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health matters

BROUGHT TO YOU BY SARH

Great Local Events & Fun Ways to Spend This Hot Summer!

Summer

Restaurant Extravaganza

LOCAL ATHLETE TRAVELS TO THE MACCABIAH GAMES

AN INSIDE LOOK:

the Joseph Filippi Winery

W E G E T CL OSE AN D P E RSO N A L WI T H

Sgt. Marci Williams

Mädchen Amick PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID GARDENA CA PERMIT NO 40

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Upland’s 1st Woman Sergeant

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For sports physicals, allergy pains, and your sprains and strains. Skip the wait — make an appointment online:

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R CM C W E I GH T LO SS R A NCH O C UCAMON G A

Its not to late to look GREAT FOR SUMMER! HCG • Lipo Injections • Testosterone • Nutritional Counseling • helps patients drop pounds fast and feel more energetic than they have in years. Most notable, nutrition counseling and lifestyle advice helps patients correct nega­ tive habits that may have led to their weight gain in the first place, so the pounds stay off for good.

formative and the doc­ tors and staff are excited to share their approach with you. “Being overweight is a medical condition, and we treat it as one,” says RCMC. “Our patient chances of losing weight will be significantly higher using the program at RCMC Medical Weight Loss rather than doing it on their own.” “Losing weight is much more than just diet and exercise. It is simply overwhelm­ ing without guidance and direction,” adds Sariah Veirs, co-operator in the business. “Our program provides a pri­ vate nutrition­al counselor to help keep our clients accountable for achieving their weight loss goals. Many patients have failed numerous times in their past dieting attempts, but are amazed when they find real success at RCMC Medical Weight Loss.”

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magine your ideal self. Would you weight less? Have more energy? No lon­ ger strug­gle with chronic fatigue? The wellness team at RCMC Medical Weight Loss is there to guide you so you can take control of your life and get healthy. Whether you need assistance with medical weight loss, nutritional counseling, or increasing stami­ na, they can help. For many years, the clinic has aided many patients to success­fully lose weight, regain energy and keep the weight off. The clinics approach to wellness is truly trans­

90% Success Rate

Dr. Steven Zlatt and his team can help you lose one pound a day for up to 45 days,and more importantly, keep it off. They start with determining the under­ lying problem for your weight gain. For many patients, eating healthy and ex­ ercising is not enough to take off the pounds. RCMC’s cutting-edge medical weight loss treatments include integrat­ ing HCG injec­tions, lipo injections, ap­ petite control med­ication and nutrition­ al counseling. The medically prescribed injections protect your lean muscle mass while turning your body into a fat-burning machine. HCG is a part of a fast track medical weight loss pro­ gram, which

7388 Carnelian St., Ste D, Rancho Cucamonga

909-341-2058

One of RCMC’s most popular programs is their 18-week fast track program. Their goal for patients is to lose 80 pounds in 18 weeks. One of their patients, Tr­ isha, was amazed at her results from the program after losing 80 pounds. “ I have tried every diet out there, this was my last resort and then I was turning to surgery. I could not believe it when my first week I lost 13 pounds! They held my hand every week and made sure that I got to my goal weight! Thank you RCMC for giving me my life back!” Another patient, Gladys, lost 50 pounds after only 14 weeks. She com­ mented, “When I first came to RCMC I did not think that the results were real or that it would work for me. Every week I would be hitting my goals that my coun­ selor set out for me. It kept me moti­ vated and so excited to stay on course. This has changed my life and I could not thank RCMC enough!” RCMC’s wellness team provides nutri­ tional counseling and lifestyle advice. Their patient- proven results show that their pro­grams deliver positive results. Obviously, RCMC points out that results may vary by individuals, but they firmly believe that by proactively addressing and correcting unhealthy eating hab­ its in combination with their medically supervised programs, they can help patients down the path to perma­ nent weight loss. RCMC’s wellness team is committed to helping every patient em­ brace a healthy, positive lifestyle. Call 909-341-2058 today to schedule your complimentary consultation and diagnostic appointment.

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J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 7 License#: 364700030


from the publisher

Readers,

We are back with our July/August issue of 909 magazine. It has officially reached the

summer and by the looks of it, it’s going to be a hot one. We hope all of our beloved readers find time to enjoy these summer months with your children as we will with ours. If you’re looking for inspiration for summer fun with the kids look no further. We have articles on Wizarding World of Harry Potter Lightshow, Alf Museum of Paleontology, and a whole calendar of events. In this issue we sat down with the very talented Mädchen Amick from American Horror Story, Riverdale and Witches of East End as she dives into details of her career. As well as our interview, we also have articles on, Reggie Retzlaff, Upland’s First Female Sergeant: Sgt. Marci Williams, Montclair Art Works, Local Sips: Joseph Filippi Winery, Mrs. Evangeline Grossman and Mr. Marc Grossman, Executive Publishers Photo by Sam Grossman

and our Food Extravaganza! Of course we didn’t forget to update you with local health professional advice. SARH educates us on the differences between the Emergency Room and Urgent Care. Casa Colina offers insight on seniors and driving. This issue includes all of the above articles and many more! We hope you enjoy our efforts in providing you with another entertaining and informative issue of 909 Magazine. Take care and stay cool.

From our family to yours,

Evangeline & Marc Grossman T HE

magazine

TE A M

Executive Publishers

Art Director

Contributing Writers

Marc Grossman

Jovielle Ortiz

John Calderwood David Grossman

Evangeline Fisher Grossman

Matt Komoto

Production Manager Chief Operating Officer

Cindy Rhodes

Jessica Ortiz

Jessica Thorpe

Juan Leal

Alan Haskvitz

Sales Executives Editors

Lisa Corsini

Lisa Corsini

Jessica Fuentes

Evangeline Fisher Grossman

Serving Claremont, Upland, Rancho Cucamonga, Eastvale, Corona and surrounding cities.

Call to advertise 909-252-7224

Kristina Tomlin

Assistant to the Publisher Ryan L. Gales

909-252-7224

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100 North Euclid Ave, Upland CA

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Contents TA B L E O F

11 BLUE HOUSE DENTISTRY T H E L I T T L E B L U E H O U S E I S T H E W AY TO GO WHEN LOOKING FOR TOP D E N TA L C A R E , C H E C K I T O U T !

2017

20 REGGIE RETZLAFF &

MACCABIAH GAMES REGGIE IS FOLLOWING IN HIS MOTHER’S FOOTSTEPS AND HEADING FOR THE GAMES!

24 UPLAND FIRE DEPARTMENT T H I S M O N T H W E A R E S AY I N G T H A N K YOU AND GOODBYE TO THE UPLAND F I R E D E PA R T M E N T.

31 SUMMER RESTAURANT EXTRAVAGANZA

FIND OUT WHERE TO GO FOR THE HOTTEST SUMMER FOOD TRENDS

12 JOSEPH FILLIPI WINERY A FA M I LY T R A D I T I O N S I N C E 1 9 2 2 A N D A L O V E D C O M M U N I T Y S TA P L E

17 BEAUTY: LASHES! GENA BRADLEY SHARES THIS M O N T H ’ S B E A U T Y T R E AT M E N T

34 SUMMER FUN G R E A T W AY S T O S P E N D T H I S S U M M E R W I T H T H E E N T I R E F A M I LY, A L L I N O U R COMMUNITY!

35 UNIVERSAL STUDIOS

SUMMER LIGHT PARADE WE VISITED UNIVERSAL STUDIOS TO CHECK OUT THE SUMMER LIGHT PA R A D E ! I T I S A M U S T S E E !

37 ALF MUSEM H I D D E N I N T H E 9 0 9 ’ S B A C K YA R D , S E E W H AT F U N Y O U C A N D I G U P AT THE ALF MUSEUM

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on the

cover

EL EGANCE & GR ACE W E H A D A C HANCE TO S I T DOWN WI TH THE I N C R E D IB LY TA LENT ED MÄDCH EN AMICK, WHO H A S R E C E N T LY AP P EARED I N AMERI CA N HORROR ST O RY, R IV E R DALE AND OF COU RS E THE REV IVA L O F T H E T E L E V I S I ON P H ENOMENON TWIN PEA KS.

39 SENIOR OLYMPIC FITNESS

S T AY I N S H A P E A T A L L AGES! SENIORS ARE HOT THIS SUMMER!

41 MONEY SENSE L E T ’ S TA L K M O N E Y. T H I S MONTH WE LEARN ABOUT DIVORCE, REMARRIGE, AND THE TRUE COST

In Every Issue CASA COLINA

CALENDAR

L AW TA L K

H E A LT H M AT T E R S

T H E C A R FA M I LY

BREED OF THE MONTH

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GALLERY HOURS:

Wed through Sat 12 pm - 5 pm

hillsidefineart.com 445 West Foothill Blvd Suite 101, Claremont, CA 91711

(909) 268 - 4526 909 MAGAZINE

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M O D E R N D E N T I S T R Y, O L D FA S H I O N S E R V I C E

(909) 443-1055 318 N Indian Hill Blvd, Claremont, California, 91711 10

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We are located at the Claremont village on Indian Hill and Bonita

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Blue House Dentistry BY ELAINE REGUS

W

hen the Claremont Colleges women’s rugby team called Dr. Ned Paniagua asking for a donation, he not only donated money, he crafted custom-made mouth guards for the entire team without charge. The girls went on to win the west coast regional championship. Whether or not the mouth guards contributed to their success is hard to say but at least the team members were more comfortable and able to communicate better on the field. “They were so appreciative and it felt good for us to do something for the community,” said Paniagua, who opened Blue House Dentistry in Claremont in January. Paniagua moved with his parents from Guatamala to Upland when he was 14 and worked in his father’s dental office in Ontario while attending Upland High School. He married high school sweetheart Chrissie and they have two children, Tyler, 11 and Eva, 13. After graduating from Boston University with a doctorate in dental medicine, Paniagua returned to the area in 2002 and partnered with his father before buying the practice 10 years ago. The Paniaguas moved to Claremont two years ago and started looking to relocate the practice. They chose the iconic blue house on Indian Hill Boulevard that had been an optometry office and appropriately named it Blue House Dentistry. “We’re happy to have a practice close

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to home where we have a lot of family and friends,” Paniagua said. Dr. Paniagua appreciates the mentoring he received from his father. Now, he relies on input from a peer group of dentists who meet 10 times a year to share information and discuss cases. “In dentistry, we’re in our own little office so it’s nice to get together with other dentists with different levels of experience and different specialties,” Paniagua said. “We learn a lot from each other.” Paniagua’s primary practice emphasis is implants and cosmetic dentistry. He stays current on the latest developments in dentistry including “teeth in a day.” The procedure called screw-retained hybrid dentures is designed to replace dentures in patients with no teeth. He places four to six implants and then screws their dentures into the implant so patients can walk out of the office with a permanent set of teeth. Of course, the practice focuses on regular dentistry; filings, checkups, and cleaning. Dr. Paniagua has patients he cares for from 5 to 105 years old. “My goal is to get all my patients through life with good health and all their dentition,” Paniagua said. “If we can’t, and they lose their teeth, then implants are a solution.” Blue House Dentistry also treats a steady stream of patients seeking an array of cosmetic dental work including

D R . NE D PA NI A GUA

Invisalign clear braces, an alternative to metal braces, and teeth whitening, especially in advance of weddings, graduations and other special events. On weekends, Paniagua enjoys hiking, climbing and camping with his family. Last year, he and his wife, climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro in Africa after conquering less demanding peaks like Mt. Baldy and Mt. Whitney. “That was a big one” Paniagua said. “It took us about five days to complete the journey.” He also enjoys volunteering at a free dental clinic sponsored by the Assistance League of Upland for children who don’t have dental benefits. “It’s tough to see children suffering just because their parents can’t afford the treatment.” We welcome Dr. Paniagua and his family to the Claremont community.

