter a nursing home at some point during their lives. The stay in the nursing home may be as short as a week or two for recovery from an acute event, such a surgery or accident, or as long as many, many months for rehabilitation from a life changing event. In either case, you should know your rights when you are in a nursing home. Many people think of hospitals and nursing homes as similar institutions. However, this is not true. Think of it this way. When you are in a hospital you are a patient. Hospitals are acute care health care providers where you stay for a short time. When you are in a nursing home you are a resident. Nursing homes are for an extended stay and a place where M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 7

in writing by a physician and necessary to meet resident’s welfare, Any transfer or discharge requires 30 days written notice, except for when the health of safety of other individual is involved, the resident’s urgent medical needs require a more immediate transfer.

Rights Within Nursing Home Right to receive the necessary are and services to attain or maintain the highest practicable physical, mental and psychosocial well-being. Rights to be treated with dignity Right to reasonable accommodation of individual needs and preferences.

Following a few of the rights of nursing home residents:

Right to activity program that meets the resident’s needs and interest.

Admission Rights

Right to safe, clean, comfortable and homelike environment.

Every nursing home must use the Standard Admissions Agreement developed by the California Department of Public Health

Right to retain and use personal possessions, including some furnishings, and appropriate clothing.

Agreement shall not require notice of resident’s intent to convert to Medi-Cal status.

Right to refuse treatment.

Agreement shall not require advance notice of voluntary discharge from nursing home. Agreement cannot require applicant to sign an arbitration agreement as a condition of admission. Nursing homes may not require third party guarantee of payment as a condition of admission.

Transfer & Discharge Rights Medi-Cal certified nursing homes shall not transfer or seek to evict resident due to resident changing from private pay or Medicare to Medi-Cal. Transfer or discharge must be ordered

Right to informed consent. Right to be free from chemical or physical restraints imposed for purposes of discipline or convenience and not required to treat the resident’s medical symptoms

Conclusion The above list is just a short list of residents’ rights. It is the hope of the writer that the above list will indicate to the reader that a resident in a nursing home has most, if not all, the rights of an ordinary citizen. You do not lose these rights when you become a resident of a nursing home. However, the list of rights is long, detailed and extensive. If you feel that a resident’s rights is being violated you should contact the State Ombudsman or a local attorney and discuss the situation. 909 MAGAZINE

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A Chat With

Harry Hamlin INTER VIEW BY JOHN CALDERWOOD

We had the absolute honor to get a few minutes to speak with the world renowned actor, author and family man Harry Hamlin to talk a little bit about his family life and his incredibly memorable years in Hollywood. (909) Harry Hamlin, it’s a pleasure to meet you. You are an incredibly talented actor, classically trained at Yale University. You’ve performed stage, television and film in so many iconic roles it would be hard to pin down a favorite, from Perseus in “Clash of the Titans” with Lawrence Olivier, to your Emmy nominated reoccurring role as Jim Culter on AMC’s “Mad Men”. Do you have any personal favorite roles that you’ve portrayed? 14

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(Harry) It’s often said that the first staring role on film is the most memorable for a lot of reasons and I think that holds true for me. Playing Joey Popchick in the Larry Gelbart spoof, MOVIE MOVIE directed by Stanley Donen has to be at the top of the list. Working opposite George C Scott, Eli Wallach and Red Buttons for my first movie role was truly memorable and quite an auspicious beginning. (909) Having touched on every stage do you feel you have a preference for any one media? Such as the stage, or television? (Harry) I think I’m at my best on stage and I love live theater because there is something dangerous and excit-

ing about working without a net. But, I just love to act…on stage, on a soundstage, on location…in the shower…wherever! (909) Are there any roles that

you’ve wanted to play but haven’t? If you could cast yourself as any

character on any project, is there

something that you have in mind? (Harry) I’ve been working on Richard from RICHARD III and George from WHOS AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOLF. I’d go just about anywhere to play those parts. I’ve already played them in the nude…in the shower. M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 7


909 EXC LU SIVE INTE R V I E W

(909) I imagine a lot has changed in the movie industry since your debut film “Movie Movie” in 1977. Working in film and television today 40 years later what changes would you say you’ve noticed the most? Good or bad. (Harry) The movie business has changed about 180 degrees since I started. The emphasis has gone from stars to stories and mainly comic book type stories. The advent of digital has changed everything by making special effects so available. And green screen is used more and more for exotic locations. The acting process is the same though and the craft is still the craft. (909) Your Grandfather was the founder of the International Council of Museums, your father helped design the Saturn V rocket and I’ve read that you also have a degree in Psychology and have a big interest in fusion energy advancement. How do you feel that these studies have affected your career? (Harry) I’m certain that my studies of behavioral psychology have been a big help in building characters. I still keep a copy of the DSM 5 close by! I’m not sure my addiction to Quantum field theory and the Standard Model of Particle Physics have done much other than distract me from the craft. I am a huge proponent of Clean, non-radioactive Fusion Energy and I started a company called Tri Alpha Energy in 1998 to bring clean Fusion to the world. Check out my TED Talk on the subject. Google “You Don’t Have To Be A Rocket Scientist by Harry Hamlin” and you will find it on You Tube! (909) What’s the process like for Harry Hamlin when it comes to picking a role to play, and preparing for it? (Harry) I know immediately when I read a script if it’s something I want to do. Maybe it’s a sixth sense, I don’t know, but I know right away. Usually I’m drawn to quirky characters who inhabit their world at slight right angles to the generally accepted norm. I do as much research and preparation as I need to so that the role fits like a glove on day one. M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 7

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9 0 9 EX CL U S IV E IN TE R V IE W

(909)What sort of interests and hobbies do you have off stage? (Harry) I’m an adventure traveler and my favorite off duty pastimes are scuba diving and mountain climbing. I especially like diving on sunken ships and have dived on Spanish galleons in the Caribbean and World War II supply ships in Micronesia. Just dived the Great Barrier Reef with my daughter in November. I also play acoustic guitar for my nine-yearold Rottweiler, Lola! She seems to like it. (909) You and your family have taken part in two reality shows now “Harry Loves Lisa” and now Lisa is on “The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills” What are some of the ups and downs of taking part in a reality show? How has that experience been for you? (Harry) Lisa and I are always coming up with kooky ideas to keep busy during 16

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off times and industry strikes. During a writer’s strike we decided to come up with our own reality show called “I LOVE LISA”, mainly because Lisa shares some of the domestic challenges with Lucile Ball from “I LOVE LUCY”. We sold the show as “I LOVE LISA” but the network got cold feet and changed the name to “HARRY LOVES LISA” and it just wasn’t the same. It never quite hit the mark I wanted to hit due to network interference so I’d say it wasn’t the most satisfying experience. As for RHOBH, I try to keep my head down as much as possible for fear of taking a stray bullet! (909) By the time people get to read this issue of the magazine it’ll be time to celebrate Mother’s Day then Father’s Day. Do you have any funny antidotes or fond memories of a particular mother’s day? How do you celebrate with Lisa and the kids?

(Harry) Since I delivered both kids in the hospital, Mother’s Day is something Lisa and I kind of share. We celebrate Mother’s Day as a family, usually at brunch in Malibu but Father’s Day kind of comes and goes with a whimper. (909) Are there currently any upcoming projects that you’re allowed to talk to us about? (Harry) As for upcoming projects, I will be working again with Nick Nolte and Sela Ward on GRAVES for season 2. It was a real pleasure to spend some time getting to know Harry, and we encourage you to get to know him even better by picking up a copy of his autobiography Full Frontal Nudity: The Making of an Accidental Actor, checking out his TED Talk on YouTube and of course stay tuned for the next Season of “GRAVES” on EPIX. M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 7


Program of Rancho Cucamonga was established in November 2005, there are over 400 military banners proudly displayed on Haven and Milliken Avenues, Base Line Road, and 4th Street including 15 bearing a gold star for those who have been killed or died while on active duty.

Honoring Our Heroes

Rancho Cucamonga’s Armed Forces Banner Replacement Program

WRITTEN BY ELAINE REGUS Look a little closer however, and it’s hard not to notice the worn and weathered condition of some of those banners. Thanks to efforts of the city’s Gold Star families, whose sons and daughters made the ultimate sacrifice for their country, those aging banners are gradually being replaced.

