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89 (PACIFIC) SQUADRON ROYAL CANADIAN AIR CADETS Parent/Guardian Resource Guide

TO LEARN

TO SERVE

TO ADVANCE


Vision of the Canadian Cadet Movement We commit to develop in each and every Air Cadet qualities of leadership and an aspiration to become a valued member of their community. We reinforce values necessary to prepare youth to meet the challenges of tomorrow and to embrace the multicultural dimensions of Canada. To this end, we offer dynamic training in a supportive and efficient environment where change is a positive and essential element. We further commit to attain this vision by living shared Canadian values with particular attention to: • LOYALTY… the expression of our collective dedication to the ideals of the Cadet Movement and to all its members. • PROFESSIONALISM… the accomplishment of all tasks with pride and diligence. • MUTUAL RESPECT… the treatment of others with dignity and equality. • INTEGRITY… the courage and commitment to exemplify trust, sincerity and honesty. Aims of the Air Cadet Program • To develop in youth the attributes of good citizenship and leadership. • To promote physical fitness. • To stimulate an interest in the air element of the Canadian Armed Forces. Extracted from the CIC National newsletter, Number 3 – spring 1997


Table of Contents Welcome Letter.............................................................................................................................. 1 Contact Information for the Squadron....................................................................... 2 Website Addresses........................................................................................................................................2 Mandatory Events.........................................................................................................................................2 Abbreviations & Acronyms....................................................................................................... 3 Definitions........................................................................................................................................ 4 89 Pacific Air Cadet Program — Overview ...................................................................... 5 Frequently Asked Questions and Answers.................................................................... 8 89 (PACIFIC) SQUADRON INFORMATION................................................................................... 12 Officers and Civilian Instructors............................................................................................................. 12 Local Training for Cadets......................................................................................................................... 12 Ranks and Appointments for Cadets...................................................................................................... 13 How do Cadets Benefit from the Program?........................................................................................... 13 Programs, Training and Activities.................................................................................. 14 Positive Social Relations for Youth.......................................................................................................... 14 Flying .......................................................................................................................................................... 14 Music in Air Cadets................................................................................................................................... 15 Cadet Band................................................................................................................................................. 15 Flag Party ................................................................................................................................................... 16 The Duke of Edinburgh Award Program............................................................................................... 16 Biathlon Team............................................................................................................................................ 16 Drill Team................................................................................................................................................... 16 First Aid Training and Team.................................................................................................................... 17 Range Team................................................................................................................................................ 17 Effective Speaking Program..................................................................................................................... 17 Annual Ceremonial Review .................................................................................................................... 18 Summer Training.......................................................................................................................... 18 Summer Training Application Process................................................................................................... 19 Regional Summer Courses (no selection board)................................................................................... 19 General Training (GT).............................................................................................................................. 19 Basic Courses....................................................................................................................................... 19 Basic Leadership (BLC)............................................................................................................................. 19 Basic Aviation (BAC)................................................................................................................................ 19 Basic Fitness and Sport (BFS).................................................................................................................. 20 Basic Survival (BSC).................................................................................................................................. 20 Military Band - Basic Musician (MB-BMC).......................................................................................... 20 Basic Aviation Technology and Aerospace (BATA).............................................................................. 20 Advanced Courses........................................................................................................................... 21 Leadership and Ceremonial Instructor (LCIC)..................................................................................... 21 Advanced Aviation (AAC)........................................................................................................................ 21 Air Rifle Marksmanship Instructor (ARMIC)....................................................................................... 21 Fitness and Sports Instructor (FSIC)...................................................................................................... 22 Survival Instructor (SI)............................................................................................................................. 22 Military Band Intermediate Musician (MB-IMC)................................................................................ 22 Military Band Advanced Musician (MB-AMC).................................................................................... 22 National Summer Scholarship Courses (selection board).................................................................. 23 Selection Process........................................................................................................................................ 23 International Air Cadet Exchange (IACE)............................................................................................. 23 Advanced Aviation Technology Aircraft Maintenance (AATC-AM)................................................. 23 Advanced Aviation Technology Airport Operations (AATC-AO)..................................................... 24


Oshkosh Trip (OT).................................................................................................................................... 24 Advanced Aerospace (AASC).................................................................................................................. 24 Flying Scholarship Courses...................................................................................................... 24 Glider Pilot Scholarship (GPS)................................................................................................................ 24 Power Pilot Scholarship (PPS)................................................................................................................. 24 Medals and Awards..................................................................................................................... 25 Lord Strathcona Medal.............................................................................................................................. 25 Royal Canadian Legion Cadet Medal of Excellence.............................................................................. 25 Duke of Edinburgh Award....................................................................................................................... 25 Other Awards............................................................................................................................................. 25 Scholarships available through the Canadian Cadet Movement............... 26 Steven-Guilles Bursary.............................................................................................................................. 26 Royal United Services Institute “Cadet Spirit Award”.......................................................................... 26 Korea Veterans Association of Canada Major General J.M. Rockingham Bursary......................... 26 R.C.A.F. Association 800 Pacific Wing – Bursary................................................................................ 26 Squadron Trophies and Awards......................................................................................... 27 Squadron Bursaries and Scholarships.......................................................................... 28 Support Association Bursary.................................................................................................................... 28 Cadet to Regular Force Award................................................................................................................. 28 The Air Cadet League of Canada........................................................................................ 28 Air Cadet Administration Structure....................................................................................................... 28 Educational Credits................................................................................................................................... 29 The Air Cadet League Awards.................................................................................................................. 29 Continuation Flying Training Awards.............................................................................................. 29 Harry Astoria Memorial Gliding Award.......................................................................................... 29 Bill Batchelor Continuation Flying Training Award...................................................................... 29 89 (Pacific) RCACS Support Association............................................................................ 30 Membership................................................................................................................................................ 30 Information Board..................................................................................................................................... 31 Fundraising................................................................................................................................................. 31 Canteen and Food Services...................................................................................................................... 31 HISTORY .............................................................................................................................................. 32 Air Cadets in Canada................................................................................................................................ 32 Air Cadets in British Columbia............................................................................................................... 32 89 (Pacific) Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron History................................................................... 33