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Local Sips

Joseph Filippi

Winery WRIT T EN B Y KR ISTINA TO M L I N

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oseph Filippi Winery, located off Base Line Road in Rancho Cucamonga, has been a family matter since 1922. Giovanni Filippi and son, Joseph Filippi, made their way from Veneto, Italy to Rancho Cucamonga where they began growing wine grapes in 1922. The original Joseph Filippi Winery was located east of Etiwanda Avenue and above and below Jurupa. The initial plantings included Palomino, Grenache, Salvador, Mission, and Golden Chasselas.

“Joseph Filippi wines are the result of craftsmanship derived from tradition, passion, and skill.” With Joseph “JP” Filippi as the director of winemaking, Jared Filippi, 5th generation, as the Cellar Master, and Kristina Filippi (wife of Jared) as head winemaker, Joseph Filippi Winery boasts over 200 awards for winemaking over the past 30 years. Award winning wines include: Zinfandel, Grenache, Cabernet Sauvignon, Petite Sirah, Mourvedre blends, Sauvignon Blanc, Sherry, Port, and Angelica. In 1990 the winery moved to its current location, the historic landmark Ellena Bros./Regina Winery. The Filippi family has been instrumental in highlighting California’s winemaking history. The Rancho Cucamonga – Guasti area once boasted 40,000 acres of vines, more expansive than Napa Valley. Vine plantings have dwindled since then, but now wines made with grapes from the Rancho Cucamonga Guasti have the AVA (American Viticultural Area) designation. In 1995, the Filippis successfully petitioned the TTB (Alcohol Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau) for a Rancho Cucamonga AVA designation. Visible from Base Line Road, the Joseph Filippi

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Local Sips Winery is adorned with murals depicting the winemaking process from vineyard to the bottle. Surrounded by vineyards, the tasting room itself is brimming with grapevines winding their way onto the arches and railings along the building. The ample outdoor seating below the rows of string lights begs for twilight sipping. The tasting room itself is cool and spacious with a redwood cask bar as the focal point. Guests of the Joseph Filippi Winery can enjoy the premium or reserve tastings during open hours (Tuesday through Sunday), and have the option of a sparkling tasting on the weekend (Friday through Sunday). The tasting room parades historical relics from the area’s winemaking history –along the back walls of the tasting room resides a collection of old labels, bottles, signs, artifacts from the family wineries of the Rancho Cucamonga area. Many of Joseph Filippi’s wines are displayed on old irrigation carts, while used oak barrels and a retro oven are used to display wine themed knick knacks and trinkets. Tours of the winery and facility are offered Wednesday through Sunday at 1pm.

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AN EXCLU S I V E I N T E R V I E W W ITH

Mädchen Amick INTERVIEW BY JOHN CALDERWOOD H O |T O9S0 B9 Y MMAAG NA FR D EB A U M A N N 1P 4 ZEI N

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909 EXC LU SIVE INTE R V I E W 909 Magazine had a chance to sit down with the incredibly talented Mädchen Amick, who’s recently appeared in American Horror Story, Riverdale and of course the revival of the television phenomenon Twin Peaks. Fans would recognize Mädchen Amick from past roles such as the Witches of East End, I’m Dangerous Tonight, Sleepwalkers and of course the original run of Twin Peaks. (909) From one role to another your characters seem to come from so many different walks of life. Which character that you’ve portrayed do you feel you relate the most to?

I love to feel “in the moment” of working off of the other actors

(Mädchen) I find a little bit of myself in every character (which is what you’re supposed to do as an actress) but what I enjoy most is to find a way to portray the parts of a character that I can’t relate to. I pride myself in playing very diverse roles and still grounding them in truth.

(909) I heard you left home at 16 with the blessing of your parents and moved to Hollywood to become a model. What sort of hurdles did you face? What was that like? (Mädchen) I think the biggest hurdles I had to conquer were the ones I put on myself. I never wanted to only play the lead female character. I’ve always been drawn to the “character” roles. So I’ve had to prove myself over and over to be the “girl next door” or the “goofy best friend.” But that’s what keeps it interesting for me, the diversity in the roles I get to play.

(909) What advice would you give to young women who were looking to make it in Hollywood today? (Mädchen) You have to be prepared to be in it for the long haul. There is no such thing as being “discovered overnight”. The over-night success often takes 10 years. If you don’t have that kind of dedication, don’t even dabble. If you do, hold J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 7

on tight and believe in yourself. It just takes a lot of time.

(909) What was it like coming back to the project, Twin Peaks nearly 30 years later? (Mädchen) Absolutely surreal! I’m still not sure that it’s actually happened. Maybe you need to check back in with me in another thirty years…

(909) Did you stay in touch with most of the original cast of Twin Peaks or has it been more like a reunion? (Mädchen) I’ve kept in touch with the cast that I regularly had scenes with, Peggy Lipton, Dana Ashbrook and Eric DaRe. Everyone else was like a family reunion!

(909) Do you have any funny stories or anecdotes from the back stage? 909 MAGAZINE

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(Mädchen) Just that most of the younger actors had so much fun filming the original. We would goof-off on set and play lots of practical jokes on one another.

(909) With the revival of Twin Peaks bringing the amazing drama to a whole new generation, how do you feel the show has changed to evolve for modern television? (Mädchen) Well, a lot will be revealed this time around. David Lynch and Mark Frost have a much bigger scale of the Twin Peaks tale to tell. This time it’s not just about the sleepy little town, it’s now global, if not universal.

(909) How do you prepare yourself to play a new role? Would you consider yourself a method actor? (Mädchen) I don’t consider myself a method actor because I don’t take the work home with me. I have a wonderful and supportive husband (of thirty years) and two wonderful children in their mid-twenties. That method wouldn’t be fair to them, in my opinion. I work with more of a Stanislavski’s system. It’s more improvised based. I love to feel “in the moment” of working off of the other actors in the scene and feeling the location space.

(909) You’ve got a knack for starring in supernatural shows and movies, such as American Horror Story, Sleepwalkers, and of course Witches of East End. Is there an inspiration for your choice in these roles? Do you have a favorite genre? (Mädchen) Not necessarily. I love drama as much as comedy. And sci-fi as much as mystery. The main thing that drives my decision to go after a role, is that it’s a strong and layered female character. I have no interest in being some action-hero’s decoration.

(909) Ghosts, witches, vampires? Do you have a favorite supernatural being? (Mädchen) I would have to say that out of those three choices, it’s the witch. Maybe because I don’t feel that our sweet little witch story (Witches of East End that was canceled so abruptly) has been properly wrapped up, but also because I know so much of the folklore behind the witch history. It was a tool for the extremely religious sect of our society to 16

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punish any woman that was fighting for independence and female rights.

(909) Has there ever been a part that you considered a dream role? If you could cast yourself as any character is there a part that you’d have in mind? (Mädchen) I’m such a huge fan of Audrey Hepburn. Not only because she was a captivatingly talented beauty but also because she was a huge advocate of UNICEF. Dedicating her time to the poorest communities of Africa, South America and Asia.

(909) What’s on Mädchen Amick’s must-watch list? What sort of television do you watch most? (Mädchen) Oh, well, I’m mostly glued to cable or streaming shows. It’s our “independent filmmaking” nowadays. Shows like Leftovers, Big Little Lies, Please Like Me and Transparent are a mustsee for me. Thank you again for giving your time to 909 Magazine Mädchen, we truly appreciate it and look forward to re-watching season one of Riverdale and following each episode of Twin Peaks new revival. J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 7


Gena Bradley’s

Beauty Treatment OF THE MONTH

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think it is fair to say that I have become very high maintenance over the years. The days of an easy makeup regimen is seriously over. We are all looking for the fountain of youth. The professional woman needs to look and feel beautiful and

youthful. From Botox to fillers to a quick trip to the boutique salon in your area, we all try to look our best. As a licensed esthetician and a permanent makeup artist, I am always looking at products and services to enhance beauty. I love to make clients look younger and feel more confident within themselves. Now I think I have found the services of the month with keratin lash lift. This product really delivers from start to finish. Keratin lash lift opens up your eyes makes your lashes look fuller, thicker and curlier. It delivers conditioning and strength to your own lashes without damage. You can choose the curl to your lashes from small, medium, to large. How the treatment works is, the lashes are stuck to the silicone pads for a limited time, it isn’t painful but

your eyes do have to stay shut for the entire service. Once the curl is set, they can be treated as allowed depending on the state you reside in. Keratin lash lift leaves a curl that can last up to three months! This is a beautiful look! It really opens up your eyes and brings out your natural beauty with no damage to your own lashes. If you are high maintenance woman looking for that finishing touch, this is a great place to start. Everyone knows my motto, “wakeup with makeup” and now wakeup with the natural beauty with keratin lash lift. For additional info on this procedure, you can contact Gena Bradley the “Guru of Beauty” at Aahsome Salon at 909-987-6858 in Rancho Cucamonga at 8063 Archibald Ave. In the RC Plaza at the intersection of Foothill and Archibald.

Homebody Décor & Gifts

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claremont

optometry hill Blvd. They now have space for the latest technology, two more exam rooms and a much larger optical boutique displaying over 2,400 frames.