Driving down the main streets of Rancho Cucamonga, it’s hard not to notice the parade of red, white and blue banners hanging from streetlight standards honoring hometown men and women serving in the military. M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 7

Francie Palmer, Communications Manager for the city of Rancho Cucamonga, said the city provides the banners at no cost to the families and will replace those that fall including 88 that were toppled by a recent wind storm. However, the city must rely on donations to replace those ravaged by weather and time. Every Christmas, the Creeds put on a display at their Tioga Peak Court home featuring a slide show of all the military banners projected on their garage and lights coordinated with alternating Christmas and patriotic music. They leave a donation box out front and typically collect $200 to $400 a season, enough to replace one or two banners.

Kim and Rick Creed, whose son, Corporal Matthew Creed, was killed in Iraq in 2006 are one of those families. The Creeds first got involved in the banner replacement program after noticing that many of the banners had become discolored and tattered. Rick Creed initially offered to rent a boom truck to clean them up but liability issues prevented the city from accepting his offer. The cost of hiring a contractor to do the work was about the same as replacing them.

“They have definitely been champions and strong supporters of our military banner program as well as other Gold Star families,” Palmer said.

So, the Creeds and other Gold Star families partnered with the Rancho Cucamonga Community and Arts Foundation to raise funds to assist the city with the cost of replacing old and damaged banners. The group sponsors the replacement of 12 to 18 banners every year.

“I go out of my way to drive up Haven to ask him how he’s doing,” Creed said. “It’s a point of connection for us and for the other families.”

Since the Armed Forces Banner

Creed’s own son’s banner hangs on Haven Avenue south of Foothill Boulevard in front of City Hall. Matt Creed enlisted in the U.S. Army in 2003 and was killed by a sniper while on patrol in Iraq in 2006, four months after his family moved from Covina to Rancho Cucamonga.

Anyone interested in donating to the banner replacement fund can go to www.cityofrc.us and click on Armed Forces Banner Program under City Services. 909 MAGAZINE

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Pitching

For A

GREAT

Summer With The Quakes W R I TTE N BY M ATT KOMO TO

T

he Rancho Cucamonga Quakes have a great minor league baseball team to watch in the summer. The season

started in April and continues to early September. There are 67 home games played at LoanMart Field this year. With 15 in May and 11 in June alone, there’s plenty of baseball

action for the coming months. By late April they have had some great wins at home including the home opener. This Los Angeles Dodgers farm team is a great team to watch as

they feature some prospective up and coming Dodgers and have major league players on rehab assignments. There is some top talent to watch with the pitching alone. The Quakes have 15 pitchers on the roster and at the time of this writing a few started to stand out already. Twenty-two year-old Mitchell White is a pitcher who was named Pitcher of the Week in April for the California League at the beginning of this season. He went 1-0 with 9 shutout innings.

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The 2015 first round draft pick and top Dodger prospect Walker Buehler showed off some great pitching in the April 15 win against the Lake Elsinore Storm. He struck out 8 batters in a row after allowing back to back singles at the beginning of the game. After being out for a year from Tommy John surgery, Buehler looks to be showing healthy potential. He turns 23 in July. Other top-ranked names to look out for include No. 2 Dodger prospect for pitching according to Baseball America; Yadier Alvarez and No. 7 centerfielder Yusinel Diaz. Alvarez has thrown fastballs over 100 mph during games. The 28 man player roster consists of 12 returning players, some new up and comers and some locals. One local includes Glendora High School graduate D.J. Peters. This is his first year with the Quakes as last year he played for the Ogden Raptors minor league team in Utah; also an affiliate farm team of the Dodgers. In 308 at bats for Ogden, Peters had a .351 batting average. The centerfielder attended Western Nevada Community College before he was drafted by the Dodgers in the 4th round in 2016.

The Quakes play in the Class A Advanced California League. There are 8 teams in the league with north and south divisions. The Quakes are

in the California League South and compete for standings with the Inland Empire 66ers, Lancaster Jet Hawks and the Lake Elsinore Storm. The Inland Empire 66ers are an Anaheim Angels farm team in San Bernardino at the San Manuel Stadium. This will be the 25th season of the Quakes. In April there were 7 home games that already showed some Quake potential. From May to September there will be 60 home games to watch minor league baseball action and follow talented players as they develop their skills to hopefully compete at the next level, and eventually for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

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PH O TO S BY D US TI N N O S L ER

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TOP 10

Mother’s Day Pampering Ideas

Mother’s Day is May 14th. Have you made plans to make your mom feel like a queen for a day? We here at 909 Magazine offer 10 top tips for a memorable celebration from the woman who cared for you through diapers, teenage drama, college degrees and all of life’s surprises.

1

Breakfast in bed.

2

A mid-day picnic in the park.

3

A day trip to her favorite travel spot or one she’s never before visited.

6

7 4

5

Plant a new tree or floral bush together in her garden. A classic film fest on the couch - all of her favorites from back in her day.

8

9

A surprise family photo shoot with all the kids and grandkids in a picturesque locale - perhaps the beach, the park or a local historic site. An artful experience take a painting, pottery or glass-blowing class together. Make and bury or hide a time capsule and make plans to “rediscover” it on Mother’s Day, 2025, 2035, etc. A day at the spa with a sumptuous facial and massage.

Go to the theater, musical or 10 concert.

MA AG GA A ZZ II N N EE 22 00 || 99 00 99 M

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909 Magazine brings you Father’s Day fun activities that will help you bond with your dad on June 18th. Check out these fun father-son and father-daughter activities for children of all ages and dads with all different interests. You’re sure to make lasting memories!

4. Go Fishing

1. Play Golf or Miniature Golf

5. Play Catch

Whether Dad is a pro on the golf course or more of an ace at putt-putt, an afternoon of golf is fun for fathers and kids alike. Stick with miniature golf if the kids are beginners, of course. Going to the driving range is a great activity if Dad wants to start teaching the kids the “real” game.

2. Take Him Out to a Ball Game America’s favorite pastime is always a crowd-pleaser. If attending a pro baseball game isn’t an option, find a local minor league or community softball game to take in.

3. Go Bowling Bowling is right up Dad’s alley — especially if Father’s Day is a rainy day this year. Opt for bumper bowling to give little kids an advantage!

Casting a line with the kids is a classic, relaxing way to spend Dad’s special day. Children’s fishing poles can cost as little as $12 and are sure to create cute memories.

Dad would probably love nothing more than a special game of catch or some other favorite backyard game with the kids. Follow it up with a low-key family barbecue.

6. Go for a Bike Ride Spending the day cruising around on two wheels is fun and also healthy for Dad and the kids. Try a bicycle scavenger hunt to make it even more interesting.

7. Build Something Does Dad spend his free time in the garage or woodshop? Follow some simple instructions to build a birdhouse, or find something else kid-friendly to build together. If the kids are too young to use tools, break out the paintbrushes for them to decorate whatever Dad creates.

8. Take a Hike If he’s like most dads, yours probably loves the great outdoors. Find a local hiking or walking trail that the entire family will enjoy. Look up trail reviews online to make sure it’s suitable for younger children so that Dad doesn’t end up carrying them home!

9. Visit a Historic Site If your father is a history buff or veteran, visiting a history museum, war memorial, or other historic site in your area will fulfill his Father’s Day wishes. Pack his favorite sandwiches and snacks, and enjoy a picnic nearby.

10. Have a Movie Night Order or make Dad’s favorite pizza and turn on a family-friendly flick that he’ll love. It’s the perfect ending to a fantastic Father’s Day.

Top 10

Father’s Day Fun Activities in the IE!

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9 0 9 S OCIAL STATE OF THE CITY

UPLAND

James and Dana Pike Grace Luthern Church

909 Magazine’s Lisa Corsini and Joe Tatone

Maria Bellomo Upland Chamber Ambassador and Meghan Nehamen Foothill Family Shelter

CLAREMONT

Jimmy Tatosian and Steve Bradshaw from Burrtec

Rich Mayo from Pacific Auto Sales and Leasing, and Michael Tracey from San Antonio Hospital Foundation

Sue Gold and Shannon Castro San Antonio Hospital Foundation

STATE OF THE CITY

Arvee Robinson, Arvee Robinson International; Donna Loeffler, Donna Loeffler International; Chrissie Paniagua, Blue House Dentistry

Maureen Aldridge, CEO Claremont Chamber of Commerce ; Nikki Coulas JN Coulas & Associates Susie Guarrera, Outhouse Apparel, Print & Promotional Products ; Kim Peeples, Vom Fass 22 | 909 MAGAZINE

Larry Schroeder Mayor City of Claremont, Susie Guarrera, Outhouse Apparel, Print & Promotional Products

Rick Tollivoe and Past Mayor Sam Pedroza

Maureen Aldridge, CEO Claremont Chamber of Commerce, Shelly Vander Veen, Police Chief, Arron Fate, Captain Claremont Police Department M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 7


MEET THE MAYOR CLAREMONT Mayor Larry Schroeder Mayor Larry Schroeder is serving his third term on the Claremont City Council (Mar. 2017 - Mar. 2021). He previously served on the Claremont Community Services Commission, to which he was appointed in 2007. Larry has 26 years of experience in city government. Larry also has 17 years of experience in economic development. From 1997-2007 Larry held the positions of Treasurer, Chairperson of the Finance Committee, and Member of the Claims Committee for the California Joint Powers Insurance Authority. From 2004-2009, Larry taught a course in public budgeting at the University of La Verne; he currently teaches at Cal Poly Pomona. Larry holds a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology, a Master’s degree in Public Administration and a doctorate degree in Public Administration.