Welcome Letter Royal Canadian Air Cadets 89 (Pacific) Squadron 212B - 715 Bay Street Victoria BC V8T 1R1 Tel/Fax 250-363-8150 Dear Parents and Guardians: Welcome to 89 (Pacific) Squadron of the Royal Canadian Air Cadets. Your child has chosen to join one of the finest youth organizations in Canada. The key goal of this organization is to promote interest in aviation. Close to one million young Canadians, between the ages of 12 and 19, have attended air cadets since the organization’s foundation in 1940. We believe this organization is not only good for young people; it also enhances our communities and country. The success of the program is the result of the strong partnership between the government’s Department of National Defence (DND) and a civilian organization, the Air Cadet League of Canada. Therefore we are more committed than ever to fundraising throughout the year to help offset additional expenses required to keep as many programs active as possible. Although we get a tremendous amount of support from DND, the Air Cadet Leaque has the responsibility to fund the aircraft and maintence as well as the training equipment. To this end, parents/guardians are strongly encouraged to volunteer towards the efforts of fundraising. Additional financial contributions are also welcome and a tax receipt can be issued, upon request, for donations over ten dollars. The 89 (Pacific) Squadron Support Association welcomes you and hopes you will become an involved member for the good of the Air Cadet program and the longevity of our squadron. For our squadron to be a viable organization we need to work together to sustain the programs that are offered. We hope this Parent Resource Guide will help you and your cadet. Please keep it handy, as many of your questions are answered here. Feel free to ask the officers or Support Association members if you are unable to find the information you seek. Sincerely, 89 (Pacific) R.C.A.C.S. Support Association

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Contact Information for the Squadron Building Address Bay Street Armoury at 715 Bay Street, Victoria BC, V8T 1R1 Mailing Address 89 (Pacific) R.C.A.C.S. Support Association Room 212B – 715 Bay Street, Victoria BC, V8T 1R1 Squadron Office Telephone Administration Office: 250-363-8150 Email: 89air@cadets.gc.ca If your cadet is not able to attend a parade night please call the squadron administration office no later than 18:00 (6 pm) and leave a message. For other scheduled events, please call the appropriate flight sergeant (or flight contact person) or administration office. Website addresses 89 Pacific Website:

www.89Pacific-aircadets.ca

Air Cadet League of BC:

www.bc.aircadetleagueofcanada.ca

Cadets Canada:

www.cadets.ca

Regional Cadet Support Unit (Pacific):

www.cadets.ca/regions/pac/Pacific_Region_Home/

Air Cadet League of Canada:

www.aircadetleague.com

Mandatory Events

Fundraisers & Events Tag Days – Spring & Fall

Parades & Reviews Battle of Britain Parade – mid September (Sunday)

Victoria Marathon – Thanksgiving Sunday

Remembrance Day Parade – Nov 11 Victoria Day Parade – May (Victoria Day)

Poppy Sales – Royal Canadian Legion

Annual Ceremonial Review – June - 1st Sunday

Cadets Caring for Canada

Annual Mess Dinner

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Abbreviations and Acronyms The following may be helpful when you hear the Officers and Cadets using these abbreviated terms or see them in print. 2IC Second in Command 2Lt Second Lieutenant AC Air Cadet ACR Annual Ceremonial Review BCPC British Columbia Provincial Committee BCPR British Columbia Pacific Region Capt Captain CCM Canadian Cadet Movement CF Canadian Forces CHAP Cadet Harassment and Abuse Prevention CI Civilian Instructor CIC Cadet Instructors Cadre CO Commanding Officer Cpl Corporal DND Department of National Defence F/Cpl Flight Corporal F/Sgt Flight Sergeant G/C Group Captain IMP Individual Meal Packet LAC Leading Air Cadet LHQ Local Headquarters Lt Lieutenant Maj Major MROs Monthly Routine Orders NCO Non-Commissioned Officer OCdt Officer Cadet PRG Parents Resource Guide RCACS Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron RCAF Royal Canadian Air Force RCSU Regional Cadet Support Unit Sgt Sergeant S/L Squadron Leader Sqn Squadron TC Transport Canada VFR Visual Flight Rules/Rating WO Warrant Officer WO1 Warrant Officer 1st Class WO2 Warrant Officer 2nd Class

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Definitions The following are definitions of expressions commonly used by officers and cadets. Term

Meaning

Arms

Rifles (Air and 22 caliber).

Civilian Dress

Appropriate every day clothing – not uniform.

Colours

Flags – as carried by the Flag Party/Colour Party.

Dress Uniform / C1

Full uniform – wedge, shirt, tie, tunic with name tags and medals, pants, belt, socks and boots.

Dress Uniform / C2

Full uniform – wedge, shirt, tie, tunic with name tags and ribbons, pants, belt, socks and boots.

Gliding

This refers to an opportunity when cadets are able to go gliding at Cassidy Airport near Nanaimo. A fixed wing, engineless aircraft is towed aloft by a tow plane. Once at a predetermined height the glider is released from the tow plane and soars on the air currents. In 2011 in British Columbia there were 7,465 flights without a single reportable incident.

Summer Dress

Dress uniform without tie and tunic.

Power Aircraft

For our purpose this refers to Cessna 172’s or equivalent.

PT Gear

Physical training clothing - shorts/t-shirt and runners.

Tag Days

This refers to one of the main squadron fundraising events when cadets are out looking for community support and give donors an “I Support Air Cadets” tag or a ‘glider’ sticker.

Tri-Service

Army/Sea/Air Elements of the Military and Cadet organization.

Whites

White belt, lanyard and gloves worn by senior NCO’s and members of the colour party and band.

Winter Dress

Uniform with shirt/tie and tunic for senior cadets. Uniform with turtleneck and tunic for junior cadets.

Wedge

Cadet uniform hat.