Dr. Ann Johannsen

Dr. Brad Baggarly

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ords like high-tech, trendy and eco-friendly typically don’t come to mind when referring to optometrists. But then, the optometrists at Claremont Optometry are anything but typical. Partners since 1994, Drs. Ann Johannsen and Brad Baggarly relocated from the Claremont Village in 2011 to the old Century 21/Betsy Ross Ice Cream Parlor building at 695 W. Foot-

“We’re probably considered to be one of the most high tech practices in the area,” said Dr. Baggarly. They offer Optomap wide-field retinal imaging, computer controlled lens testing and OCT laser glaucoma and macular degeneration scanning. These instruments are designed to detect eye disease without dilation years before experiencing any changes in vision. The move also afforded the doctors an opportunity to construct an environmentally sustainable building. Privacy panels are made from recycled CD cases and real twigs. Flooring and carpet are made from 100 percent recycled materials. Energy-saving LED fixtures and natural solar tubes provide the indoor lighting. “We’re always looking out for our patients and how best to care for them and their eyes and we do the same for our environment,” said Dr. Johannsen. Claremont Optometry offers a wide array of designer frames and sunglasses so there’s no need to travel to LA or Newport Beach to find the latest styles. Unlike most optometry offices, they have an on-site lens lab. Express service is available for patients who break their glasses! For those who prefer

Providing Exceptional Eyecare Experiences Using The Latest Technology Computer Assisted Vision Exams Designer Eyewear / Lens Lab on Premises Specialty Contact Lenses Optomap Retinal Imaging (can avoid dilation) LASIK Surgery Co-Management Disease Detection and Treatment Diabetes, Cataract and Glaucoma Care Ca

contact lenses, the doctors fit all types including soft disposable, rigid, multi-focal and lenses to correct astigmatism. Ophthalmologists often refer their complicated post surgical fits to them as well. Drs. Baggarly and Johannsen are longtime Claremont residents and both have served as presidents of the Inland Empire Optometric Society. They sit on the Advisory Board of NVision Laser Eye Centers and preceptor students from Western University College of Optometry. They appreciate the support they receive from the community and believe in giving back. Both participate in California Vision Project and California Care Force, providing free eye exams and glasses to the working poor. The doctors also volunteer yearly at Operation Stand Down, providing care for our homeless veterans in Compton. Dr. Baggarly said, “We both have a passion for our profession and are very blessed that we really enjoy what we do.”

www.claremontoptometry.com ACTUAL PATIENT TESTIMONIALS

“I love how Dr Baggarly keeps up with the latest technology to better serve his patients.” “This office and the doctors and staff in it are tops. There is no other medical office I visit where I am treated with such prompt attention, respect for my feelings, and dispensing of information.” “Dr. Johannsen was delightful and so helpful.”

PPO MEDICAL PLANS

695 W Foothill Blvd, Claremont, CA J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 7

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MEDICARE

(909) 625-7861 909 MAGAZINE

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Reggie Retzlaff T R AV E L S T O T H E

Maccabiah Games BY CINDY RHODES

R

eggie Retzlaff’s world is about to get much bigger. Not that it hadn’t been slowly expanding already. The three-sport athlete left Webb, a small private school for Claremont High School, which has more than 2,000 students on campus. Academics, athletics and his social life came easy, as he had grown up with many of these kids. Still, his life rarely took him out of the 909 area code. This summer’s trip to Israel, to compete in the Maccabiah Games, will be a whole new world. At 16, spirit and skill will combine on the basketball court. And Retzlaff readily admits, “I don’t know if I’ll come back changed or not. But I think I will.”

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First held in 1932, the Maccabiah Games are an international Jewish multi-sport event, held every four years in Israel. It is the third-largest sporting event in the world with more than 9,000 athletes competing on behalf of nearly 80 countries. The organizers combine competition with sightseeing, as the athletes are able to travel to some of the holy places of Judaism, including the Dead Sea, Masada and Jerusalem. Sanctioned by the International Olympic Committee, it is often called the “Jewish Olympics.” Some of its participants have included Mark Spitz (swimming), Mitch Gaylord and Kerri Strug (gymnastics) and Dolph Schayes (basketball). It also included a 23-year old tennis player, Max Retzlaff.

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Max, Reggie’s mom, competed several times and from the time her son showed an aptitude for sports, she wanted him to participate in the Games. “This is something ever since we saw him loving athletics, we wanted him to play,” Max Retzlaff said. “All the things you learned in Hebrew school will come to life. You’re not just hearing about it, you’re experiencing it.” A 6-foot-2 guard, Retzlaff tried out earlier this year at an open tryout in Los Angeles. A couple months later, he was told he made the team. “It was kind of like…I don’t know how to explain it. I was really happy,” Retzlaff said. “The thought of a whole stadium filled with people of the same religion, cheering. I’m still looking forward to that. It’s like you’re representing your country and your religion.” His mother agreed, remembering her days as a competitor, saying it is not just another international tournament. She still remembers getting goose

bumps during the Opening Ceremonies, when the entire stadium is singing the national anthem of Israel in Hebrew. “Every person can sing it.” “It’s much bigger than you. You make friendships for life,” Max Retzlaff said. “Religion isn’t as important to all people as it once was, but it is an important aspect of who he (Reggie) is and he will learn what it means to be both an athlete and Jewish. It is bringing the two aspects of his life together.” The Maccabiah Games are from July 4-18.

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9 0 9 S OCIAL UPLAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Gourmet Golf Tournament (April 18th) - Winners Ryan Merrill, Kevin Villasenor, Ken Heuber, Dien Stephens

Ribbon Cutting - April 25th- Sola Salon Studios in Upland

Ribbon Cutting - June 1st - Pet Suppies Plus in Upland

Poker Classic - June 9th - Justin Volkmann, Mark Monninger, Jonathan Reader, David Powers

RANCHO CUCAMONGA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE RIBBON CUTTINGS

May 25th - Syndee’s Pet Grooming in Rancho Cucamonga

May 10th- Café Rio in Rancho Cucamonga

CLAREMONT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE RIBBON CUTTINGS

May 18th- Blue House Dentistry in Claremont 22

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June 8th - Nothing Bundt Cake in La Verne J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 7


FO CUS O N UP LAND

Upland’s First Woman Sergeant

Sgt. Marci Williams lifestyle, my family and my home. I’m very appreciative of the opportunity they’ve given me. I would like to repay the department by helping make a difference.” As a sergeant, Williams spends a lot of time out in the field, listening to radio calls and responding to crimes in progress to provide another set of hands and eyes.

Twelve years ago, Marci Williams was working her way through college to be a teacher when former Upland Police Chief Steve Adams convinced her to join the force as a part-time police cadet. Adams and other department higher ups frequently dined at the Steer and Stein in Rancho Cucamonga where Williams was a waitress and something about the way she conducted herself impressed them. Two years later, Adams offered to pay for her to attend the police academy. Williams hesitated at first because she only had one quarter left to finish college. But, she decided to quit school, enroll in the academy and become a police officer. Two years later, she went back to school full time to complete her studies while working full time for the department. In March, Williams was promoted to sergeant, becoming the first woman in the department to hold that rank. Chief Brian Johnson, who joined the department in 2015, opened up the sergeant’s J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 7

test to patrol officers instead of just detectives for the first time and Williams finished number one. “I looked at it as an opportunity to create a greater pool of talented candidates and really to push people to excel and demonstrate their leadership and dedication to the organization,” Johnson said. Calling Williams’ promotion an “incredible milestone,” Johnson said, “I think it’s important for young women to see a mentor, someone they could look up to and aspire to succeed. Marci is that individual not only in the police department but in the community. I just feel blessed and honored that it happened on my watch.

“My guys are very proficient,” Willliams said. “I’m only there if they have questions or see something wrong.” While she’s never fired her gun on the job, Williams says she unholsters her gun on a daily basis. “There’s a difference between taking your gun out of the holster and putting your finger on the trigger,” she said. “Your finger doesn’t go on the trigger unless you’re going to shoot.” As a woman, Williams said she might communicate better or be more compassionate than her male counterparts; yet, men bring certain aspects to the job that she lacks. “If there is a weakness in one person, there’s a strength in another and that’s how we work with each other as a team,” she said.

“It’s certainly nothing that I did. This was all Marci’s commitment to her education and developing herself into a leader and a professional. She was rewarded accordingly.” Williams, who has a 10-monthold daughter, Emme Rose, and is married to an Ontario police officer, said, “This job has afforded me my

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GOODBYE

U P L A N D F I R E D E PA R T M E N T B Y M AT T K O M O T O

Upland Fire Department services transitions to San Bernardino County Fire Department

O

n July 22 the transition of Upland Fire Department services to San Bernardino County Fire Department is expected to happen. All Upland firefighters will keep their jobs but most will have to move to different locations. In late May, Upland firefighters had already finished putting in their bids for different stations throughout San Bernardino County. By June they learned where they would be placed. One Upland Fire 24

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Department Captain Jeff Schneider was also putting in bids of his own. An Upland Fire Department Captain since 2009, he was born and raised in Upland. He was a reserve firefighter in 2002 and worked up the ranks. It is anticipated that the Upland Fire Department transition to San Bernardino will happen smoothly. Earlier there was a small possibility of opposition of the move by a certain area of Upland, but it was highly unlikely.

“We’re optimistic that it [opposition to transfer] doesn’t happen because the scenario is [has become] that Upland Fire is very weak in what we’re able to continue to provide to the community in terms of our apparatus that’s failing, our fire stations that are crumbling, our lack of adequate staffing resources for our call volume that increases year over year,” said Captain Schneider. “So we’re very hopeful that the residents will see that moving towards San Bernardino County

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town area that has some of the city’s older buildings with apartments above businesses, convalescent homes and a lot of high risk areas.

Fire Department is their best option as far as fire services now and in the future.” Captain Schneider said a few changes would be made and that Upland’s four fire stations would be consolidated to three stations. In the end though, the city will still get more county resources to effectively provide firefighter services. The city would also continue to utilize the REACH medivac helicopter service that would go into a San Bernardino County partnership use.

Overall, the move to San Bernardino County will be better for the city. With vast resources from county, other city fire departments wouldn’t have to aid Upland as much when call volume gets too high. Captain Schneider said in Upland if all four fire engines are on call which sometimes happens, there is an automatic aid agreement with other surrounding fire departments to aid them. The next closest units from Rancho Cucamonga or Montclair would be called into service. At the same time, with more county resources Upland could now help out its neighbors more often as well. Upland fire stations are very close to the Rancho Cucamonga border and are actually closer to a lot of the Rancho Cucamonga border homes than the Rancho stations. If Rancho Cucamonga units are on call, then Upland will go into Rancho Cucamonga and provide those same shared services back and forth. As the transition occurs later this month, 12 Upland firefighters will stay in the city. They will provide guidance to new incoming county firefighters and inform them of Upland’s target hazards,

their normal response areas, normal residence of citizens and the general dynamics of Upland City. Captain Schneider said the transition is going very smoothly. The County of San Bernardino is extremely professional and a great organization he is proud to serve. “None of our employees will be losing their jobs. Everybody will maintain a job position. The county has assured that everyone will have a welcome home in the County of San Bernardino. Now there are a couple individuals that will see some demotions, but it’s only positions that are the highest. The fire chief, obviously San Bernardino County doesn’t need another fire chief so he’s going to be going back down to a captain’s position. A couple of the battalion chiefs are going to get bumped down to captain positions as well, however, there is promotional opportunities for them to get their positions right back in the county very shortly after the transition. It’s just that the county wants to evaluate the highest of abilities of leadership in their department and that is their right, and our chiefs graciously agreed to that as an acceptable practice with agreement in the county,” said Captain Schneider.