UPLAND Mayor Debbie Stone Debbie Stone has been a resident of Upland since 1979 where her daughter attended Upland schools. She has worked nearly 30 years at Stone Funeral Home. In addition to her professional career, she has been an active member of the Rotary Club of Upland since 1994 serving on the Board of Directors, as well as Club President. Mayor Stone currently serves as Chairman of the Public Works Committee and is a member of the Police & Fire Committee. She has also been appointed to represent the City Council on the Sister City Association and the Water Facility Authority. Debbie’s regional appointments include serving on the Independent Cities Risk Management Authority and the Inland Empire Utility Agency Policy Committee. Debbie can be contacted at debbiestoneforupland@gmail.com.

RANCHO CUCAMONGA Mayor L. Dennis Michael Mayor L. Dennis Michael is a lifelong resident of Rancho Cucamonga. He is married to Regina Holt-Michael and is the father of two children and has five lovely grandchildren. Dennis received his education in Rancho Cucamonga including attending Chaffey College. He began his career as a firefighter with Rancho Cucamonga Fire District in April 1976; promoting through the ranks to Engineer, Captain, Battalion Chief and Division Chief. He was appointed Fire Chief in 1984, and he held that position for nineteen years until his official retirement on December 29, 2003. Dennis was elected to the Rancho Cucamonga City Council in November 2004 and 2008 and was elected Mayor in 2010 and 2014. Dennis also serves on the Inland Empire Economic Partnership Board of Directors and the state’s City Council Schools Partnership.

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Claremont’s Hillside Fine Art C E L E B R AT E S T H E I R

Gallery’s Anniversary By Lisa Corsini

C

laremont’s Hillside Fine Art celebrates their gallery’s anniversary this summer. ‘Who knew work could be so fun!” exclaimed Steve Harrison, owner of Hillside Fine Art in Claremont. “I am fortunate to have been able to spend the last three years surrounded by fine art and meeting many creative and interesting people.” After 33 years teaching junior high, Steve retired to embrace his

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passion and try something new. In June, he will celebrate his three-year anniversary selling art by some of California’s celebrated contemporary artists. The gallery is located on the patio of the Old School House complex next to Candlelight Pavilion which is above the parking lot of Trader Joe’s in Claremont. It is a small and cozy space which specializes in representational art done in the California style. There are usually 80 paintings hung. The 15 artists Steve represents all belong to the historic California Art Club, headquartered in Pasadena and started over 100 years ago. “I would love to have opened a gallery in Carmel or Laguna, but my home has been in Claremont for 30 years, so I tried to create a gallery you would find in those art centers here in my hometown.” Paintings in the gallery are of familiar places like Yosemite National Park, or Crystal Cove, Point Lobos outside of Carmel, Laguna Beach, Back Bay in

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Newport, lakes and mountains in the Sierras. Paintings also include still-lifes of flowers, fountains, and fruit, as well as figurative paintings of people at work and play. The owner says he always tries to have a selection of paintings which would suit an established art collection or help begin someone’s new interest in collecting. He keeps his prices affordable and wants everyone to feel comfortable to come in and take a look. “When I was planning the gallery, it was important for me to have comfy chairs for people to sit in, hang out, and talk. I see this as a gathering place as much as a retail store.” “I’ve learned many things in three years, but the most important has been patience,” said the gallerist. “As a teacher, I would

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put an assignment on the board or ask my class to do something, and I would immediately see results. In the gallery I can advertise, have reception, post things on Facebook or my website, but it doesn’t mean I will see an immediate rush of sales. Still in three short years it has been amazing to build a reputation in the art world as a knowledgeable and reliable gallery owner.” Steve sees the gallery as an extension of his teaching career. Not only does he continue to learn about artistic technique and composition from his artists, but customers teach him new ways of looking at a painting. “Art is all about seeing,” observed Steve. “Customers come in and share what they observe in a painting, what they like and don’t like about an artist’s style, how it makes them feel or what it reminds them of. The customer might be reacting to a painting that I have been looking at for months, causing me to see it in a new way; and yet, the painting will speak to every observer differently. That is what art does.” The gallery has seven to eight special exhibitions a year. It just finished “Curves” and “Silver and

Gold” but has also held shows entitled “Vacations,” “Claremont and its Environs,” as well as many one man shows highlighting the work of individual Hillside artists. “Working with and talking to all of these creative people has been the greatest gift,” Steve said. “Being able to share their work and help them make a living has made life after teaching meaningful and worthwhile.” If you would like to visit this special little spot, it is located at the intersection of Indian Hill and Foothill Boulevards in Claremont — 445 West Foothill Blvd., Suite 101.

hillsidefineart.com

Gallery Hours: Wed through Sat 12 pm - 5 pm

445 West Foothill Blvd Suite 101, Claremont, CA

(909) 268 - 4526

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HEALTH MATTERS Brought to you by San Antonio Regional Hospital

ORTHOPEDIC MEDICINE – MORE THAN JUST SURGERY Back pain, sports injuries, arthritic hips and knees, and stiff muscles are just a few of the musculoskeletal conditions that have an enormous impact on Americans and the healthcare system each year. For the proper diagnosis and most appropriate treatment options for musculoskeletal conditions, it is important to consult an orthopedic surgeon. Orthopedic surgeons can examine, diagnose, and treat a variety of diseases and injuries of the musculoskeletal system. They take care of bones, joints, ligaments, tendons, muscles, and nerves -everything that allows you to move, work, and be active. While the word “surgeon” may imply that orthopedic surgeons do nothing but surgeries, it is quite the contrary. In some cases, surgery may be needed to restore function lost as a result of injury or disease, but orthopedic surgeons also use medical, physical, and rehabilitative methods as well as surgery. In fact, as much as 50 percent of an orthopedic surgeon’s practice is devoted to non-surgical or medical management of injuries or disease. Here are some of the lifestyle modifications, alternative therapies, and medical treatments an orthopedic surgeon may recommend before offering a surgical solution: 26

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• Physical activity. Regular low-impact exercise, such as walking, yoga, and tai chi, can help to reduce joint pain, while weight bearing exercises help strengthen muscles and support painful joints.

What Kinds of Conditions do Orthopedic Surgeons Treat? Orthopedics is a specialty of immense breadth and variety. Some of the conditions and diseases an orthopedic surgeon can treat include:

• Weight management. Moderate weight loss can significantly reduce arthritis pain – losing 1 pound reduces 4 pounds of added pressure on joints.

• Back pain, ruptured disks, sciatica, and scoliosis • Bone tumors, muscular dystrophy, and cerebral palsy • Fractures and dislocations • Growth abnormalities • Osteoarthritis and osteoporosis • Rheumatoid arthritis • Sports or work-related injuries • Tendon injuries, pulled muscles, bursitis, and torn cartilage • Torn ligaments, sprains, and strains • Abnormalities of the fingers and toes

• Assistive devices. Joint protection aids may include braces and assistive devices such as canes and walkers. • Alternative therapies. Massage therapy can reduce pain and stiffness, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) disrupts the transmission of pain signals. • Physical and occupational therapy. Therapists offer rehabilitation techniques and modification of daily activities and work habits to preserve function and reduce re-injury. • Medications. Orthopedic surgeons may recommend over-the-counter or prescription medications to reduce pain and inflammation.

Do Orthopedic Surgeons Have Specialties? While there are many general orthopedists, quite a few orthopedic surgeons specialize in specific parts of the anatomy or certain diseases. Within orthopedic medicine, physicians may have special interest and expertise in: • Arthritis and osteoarthritis • Joint replacement surgery M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 7


Orthopedic conditions have an enormous impact on Americans and the healthcare system each year.

• • • • • • •

Orthopedic trauma or injury care including fractures Sports medicine Back and spine surgery Hand surgery Hip injuries and replacement Shoulder injuries and replacement Foot and ankle surgery

The Orthopedic Institute at San Antonio Regional Hospital is comprised of board certified orthopedic surgeons with expertise in a number of orthopedic conditions. The earlier you seek advice about a musculoskeletal issue, the sooner you can receive treatment and prevent your condition from becoming more severe. San Antonio’s orthopedic experts will isolate the problem, narrow down the cause of the issue, and explain your treatment options.