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89 Pacific Air Cadet Program Overview

Introduction 89 Pacific is one of fifty-seven Air Cadet Squadrons in BC and one of approximately 440 Squadrons in Canada. To enroll in cadets you must be between the ages of 12 and 18, be a Canadian citizen or landed immigrant, be in good physical condition, and be of good moral character. The Motto of the Air Cadet Program is: To Learn, To Serve and To Advance The aims of the Air Cadets Program are: 1. To develop in youth the attributes of good citizenship and leadership; 2. To promote physical fitness; and 3. To stimulate an interest in the air element of the Canadian Forces Enrolment The enrolment application must be completed before your child can participate in any squadron activities or be an official member of the squadron. This application requires a medical questionnaire, as well you will be asked to provide your son or daughter’s birth certificate and BC Care Card for a photocopy to be obtained for our records. Dress and Deportment Uniforms will not be issued until the cadet has proven to be genuinely interested in the cadet program and has attended a minimum of 4 regular parades, and all enrolment paperwork is complete. Uniforms are loaned free of charge by the Department of National Defence for the duration of your child’s involvement in the cadet program and must be returned immediately if your child ceases to attend regular squadron parades. Failure to return the uniform will result in a phone call to arrange for a squadron officer to pick up of the uniform. These uniforms are part of Crown Assets and as taxpayers we cannot afford too many losses. After 3 consecutive, unapproved absences you will be notified and asked to return your child’s uniform on the next scheduled parade night. (If your child is going to be absent for any reason, the cadet is expected to notify the squadron office by leaving a message on the answering machine. It is preferred that this be done the night before cadets. The phone number is (250) 363-8150). Once issued, uniforms shall be well cared for, cleaned, ironed and boots polished on a weekly basis. Dry cleaning is only necessary for the wedge cap. When in uniform, your child represents the cadet movement and the Canadian Forces, therefore the uniform must always be in clean and pressed condition. Also, once a uniform is issued, it must be worn to all squadron activities unless your cadet is directed not to wear it. Uniforms shall not be worn for any reason (without permission of the Commanding Officer) except for squadron activities.

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A proper tapered military style haircut is required for all male cadets. This means that hair must be neatly cut above the collar and ears, must be of uniform length (for example: no undercuts, Mohawks, or other bizarre styles), and must be of a natural colour. Males are not to wear earrings (ears or otherwise) while participating in cadet activities. Female cadets must put their hair up so that it does not hang past the bottom of the collar. For hair that would pass the collar, it must be put up into a bun in a neat fashion. Short hair must be neat, tidy and not hanging in the cadet’s face. The hair must be of a natural colour. (Not necessarily your original colour). Female cadets may wear a single stud earring in the centre of each ear lobe. Any other earrings must be removed while participating in cadet activities. No makeup is to be worn while in uniform. Weekly Training Our squadron meets every Monday evening, September to June (except for Christmas, New Years and Spring Break) from 6:15 – 9:30 pm. The meeting location is at 715 Bay Street. The Bay Street Armoury is located at the end of Field Street off Douglas Street in Victoria. On the training nights, cadets will participate in many classes and activities over the first four years. These include: drill, drill instruction, general cadet knowledge, citizenship, aircraft identification, aeronautical facilities, meteorology, principles of flight, airframe structure, propulsion, navigation, radio communication, air crew survival and the Positive Social Relations for Youth Program. Regular attendance is a requirement for advancement in the program. The last formal parade of the training year is the Squadron’s Annual Ceremonial Review (ACR), which is the culmination of the year’s activities. It is a chance for the cadets to display their many talents to family and friends. This is also a time when many awards are presented. There are five levels of training (see page 12) and the following are a requirement of the program at each level. • Participation in a minimum of 1 weekend survival and leadership exercise • Participation in 1 flying or gliding activity; and • Participation in 1 other community activity. Cadets are also required to participate in various fundraising and community activities in order to satisfy the first aim of the Air Cadet Program. Optional Training It is recommended that your cadet try one or two of the optional training activities. Inquire about the amount of time and dedication that is required before joining any of these teams as your cadet is expected to attend regularly - the team depends on it.

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Also note school and attendance on regular parade nights takes precedence over optional training. Optional training includes : • Biathlon Team (see page 16) • Range Team (see page 17) • Flag Party (see page 16) • Flying Scholarship – ground school (see page 24)

• Drill Team (see page 16) • First Aid Team (see page 17) • Effective Speaking (see page 17) • Band (see page 15)

Exercises, Trips, and Tours During the year the squadron arranges trips and tours whenever possible. The squadron plans to hold 2 survival and leadership exercises weekends throughout the year. Cadets should try to borrow or acquire a warm sleeping bag, ground pad, backpack, and rain gear for these exercises. If cadets wish, they may purchase combat clothing at a surplus store to wear on these exercises. Summer Training During the summer the Air Cadet program offers summer training courses to those cadets who qualify. These courses are held at Cadet Summer Training Centres mainly in BC, but can include other provinces. All training, transportation, housing, and meals are provided free of charge by DND. (see page 18) Officers and Instructors The officers associated with the Air Cadets are members of the Canadian Forces and are subject to the rules, regulations and procedures of the Canadian Forces. These Officers belong to the Cadet Instructors Cadre (CIC), a branch of the Canadian Forces. They have regular fulltime careers outside of the military and work part time with the cadet program. The CIC Branch is the largest contingent of Officers in the Canadian Forces. There are also some civilian volunteers who have an interest in the cadet program and offer their expertise and time to assist in the implementation of the program. All persons involved in the supervision of cadets are selected based on maturity, knowledge and skills, and must possess some special training applicable to the program. Furthermore, all officers and civilian instructors are screened by DND and pass a Vulnerable Sector Screening by police to ensure their suitability to work with youth. Conclusion As a cadet your child is a member of the largest youth organization in Canada and upon registration your child becomes a member of a team. We look forward to having your child in 89 Pacific Squadron and hope your child will be rewarded with an enjoyable as well as an educational experience. If you have any questions regarding the cadet program, please feel free to talk to one of the officers or instructors to discuss your concerns. Officers and instructors are at the Squadron on Mondays (training night) and Thursdays (administration night) from 6:30 - 9:30 pm or call (250) 363-8150.