Station 162 will close since it’s a very slow station and the city would utilize fire station 12 more often. Station 12 is a San Bernardino County fire station at the border of Upland that already serves San Antonio Heights. The fire engine from 162 will be moved to station 164 at The Colonies. The ladder truck will move to station 161 which is downtown near the civic center. Overall this move will be better as a fire engine and ladder truck will be in one central location for a high call volume area. Captain Schneider said response times will be enhanced for the down-

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HEALTH MATTERS Brought to you by San Antonio Regional Hospital

ER OR URGENT CARE? JUST IN TIME FOR SUMMER It’s official—the kids are out of school and summer vacation is in full swing. As we spend more time outdoors participating in activities, unexpected accidents and injuries are more likely to occur. In fact, emergency departments and urgent care centers see predictable spikes in injury visits during the summer months. Fortunately, not all summer illnesses or injuries require the emergency room. In fact, urgent care centers are well suited for many unexpected health needs, whether you are suffering from an illness in the evening or over the weekend, your allergies are out of control, or you sustain a minor injury engaging in summer activities. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the most common summer hazards include: Falls and Sports Injuries - With so many outdoor activities, falls and injuries are bound to happen. Falling during a bike ride in the park, landing in the sand playing beach volleyball, even getting bounced off a trampoline could land you with moderate or severe strains, sprains, fractures, or abrasions. 26

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Head Injuries - Head injuries can happen from skateboarding, bicycling, or rollerblading, especially when not wearing a helmet. Insect Bites - Stinging insects, as well as ticks, are plentiful during the summer. For small bites, there are a number of over-thecounter topical creams available to reduce skin itching and swelling. Some bug bites, however, can cause severe allergic reactions, and ticks can carry Lyme disease. Heat Cramps, Heat Exhaustion, and Heat Stroke - Heat injury can easily escalate. Heat injuries have three levels of severity: heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke. If you experience fatigue from sun exposure, seek immediate medical attention as heat stroke could become life-threatening. Summer sports and athletic activities significantly increase your perspiration, draining the body of water and electrolytes, so make sure you stay hydrated.

Burns - Minor burns from BBQ grills, fireworks, and campfires can happen in an instant. Avoid distractions and keep little ones away from hot areas. Make sure there is plenty of adult supervision and that children are playing a distance away from anything with heat or flames. Food Poisoning – This can often occur when perishable items are left outdoors for extended periods during the day. While most people hope their summer will unfold without incident, it’s a great idea to know where your local urgent care center is located should you need it. San Antonio’s Emergency Department will always play a critical role in providing communities with life-saving services, but many illnesses and injuries are more appropriate for an urgent care center where care can be provided more rapidly and at a lower cost to the patient. J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 7


Urgent care centers are well suited for many typical summer injuries.

When to Visit an Emergency Room

When to Choose Urgent Care

Difficulty breathing, shortness of breath

Colds, sinus infections, allergies, coughs

Chest or upper abdominal pain or pressure lasting two minutes or more

Flu

Fainting, sudden dizziness or weakness

Earaches

Changes in vision

Burning with urination

Difficulty speaking

Sore throats

Confusion or changes in mental status; unusual behavior or difficulty waking

Migraines

Any sudden or severe pain

Low-grade fevers

Uncontrolled bleeding

Rashes

Severe/persistent vomiting or diarrhea

Sprains

Coughing or vomiting blood

Back pain

Unusual abdominal pain

Body aches

Severe headache or vomiting following a head injury, unconsciousness or uncontrolled bleeding

Mild nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea Non-severe burns or cuts

San Antonio Urgent Care centers are open extended hours and weekends to provide quick, quality care. X-ray services and lab tests can often be done onsite, and patients can usually schedule their same-day appointment online while waiting in the comfort of their own home

(sarh.org/inquicker).

Rancho San Antonio Medical Plaza 7777 Milliken Avenue, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730 909.948.8100

Eastvale San Antonio Medical Plaza 12442 Limonite Avenue, Eastvale, CA 91752 951.393.3010

Sierra San Antonio Medical Plaza 16465 Sierra Lakes Parkway, Fontana, CA 92336 909.434.1150

Minor broken bones Eye irritation, swelling, or pain

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Our past has taught us to always look forward.

So we can offer our patients the most advanced surgical care right now. Finding a better way to treat our patients has been the driving force behind everything we do for nearly 80 years. Long ago, we learned that when we put patients first, our medical and rehabilitation services have a lasting impact. This is why we made the decision to offer the most technologically advanced equipment available – so we could assure better surgical outcomes for people in our community. Now the area’s top surgeons can perform minimally invasive surgical procedures with the latest da Vinci® Xi™ surgery system. They can carry out less invasive partial knee replacements with the Mako™ robotic arm-assisted surgery system, and so much more. Of course, we also sought the highest caliber of nurses who specialize in surgical care. When you consider how much we have to offer, there’s no time like the present to move forward with an elective surgery.

Take a virtual tour. Visit us at www.casacolina.org/tour

255 East Bonita Avenue (at Garey), Pomona, CA 28

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909/596-7733

www.casacolina.org

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What You Should Know about Seniors and Driving By Harvey D. Cohen, M.D., Board-certified Internal and Geriatric Medicine and Medical Director of the Casa Colina Senior Evaluation Program As people get older, their driving habits change. Retirement, different schedules, and new activities affect when and where they drive. Most older adults drive safely because they have a lot of experience behind the wheel. Many “police themselves” by avoiding driving at night, avoiding freeways, and driving shorter distances. But, when they are involved in crashes, they are often killed or hurt more seriously than younger drivers, if they are physically frail. The good news is that older people are more likely to survive crashes than in the past because of overall better health, safer cars and roads, and stricter state laws on license renewals. Age-related decline in vision and hearing, as well as certain health conditions and medications, can affect driving skills. Health problems don’t always mean that driving needs to stop, but they do require extra vigilance, awareness and a willingness to correct them. Some elderly may have problems with memory and miss exits on the freeway or get lost frequently when returning home.

Driving is a complicated task. It requires the driver to see and hear clearly; pay close attention to other cars, traffic signs, signals, and pedestrians, and react quickly to events. Drivers must be able to accurately judge distances, speeds and monitor movement on both sides, as well as in front of them. Pain or stiffness in the driver’s neck can make it more difficult to look over their shoulder, to change lanes, or look left or right at intersections to check for other traffic or pedestrians. Leg pain may cause difficulties to move the foot from the gas to the break pedal. Diminished arm strength may make it difficult to turn the steering wheel. Also reaction time slows down with age. Seniors may be slower to stop the vehicle because reaction time slows down with age. They also may be slower to see a vehicle emerging from side streets and driveways or to realize that the vehicle ahead of them has slowed down or stopped. Common mistakes of older drivers include: Failing to yield the right of way; failing to stay in a lane; misjudging the time or distance needed to turn in front of traffic; and failing to stop completely at stop signs, speeding or driving too slowly. J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 7

Here are some tips for safe driving: 1. Get eyes checked every year. Turn “brightness” up on the instrument panel of the dash board. Keep the windshields, mirrors and headlights clean. 2. Hearing must be checked annually. If hearing aids are prescribed, make sure they are worn while driving. Be careful when opening car windows as drafts can sometimes impair the effectiveness of hearing aids. 3. Talk with a doctor about the effects that ailments or medications may have on driving ability. For example, a person with glaucoma may find tinted eyeglass lenses effective in reducing glare. 4. Get plenty of rest and sleep well. 5. Know one’s limitations. If a driving situation makes you uncomfortable, don’t do it.

Casa Colina’s Senior Evaluation Program offers a comprehensive senior assessment that includes evaluating driving skills. An occupational therapist who is also a certified driver rehabilitation specialist provides the evaluation and, if needed, recommends car modifications or tools to keep a senior driving as long as possible. Even if one finds that they need to reduce driving or give up the keys to keep themselves and others safe, it doesn’t mean the end of independence. Seeking alternative methods of transportation can offer health and soul benefits, as well as a welcome change in lifestyle!

To learn more about this innovative outpatient program designed to help seniors stay as independent as possible, please call Casa Colina Hospital and Centers for Healthcare at 909/596-7733, ext. 3800.

Harvey D. Cohen M.D., Board-certified Internal and Geriatric Medicine and Medical Director of the Casa Colina Senior Evaluation Program

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Summer

Restaurant Extravaganza! B Y J O H N C A L DE R W O O D

50-Fifty Asian Fusion Cuisine 201 North Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont, CA

This summer, treat yourself to something fun and exciting! 50-Fifty Asian Fu­ sion Cuisine was founded by Joyce Patra, who was born and raised in Bang­ kok, Thailand. After studying in Thailand and Australia she moved to America and opened her first restaurant back in 2003, called the Bangkok Blue Thai Cuisine in La Verne. Her expertise in hospitality shows through the moment

Last Drop Café

119 Harvard Ave., N, Claremont, CA They feed the village at the Last Drop Café, and that’s not an understatement. Anyone who’s hip to the Claremont scene will tell you that the place to go for a breakfast sandwich and a nice cup of coffee is the Last Drop Café, and that’s probably why their line is out and around the corner every morning. The 20 minute wait is definitely worth it, once you’ve taken a bite of their toasted parmesan cheese bagel topped with bacon, ham and eggs, then smothered in melted provolone and cheddar you’ll be coming back morn­ ing after morning. The Last Drop Café also serves up the freshest cookies, home made each morning and paired perfectly with any sandwich you order. They’re also more than just a great breakfast; their chicken sal­ ad sandwich is something out of this world. The Last Drop Café is like family, their tiny little hole in the wall shop hides how huge they are in this community, from charity fundraisers like “Shoes that fit” to participat­ ing in all the local events the Last Drop Café is truly a member of our community.

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you step in. The staff is courteous, quick and kind. Treating yourself to a glass of wine and some curry is an excellent treat that is done just right. The atmosphere and setting of 50-Fifty make it perfect for a get together with a few socialites during your next trip to the Claremont Village or the perfect place for a summer date. The vegan dishes are also some of the best you’ll find in the Village.

Juancho’s Mexican Grill

2802 South Milliken Ave., Suite B, Ontario, CA And 2440 W Arrow Route, D, Upland, CA Juancho’s Mexican Grill has been serving authen­ tic south of the border cuisine for over 20 years. Their first location opened in Ontario, and the second location in Upland. Their bottomless taco lunch buffet can bring spice and flavor to any hum drum week day routine with their fresh salsas, choice meats and house made corn tortillas. The atmosphere is quaint and festive; the staff is in­ credibly inviting and friendly as well, however the true star of the show for me is their cocktail menu. There’s hardly any better way to beat the summer heat than with an ice-cold beer, or better yet a perfectly blended margarita.

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Cask’ n Cleaver Steakhouse 8689 Ninth St., Rancho Cucamonga, CA

Charlie’s Stars and Stripes All American Deli & Bar

Year after year the Cask’ n Cleaver gets voted the “Best Steak­ house” by reviewers all over the Inland Empire. Since 1967 they’ve been serving up only top choice Midwestern corn-fed beef, aged to perfection for the best flavor and tenderness that you can find. Their top cuts of beef are part of a tradition that you find at very many places this day and age. Still family owned and operated by Linda and Chuck Keagle, the Cask’ N Cleaver is an old-world steakhouse, the kind of place that every new trendy barbecue joint is trying to imitate, but can never beat. Coming in for dinner is a great choice but their lunch menu is something you’ll want to check out too. From their salad bar, to their top sirloin the lunch menu has become a local favorite as well as a family tradition.