When Should You See an Orthopedic Specialist? If you are experiencing any type of pain in your ankles, knees, hips, shoulders, or back, you should consider seeing an orthopedic surgeon. Symptoms may include any of the following: If you are experiencing chronic pain in your hips or shoulders, join the experts at San Antonio Regional Hospital’s Orthopedic • Difficulty using a particular body Institute at the upcoming orthopedic lecture series: part to perform daily functions (e.g., walking up the stairs or Orthopedic Lecture Series carrying grocery bags) Innovations in Joint Replacement Surgery • Pain in muscles, tendons, or joints that persists for more than a few Tuesday, May 9 Tuesday, June 13 days 6:00 -7:30 pm 6:00 – 7:30 pm • Joint pain that becomes more Shoulder Replacements Hip Replacements intense during periods of rest Presented by: Presented by: • Swelling or bruising around the Sachin Patel, MD Michelle Ward, MD joint or the location of an injury Orthopedic Surgeon Orthopedic Surgeon • Limited range of motion, such as an inability to straighten the back • Joint deformity • Signs of infection including heat, inflammation, fever, and/or redness M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 7

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Our past has taught us to always look forward.

So we can offer our patients the most advanced surgical care right now. Finding a better way to treat our patients has been the driving force behind everything we do for nearly 80 years. Long ago, we learned that when we put patients first, our medical and rehabilitation services have a lasting impact. This is why we made the decision to offer the most technologically advanced equipment available – so we could assure better surgical outcomes for people in our community. Now the area’s top surgeons can perform minimally invasive surgical procedures with the latest da Vinci® Xi™ surgery system. They can carry out less invasive partial knee replacements with the Mako™ robotic arm-assisted surgery system, and so much more. Of course, we also sought the highest caliber of nurses who specialize in surgical care. When you consider how much we have to offer, there’s no time like the present to move forward with an elective surgery.

Take a virtual tour. Visit us at www.casacolina.org/tour

255 East Bonita Avenue (at Garey), Pomona, CA 28

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909/596-7733

www.casacolina.org

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How to Make Sure Your Weight Loss Really Lasts By Usha Mantha, M.D., FAAFP, MRCOG, board certified in Obesity Medicine and Program Medical Director of the Casa Colina Medical Weight Loss & Wellness Program What does it take to break the cycle of yo-yo dieting? Why are some people more successful than others at losing weight? In 1994, the National Weight Control Registry was established to conduct the largest study of individuals who maintained a weight loss of at least 30 pounds for over a year. How did they do it? Those who participated shed the weight also shed light on how to make weight loss work for others: • 98% modified their food intake in some way to lose weight

• 94% increased their physical activity with the most frequent activity of choice being walking • 90% exercised about 1 hour a day

• 78% reported they ate breakfast daily

• 74% weighed themselves at least once a week

• 62% watched less than 10 hours of TV a week This study also revealed that the average intake for women was 1,300 calories and for men 1,600 calories daily. According the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which was created by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Health and Human Services (HHS), here are the top 10 factors that make a big difference for Americans: 1. A lifetime of healthy eating prevents chronic obesity, heart disease, hypertension and type II Diabetes Mellitus.

2. Healthy eating is the most powerful tool to reduce the onset of disease. 3. Choose a healthy combination of food and drinks that may be adapted to your taste preferences, traditions, culture and income.

4. Eat a wide variety of foods, including fruits/vegetables, grains, fiber, fat-free dairy, poultry, eggs, lean meat and protein as well as fats from vegetables, such as canola, corn safflower and olive oil and reduced saturated fats. M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 7

5. Total fats should be less than 10% of daily calories. Limit saturated fats and do not consume trans fats. 6. Limit sugars to less than 10% of total calories. 7. Limit sodium to 2,300 mg daily. 8. Small shifts in food choices in just one week will have a long-term impact on your overall health. 9. Fit at least 150 minutes of moderate physical activity per week into your routine. 10. Take an active role to encourage easy and affordable access to healthy choices in a variety of settings including home, school, workplace, churches, and community.

Medical supervision when appropriate and community support can also make a big difference in your weight loss journey. If you or your loved ones are affected by obesity, please join Dr. Mantha at a free community seminar, “Proper Exercise for Weight Loss and Wellness” on Monday, May 15 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Casa Colina Hospital and Centers for Healthcare, William W. Norin Education Center in the Tamkin Room (Building 1D), 255 East Bonita Avenue (at Garey) in Pomona. Please call 1-866-724-4132 to reserve your space today. The healthy changes you make now will tip the scales in your favor.

Usha Mantha, M.D., FAAFP, MRCOG Board certified in Obesity Medicine and Program Medical Director of the Casa Colina Medical Weight Loss & Wellness Program

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Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center’s

Heartbeat Gala B Y ELA I N E R EGU S

More than 500 guests gathered in hearty celebration and support at Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center Foundation’s 23rd annual Heartbeat Gala Feb. 25 at the DoubleTree Hotel in Ontario. The Viva Las Vegas-themed event raised about $75,000 to benefit the hospital’s Stead Heart and Vascular Center and its endowment fund bringing the total to date to more than $3 million. “This gala is as much about exposure and making friends as it is about raising money,” said La Verne Mayor Don Kendrick, co-chair of the annual event. “Raising money obviously is very, very important because we can’t do the work

Carole and Bill Stead, Mayor of La Verne, Don Kendrick and wife, Gaynel

Frick, a retired Bonita Unified School District administrator, relayed the agony of suffering a serious heart attack in December and the thrill of walking out of the center days later to rejoin his family.

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without the financial support, but the gala also brings awareness to what we’re doing at the hospital.” Guests were treated to a demonstration of the proper way to perform CPR, stressing guidelines that emphasize chest compressions over mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. They participated in a variety of Las Vegasstyle games during a champagne reception and silent auction followed by dinner and entertainment. Curtis Frick, 61, was among the many patients and their families in attendance whose lives had been touched by physicians and others at the Stead Heart and Vascular Center.

The Stead Heart Center opened in 1986 with the support and financial backing of the Bill and Carol Stead family of Mt. Baldy in response to the growing need for high-quality, cardiac-related medical services in the community, according to Kendrick. Later, the center’s name was changed to encompass vascular disease, which includes blood clots, aneurysms and strokes. Today, the Stead Heart and Vascular Center offers one of the most complete lines of cardiovascular and stroke services in the region. Hundreds of patients have been diagnosed, treated and rehabilitated at the center, which offers a wide range of programs such as the Heart Failure Education and Awareness group for patients, their families and the community. M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 7


MONEY SENSE

Two People, One Strategy: Retirement as a Couple B Y K A R E N B U R N S, DI R E CT O R , CL I E NT S E GM E NTS A ND A D VI SO R D E VE LO PM E NT Planning for retirement is one of the most important things to do when looking at your financial future, but equally important is making sure your life partner is on the same page with your retirement plan. Many begin saving and investing for retirement before their life partner is even in the picture, so often couples are faced with merging the two individual plans for retirement into one. This can present a challenge if your views are different from your spouse. A 2012 Merrill Lynch survey showed that sexes are not exactly aligned on their retirement views. For example, 66 percent of affluent women are concerned about their retirement assets lasting throughout their lifetime, compared with 54 percent of men. Women are also more concerned about the future of Social Security benefits than men (76% women; 59% men), and about their financial security if tasked with caring for an aging parent (37% women; 25% men). It is never too early to start discussing and planning for retirement together and the earlier you start, the better. Use these key questions to guide a conversation between you and your partner about retirement. When will we retire? The longer you both work, the more you may save and the fewer years you’ll be living off retirement savings. At the same time, retiring earlier lets you embark together on new adventures while you’re still in good health. For example, one of you may want to retire tomorrow and the other’s career may just be hitting its stride. Answering this question is key to the rest of the planning process. How will we spend our days? Decisions about travel, family time, volunteer work and other retirement pursuits are as individual as the couples who make them — and they will continue to evolve. But different choices carry different price tags, having at least a broad outline of your retired time together will lend to what you need to plan for. Where will we live? The family home may be too full of memories to even think about selling it — or an albatross you can’t wait to leave. Your choice of where to live could have a major impact on your retirement finances. Downsizing to a

condominium could free up cash to bolster your savings and might also reduce outlays for property taxes and upkeep. Houses age, too, and if you keep the family home, its maintenance needs are likely to increase. Whose investment style will we follow? During your working years, you and your spouse may have managed your own 401(k)s and IRAs in line with your individual risk tolerances and investment preferences. That doesn’t have to change as you move into retirement, but consider working with a financial professional to help coordinate an overall portfolio that serves your mutual goals. Leave assets to the kids or to charity? This question may inspire passionate conversation. Look into various options to balance both of your wishes, such as creating a family foundation or establishing a Health and Education Trust. Start the conversation early to determine what your retirement goals are as individuals and how you plan to retire together.