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Frequently Asked Questions and Answers How old must I be to join the Air Cadets? You are eligible to join a squadron if you are between the ages of 12 and 18 years. You must have reached your 12th birthday before you can be enrolled and attend Parade nights. You will need to complete an application form and bring the following: 1. Satisfactory Proof of  Your Identity, these include: • Birth Certificate (preferred)  • Valid Canadian passport  • Photo ID card issued by the Canadian government  • BC ID card (available from BC Drivers’ Centre)  Note: we recommend that all cadets obtain a BC ID to carry on all cadet activities 2. Your BC Care Card What are the requirements of membership in the Squadron? All potential cadets must be of good character, interested in the program and prepared to attend parades regularly. Parent/Guardian permission is also required. What about medical exams? Your parent/guardian must complete a statement of medical fitness before you are accepted as an Air Cadet. This statement of medical fitness should not be seen as a way of excluding any individual; in fact individuals with various physical and mental challenges have been quite active and successful in the Air Cadet Program. Will Air Cadet training detract from my schoolwork? Not likely. The instruction is designed to supplement your school studies and education credits are available to grade 10, 11 and 12 students. Will I be eligible to attend a summer training course? Summer Training is held at Cadet Summer Training Centres across the country. These courses range from two to seven weeks in duration and offer a varied program of outdoor sports and recreational activities in addition to valuable instruction in aeronautics, leadership and other areas of interest. Selection for Summer Training is merit based. There are normally enough spaces allocated to allow 30-40% of the cadets in the squadron to attend. Regular attendance at weekly training and squadron activities, attitude, and performance are considered when selecting cadets for summer training courses. In their first year cadets must be enrolled before the end of January to be eligible to apply for a summer training course.

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Are there advanced training courses for Air Cadets? Yes, in addition to a Senior Leaders Course, advanced summer courses are provided in Athletic Instruction, Technical Training, Survival Instructor, Aviation (Glider and Private Pilot’s licenses) and other subjects. Many of these courses will prepare cadets for future positions of leadership, either in the Air Cadet movement or in other fields. Are there travel opportunities? Yes, Air Cadets travel to their summer training courses and other programmes held in different parts of Canada. Also, each year, groups of Air Cadets travel within Canada, visit the United States, Great Britain, Continental Europe, and other areas under an International Exchange sponsored by the Air Cadet League of Canada. There is no cost to Parents/Guardians for this travel. How often do Air Cadets Train? 89 (Pacific) Squadron’s main training night is on Monday night between 1830 and 2130 hours (6:30 – 9:30p.m.). Additional training can occur on Thursday nights and Saturday and Sunday afternoons depending on the optional activities a cadet is involved in. Additional training takes place for the band, colour party, ground school and competition teams (biathlon, range, first aid, drill and effective speaking). Air Cadets also participate in occasional day trips (gliding and flying) and overnight weekend training (survival exercises, biathlon and the Squadron Live-In). What is the Squadron Live-In? Each year the Squadron tries to have a major training weekend in conjunction with Remembrance Day. The whole squadron spends the weekend at Albert Head or an alternative location for a major training session. During this short time a lot of the mandatory training is covered and it helps the squadron become a cohesive unit. This exercise is a mandatory training event. In the past, other air cadet squadrons including 676 Kitty Hawk (Sidney), 744 Cowichan and 848 Royal Roads (Langford) Squadrons have participated also. What are the First Aid procedures for the Squadron? Should your cadet require first aid beyond what can normally be supplied by the Officer(s) in attendance an ambulance will be immediately summoned. You will be contacted immediately after the call for the ambulance and advised of the situation and what action you should take and what action is being taken on site. If the incident occurs when the cadet is on a survival or other exercise you will be advised as quickly as possible. It is policy to have either a cell phone or two-way radio on site in case of emergency. Does it cost anything to join? There are no registration fees from DND and no uniform costs. However our squadron requests an annual Sponsoring Committee Fee of $100.00 per family. This fee is payable, by cheque, to “89 (Pacific) RCACS Support Association” or in cash. The Support Association would appreciate it if payment can be made at or before the

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CO’s Parade night on the last Monday of September. Arrangements can be made for a 2 or 3 payment program. If a payment plan is requested it would be appreciated if payment is complete before December 1st. It should be noted that no cadet will be turned away from the program nor will their training be affected in any way if a family is unable to pay this fee. Parents are also encouraged to join the Support Association and this can be done by paying an annual $10.00 membership fee. It is also possible to purchase a life membership for $100.00. Being a member of the Support Association gives you the right to vote at the Annual General Meeting, plus it keeps you connected to 89 Pacific. By paying this cost, what do I get? The Sponsoring Committee Fee will help offset the rapidly rising costs faced by the Air Cadet League, BC Committee for the purchase of new aircraft and aircraft maintenance (tow planes and gliders), insurance, legal fees, trophies, scholarships and other costs necessary to operate this program. Each Sponsoring Committee must contribute to these costs at the provincial level. Do I need to supply a uniform or required clothing? No. DND will supply your Cadet with a full uniform, and if your Cadet is selected to go to one of the summer training courses they will be supplied with 1 pair of running shoes, a tee shirt, sports shorts and a hat. The Support Association will purchase your Cadet’s first nametag (additional name tags can be purchased for $4 from the administration officer). It should be noted that the nametag is part of your cadet’s uniform. What about optional clothing for survival exercises? The squadron does winter and summer survival exercises and appropriate civilian clothing is acceptable for this. However, should your Cadet want fatigues or other military surplus type attire and equipment it is the responsibility of the Cadet or parent to obtain this type of gear at their own expense. Who supplies the training and training equipment? The squadron officers are all DND personnel and they are supplemented by Civilian and Volunteer Instructors. The mandatory training programs are all supplied by DND as is most of the equipment to operate the programs. Your Support Association supplies funding, through cadet fundraising activities, to supplement DND training and purchase equipment for the squadron. Do I have to pay for anything? Other then pocket money that may be required when cadets are on a trip, there are two or three occasions when cadets are asked for payment. Cadets are asked to pay for their squadron and personal photo if they wish to have one. The Annual Squadron Mess Dinner, which is a mandatory training exercise, is held once a year and the Support Association asks that cadets pay approximately half of this cost

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(between $10 and $15). If a cadet can not afford this fee the Commanding Officer is to be advised and the Support Association will be made aware that a cadet is in need of assistance. The Association will not be told which cadet is requesting assistance. What is the protocol when cadets travel? Whenever cadets travel they will have an officer either with them or an officer will see that they are safely on an aircraft and there will be an officer to meet them at their destination. The only time that they may not be accompanied by an officer is when they are actually on a commercial flight from point A to point B. Cadets are required to carry government issued photo ID at all times when travelling. The BC ID issued by Drivers’ license centres is one such ID. Is there parking available at the Armoury? The parking lot, on the right, at the end of Field Street (behind the Armoury) is available for picking up and dropping off cadets. For Squadron events there is assigned parking for VIP’s and other invited guests. Parents may park in legal parking locations including on-street parking in the area of the Armoury and in the parking lots adjacent to Andrew Sheret Ltd (across Bay Street from the Armoury) so long as they are not open for business. Will I be expected to join the Regular Canadian Forces? No. However, those who do join the Canadian Forces, find it an advantage as they have already learned valuable skills through Air Cadet training. Cadets are not members of the Regional Canadian Forces and the program is not a recruiting program.