296 N 2nd Ave, Upland, CA

Every day is the 4th of July at Charlie’s Stars and Stripes, in Downtown Upland. The restaurant formally known as the Aria was renamed after Charlie Hendrix, a brave US soldier who gave his life for our country while serving in Iraq back in 2012. Patriotism is the key word when stepping into this open and sunny corner deli. Their craft burgers and sandwiches have been given some cute patriotic nicknames, but don’t let the whimsy fool you, these sandwiches are serious. Good portions served on artisan bread rolls, from Jalapeno Cheese, to Sourdough they will fill you up and have you coming back for more. Again, their full-service bar is an excellent night cap to a hot summer night, from which I usually order a crisp pine­ apple cider to go with my usual Corned Beef sandwich served with fresh homemade chips.

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Summer

Restaurant Extravaganza! Le Gourmet

121 W. Foothill Blvd. Suite D., Upland, CA Le Gourmet is a little-known secret that everyone should be talking about. This French restaurant that was founded by French chef Ange and his wife Nicole, who passed the torch on to two young brothers, chef Atilano and Juan who are an absolute delight. You won’t find higher quality cuts of meat, fresh ingredients and a dedicated intimate understanding of the art of French food anywhere else in the inland empire. From skillfully crafted appetizers such as lightly hand breaded calamari and buttery escargot, to the filet mignon with a port wine sauce, rack of lamb flavored with fresh herbs, garlic and mint sauce, and duck leg confit with a robust orange sauce are some of the lunch and dinner menu items. After your meal, you should certainly end with their signature Grand Mariner soufflé served with crème anglaise. A dessert served in style at your table that is a perfect example of French culinary pride, never too rich yet sweet and delicate. For the summer, they will also be serving a seasonal vichyssoise soup as well as a nicoise salad. You can’t go wrong with any choice you pick at Le Gourmet. Whether you’re a fan of French cuisine or have yet to experience it, a culi­ nary adventure awaits you at Le Gourmet located in the heart of Upland, I couldn’t recommend it more.

Dinner: Mon - Sat 5PM - 9PM Lunch: Mon - Fri 11AM - 2PM Closed Sunday (Except Special Events)

French Restaurant

3 Course Dinner Special Valid Mon - Thursday

Your choice of:

909-981-1716

121 W Foothill Blvd Ste D, Upland (JUST WEST OF EUCLID AVE IN VONS SHOPPING CENTER)

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2295

$

-Soup du Jour or Salad - The Chef's Entree Specials - Mini Grand Marnier Soufflé or Cream Caramel Flan

Not available holidays or special occasions. Prices are subjected to change. No Substitution. Cannot be combined with other offers. this special can change without notice. Exp 8/31/17

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Yianni’s Greek Restaurant 238 Yale Ave, Claremont, CA

Stepping into Yianni’s Greek restaurant in the Claremont Vil­ lage and you will be immediately greeted by the fresh aroma of perfectly seasoned cuts of meat as they are slow cooked to perfection. The atmosphere here is a perfect blend of the rustic romance reminiscent of a Greek Countryside blended with the sophisticated elegance that you would expect to find right in the chic Claremont Village. The food matches the atmosphere in both quality and style. Head chef, owner and chief operator Greg prepares each meal himself, taught by his father John AKA Yianni himself who learned his craft serving in the Navy. Greg has been perfecting his skill at the restaurant that was opened by his parents over 30 years ago which first opened as a café. When I stopped in to visit, I was immediately welcomed in with an inviting warmth that can make anyone feel like an aristocrat. With enthusiasm, he insisted we try the Saganaki Cheese appetizer first. A crisped kefalotyri goat’s cheese that’s ignited with a three-foot flame right at our table side. The crowded restaurant let off an excited awe in unison as the dish flamed up and sizzled and even that

Elvira’s Mexican Grill 415 W Foothill Blvd, Claremont, CA

A great restaurant isn’t born without dedication and a passion that resonates with customers. Oscar Torres, owner of Elvira’s Mexican Grill in Upland has both. Elvira’s, a family owned and operated business, has thrived but hasn’t been without struggle. Starting from humble beginnings and surviving the harsh turn of the economy, the restaurant has blossomed into a local and cherished favorite. Named after Torres’ mother Elvira, who with his father Fermin, exposed the family to restaurant ownership starting in the 70’s. In 2003 Torres decided to open his own restaurant in Upland. “Year after year, the restaurant numbers have gone up and are nowhere near the industry average. It’s a huge blessing for us as a family,” said Torres. “When you see your restaurant full of people…you’re just so impressed. It’s really satisfying.” Elvira’s has gotten so full, in fact, they’ve ex­ panded to a second location.

paled in comparison to the piquant flavor that melded perfect­ ly with the fresh pita that it was served with. Next, we had the opportunity to sample the lunch gryo. The gyro meat was a sweet and savory lamb that you can imme­ diately tell was slow roasted on the rotisserie, never rushed. It was topped with fresh vegetables and a tangy, crumbly feta cheese all wrapped up in another fresh piece of pita. Lastly they brought to our table the chef’s personal favorite dinner; the most succulent and savory lamb shank that I’ve ever tasted in my life. Served with a seasoned medley of vege­ tables and rice, this cut of lamb shank was broiled for 9 hours. The meat not only was ready to fall off the bone, the bone was splitting from how long it was slow cooked, a sign the long hours and dedication that went into preparing this fine and delicate cut of meat. At the end of my meal I found it hard to tell what I had enjoyed more, the exceptionally well-crafted meals that made their way to our table, or the perfect date night atmosphere that seemed to pull me in and keep me cozy. Either way, I will certainly be back to Yianni’s often and that’s really a good thing for our community as they donate their proceeds to local charitable organizations and participate in fundraiser events. If you would like to experience the food at Yianni’s Greek Restaurant, you can find them at 238 Yale Avenue, in the Clare­ mont Village.

BY CLARISSA TOLL

For Torres and his family, the opening of their second location in the Claremont Schoolhouse Center is a testament to how far they’ve come.

second location with 35 staff members in total, insuring the same home-like environment is crucial.

The family’s faith and commitment shows through their hard work.

“Now that Claremont is a part of the family,” it is important that customers at both locations “feel like they are home,” said Torres.

“We’re Christian and we’re firm believers that the Lord’s the one in control of everything,” said Torres. “When you’re going through (struggles), it’s very hard…So when you see the performance of the restaurant, it’s unbelievable,” continued Torres. The Torres’ pride themselves on creating a wel­ coming and home-like environment for their customers. Often the family is seen greeting, working and sharing with customers in the restaurant, and the new location is no different.

Customers will be greeted with the same great food, welcoming environment and friendly service they have come to expect and love at the original Elvira’s. For Torres, the entire experience has been both gratifying and inspiring. The restaurant isn’t just about covering the bills anymore, it has become so much more. When asked to survey how far Elvira’s has come, Torres said: “I can’t believe we did this.”

With a staff that has grown over the years from just Torres, his wife and daughters to the opening of a

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Summer

Family Fun

Hangar 18 Indoor Climbing Gym

Over 12,000 square feet of textured climbing surface, including top-rope, multiple bouldering areas, and lead routes up to seventy feet long. 256 Stowell St., Suite A, Upland, CA 91786 (909) 931-5991 www.climbhangar18.com

Boomers Amusement Park

Upland’s favorite place for fun has something for everyone; it’s like having an amusement park in your own backyard! From indoor and outdoor Mini Golf to Go Karts, our attractions are sure to keep the fun going for hours. 1500 W. 7th St., Upland, CA 91786 (909) 946-9555 www.boomersparks.com

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Exodus Escape Room Exodus Escape Room is a real-life adventure game where you are locked in a room. you have 60 minutes to work together with other players, crack codes and solve ciphers to escape. Small groups of 2-14 people. 9269 Utica Ave. Ste 120, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730 (714) 392-3802 www.exodusescaperoom.com

House of Play

Wizarding World Lightshow BY JOH N CAL D ERWOOD

There’s really no better way to spend your summer vacation with the family then a destination trip. Living in the heart of the Inland Empire, we’re presented with a wonderful opportunity to head just about any direction and find something entertaining and beautiful.

House of Play is your indoor destination for fun, safe indoor play for children of all ages. 10582 Foothill Blvd., Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730 (909) 476-4476 www.hopindoorpalyground.com

This summer, if you’re looking to get out and see something magical and unique, then Universal Studios Hollywood has something in store for you. The Wizarding World of Harry Potter which opened last year with immense detail is inviting guests back to re-experience J.K. Rowling’s magical world. Since last year when they opened the new land, they’ve already jumped on improving the experience for all, such as upgrades to brand new rides and starting this summer they’ve started a dazzling lightshow. As the sun sets on Hogsmeade village, you can experience the state-of-the-art spectacle called “The Nighttime Lights at Hogwarts Castle.” The show is a breathtaking display of special effects that are projected onto the castle and into the night’s sky, which is accompanied by a musical arrangement by Academy Award-winning composer John Williams, who created the scores for the film series, conducted by William Ross and recorded by the world famous London Symphony Orchestra.

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The lightshow will be held multiple times per night, and is a wonder to see for all fans, and park guests. There’s also no better way to enjoy the summer air than a frozen Butterbeer, or a ride on the “Flight of the Hippogriff.” Or “Harry Potter and the Forbidden Journey” which was recently upgraded with new 4K-HD laser projectors that project at an astounding 120 framesper-second. The atmosphere is amazing, the show is magical and it all comes together to prove once again that Universal Studios Hollywood truly is the entertainment capital of LA. 909 MAGAZINE

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city’s prized mountain range backdrop. Led by fine artist and professor Chris Trueman, the students spent six days completing the 145-foot mural of the San Gabriel Mountains, which took more than 180 cans of spray paint (for the color gradient background) and 30 paint pens (to draw the mountain range using U.S. Geological Survey topographic maps). The mural is featured on the exterior wall of the mall’s parking deck ramp, facing west.

PUNK ME TENDER Celebrated artist Punk Me Tender painted a 28’ W x 14’ H mural featuring a fashionable woman wearing a dress inspired by an Alexander McQueen design,

Montclair Place Launches Year-Long Series on Creativity Local Student Artists Kickoff ‘ART WORKS’ with City-themed Mural for a Series of Music, Digital and Culinary Art Art Works is a unique art installation series at Montclair Place, formerly Montclair Plaza, which is part of the center’s year-long celebration of creativity and its own reimaging. Curated by John Wolf Advisory of Los Angeles, the interior and exterior art installations will feature mixed media and interactive works created by a combination of well-known artists and local college students. Art Works kicked-off in April with a colorful mural of the San Gabriel mountains completed by three art students from Chaffey College and fine artist and professor Chris Trueman. The 145-ft mural is featured on the exterior wall of the mall’s

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parking deck ramp, facing west. Since the initial launch, Montclair Place has welcomed additional artwork to the center from celebrated artist Punk Me Tender, who painted a large fashion themed mural, which can be seen on the upper level of the mall near the East End escalators. A third mural is currently underway from acclaimed hyper realistic artist Nate Frizzell and is expected to be completed later this week.