LAW OFFICE OF

MARK W. REGUS II · Wills and Trusts (Estate Planning) · Trust and Estate Administration · Probate and Probate Litigation · Business Law & Litigation

Contact for a free consultation, as well as second opinions for those who already have an attorney or estate plan. mregus@gmail.com

(909) 938-2289 www.reguslaw.com

For more information, contact Merrill Lynch Financial Advisor Raymond L. Hebert of the Ontario, CA office at 909.476.5125 or raymond.l.hebert@ml.com. M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 7

8816 Foothill Blvd., Ste. 103-173, Rancho Cucamonga 909 MAGAZINE

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Mother Daughter Duo

of My Delight Cupcakery BY J O HN CA L DE R W O O D

W

hat is it that makes a cupcake so sweet? The simplest answer would be the sugar, the sweet little reward for ourselves, that brings a smile to everyone’s face. Others might say the thoughtfulness that goes into remembering a special day and sharing memories over a delicious treat. The people of Ontario and its neighboring communities will say that what makes a cupcake so sweet, is the lovely mother and daughter duo at My Delight Cupcakery. Their dedication and love for their community has a fan following which has grown around them. There are dozens, if not hundreds of bakeries in and around the city of Ontario, but not many of them focus on just cupcakes, and none of them are anything like My Delight Cupcakery. Founded in 2009 by Mother and Daughter team Melinda and Naomi Moreno, My Delight Cupcakery has quickly become a staple of celebration and indulgence to the community around it. I had the lucky opportunity to stop by and speak with the wonderful team behind the scenes and get to know what makes My Delight

Cupcakery so unique. From the moment you step into their soon to expand lobby you find yourself drifted away into a sweets lover’s dream. The counter is filled with a beautiful display of unique artisan cupcakes that will have your mouth watering from the start. Local favorites are the breakfast cupcake, made with sweet buttermilk batter, topped with iced maple frosting, crisp bacon and drizzled with real maple syrup. This is sure to start any day with a smile. You could also try the seasonal favorites such as blueberry coffee cake, chocolate caramel truffle and the classic chocolate or carrot cake with the other staples at the confection counter. Whatever you try at My Delight Cupcakery, you’re going to be in for a treat. Naomi graduated from Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts as a pastry chef, but her mother Melinda recalls

Naomi’s love of baking confections as far back as she can remember, and their staff create a delightful shopping experience and immediately makes you feel like a member of their family, be it at their bakery counter or one of their mobile food trucks that have been catering cupcakes to local and large events, from The Grammy’s or the E3 Expo since 2011. My Delight Cupcakery is located at 1520 N. Mountain Ave. Suite B-108 Ontario, California 91762

Follow us for Frequent Giveaways!

FREE

mydelightcupcakery.com

Mini Cupcake with any purchase with this coupon. Expires June 30, 2017

909.988.4151

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IC • CHAMPAGNE BRUNCH LIVE MUS SUNDAY, MAY

14, 2017

Give Mom a special treat with a day to remember! All the glitz and glam with this Elton John tribute show featuring all her favorite songs. Let our incredible award winning culinary team create a deliciously memorable experience celebrating and honoring the special ladies we love!

Large parties are welcome Make your reservations today! 909.937.3000

SHOW TIMES:

10:00AM • 12:00PM • 2:00PM

41 ADULTS

$

21 KIDS 12 & UNDER

$

ONTARIO CONVENTION CENTER

2000 E. Convention Center Way, Ontario, C A 9 1 7 64

FOR MORE INFORMATION, ONTARIOCC.ORG

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Luxury Living

628 Indiana Ave, Venice Rare Gem! Completely remodeled single story home located west of Lincoln is an absolute stunner. This 4 bedroom 2 bath home with an additional office has been fully remodeled and outfitted with amazing curb appeal and designer touches. Walk through the private gated entrance onto a large front deck that is perfect for enjoying the best weather Southern California has to offer or open the bi-fold doors to create a seamless transition between indoor and outdoor living spaces. As you enter through the front of the house you’ll notice vaulted ceilings which beautifully complement the open floor plan. The kitchen has been retrofitted with European style cabinets and quartz counter tops along with a waterfall island and Thermador

Professional appliances. Adjacent to the living room is the spacious office and indoor laundry room. As you approach the back of the house you will find 3 bedrooms and the spacious master suite. The master features recessed lighting, a walk in closet and bathroom with marble flooring and shower. Also in the master is a large sliding door that allows you to enjoy the private and tranquil back yard. This home also features a 2 car garage with an additional space in front of the garage door. This home offers the best of Venice, just minutes away from world renowned boutique shops, art galleries, wine shops and a growing selection of nightlife establishments. A must see, call today to schedule an appointment. $2,295,000

T H E R E A L E S T A T E C O N S U LT A N T S TRECHOMES.COM Brent Lippincott Broker CalBRE #01729047 Cell: 909.917.4883 brent@trechhomes.com

8 4 4 - J S T- S O L D Joshua Tolar RealtorÂŽ CalBRE#02000924 Cell: 909.525.2770 jtolar@trechomes.com


Carden Arbor View School

One Stop Summer

S

B Y DI A NE M O L LE , CA R D E N A R BO R VI E W SCH O O L

ummer is approaching and schools are finishing up for the year. This is the time when working parents find themselves faced with the challenge of running their children all over town to engaging activities while still being present at work. Every child in the family wants to be involved in different activities. Susie wants to spend her summer in dance classes. Johnny is hoping to spend his summer in robotics class. You know that both of them could use a refresher course in math and of course no one wants their child to lose their writing skills over the summer because they aren’t using them. Carden Arbor View School is the perfect solution. The school is centrally located in Upland and offers enriching, educational courses for students entering kindergarten through eighth grade. In addition, childcare is available from 6:45 am until 6:30 pm Monday through Friday. This means you can drop the kids off on your way to work, know that they will spend their day in a wide variety

of classes, and then pick them up again on your way home. So what types of classes are being offered? How is this a one-stop solution? Well, kindergarten students are in a selfcontained program that incorporates art, math, science, pre-reading and reading programs into a weekly theme. They will learn about everything from outer space to exploring occupations that might interest them in the future. Elementary aged kids have an expanded array of course options. They could learn about time, measurement, and money while perfecting their basic math skills in a confidence-building atmosphere. Maybe they would prefer to have a more artistic summer learning to draw comic strips, fold origami creatures, paint, design, and craft away the days. There are poems to read and write, states to explore, and games to play. Perhaps they appreciate physical activities and want to learn beginning ballet, cheerleading, Zumba, and playground games. All of these

options are available. Middle school students can be a real summer challenge for parents. They can be old enough to stay home alone but at the same time you want their summer to have some positive structure. This Roaring Summer program is a great solution because the options available will appeal to older students. They can begin to learn Spanish through a theater course; cooking and baking classes are always popular, as are rocketry and robotics. Language arts skills can also be reinforced through authoring and illustrating their own book, and computer skills can be discovered as they learn to use Photoshop and basic coding. Fridays offer a unique program that takes students out into the community for visits to regional activities in a supervised group. There are also on-campus activities for younger students, but every option available is enriching, engaging, and educational. For more information please contact the school directly.

Get Set For A Roaring Summer! Carden Arbor View School invites K-8th grade students to join us for a summer of adventure, fun and learning. Our summer program is designed for motivated and creative learners and embraces a day of joy, growth, enthusiasm, dignity and respect.