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89 (PACIFIC) SQUADRON INFORMATION Officers and Civilian Instructors This is a basic flowchart and can change as deemed necessary by the Commanding Officer to suit the squadron’s needs. Commanding Officer Deputy Commanding Officer & Special Projects Officer

Band Officers

Standards Officer

Training Officer

Supply Officer

Administration Officer

21C Training

21C Supply

21C Administration

Special Teams Officers

Flying Officer

Local Training for Cadets The Proficiency Level Program is divided into 5 levels of training.

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

Level 5

A cadet will usually complete one proficiency level each calendar year. However, there can be exceptions. Each proficiency level builds on the knowledge and skills of previous levels. For more information regarding Levels, please refer to your Cadet’s Handbook. Also check out this website http://www.cadets.ca/air/

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Ranks and Appointments for Cadets Ranks are earned on the basis of qualification and merit. Both minimum National Standards and local standards are applied in assessing cadets for promotion. The number of cadets that may hold the rank of Sergeant and above is limited by the number of cadets in the squadron.

The junior ranks are:

NCO ranks are:

There is no rank insignia Air Cadet (AC)

Leading Air Cadet (LAC)

Corporal (Cpl)

Flight Corporal (F/Cpl)

Warrant Officer 2nd Class (WO2)

Warrant Officer 1st Class (WO1)

The NCO ranks continued:

Sergeant (Sgt)

Flight Sergeant (F/Sgt)

How do Cadets Benefit from the Program? The 89 (Pacific) Squadron offers an educational and social program for youth in the community. Participants are required to meet specific standards in dress, appearance, behaviour and individual and group citizenship. Every cadet has the opportunity to participate in all aspects of the program. Your cadet will earn promotions and awards through training achievements and for services within the squadron and community. Air Cadets meet weekly to participate in parade and training programs such as flying, gliding, marksmanship, effective speaking, leadership, physical fitness, military band, drill, first aid, citizenship, and survival training. Cadets aged between 16 and 19 have the opportunity to attain their glider pilot license and cadets between 17 and 19 have the opportunity to attain the private power pilot license. Also offered are a number of opportunities to participate in competitions such as: Biathlon, Effective Speaking, Band, First Aid, Range, and Drill competitions. There are also weekend survival exercises and summer training courses.

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Programs, Training and Activities Positive Social Relations for Youth The Positive Social Relations for Youth Training prepares cadets to interact comfortably within the community, interact positively with others, exercise sound judgment, accept personal responsibility for actions and choices, deal with interpersonal conflict, and seek assistance from available resources when needed. To support this, two modules of formal training have been designed and developed using a modularized structure to maximize the cadet’s training experience and learning. The first module, Building Positive Social Relations, is for all new cadets joining a corps/squadron and the second module, Influencing Positive Social Relations, is for all cadets entering their fourth year in the Cadet Program. In addition, an informal learning reinforcement strategy, Maintaining Positive Social Relations, was specifically designed to reinforce learning of the formal training component, without the redundancies and negative consequences of additional formal training. The Building Positive Social Relations module will enable cadets to describe what is expected from a cadet, what can happen when behaviour exceeds or does not meet expectations, and how to apply a conflict management style to minimize conflict. In addition cadets will know where they can go for help. The Influencing Positive Social Relations module will enable senior cadets to understand their responsibility as a leader to influence positive social relations, to practice risk reduction, and to help manage conflict. The Maintaining Positive Social Relations module is a flexible and adaptive strategy that includes activities and resources that are instrumental in providing cadets with reminders of and a connection to the learning that resulted from the formal training component. This training is intended to be delivered by a team of instructors in order to capitalize on the leadership and instructional abilities, as well as the subject matter expertise of all corps/squadron personnel. The training will be delivered through interactive lectures, in-class activities and facilitated discussions in order to create a positive atmosphere, to provoke thought and to stimulate interest among cadets. The instructional material includes an interactive DVD, video-scenarios and print-based instructional material. Flying One of the aims of the Air Cadet program is to stimulate interest in young people in the air element of the Canadian Forces. This is achieved through the Flying Scholarship Program and the Glider Pilot Training Program. The interest of cadets not undergoing flying training is maintained by familiarization flights in gliders and power aircraft during the training year. Our squadron offers familiarization power flying. The aim of this is to provide each junior Air Cadet with at least one familiarization flight per year. Flying, on Saturdays