STUDENT MURAL Montclair Place originated Art Works with three local student artists from Chaffey College who painted an exterior mural themed around the

who is posed among dripping chandeliers while walking her pooches. The mural is featured on the upper level of the mall near the East End escalators. The artist, who is best known for his outdoor murals, constructed the dress using 10 yards of silk, taffeta and mixed media along with stencils, spray paint and brushed-on acrylic paint for the remainder of the mural. Using a mix of graffiti and fabric is an original approach by the artist who says that “it never fails to intrigue and captivate the viewer.” The artwork selected by Punk Me Tender is made to inspire elegance as the artist himself is inspired by fashion and style. The theme behind the artwork embodies the fashionforward shopper at Montclair Place who’s always looking for the next trend. Montclair Place continues to be a key shopping destination in the Inland Empire.

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Exploring the Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology BY JESS ICA T HO R PE

There are many places in Southern California that offer educational opportunities for children and families. Some museums utilize hands-on displays and other interactive exhibits to keep children of all ages engaged while they learn about various subjects. While there are numerous museums located within an hour’s drive of the Inland Empire, there are also quality museums for families to explore within our cities. The Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology is located on the Webb Schools Campus in Claremont.

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It is the only nationally accredited museum in the United States to be located on a high school campus, and it provides Webb students unique opportunities to research fossils and collaborate their findings with museum staff. It is not unusual to see student volunteers at the museum during outreach events, and Webb students are even involved in collecting fossils as well as providing basic cleaning and conservation of specimens. In fact, over ninety-five percent of the 150,000 fossils in the museum’s collection were unearthed by Webb students and staff members during student fossil collecting trips. The museum is divided into two sections: The Hall of Life and The Hall of Footprints. The Hall of Life guides visitors through Earth’s 4.6 billion year history, and includes displays featuring ancient environments as well as the fossil remains of life forms that lived during

various geologic eras. The Hall of Footprints displays fossil tracks and trackways from various animals throughout history. The museum has designated “hands-on” sections, but parents should be aware that there are many exhibits to be experienced without touching. Families visiting the Alf Museum may enjoy looking at fossils from various eras. Children are able to stand face-to-face and marvel at the monstrous skull cast of a tyrannosaurus rex. The museum is also home to “Dinosaur Joe”, which is the smallest and most complete Parasaurolophus ever found. Several exhibits are available for children to touch designated “hands-on” fossils. The museum includes a pretend dig site and a small activity area with books, puzzles and dinosaur figures to entertain children of various ages. The Raymond M. Alf Museum is an exciting excursion, and with the short drive, a trip to the museum won’t consume an entire day. For additional information regarding the Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology, including hours, admission and upcoming events, call (909) 624-2798 or visit www. alfmuseum.org.

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Senior Fitness:

The Time has Come B Y AL AN H ASK VI TZ

O

ne of the fastest growing groups in the nation are seniors over 65 and with that comes considerable interest in wellness and fitness. Fortunately, the 909 area has an abundance of facilities to help with active senior fitness centers in Claremont, Ontario, and Rancho Cucamonga among others. Indeed, there are at least 50 businesses that offer fitness training in the area besides the larger facilities such as 24 Hour and LA Fitness. It is no secret that physical training helps seniors both mentally and physically. The most important part is to find a group that can be both challenging and enjoyable. Such sessions come in several forms from the basic classes using chairs and personal instruction all the way to the challenges of the Senior Olympic Games where oldsters partake in various categories for the gold. It is estimated that only 32 percent of the population over 65 years of age have a regular exercise program and those who do not exercise have a 35 percent chance of being obese. Even exercising 30 minutes every few days can bring that rate into the 20 percent range. To help in that regard there are over 70 books dealing with senior fitness on Amazon and over a million references to articles on the same subject on Google. In other words, there is literally no excuse for not trying to get fit either at home or at a center. In addition, exercise has also been shown to have a positive effect on some areas of cognition, especially the executive-control processes, and data indicates that it helps cognitive and neural plasticity throughout one’s life span. Aging is associated with a decline in muscle strength, mass, and aerobic capacity that contributes to reduced mobility and impaired quality of life. For example The National Council on Aging states that one-fourth of Americans aged 65+ fall each year. Every 11 seconds, an older adult is treated in the emergency room for a fall. Every 19 minutes, an older adult dies from a fall. Simply put, regular physical activity shows a significant improvement in the quality of life, including benefits such as improvements in cardiovascular, functional, metabolic, cognitive, and the overall quality of life. The type of program a senior decides to use depends on their doctor’s recommendation and their starting level of fitness. There are programs where the senior sits on a chair and others where they are walking and jogging well over a mile. Regardless of the level, J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 7

it is essential that the senior continue with the program or change it to something they feel is more appropriate for their fitness level. With all the choices it may be difficult to know where to start. There are two types of training. One is for strength and the other is a program that works on your cardio vascular system. You need both of them in moderation. If you go to a facility to work-out ask one major question; does the trainer or class Senior Olympian Alan Haskvitz, (75) leader have experience working with seniors? gets ready for 5K run. Dr. Esther Haskvitz of Sage University recommends looking for exercise leaders who To review, first check with your doctor. Next, see if your have expertise in training seniors and know health coverage offers some discounted memberships. how to reduce the risks for falls, understand Thirdly, call your city and ask about the Senior Center offerlimitations and the aging process. ings. They are either free or low cost and there is a variety. Depending on the facility, classes could Indeed, Rancho Cucamonga has 1500 people signed up include aquatic, cardiac, cycling, core, dance, for its fitness room while Claremont greets 1000 users a Pilates, running, strength, yoga, Tai Chi, and month. Finally, consider improving your fitness level your Zumba. Each program helps and is offered new job. at a variety of levels so there is no need to If you want some motivation, check Impossible Dreamers be embarrassed as a newcomer. In fact, on Netflicks and see what is possible. there are even classes just for seniors such Not how long, but how well you have lived. -Seneca as Zumba Gold and Silver Sneakers. If you are just starting out you might even consider aqua fitness as the water helps moderate the pressure on your muscles and joints as you build some cardio fitness. Now paying for those classes is another case 10832 Laurel St., Suite 201 for patience. Many health Rancho Cucamonga care providers are willing to invest in seniors and 1370 Valley Vista Dr. Suite 200 offer discounts at gyms Diamond Bar or even full memberships depending on their plan as providers 866-213-2242 have a vested interest in healthy members. It is best if you contact your provider as offerings can change. For example, at the current time BlueCross and BlueShield offers a For Singles/Individuals. $100 additional for married/couples. CALL NOW! partial reimbursement for gym memberships and NO MONTHLY DUES/MEMBERSHIP • NO SEMINAR REQUIRED Kaiser Permanente offers Living Trust Package includes: discounts through partner All Documents repared by our programs. United Health • Certification of Trust Attorney, not a paralegal. Care may offer some and • Pour-over Will Silver Sneakers is offered • Includes Notary of All Docs Mark Lansing at several locations. Scan • Power of Attorney for Finances AT T O R N E Y AT L A W and Humania also may CA Bar# 297079 • All Documents are prepared for you offer some fitness memby Our Attorney - Not a Paralegal bership discounts.

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LawCorner B Y D AV I D M . G R O S S M A N

SENIORS AND SCAMS rate. Scammers use telephone, mail, print advertising and internet advertising to approach their victims. Scams to watch out for in 2017 are: Disaster Mitigation – Disaster mitigation is a lucrative business. Lack of oversight makes it easy for unscrupulous companies to take advantage of seniors worried about the expense of a potential water, sewer, utility disaster. The scammers frequently overstate the frequency of the disaster, the cost to repair the disaster, and the coverage they will provide.

Attorney David M. Grossman E S TAT E P L A N N I N G & ELDER LAW SPECIALIST Seniors, as many other groups, are the target of predatory scammers. This is so because seniors have two major fears: the fear of outliving their savings and the fear of going into a nursing home. Seniors are often lonely. Further, seniors do not have the computer skills of their children and grandchildren. That is not to say that seniors do not have computer skills; however, seniors are not as intuitive as the younger generations when it comes to computers and the internet. This leaves them more vulnerable to scams involving the internet. Scammers, who are nothing more than financial predators, are using the seniors’ need for information about nursing homes and financial issues as an opportunity to swindle. This need for information and lack of computer/internet skills and intuition, allows the predators to swindle seniors at an alarming 40

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Online Loans – Beware of unscrupulous online loan service providers. Fake loan companies with fake websites have taken seniors for thousands of dollars. Most fake loan companies require applicants to pay fees in advance of securing the loan. Phishing Imposters – No one is immune! Many phishing scams masquerade as the emails or websites of legitimate business and organizations. They use the logo and good name of reputable charities, banks, government agencies and businesses. Their goal is often to install mallware on your computer or steal your private information. Never open an email or click on any link in social media accounts, unless you are certain you know who it is from, what it is about and if it is legitimate. Lottery & Prize Winner Scams – Lottery and prize-winning scams come in many shapes and forms. Don’t fall for fantastic offerings of foreign-lottery winnings, dream vacations, exciting prizes of money, a new car, or new technology. If it is to good to be true; it probably is not true. Tech Support Scams – Seniors are aggressively targeted by predators pretending to be Microsoft, Apple or other tech support companies. Victims

are contacted and informed that their computer has been infected with a virus. In order to “fix” the problem, the victim is directed to a website, asked to provide their credit card information as payment, and told to download an anti-virus program. Internet Dating – We’ve all heard of on-line dating scams that try to get you to send money to someone on Ghana, Nigeria, or some other foreign county. But the number of people falling for these scams is growing at an alarming rate. According to the FBI, such fraud costs users over $100 million. Many of those being targeted are seniors longing to get back in the dating pool. HERO Program - Another new scam that is affecting the 909 area is the scam surrounding the HERO program. The HERO program is a government backed financing program designed to allow seniors to upgrade their homes at little or no initial cost. However, the financing ends up with a tax lien on the seniors’ house that the home-remodeling contractor negligently and fraudulently forgets to tell the homeowner. The scam has become so widespread throughout the Inland Empire that the Riverside County District Attorney is investigating the abuse In conclusion, if you or a family member feel that you have been scammed report the matter to the local authorities or contact an attorney to investigate the matter. Do not sweep the issue under the rug because you think you did a silly thing or should have known better. The scammers who target and take advantage of seniors are extremely sophisticated and know what they are doing. The only way to stop scammers is to prosecute them. David Grossman is a local attorney who practiced elder law and estate planning in Upland.