June 19th - August 11, 2017

Four, two week sessions Monday - Thursday Friday is a day of unique outdoor activities Extended child care 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Review courses at cardenarborview.org

Call today! 909-982-9919 Carden Arbor View School

1530 N. San Antonio Ave. Upland, CA 91786 M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 7

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Helping Children Reach Their Potential

Project THINK was founded in 1980 by master educators Kay Conley, MS and Susan Warren, Ph.D. with the goal of academically motivating students. This program has been helping children reach their potential for 37 years. The mission of Project Think is the goal of preparing students for the school year ahead, excelling them beyond their grade level, and motivating them to love learning. Classes are held at the Claremont CollegesPomona College. Dr. Warren believes in offering the best education to students by providing credentialed teachers who are hand selected based on their experience, expertise, accomplishments, and ability to engage all learners through exceptional classroom curriculum and instruction. Project Think, as a non-profit organization, is committed to supporting and enriching the lives of the children in the surrounding communities through excellence in education. Project Think is a non-profit academic enrichment program for academically motivated students Pre-K to 8th Grade. It is designed to stimulate and motivate students as it embraces a wide variety of interest areas. Exceptional educators motivate children to develop thinking skills which will enable them to participate and succeed in a growing, challenging 21st century. Emphasis is on active learning; children learn by using all of their senses in hands-on activities. Professional guest speakers enhance the program. Master credentialed teachers, classroom aides, and specialists provide a small students: instructor ratio, enabling them to offer small group and individual instruction. Students may register for either M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 7

one or both of the 3-week sessions as teachers plan a variety of curriculum choices to stimulate the children’s curiosity and interest for the entire six-week period. This year’s 2017 Project Think theme is “Open the doors to a global world in 2017.” Sessions begin in June. Session 1: June 19-July 7, 2017 and Session 2: July 10 - 28, 2017. Morning Enrichment Classes are 8:30 a.m.- 12:00 p.m. Monday- Friday. Afternoon Extracurricular Classes will provide your child with an exceptional learning experience 12:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Monday – Friday. Children Pre K through second grade attend “Young Thinkers” enjoying learning centers in self-contained classrooms. Students 3rd8th grades, are grouped according to grade level and rotate through the six classes that make up the Morning Enrichment Classes. Afternoon Extracurricular Classes are available

based on grade level: Computers (Grades 4-8), Swimming Lessons (All Ages), Visual & Performing Arts (Pre-K- 2nd Grade), Drama (Grades 3-8 and Spanish (Grades 3-8). For more information about Project THINK Summer Program go to their website at: projectthink.com

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S AY I N G

&

Yes to the Dress Yes to the Destination

WRITTEN BY DESTINY LALONDE PHOTOGRAPHY BY FRANK PEREZ

T

he month of June has always been the highlight of a very special occasion. This summer season is full of blooming essences of love. Weddings are a part of this special month but a new trend is changing the wedding season. The origin of weddings comes from an ancient mythological deity, Juno, a Roman goddess. She was the goddess and protector of women in all aspects of their lives. She was especially known to be the goddess of marriage and childbearing. Juno (as referred to in Latin), or June, is the month commonly revered to hold a wedding. This auspicious month also originated from the Celtic calendar. Due to these beliefs, most weddings were commonly placed in the month of June. In 2017, saying yes to the dress just became a little more expansive in style and theme for 40

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those yet-to-be-lovebirds to try out. Weddings aren’t just fit for the month of June anymore. New wedding trends for those interested in trying something different are the destination weddings and weddings in other months of the year. A new place, either exotic or quiet; give couples the opportunity to celebrate their betrothal in a gorgeous setting of their choosing. Destination weddings are a go-to idea for those feeling both frivolous and adventurous. If choosing a fall wedding there are flowers in earthy tones to set the autumn mood just right. Fall weddings are for those who are feeling more in touch with the earth and its colors. Winter wonderland themed weddings surround guests with snowflakes and cool colors. Summer destinations are high on the list of wedding travelers to

romantic Hawaii and Mexico beaches for ceremonies on the sand and receptions overlooking the ocean. These trends are suited for any couple looking to discover how to make their special day more extraordinary. It seems every bride will not only be “saying yes to the dress,” but saying yes to trying out these spectacular new places and different times of the year for their memorable day. M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 7


Movement is Our Specialty By Derek Wohlers CPT, CSMS, SCS

Over the past year and a half at Life Performance Enhancement’s new facility in Upland, we set the tone to ensure that each person receives what is necessary for the health, maintenance, protection, and enhancement of their body.

advanced state. For this to happen an identification of what needs changing is necessary. Have you identified what needs changing in your body? Here are 3 questions to ask yourself that will assist you in the process.

LPE’s ability to deliver again and again is rooted in the truths that fuel the foundation we build in each person’s body. The attention to detail needed for the progression of their individual assets is always attended to.

If pain is an issue this usually stems from your body being in a state of dis-ease. We call it disease, but what your body is telling you is that something is not at rest and needs your attention. The degree of your pain indicates the level of urgency you should have towards the process of eliminating it.

Every person’s body that goes under the optimization process requires research, adaption, application, more research, more adaption, and then again, more application. I spoke with a client Joe S., a 54-year-old golf enthusiast, who wanted to reverse the effects of years working at a desk to provide for his family. I wanted to know what he appreciated the most about his training regimen. He quickly replied “The care I receive motivates me to trust what is being done to my body now and for the future. I like how we are setting things up for my next improvement.” Progression is defined as: the process of developing or moving gradually towards a more

1. Am I in pain?

3. Why am I motivated to do something? The source of our motivation is like the oxygen we breathe to our cells. It begins and continues the process of delivering the energy that fuels our progress. All things are going to originate from the source. It’s a vital component to any operational order. Without it the order does not exist. Knowing the true source of your motivation will enable you to finish what was started.

2. What am I not doing that I should be doing? Typically, with most clients this is consuming enough quality water to ensure they are adequately hydrated. Water is a (but not the only) driving force for optimal operation at the cellular level and should be taken seriously. Even if you do not exercise, hydration effects regular body function and can have a serious impact on your mood and focus. But if you do exercise you may not be receiving all the nutrients you should be from that expensive organic food you purchase.

Life Performance Enhancement in Upland, CA and has trained athletes in the MLB, NCAA, NAIA, USA Track and Field, PGA, and fitness enthusiasts throughout Los Angeles and San Bernardino county. Community Involvement and service is an area Derek Wohlers and LPE are extremely passionate about. Derek and his wife Ericka attend Christ’s Church of the Valley located in San Dimas.

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Kia Hybrids

Ready for Higher Gas Prices BY THE CA R FA MI LY

T

his is the best time to look into hybrids with new fuel taxes on the horizon. No better place to start then with the new Kia Niro SUV and Kia Optima starting at $22,890 and $25,995 while pushing past 40 mpg. No doubt these Kias with their exceptional reliability rating and stellar warranty are worth considering, especially considering the average new car is going for $32,000. With 909 readers having an average oneway commute time of over 30 minutes, and 15 percent spending an hour in traffic, these hybrids are ideal, essentially offering savings up to 50 percent in fuel savings over typical competitors. Kia Niro Hybrid Overview: This is a sub42

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compact SUV and is priced under most of the hybrid competition. You can average nearly 50 mpg overall which is outstanding for a car this versatile. It has a slightly higher stance and comfortable seats, but the real star is the way six-speed, dual-clutch automatic transmission shifts. Kia Optima Hybrid overview: The 2017 is new and appealing offering a calm driving experience, plenty of cargo room and 40 mpg average. Loaded with technology such as Apple CarPlay, Android Auto and safety features that include autonomous emergency braking. The ride is quiet and you get 13.4 cubic feet of storage with a lot of inside bins for personal items. Although the exterior is not as exciting as some competitors, it nevertheless looks

sleek and should age well. You can also get an Optima plug-in. Mom’s view: The Niro is fun, but get the EX model as it offers so much more with heated seats, blind spot monitoring and an abundance of other safety and convenience features. The less expensive FE is the mileage champ, but a warm bottom is well worth the extra for the upgraded model. You can get the more loaded Touring and Touring Launch as well, but there isn’t any all-wheel drive option on any model. The back seats of the EX fold down giving you ample room for packages. The Optima hybrid allows you to select Eco or Sport mode outside of the standard setting. Eco takes the edge off driving and gives you superior mileage, but M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 7


the cost is more relaxed acceleration. Sport brings the Optima on boil and is excellent for passing or lane merging. Dad’s view: The Niro is a 1.6 liter four-cylinder gas-electric hybrid with 6-speed dual-clutch automatic drive train. It is fun to drive, but it isn’t going to set any speed records. The brakes on both vehicles take a while to get used to as they regenerate the batteries. This is good as it saves on brake wear, but can be abrupt at times until a gentle touch is mastered. Steering is quite good and makes the Niro nimble and corners well.

problem. Interestingly, the vehicles are loaded with pockets for caring everything from large water bottles to small handwipes. As similar as these two Kia products are they appeal to a very different buyer. The Niro is handy and versatile, perfect for the active family. The Optima is larger and more gentrified, perfect for those who like a quieter ride and more space. I like larger cars, but worry about mall parking lots. The special rear and skyward views on the monitor relieves that stress. Back-to-school male’s view: Working on my computer security certificate, but in the meantime the Kia’s offered some excellent technology, although the GPS was a bit slow. We had the Harman Kardon system, which was fine, and the optional wireless smartphone charging

worked well. There is an adaptive cruise control and voice control, including Siri. My choice would be the handy Niro. Looks good, handy, and fuel frugal. Family conference: The front-wheeldrive Optima hybrid has been restyled this year and improved in many areas and the Niro is all new. Kia’s warranty is special with a basic five year/60,000 coverage and roadside assistance and 10 years and 100,000 miles on the powertrain. My brother has a Kia and has found them easy to deal with and quite pleased overall. Kia ranks highest among all automotive industry nameplates in the J.D. Power 2016 U.S. Initial Quality Study and this is the first time a non-luxury brand has led the industry. Others to consider are the Toyota RAV4 and the Nissan Rogue.