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or Sundays, is carried through the Victoria Flying Club at the Victoria International Airport. Familiarization flying is also provided for junior cadets during the General Training summer course at Albert Head. The glider familiarization program is conducted on weekends from September to November and March to June (weather permitting). These sessions are held at the Cassidy Airport (Nanaimo) with Regional Air Cadet Gliding School personnel. The Gliding Program is a co-operative partnership effort between DND and the Air Cadet League and is conducted in accordance with the terms of a renewable threeyear Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) Agreement. Music in Air Cadets The cadet music program consists of six music levels; Basic to Level 5. Levels: Basic, 1, and 2 will develop musical ability to play in the squadron band for parades and local activities such as Remembrance Day Parade, Canada Day Parade. Levels: 3, 4, and 5 will develop individual skills, as you become a senior cadet musician, which will lead to your ability to instruct junior cadets at the squadron and to assist as staff cadets during the summer. The music program has a variety of ensembles that are determined by the unit to which you belong (Glockenspiel and Percussion, Brass and Reed, Pipe and Drum, Percussion, Brass and Percussion, and Bugle and Percussion, etc.). You can receive instruction on any of these instruments at the squadron, by attending regional band clinic sessions, and summer training courses. For military band musicians, Levels 3, 4 and 5 are designed to compare to specific grades of the Royal Conservatory of Music program. It should be noted that the cadet music level training covers all aspects of the Royal Conservatory of Music (RCM) program except the technical studies. The cadet program is equivalent to the Royal Conservatory of Music as outlined: Cadet Level 3 = RCM Grade 2; Cadet Level 4 = RCM Grade 4; Cadet Level 5 = RCM Grade 5 Cadets also receive instruction in music theory, aural skills, drill, sight-reading, instrument maintenance, and skills necessary to perform duties of a Drum Major. Cadet Band The band is an active part of 89 (Pacific) Squadron. Any cadet may participate even those without musical knowledge of instruments. Cadets in the band not only receive weekly instruction but also participate in annual band clinics. The band is a military-style band and performs at all parade nights, The Battle of Britain Parade, Remembrance Day Parade, Victoria Day Parade and many other special events. Many of these cadet musicians have participated in the Honour Band clinics and concerts. The band competes in the Annual Vancouver Island Band competition. At the Annual Vancouver Island Band competition there is a Cadet Military Tattoo in the evening that is open to the public. This event normally takes place at the Archie Browning Sports Centre in Esquimalt. Additional practices are generally required before the band competition. The band practices most Sunday afternoons from 14:00 – 18:00 (2:00 – 6:00 pm) at the Armoury.

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Flag Party The Colour Party has the honour and pride of carrying the Colours (flags) that represent Canada and The Squadron. It takes hard work, team effort, precise drill and dedication to be a part of this flight of nine cadets. The Colour Party carries the Colours and presents Arms (rifles) at all CO’s Parade nights. They also parade as a unit at the Victoria Day and Remembrance Day Parades and other special events. The Duke of Edinburgh Award Program In Great Britain, The Duke of Edinburgh in 1956 founded the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award, also known as “The International Award for Young People”, and in Canada as “The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Young Canadians Challenge”. Designed to help young people develop a sense of responsibility in themselves and their community by expanding their horizons, this award has evolved into one of the most impressive individual development, self-training and personal achievement programs in the world. The program is open to all youth between the ages of 14 and 25 and is comprised of four sections: Community Service

Physical Fitness

Skills Development

Expeditions and Explorations

Since the program became available in the 1970’s, BC Air Cadets have earned a significant number of Duke of Edinburgh Awards, for the most part, from activities undertaken through their squadrons. If you are involved with the regular and extra curricular activities of your squadron you should consider registering as an Award participant. Visit the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award website to get more information on how to achieve a Bronze, Silver or Gold Duke of Edinburgh’s Award through the Air Cadet Program: www.dukeofed.org Biathlon Team Biathlon – Cross-country skiing and shooting – this is a sport of endurance and accuracy and the team has tryouts shortly after the start of the cadet year and trains by running, roller skiing, and shooting. Once there is snow on Mt Washington the team travels up island and holds practices on as many weekends as possible prior to the Zone (Southern Vancouver Island) competition. Any cadet who is interested in skiing or shooting can try out for this team however only a few are lucky enough to be selected. If the team is successful at the “Zones” they then compete in the Provincial Competition and if successful they can then move on to the Nationals. A cadet can try out for this team even if they can not ski or shoot. They are provided with instruction and coaching and with enough dedication and skill they can make the team. Drill Team Drill is an exercise of obedience, accuracy and concentration. It is closely supervised and the utmost precision is demanded. It sets standards for individuals and the

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squadron in uniform, appearance and drill as well as building a sense of confidence. The team is comprised of cadets from AC’s to WO1’s who present two drill routines. The first is a compulsory command sequence and the second is a meticulous 5 minute precision drill routine with no commands. First Aid Training and Team First Aid training is implemented each year to develop enhanced cadet knowledge. Courses are offered in Emergency and Standard First Aid certification through St. John’s Ambulance. This course proves to be useful in life-threatening emergencies. A First Aid Team also competes in the Tri-Services Vancouver Island First Aid Competition. Range Team There are two marksmanship teams within the squadron with each team using a different type of Cadet-approved rifle. The Anschutz team uses the Anschutz 22 caliber rifle and also form the Biathlon team, while the Daisy team trains with the Daisy air rifle. The air rifle team will practice in the range in the basement of the Bay Street Armoury on Thursday evenings if/when this range re-opens. Currently it practices at the North Saanich Rod and Gun Club (on McTavish Road) on Saturdays along with the Anshutz team. Both teams can enter competitions against other units both provincially and nationally. Effective Speaking Program The Effective Speaking program is an Air Cadet League sponsored activity and is in addition to the cadet-training program. Cadets are encouraged to participate in this program as it helps build self confidence and an understanding of how to effectively express oneself. This program also has Zone, Provincial and National competitions. Cadets are taught how to do ‘effective speaking’ and just prior to the Zone competition a Squadron Speak-off is held. Normally the top two cadets from the Squadron travel to Nanaimo to compete in the Vancouver Island Zone Speakoff. Success here moves the top cadet to the Provincial Speak-off, normally held in Richmond. The top Cadet in BC then goes to the National Championship which can be held anywhere in Canada. The Air Cadet league believes that this program provides an important skill, which will benefit cadets in their future undertakings. All effective speaking competitions forms can be found on the Air Cadet League of Canada website. The aim of the effective speaking program is: • To provide an opportunity for Air Cadets to increase their self-confidence; and increase their ability to reason, organize and express ideas. • To promote the citizenship component of local squadron training. • To provide a focus for the effective speaking component of the senior cadet training syllabus, Junior Leaders Course and the Senior Leaders Course. • To increase public awareness regarding the citizenship and leadership aspects of the Air Cadet program at the local, provincial and national levels.