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MONEY SENSE

Divorce, Remarriage and Their True Cost BY STA CY A L L R E D, D I R E CT O R , W E A LT H S T R U C TU R I NG GR O U P AT BA NK O F A M E R I CA M E R R I LL LYN CH Whether you’re getting divorced, recovering from one or watching it unfold for a friend or family member, consider these steps for minimizing the financial consequences. TA K E P RE CAUT I O NS The single most effective divorce tool is a carefully drafted prenuptial agreement. Although entering a marriage with an exit strategy may seem calculating, many couples can benefit from having one. “A prenup is generally good insurance,” says Arlene Dubin, a matrimonial attorney. She recommends not only spelling out what would happen to key assets like real estate and investment portfolios, but also outlining how to deal with debts incurred before and during the marriage. K N OW W H AT ’ S AT S TA KE The first financial shock to face is the cost of the divorce itself. You’re already splitting assets; when you add a messy divorce with high legal fees, it becomes a considerable financial and emotional drain. It’s vital to have someone on your side who has a handle on a financial exit strategy that meets your needs. Start with a complete inventory to help you understand what you’re entitled to receive or retain. Assets should include retirement plans, savings and checking accounts, properties and pensions, business interests, and inheritances. In addition, list any financial obligations or debts that you and your spouse may have incurred. You should document each item by gathering tax returns, paycheck stubs, wills, trust instruments, bank and credit card statements, insurance policies, property deeds, and brokerage account documents. Financial housekeeping is essential during a divorce, arming you with the knowledge needed to help make the right financial decisions. Y OU R FA I R S H ARE Splitting the assets of your marriage will fall to the lawyers and the legal process. There are, however, tactical steps you can take to prepare. “I tend to recommend splitting what you have across all assets as opposed to a scenario where you take the house and I take

the cash,” Dubin says. If neither of you has an emotional attachment to the family home, selling it could be preferable, says Bill Hunter, director, IRA Product Management at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. The proceeds can be split, used to pay down debt, or cover the cost of the divorce itself. A sale of other shared, nonliquid assets may also be advisable. Another important asset is health insurance. If you’re covered by your spouse’s plan, under federal law you can continue that coverage for up to three years by enrolling in COBRA, although you’ll be responsible for making the payments. R ETI R EMENT ACCOUNTS Splitting IRAs and 401(k)s can prove problematic. If either of you has a retirement account, it’s vital that you sign a courtordered qualified domestic relations order (QDRO), which spells out exactly what percentage of the account each of you will receive. This document allows you to roll over your agreed-upon share into another IRA without incurring early-withdrawal taxes, as long as you do so within 60 days of receipt of the QDRO. Try to avoid tapping your retirement accounts to pay for the divorce. Instead, consider taking a loan at today’s favorable interest rates.

Michael Liersch, director, Behavioral Finance at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. Be sure to follow up on any debt you may have incurred during the marriage. Although the responsibility to pay may fall to your ex-spouse, your name may still be tied to the account. This can have repercussions on your credit should he or she default on payment. Social Security can also come into play. If you were married to your spouse for over ten years, you can claim spousal benefits even if your former partner remarries. But if you remarry, you can’t claim the benefits unless your new marriage ends in death or divorce. A NEW START Once the divorce is finalized, the next chapter begins. Your Merrill Lynch Financial Advisor can help you review your financial outlook and create a budget based on your new circumstances. Start with what you spent over the past year and try to forecast your new situation as to what would be a realistic budget. Your goal in the end is to have a new financial strategy — one based on a new life chapter.

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KIA CADENZA E C O N O M I C A L

L U X U R Y

B Y T H E C A R F A M I LY

W

ith the average new car price around $33,000 one wonders how Kia can price the feature laden Cedenza for less and still offer what J.D. Pow­ ers acknowledged is the highest Initial Quality rating of any car. They even bet­ tered the luxury brands such as Buick and Cadillac. Well, the answer is simple, they offer more. Indeed, if you are look­ ing for a family sized sedan that is all new for 2017, loaded with electronics, a stately stance, an abundance of cargo and passenger room, and a regal look the Cadenza is one of the best deals anywhere. 42

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Mom’s view: Driving it makes you feel like you are the Duchess of Cam­ bridge with an interior that is comfort­ able, adorned in faux wood and chrome accents, easy to master controls, and a quiet ride. There is leather everywhere, power-adjustable front seats, a pow­ er-adjustable tilt-and-telescoping steer­ ing wheel, position memory settings, and even heated rear seats. The luxury car feeling abounds. The trunk is 16 cubic feet, but the Cadenza has a smart opening trunk that automatically opens when the proximity key is close to the back of the car. You really need to see it in action. The interior has an abundance

of storage areas that are well placed. Safety wise there is a rearview camera and such options as blind spot detec­ tion, rear park assist, rear cross traffic alert, autonomous emergency brak­ ing, adaptive cruise control, forward collision warning system, lane change assist, lane departure warning, and a 360-degree camera system. All the controls are in easy reach, although the touch screen is a bit far for shorter people. The doors open wide and it makes entry easy even wearing a dress. Visibility is good in all directions and the cabin is very quiet. Our test car, the Technology model, had heated and cooled front seats. I would rec­ J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 7


ommend this version over the less expensive Premium model. Mall parking is much easier with the overhead camera view. All told, this is an exceptional value and enjoyable drive. The main competition is more expensive, but certainly not as luxurious. Dad’s view: All Cadenzas are front wheel drive and have a 290 horsepower, 3.3-liter V6 engine paired to an eight-speed automatic transmission. We got 25 mpg in mixed driving. The sedan is meant for driving in comfort and that is reflected in its smooth handling with adequate acceleration for passing and onramp merging. There are four driving modes. On start-up the car defaults to Comfort mode. Next you can choose from Eco, Sport, or Smart mode with each selection changing steering weight and transmission dynamics. We left it in Smart mode. That mode monitors your driving habits style and adopts accordingly your driving style. The transmission is smooth and brakes easily to modulate and provide exceptional stopping. This is a large sedan and it smooths out roads easily, but high speed canyon runs are not its forte. Steering is a bit light. The Cadenza is enjoyable to drive and relaxing. I found driving it in heavy traffic was reassuring with all the safety features and above average braking and gas mileage. With the usual 909 traffic almost worse every day, the Cadenza seemed to smooth all that over with and an 18.5 gallon fuel tank enabling 500 miles of highway travel on regular fuel. In other words, round trips to Las Vegas with miles to spare. The bottom line is that this Kia is priced even under the competition and they do not offer nearly as much. If you are into val­ ue and still want luxury, the Cadenza is easily your best bet. Young working male’s is view: Where to start? Well, the only thing Kia lacks is a hotspot Internet connection. Otherwise it has the electronics handled and fairly nicely. With Bluetooth, dual-zone automatic climate control, a proximity key, an eight-speaker sound system, infotainment system, a 7-inch touch screen, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, a USB port, HD Radio, and satellite radio. You can also order an optional 12-speaker Har­ man/Kardon surround-sound audio system, a wireless smartphone charger, an 8-inch touch

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screen and voice-command navigation. It pretty much leaves the higher priced competition in the dust and when you add the headup display with turn-by-turn directions and speed, you can’t help but wonder what Kia has in store for us next. Overall, a little to big for me, Kia’s Niro and Sorento being my favorites, but certainly notewor­ thy for those wishing to make a statement without busting the credit rating. Young working woman’s view: The Kia Cadenza comes in three trims: Premium, Technology, and Limited, with each offering a few more options. Regardless, this is a friendly sedan that is well thought out right down to the deep glove compartment and a pocket in each door. LED interior lighting is a nice touch and I loved the vanity mirrors. Family conference: Kia products have vastly improved, and the all new Cadenza is just one exam­ ple. Kia caries the exceptional fiveyear/60,000-mile basic warranty and a 10-year/100,000-mile powertrain warranty. It is a bargain even though we thought the infotainment system was a little slow. If you like luxury and don’t like paying for it the Cadenza must be considered. 909 MAGAZINE

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Cost Plus Mattress

Made in America

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aul Niederer is an American Veteran. He served his country proudly and he serves his customers proudly on a daily basis. Paul is the owner of Cost + Mattress in La Verne and Rancho Cucamonga and unlike most of his competition he’s more concerned about selling the “right” mattress rather than selling “a” mattress. His family has worked in the mattress manufacturing industry for nearly thirty years and in that time, he has seen many people taken advantage of by the big-name brands. “When I first started, I thought about stocking the big-name brands. When I went to check things out, some of them weren’t entirely made in America, and to be honest, the familyowned companies just made a better bed,” Niederer said. “Every mattress in the store from the coils to the topstitching is made in America - even our pillows.” “I try and educate customers about what to look for when purchasing a mattress,” said Niederer, who served in the Air Force during Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm along with his sales associate Elvis who was in the Marines. “Show them what’s inside the big-name mattresses and what’s inside ours. We’re making beds the old-fashioned way, with the twosided cotton, button-tufted beds that we all grew up on when we were kids. The kind that were made to last. I let them know they don’t have to spend a fortune to get a good mattress. We all have different comfort levels, just because it is more expensive mattress doesn’t mean it is the best mattress for you. If you’re not happy with your mattress I will give you 100% of your money back.” That is how we sleep at night. Something that Paul teaches is the mattress rule of thumb which is that the cost of a Mattress should equal

J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 7

out to about $100 to $150 per year, said Niederer, who is outraged by an advertisement claiming mattresses should be changed every “8” years. “They say a mattress doubles in weight in eight years, well that’s just not true,” he said. “The only reason to change your mattress is when you are no longer comfortable on it, or you are changing to a different sized mattress.” “I can tell you that at least half a dozen times I have told people to put their money back in their pockets and come back when they are uncomfortable on their mattress.” One of the many myths that Paul loves to dispel is the idea that ‘if it’s expensive it must be the best one for me’. What myth’s have you been told by a mattress salesman lately? At Cost + Mattress you’re given a 100% money back guarantee. Why not talk to Paul before you make your next Mattress purchase? “I sell a great night’s sleep at shockingly low prices.” Testimonials: “They really educate customers. I learned a lot about mattresses. I cannot express how good it feels to know that I purchased a bed that was made in America from a family owned and operated business. Thanks for all of your time in helping me decide on which mattress was best for me.” -Josh N.

The Niederer Family Resting on a Pure Latex Bed

Cost Plus Mattress in La Verne is located right off the 210 Freeway at 1147 Foothill Boulevard. Call (909) 392-5554. Cost Plus Mattress Rancho Cucamonga store is located at 9155 Archibald Avenue, Suite C (between 6th and 7th Street) Call (909) 7273700. Hours: Monday through Friday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturdays 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Closed Sundays for Family Day! And don’t forget to tell him you read it in the 909 Magazine!

“I experienced some great customer service yesterday. I bought a new mattress from Cost + Mattress in La Verne and one hour later I was taking a nap on it! Instant Gratification! Family owned, (dad sells, kids deliver) selling only American made products. If you need a mattress this is a great place to shop.” -Diane D. 909 MAGAZINE

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WHOLESALE CARPET & FLOORING CARPET • CERAMIC TILE • HARD WOOD FLOOR PORCELAIN • TRAVERTINE • VINYL & MORE BLOWOUT SALE! Porcelain Tile 12x24

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BUY DIRECT FROM THE WAREHOUSE! NO MORE PAYING RETAIL! Over 100,000 yards of Carpet, Over 80,000 sq ft of Flooring & Over 80,000 sq ft of Laminate in-stock & more...

PetMania is an animal learning and interactive day camp that will include classroom activities, projects, and lots of animal love and affection while promoting responsible pet ownership. Camps run in one week sessions Monday-Friday from 8:30 am to 2:30 pm beginning on June 26th and ending August 4th. child The camp is available to children going into Kindergarten through the 6th grade (children going into 7th grade) for $150 per week and you are not limited to the number of weeks you can attend. The camp will be held at the Upland Animal Shelter Landacena Building at 1325 San Bernardino Road in Upland, CA.