The electric motor works with the transmission and makes driving in heavy traffic easy. The Optima has an electric motor and 2.0-liter engine that combine to produce 192 hp. While most hybrids have a continuously variable transmission, the Optima Hybrid sticks with a six-speed automatic transmission for a more traditional shifting feel. Young working woman’s view: The Niro isn’t as comfortable to drive as the larger Optima with the latter being quieter as well. The Optima seats are fairly flat and so heavier drivers will find them a good fit. Entering and exiting both cars is easy, but the larger doors on the Optima make it a long reach to close at times. Both cars are good for those with mobility problems with just a little step over to get into a seat. The sloping roof of the Optima restricts rear vision, but the excellent rear view camera takes care of that M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 7

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Cost Plus Mattress

Dirty Secrets of the Mattress Industry!

Paul Niederer at Cost Plus Mattress Employs Veterans and Sells Mattresses 100% Made in the USA!

D

id you ever wonder what happens to the millions of mattresses that customers return to the store after sleeping on them in their homes for the trial period? The stores return the mattresses back to the manufactures for credit, they in turn sell them by the truckloads to individual for pennies on the dollar. Some of these individuals are unscrupulous business owners who are illegally selling these mattresses back to the public as NEW or “Last year’s models.” These mattresses are usually stacked in a warehouse wrapped in plastic with no floor model to try. BUYER BEWARE!!!

What if I purchase a bed and don’t like it?

Such advice is absolutely free from Paul Niederer, owner of Cost Plus Mattress, located in Rancho Cucamonga and La Verne. Go in and see him! The Grapevine Press family bought a Pure Latex Bliss mattress from Paul and has never slept better! Paul IS the factory. He builds your mattress for you at LOW prices. Paul’s products are 100% made in the USA. He is an Air Force vet who is so patriotic that he looks to hire other veterans, like Elvis, a former Marine, who runs the Rancho store. Paul is so honest that he will send you out of the store to check out the competition if you doubt him. He knows you’ll be back, because no one can beat his quality and prices. The price of mattresses start at $89 for a twin mattress and $149 for a twin set.

Answer: Make sure you write down the information from the label of the mattress you decide to buy. Some stores deliver a different style and that’s why it doesn’t feel the same.

Paul’s Cost Plus Mattress is a family-run business built on customer loyalty and first class service. His mantra: “I don’t want to sell you one mattress. I want to sell you a lifetime of mattresses.” Indeed, Paul’s customers keep coming back. “We pride ourselves in taking care of our customers,” says Paul. “Our salesmen are not on commission and I come out personally to see that our customers have been treated well.... We sell you what YOU need, not what WE need.” Though Paul sells many kinds of mattresses at a variety of prices, The 909 family was most impressed by Paul’s 100% Pure Latex Bliss. Latex is natural, made from the rubber tree. The 100% latex mattresses are breathable, naturally hypo-allergenic, anti-fungal, dust mite resistant, and mold and mildew proof. Being ventilated rubber, latex dissipates heat, so you sleep cooler! Here’s a few more free tips from Paul: M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 7

Offering Step-Down Pricing for a limited time

Answer: Almost all mattress stores will charge you a re-stocking fee of 10% or 15% or at least a couple hundred bucks. And they’ll force you to exchange the bed for another of equal or greater value. The mattress places force you to buy another bed. You’ll never get your money back. Read the fine print! Don’t get pushed around. Paul will never treat you that way. How do I know that you’re delivering the same comfortable mattress that I tried out in the showroom?

When I need to replace my mattress, why does the salesman say that I need to replace the mattress AND the foundation? Answer: Because he wants you to spend more money. Whether it’s a $300 or $3,000 mattress, mattresses are designed to last 3-5 to 4-7 years. But the foundation should last at least 20 years. If you go to the store with a mattress problem after 7 years, it’s usually just the mattress at issue. Don’t let them sucker you into paying big bucks for a mattress and a foundation. The salesman typically says that if you don’t buy a mattress with foundation, you won’t get the warranty. Remember, most mattresses will not last to the warranty date, so these mattress retailers will look for a way to void the warranty or pocket extra money. Paul loves what he does and he could never support his family by taking advantage of yours. You are safe with him! Besides, he guarantees his products for 10 years. Paul sells the two-sided mattresses that you can simply flip over and double its life! You’re doubling the mattresses life and paying half of what you would to the traditional mattress stores!

The Niederer Family Resting on a Pure Latex Bed Things are really looking up here at Cost Plus Mattress and we owe it all to our wonderful customers! To celebrate our latest award voted by you, our customers, we will be offering step-down pricing on most of our models from now through June 3rd. Come on in and purchase a King size bed for the price of a Queen, a Queen size bed for the price of a Full, or a Full-size bed for the price of a Twin. Please see store for details on this offer. So, don’t be shy and come by and see what all the excitement is all about, Paul, Elvis and Melissa would love to see you! Cost Plus Mattress in La Verne is located right off the 210 Freeway at 1147 Foothill Boulevard. Call (909) 392-5554. Cost Plus Mattress Rancho Cucamonga store is located at 9155 Archibald Avenue, Suite C (between 6th and 7th Street) Call (909) 727-3700. Hours: Monday through Friday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturdays 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Closed Sundays for Family Day! And don’t forget to tell him you read it in the 909 Magazine!

2017

Great news! For the second year in a row we have been voted BEST (#1) Mattress Store in the San Gabriel Valley by the readers of the three newspapers in the area. That makes us BEST in 2016 and BEST in 2017! That is after also being voted FAVORITE (#2) in 2014 and 2015. 909 MAGAZINE

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Breed of the Month The Labradoodle Labradoodle is a unique and fascinating dog which originated in Australia by a breeder of Royal Guide Dogs. After receiving a request from a customer in Hawaii looking for an allergy-friendly guide dog, they crossed a Poodle and Labrador in the hopes of creating a non-allergenic dog that would have the best characteristics found in both breeds. These characteristics include; superior intelligence, an incredible temperament, and an exceptionally loving and loyal nature, and a beautiful low to non-shedding, allergy friendly coat. In the first litter of puppies, there were a few who were low allergy and very smart and easy to train. This was exciting enough to encourage further attempts at breeding more good examples. Sometimes there were allergy friendly puppies in a litter and other times not - but it was enough to start the Labradoodle as a breed.

The Labrador’s easy going ways and the Poodle’s smartness made for an interesting combination and an exciting discovery that a percentage of each litter had puppies which appeared to be allergy friendly. A bonus, is the lack of shedding in some of these puppies, and the absence of doggy smell. They have no doggy odor. They seldom if ever need bathing, and are compatible with allergy and asthma sufferers.

The correctly bred Labradoodle tends to inherit high intelligence

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Their versatility can be enjoyed as a joyful family companion, faithful children’s dog, Assistance or Therapy Dog and dogs for people with special needs. They are easily trained and eager to please. They are a brilliant performance dog for Agility or Obedience, and they excel at and enjoy both.

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Calendar M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 7

5/04

Butterflies In May 3:45pm | 250 N. Third Ave., Upland Your child will get to experience the beauty of the butterfly by experiencing its changing life cycle from caterpillar to chrysalis to butterfly. For more info. Call (909) 931-4280

5/04

National Day of Prayer 6pm | 460 N. Euclid Ave., Upland Open to all leaders and citizens of Upland. Join in the celebration of faith, unity, spirit and love enhanced by our City’s rich heritage and diverse cultures.

5/06

Complimentary Yoga 9:30am | 7369 Day Creek Blvd. #F102, Rancho Cucamonga Join lululemon athletics every Saturday for complimentary yoga. This complimentary yoga class is perfect for all levels. Don’t have your own mat? No problem, mats are available.