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Annual Ceremonial Review The Annual Ceremonial Review or ACR is usually held at the beginning of June each year. The Support Association organizes a reception and participates in the planning of the ACR. This event is mandatory for all cadets. A Reviewing Officer is invited to attend and will inspect all cadets. In addition to the inspection and marchpast the presenting of both junior and senior Awards and Scholarships is carried out. The band and drill team present their competition routines, and static displays are available for viewing, which is then followed by a reception. Special guest and military dignitaries are invited to speak at the ACR. A BC Provincial Committee (BCPC) “League Inspector” is appointed to attend the ACR and marks both the civilian organizational ability and the presentations by cadets. These marks are then added to the marks awarded throughout the year to form the basis for the awarding of trophies to the “Top Sponsoring Committee”, “Top Squadron” and other awards at the B.C. Provincial Committee Annual General meeting.

Summer Training Summer Training is a major component of the Air Cadet Training Program. Summer training courses and other activities are held at Cadet Summer Training Centres across Canada. Summer training courses support and expand on squadron training by providing in depth training in a number of core areas and skills of the air cadet program. An initial 2 week General Training course is available for young cadets completing the first proficiency level of the air cadet program. Basic (level 2) and Advanced (level 3 and higher) courses are offered in the following streams: Aerospace; Aviation Technology; Fitness and Sports; Flying; Leadership; Marksmanship; Military Band; Pipe Band; and Survival. In addition to courses, senior cadets are also offered the opportunity to take part in a trip to the International Experimental Aircraft Association Fly-in Convention most commonly known as AirVenture Oshkosh or, simply, Oshkosh; to take part in the International Air Cadet Exchange; or to act as staff cadets at summer training centres. Selection for courses depends on mandatory criteria including the Proficiency Level that the cadet has completed. Summer training provides a unique opportunity for cadets to learn new and enhanced skills in a dynamic learning environment. Cadets will return from their summer courses with an enhanced knowledge of different areas of the air cadet program as well as a developed sense of teamwork and self-confidence. Cadets who attend summer courses also receive a weekly training allocation allowance.

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Summer Training Application Process Squadron staff will present a summer training briefing in the fall to inform cadets and parents on opportunities that are available. Please attend the summer training briefing to ensure that you understand the courses and opportunities available to your cadet(s). Cadets and parents will then be expected to submit an application to request courses, positions, and or activities for the following summer training. This form will also provide an opportunity for you as a parent to be aware of and to support your cadet’s requests. It is imperative that applications for summer training are received on or before published deadlines. Be sure to ask your squadron staff what these deadlines are so that your cadet does not miss an opportunity to apply for summer training. Applications for National Summer Training (review board) courses are due at the Air Office of RCSU (Pac) by the beginning of December each year. Be sure to check with squadron staff to find out the latest date that you can submit application forms to the squadron. Applications for other courses are due into the Air Office of RCSU (Pac) no later than the end of February each year. Be sure to check with squadron staff to find out the deadline for summer activity application forms to be submitted to the squadron.

Regional Summer Courses (no selection board) General Training Course - GT [2 weeks] is designed to familiarize cadets with life at a Cadet Summer Training Centre (CSTC) and to further develop the fundamentals of Air Cadet Proficiency training.  Cadets shall return to their squadrons prepared to continue in proficiency level training with an enhanced awareness of followership, uniform care, and personal attributes, such as self-confidence, communication, teamwork and a sense of responsibility.  Cadets attending the General Training Course will also participate in citizenship tours, air rifle marksmanship activities and a field exercise. 3 separate intakes of this course are offered at Albert Head Air Cadet Summer Training Centre. Basic Courses (3 weeks) Basic Leadership Course - BLC - provides cadets with the information and practical experience necessary to prepare them for the duties of a peer leader at their squadron.  Through a dynamic learning environment, the cadets will perform the role of a peer leader, lead team building activities, communicate effectively within a leadership team, command a squad on parade, execute rifle and flag drill, experience recreational marksmanship, summer biathlon and community service activities. 2 separate intakes are offered at Albert Head Air Cadet Summer Training Centre. Basic Aviation - BAC – provides cadets with the fundamentals of aviation training, building upon what has been taught in Level Two.  By establishing a dynamic learning environment, this course will inspire the cadets to further pursue aviation training opportunities at their squadron and on aviation related summer training

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courses.  The cadet shall return to the local headquarters with an enhanced awareness of and practical experience with the fundamentals of aviation, including meteorology, principles of flight, propulsion, air navigation, civilian, military and air cadet aviation opportunities, aviation history, and basic airmanship.This course is offered at the Regional Gliding School (RGS) in Comox. Basic Fitness and Sports Course - BFS - provides cadets with the fundamentals of fitness and sport in addition to building on what has been taught at their squadron in the training program.  Cadets will learn to perform the duties of a fitness and sport assistant, follow a fitness routine, lead a warm-up and cool-down session, assist with the cadet fitness assessment and assist with recreational sports. This course inspires cadets to pursue physical education and recreational training at both squadron and the Fitness and Sports Instructors Course (advanced). This course is offered at Albert Head Air Cadet Summer Training Centre. Basic Survival Course - BSC - provides cadets with the fundamentals of survival training by building on what has been taught in the Level Two training program at the squadron.  Cadets will practice survival skills, assist with a field exercise, assist with ground search and rescue and participate in ground navigation. This course exposes cadets to survival situations and inspires them to pursue survival-training opportunities, both at LHQ and the Survival Instructors Course (advanced). This course is offered at Albert Head Air Cadet Summer Training Centre. Military Band – Basic Musician Course – MB-BMC - is intended to develop the music proficiency of cadets and prepare them to support their home squadron bands and related music activities.  As well, they will experience some aspects of Air Cadet training to assist in their future course selections of the Air CSTC program. This course is offered at Albert Head Air Cadet Summer Training Centre. Basic Aviation Technology and Aerospace Course - BATA – is intended to develop the fundamentals of aerospace, airport operations and aircraft manufacturing and maintenance.  Cadets will participate in activities including operating radios for aviation transmission, participating in aerodrome operations and aircraft manufacturing and maintenance.  This course will inspire the cadets to pursue specialist training. This course is offered at Albert Head Air Cadet Summer Training Centre.