June 26, 2017 @ 8:30 am – August 4, 2017 @ 2:30 pm

Two Locations to Better Serve You! Lower Prices, More Stock, Great Deals!

Landacena Building 1325 San Bernardino Rd, Upland, CA 91786

Corona 110 Washburn Cir, Corona, CA 92882 (951) 326-3860 Ontario 1403 E Philadelphia St, Ontario, CA 91761 (909) 295-7673 46

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909 MAGAZINE

J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 7


Breed of the Month

The Pembroke Welsh Corgi BY JOH N CAL D ERWOOD

ular dog breed which can be attributed to their affectionate, alert and intelligent personality traits.

T

he Pembroke Welsh Corgi is one of two Corgi breeds, both of which originate from Wales. Originally bred for herding, the Corgi is one of the smallest breed of herders. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi was first recognized by the AKC as an official breed in 1934, making it a relatively young breed. Currently they’re ranked 18th most pop-

Queen Elizabeth II, The Queen of England is famed for her love of Corgis, as she’s owned more than 300 pet Corgis during her reign, though it was her mother who first started the tradition buying Elizabeth II a Corgi named “Dookie” on her 18th birthday. The queen introduced a list of disciplines and regimens for the breed to be cared for in the palace, including keeping them off the ground to avoid drafts, and what types of meals they would eat. The Queen Mother memorial facing Buckingham Palace depicts Queen Elizabeth sitting with two corgis in bronze. The small breed has been on the incline in popularity in the United States, due in part to their small size, and eagerness to learn and perform

and

Pet-Store Dogs • Cats • Horses • Small Animals

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J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 7

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However you look at it, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi is a beautiful breed that has found its way into many homes, and many lifestyles. An adaptable breed that is as loyal and friendly as they come. If you’re interested in finding out more about the Pembroke Welsh Corgi, we highly recommend you visit http://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/ pembroke-welsh-corgi, and before you add any new member to your family we always recommend considering adoption at your local shelter.

RAW FROZEN DOG FOOD

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making them suitable for apartment style living, as well as their sturdiness and hard working nature making them an easy choice for more rural families with larger living spaces. However their breed is now considered threatened in the U.K. and some point to a controversial ban on tail docking that has lead breeders to move away from the breed in general.

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Earthborn

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909 MAGAZINE

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Calendar J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 7

7/01

Kids World Citizens Business Bank Arena 4000 Ontario Center, Ontario, CA International Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Championships. Time to be announced. Doors open 1 hour prior to event.

7/08

50’s Music: Starring James King 8pm | Cooper Museum: 217 East A Street, Upland Featuring the musical styles and songs of Tom Jones, Elvis, Ricky Nelson, Buddy Holly, Old Time Rock & Roll and Neil Diamond. Tickets $20, coopermuseum.org.

7/08

Los Angeles Temptation vs Pittsburgh Rebellion 7pm | Citizens Business Bank Arena 4000 Ontario Center, Ontario, CA One of the fastest growing sports franchises, Legends Football League (LFL) formerly the Lingerie Football League, makes its return to Citizens Business Bank Arena.

7/09

Lil Rel Howery 7pm | Ontario Improv Lil Rel Howery can be seen in Jordan Peele’s hit movie Get Out in his “Break Out” role as Rod the TSA agent. He also stars as Jerrod’s brother in “The Carmichael Show.”

7/13

Marvel Universe Live! 7pm | Citizens Business Bank Arena Marvel fans, assemble for this live, actionpacked, legendary battle to defend the universe from evil. Spider-Man, the Avengers and the Guardians of the Galaxy join forces with Doctor Strange.

7/13

Annual Midsummer Shakespeare Festival 8pm - 10pm | 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont Ophelia’s Jump presents: Hamlet & Much Ado About Nothing in Repertory at the Songtag Greek Theatre. The festival includes exhibits, art and crafts. (909) 7346565 or randy@opheliasjump.org.

7/14

The Quakes vs San Jose 7:05pm | Loan Mart Field Family RV $1 Family Feast Night It’s Family RV $1 Family Feast Night at LoanMart Field, featuring $1 hot dogs, $1 Pepsi products and $1 ice cream sandwiches throughout the night!

7/15

Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat 7:30pm | Lewis Family Playhouse The Biblical saga of Joseph and his coat of many colors comes to vibrant life in this delightful musical parable. Joseph, his father’s favorite son, is a boy blessed with prophetic dreams.

7/15

Claremont Craft Ales 5th Anniversary 1pm - 8pm | 1420 N. Claremont Blvd. #204C, Claremont Five years of CCA! More Beers, More Pours, More Vendors and More Wine and Cider! Tickets: $40 includes souvenir glass and 20 pours; VIP Package is $60. For info (909) 625-5350. 48

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909 MAGAZINE

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8/11

Love Letters 7:30pm | Lewis Family Playhouse Poetic, elegant and profoundly touching, Love Letters shows that, despite how things seem, what divides us is rarely as powerful as what connects us, and love comes when you least expect it.

8/16

7/16

Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat 2pm | Lewis Family Playhouse 12505 Cultural Center Dr, RC The Biblical saga of Joseph and his coat of many colors comes to vibrant life in this delightful musical parable. Joseph, his father’s favorite son, is a boy blessed with prophetic dreams.

7/22

Kfrog 95.1 Party on the Pavement 4:30pm | Citizens Business Bank Arena 4000 Ontario Center, Ontario, CA The pre-show event you don’t want to miss! Food, bar, lounge, live music, contests, line dancing, frog team on site! Free to attend must be 21+ to enter.

7/22

Tim McGraw and Faith Hill 7:30pm | Citizens Business Bank Arena 4000 Ontario Center, Ontario, CA The 65-city tour celebrates the 10th anniversary of the record-breaking “Soul2Soul II” tour, the highest-grossing multi-year country music tour of all time.

7/22

The Wizard of Oz 6pm | The Candlelight Pavillion 455 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont Dorothy Gale is transported to the enchanting land of Oz, told that the Wizard of Oz can send her back to Kansas so she teams up with the Scarecrow, Tin Woodsman, and Cowardly Lion. J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 7

8/01

National Night Out Join the City of Upland for National Night Out! This event helps promote the safety and connection in our community. Enjoy food, music, entertainment, and activities for the whole family.

8/05

South Pacific 6pm | The Candlelight Pavillion 455 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont Stationed on a beautiful Pacific Island during WWII, two Americans face similar romantic relationships that are threatened by prejudice and war. (909) 6261254 Ext. 1.

8/05

Upland Community Day Fundraiser 4pm | 250 N. Third Ave., Upland Enjoy Dinner With Us! Enjoy dinner from The Habit Burger Grill and one another’s company during your summer August evening. Proceeds from this event will go back into the community.

8/06

The Quakes vs Lancaster 2:05pm | Loan Mart Field. 1,500 fans through the gates will score a free 2017 Quakes Team Photo. Kids 12 and under will get a voucher for a free hot dog, soda and bag of chips!

8/06

Roots & Yam Jerk Food and Music Fest 11am - 10pm | 800 N. Archibald Ave., Ontario Bring the family out to enjoy rare, juicy, delicious, jerk chicken, shrimp, fish, and pork, with sides. Music Festival tickets start at $50 from 4pm - 10pm. jerkfoodfest.com.

Kid’s Swap Meet & Craft Corner 5pm - 8pm | Memorial Park, Upland Kids, clean out your closets, drawers, under your beds, get your games and toys together and MAKE SOME MONEY! Registration for participation required, contact (909) 931-4280.

8/20

Love Letters 1pm | Lewis Family Playhouse 12505 Cultural Center Dr, RC Poetic, elegant and profoundly touching, Love Letters shows that, despite how things seem, what divides us is rarely as powerful as what connects us, and love comes when you least expect it.

8/22

The Quakes vs Lake Elsinore 7:05pm | Loan Mart Field Healthy RC Recycle Tuesday Bring Ten CRV-eligible bottles or cans to LoanMart Field and receive a free Club Seat Ticket to the game, courtesy of the Healthy RC Program and the City of Rancho Cucamonga!

8/26

Heartstrings: Live Music 4 Boomers 7pm - 8pm | Cooper Museum: 217 East A Street, Upland Not just memories, but the soundtrack of your life. Music by Steve and Jeff. Beverages, beer, wine, hotdogs and chips. Tickets $10. Date is tentative. Coopermuseum.org or PayPal. 909 MAGAZINE

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F E B RUA RY 2 0 1 5

HEALTH MATTERS

San Antonio Hospital Shares Great Ways to Improve Your Heart, and will be Hosting a Day of Dance Event!

CASA COLINA

DISCUSSES FIBROMYALGIA: THE INVISIBLE ILLNESS

NBC’s New CIA Analyst

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KATHERINE HEIGL MAKES HER RETURN TO TELEVISION IN HER NEW HIT SERIES STATE OF AFFAIRS

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Great Family Events, Shows and Activities for You to do This Month, and All Close to Home!

NEW CAR

REVIEW The Buick LaCrosse’s Comfortable Design is as Close as it gets to Sitting in Your Family Room

LAW TALK

SOHEILA’S PREMIUM PICKS FROM 900 OF CALIFORNIA’S NEW LAWS IN 2015

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Mrs. Grossman has handled thousands of insurance bad faith homeowner’s cases and sues on behalf of both individual policyholders and members of class actions. If your home has experienced a water, fire, wind, vandalism or theft loss and your insurance company has either denied your claim or not paid enough please call for a free consultation.

Fighting for the rights of homeowners against insurance giants for 22 years

EVANGELINE FISHER GROSSMAN Te l : ( 9 0 9 ) 6 2 6 - 1 9 3 4

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Fax: (909) 626-1900

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e g ro s s m a n @ e f g l a w y e r. c o m

3 2 4 N . I N D I A N H I L L B L V D . , C L A R E M O N T, C A , 9 1 7 1 1 J U LY / A U G U S T 2 0 1 7

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INTRODUCING THE REGION’S NEWEST TRAUMA CENTER INTRODUCING THE REGION’S NEWEST TRAUMA CENTER

More ready than ever. Especially when every second counts. More ready medical than ever. whenthe every second counts. As a nationally recognized center,Especially we’ve been serving region’s healthcare needs since 1903 with an unwavering commitment to excellence. It’s at the core of everything we do and it’s why we earned As a nationally recognized medical center, we’ve been serving the region’s healthcare needs since 1903 our new designation as a Trauma Center. Previously, trauma patients were transported out of the area for with an unwavering commitment to excellence. It’s at the core of everything we do and it’s why we earned care. Today, our expert trauma surgeons and specialized teams can treat patients with life-threatening our new designation as a Trauma Center. Previously, trauma patients were transported out of the area for injuries immediately, close to home. Exceptional patient care—it’s what we do best. care. Today, our expert trauma surgeons and specialized teams can treat patients with life-threatening injuries immediately, close to home. Exceptional patient care—it’s what we do best. 909.865.9500 | pvhmc.org 909.865.9500 | pvhmc.org

July August 2017 909magazine  
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