5/06

Spring Pet Fair & Celebration 10am | Memorial Park, Upland Come Find Your New Best Friend! Join the Friends of Upland Animal Shelter and the dozens of rescue organizations and vendors that will be showcasing their adoptable pets.

5/07

Claremont Forum Farmers Market 8am | Indian Hill Ave & Second St. Founded in 1996 to connect California farmers to the local community. Over 100 growers and artisan members share their goods and services throughout the year.

5/07

Free Family Day at Claremont Museum of Art 12pm | 200 W. First Street, Claremont The Claremont Museum of Art offers free admission and ARTStation, a place for children to experience art and engage with local culture. Join in on the fun!

5/07

Goldilocks and the Three Bears 1pm | 12505 Cultural Center Dr., Rancho Cucamonga When the worlds of bears and people collide, everyone learns that girls and bears aren’t as ferocious as they may seem! Book and lyrics by Anthony Drewe.

5/08

Generations Mother’s Day Tea Party 3:30pm | 250 N. Third Ave., Upland Enjoy live entertainment, time to socialize, a light fare, and a variety of teas to choose from. Punch will be served for children. This event is Free! Space is limited.

5/09

Movies in Town Square 8pm | 12505 Cultural Center Dr., Rancho Cucamonga Bring out your whole family for our themed movie nights! Participants may be eligible for prizes. We encourage you to enjoy one of the many eateries available at Victoria Gardens.

5/12

Tree Speak: Interpretations of the Rustling 12pm | 200 W. First St., Claremont The Claremont Museum of Art’s upcoming exhibition will present visual interpretations, by artists working in the area, which derive from the concept or image of trees and leaves in nature.

5/14

The Fairplex Garden Railroad 11pm | Located near Gate 1 on McKinely Avenue in Pomona The trains journey through various eras of California history from the mid-1800s through the years. This is the oldest and largest public operating garden railroad in the United States.

5/18

Claremont Green Drinks 6pm | 1420 N Claremont Blvd. #204C Welcome all to Claremont’s party of Green Drinks International. This month the folks from Home Performance Matters would like to treat you to a beer! Come join the conversation!

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5/08

Generations Mother’s Day Tea Party

3:30pm | 250 N. Third Ave., Upland Enjoy live entertainment, time to socialize, a light fare, and a variety of teas to choose from. Punch will be served for children. This event is Free! Space is limited.

6/04

Mi Casa Es Su Casa 4pm | 425 W. 1st St., Claremont Join us for a perfect Sunday afternoon of wine tasting, delicious food, live music and fun all to benefit the Claremont Community Foundation and the Claremont Educational Foundation.

6/06

5/18

Chamber Ribbon Cutting – Blue House Dentistry 5:30pm | 318 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont Blue House Dentistry practices state-ofthe-art dentistry, using the most advanced techniques with the goal to provide the best dental care to the patients.

5/20

Founder’s Day Celebration 10am | 2nd Ave. & 9th St., Upland Experience live reenactments of characters renowned in Upland’s history, such as Mac the Medicine Man, the one-armed Police Chief, and the first women President of the Sierra Club.

5/20

Relay for Life 8am | 651 W. 15th St., Upland Walk To Find A Cure! Join a team and walk to find a cure for cancer. Camp out and create a community party atmosphere. For more information call (909) 263-4216.

5/20:

Colin Mochrie & Brad Sherwood 8pm | 12505 Cultural Center Dr., Rancho Cucamonga Back by popular demand, Colin Mochrie and Brad Sherwood return to the Playhouse. Known for their work on Whose Line Is It Anyway? Get ready for non-stop laughter! M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 7

5/20

Classic Car Show & Toys for Tots Drive 9am | 217 East A St., Upland Celebrate USA Armed Forces Day! Join the Cooper Museum Motoring Guild for their 5th Annual Toys for Tots Classic Car Show hosted by Classic Impressions Car Club.

5/21

Swinging Down Old Broadway 2pm | 12505 Cultural Center Dr., Rancho Cucamonga Go back to the age of the Golden Era and relive the good old days in Swinging Down Old Broadway featuring Richard Leibell, Mara Getz and the All Star Big Band.

6/01

Comedysportz High School League Senior Game 7pm | 850 N. San Antonio Avenue, Upland The Highlanders are one of the ComedySportz Los Angeles varsity teams established throughout Southern California. Don’t miss the chance to laugh until your face hurts.

6/03

Menopause: The Musical 6:30pm | 455 West Foothill Blvd., Claremont A musical parody staged to hit tunes from the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s. Set in a department store, 4 diverse women come together over shared experiences regarding menopause.

Movies in Town Square 8pm | 12505 Cultural Center Dr., Rancho Cucamonga Moana, Luau Night. Go dressed in your favorite Hawaiian shirts and flowy grassy skirts. Take out your whole family for a themed movie night! Participants may be eligible for prizes.

6/12

Upland Summer Lunch Program 10am | 979 West 11th St., Upland Kids Eat Free This Summer! Kids, ages 18 and under eat free! Come join us for food, fun, and sun Monday through Thursday, June 12th to July 27th.Sponsored by Nutrition Services.

6/17

Hops With Pops 5K 2058 N. Mills Ave. #454, Claremont Start of Father’s Day weekend with a family fun 5K and Kids Fun Run followed by a pancake breakfast. Presented by Last Name Brewing at Cable Airport. (909)399-3553

6/19

32nd Annual San Antonio Golf Classic 10am | 8358 Red Hill Country Club Dr., Rancho Cucamonga Registration, breakfast & tee prize at 8am. Putting contest at 9am. Shotgun start at 10am. Also featuring: Lunch on course, Opportunity Drawing, Live Auctions and Awards. 909 MAGAZINE

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NEED A TAX EXPERT? TAX RETURN PREP AND PLANNING

CALL US FOR PROFESSIONAL TAX RETURN PREPARATION AND WE WILL HELP YOU FIND MAXIMUM DEDUCTIONS AND RAPID REFUNDS!

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HEALTH MATTERS

San Antonio Hospital Shares Great Ways to Improve Your Heart, and will be Hosting a Day of Dance Event!

Payment Enclosed

CASA COLINA

DISCUSSES FIBROMYALGIA: THE INVISIBLE ILLNESS

magazine

Call 909-252-7224 for Credit Card Payments

State

KATHERINE HEIGL MAKES HER RETURN TO TELEVISION IN HER NEW HIT SERIES STATE OF AFFAIRS

REVIEW The Buick LaCrosse’s Comfortable Design is as Close as it gets to Sitting in Your Family Room

LAW TALK

SOHEILA’S PREMIUM PICKS FROM 900 OF CALIFORNIA’S NEW LAWS IN 2015

serving rancho cucamonga, upland & claremont 909 MAGAZINE

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NBC’s New CIA Analyst

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Great Family Events, Shows and Activities for You to do This Month, and All Close to Home!

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Mrs. Grossman has handled thousands of insurance bad faith homeowner’s cases and sues on behalf of both individual policyholders and members of class actions. If your home has experienced a water, fire, wind, vandalism or theft loss and your insurance company has either denied your claim or not paid enough please call for a free consultation.

Fighting for the rights of homeowners against insurance giants for 22 years

EVANGELINE FISHER GROSSMAN Te l : ( 9 0 9 ) 6 2 6 - 1 9 3 4

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Fax: (909) 626-1900

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e g ro s s m a n @ e f g l a w y e r. c o m

3 2 4 N . I N D I A N H I L L B L V D . , C L A R E M O N T, C A , 9 1 7 1 1 M AY / J U N E 2 0 1 7

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INTRODUCING THE REGION’S NEWEST TRAUMA CENTER INTRODUCING THE REGION’S NEWEST TRAUMA CENTER

More ready than ever. Especially when every second counts. More ready medical than ever. whenthe every second counts. As a nationally recognized center,Especially we’ve been serving region’s healthcare needs since 1903 with an unwavering commitment to excellence. It’s at the core of everything we do and it’s why we earned As a nationally recognized medical center, we’ve been serving the region’s healthcare needs since 1903 our new designation as a Trauma Center. Previously, trauma patients were transported out of the area for with an unwavering commitment to excellence. It’s at the core of everything we do and it’s why we earned care. Today, our expert trauma surgeons and specialized teams can treat patients with life-threatening our new designation as a Trauma Center. Previously, trauma patients were transported out of the area for injuries immediately, close to home. Exceptional patient care—it’s what we do best. care. Today, our expert trauma surgeons and specialized teams can treat patients with life-threatening injuries immediately, close to home. Exceptional patient care—it’s what we do best. 909.865.9500 | pvhmc.org 909.865.9500 | pvhmc.org

May June 2017 909 Magazine  
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