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Badges for GT and Basic Courses

General Training (GT)

Basic Aviation (BAC)

Basic Aviation Technology and Aerospace (BATAC)

Basic Fitness and Sport (BFSC)

Basic Leadership (BLC)

Military Band Basic Musician (MB-BMC)

Basic Survival (BSC)

Note: Badges are awarded upon successful completion of each respective course. These badges are worn just above the cuff on the right sleeve of the tunic. Advanced Courses (3 / 6 weeks) Leadership and Ceremonial Instructor Course – LCIC (6 wks) - develops cadets to become a specialist with the skills and subject matter knowledge required to be an instructor and team leader for drill and ceremonial activities. This course is offered at Albert Head Air Cadet Summer Training Centre. Advanced Aviation Course – AAC (3 wks) - increases cadets’ knowledge and skills in the field of aviation and provides incentive to pursue specialist training such as the Glider Pilot Scholarship and Power Pilot Scholarship courses. This course is offered at the Regional Gliding School (RGS) in Comox. Air Rifle Marksmanship Instructor Course - ARMIC (6 wks) - develops the basic coaching and range assistance skills necessary to support the squadron marksmanship program.  This course contains practice of skills taught during Level One of the squadron training program as well as newly introduced, more advanced, marksmanship skills.  The cadet will be provided with the necessary basic theoretical, technical, and practical skills required to monitor and coach other cadets at their squadron.  The cadet will learn and be able to apply the duties of a Range Assistant. This course is offered at the Army Cadet Summer Training Centre in Vernon.

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Fitness and Sports Instructor Course - FSIC (6 wks) - develops the athletic skills and instructional and leadership abilities in physical education that can be applied at the squadron level.  This course contributes to the fulfilment of two of the Canadian Cadet Movement Aims, to develop in youth the attributes of good leadership and to promote physical fitness.  This course will build upon what has been experienced at the squadron level and previous summer training.  The cadet will learn more advanced theoretical and technical skills required to deliver the squadron physical education and recreational training program as a Specialist Instructor. This course is offered at Cold Lake Air Cadet Summer Training Centre in Alberta. Survival Instructors Course - SI (6 wks) - develops survival competence, and instructional and leadership abilities in survival training that can be applied at the squadron.  This course will build upon what has been experienced during the squadron training program and previous summer training.  The mission will be accomplished by providing dynamic and challenging training that allows for ample opportunity of practical application. The cadet will learn more advanced theoretical and technical skills required to assist in the delivery of survival training at their squadron.  Cadets will have an opportunity to participate in advanced survival training, canoeing, instructing survival skills, solo survival simulation and much more. This course is offered at Cold Lake Air Cadet Summer Training Centre in Alberta. Military Band – Intermediate Musician Course – MB-IMC (6 wks) - The aim of all Music Level Courses is to raise each cadet’s musical skills to the standard of the cadet’s next music proficiency level.  This training is to develop the music proficiency of cadets and prepare them to support their squadron bands and related music activities.  During this course, instruction is also given in instrument maintenance & repair and other music-related skills, while the more senior levels also learn some Instructional Techniques relating to music. This course is offered at Albert Head Air Cadet Summer Training Centre and other STCs. Military Band – Advanced Musician Course – MB-AMC (6 wks) - The aim of all Music Level Courses is to raise each cadet’s musical skills to the standard of the cadet’s next music proficiency level.  During this course, instruction is also given in instrument maintenance & repair and other music-related skills, while the more senior levels also learn some Instructional Techniques relating to music. This course is offered at Albert Head Air Cadet Summer Training Centre and other STCs.

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Badges for Advanced Courses

Advanced Aviation (AAC)

Air Rifle Marksmanship Instructor (AACI)

Fitness and Sports Instructor (FSIC)

Leadership and Ceremonial Instructor (LCIC)

Survival Instructor (SIC)

Military Band Intermediate Musician (MB-IMC)

Military Band Advanced Musician (MB-AMC)

National Summer Courses (selection board) Selection Process: The BC Air Cadet League conducts Scholarship Review Boards every year to select cadets for the National Scholarship courses. These Boards usually consist of two League members and one Officer who sit behind a table and ask questions of the applicant for approximately 30 minutes. Since these interviews can be very stressful for young candidates, the Sponsoring Committee and officers help to prepare the applicants by holding practices, called “mock review boards�, prior to the actual review board at the armouries. International Air Cadet Exchange - IACE (17 years old +) The International Exchange Program aims to promote friendship and understanding among participating countries and encourages cadets to focus on international affairs. These exchanges are available in Australia, Belgium, France, Germany, Ghana, Hong Kong, Israel, Japan, Netherlands, New Zealand, Turkey, United Kingdom, and the United States. Advanced Aviation Technology - Aircraft Maintenance - AATC-AM This course introduces cadets to the field of aircraft maintenance by engaging them in a dynamic learning environment and exposing them to a variety of aircraft manufacturing and maintenance functions.

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Advanced Aviation Technology - Airport Operations - AATC-AO This course introduces cadets to the operations of an airport by engaging them in a dynamic learning environment and by exposing them to a variety of activities that occur in the air industry. Oshkosh Trip - OT - The trip to Oshkosh provides cadets with the opportunity to participate in various aspects of aviation (air show, aviation museums, flights). This activity takes place at one of the largest air shows in the world. Advanced Aerospace Course - AASC (6 wks) - acquaints Air Cadets with the scientific, technical and human aspects related to the exploration and development of space. The assimilation and practical research methods and application of diverse theoretical themes will build on theoretical notions covered during the LHQ. This course is offered in Quebec at the St. Jean Air Cadet Summer Training Centre. Flying Scholarships Courses Two of the most prestigious courses the Air Cadet program offers are the Gliding Pilot Scholarship and the Power Pilot Scholarship Courses. This courses are available to senior air cadets as six and seven-week summer courses. Cadets work towards their Transport Canada Private pilots license. Transport Canada licensed flying instructors train cadets using an approved Transport Canada flying and academic program. While on course, cadets are supervised and guided by Cadet Instructor Cadre (CIC) officers. The flying scholarship includes both practical and in-class training. Before cadets start their practical training in aircraft, they review the basics of flying and learn the specific techniques to be used in the aircraft they will be flying. Air cadets must meet the following criteria to apply for a flying scholarship: Glider Pilot Scholarhip - GPS - (6 weeks) The Glider Pilot Scholarship includes a series of theoretical and practical lessons to train student pilots who have no previous experience in flight, in accordance with the standards of Transport Canada in order to obtain the glider pilot license. To qualify you must: • Be 16 years of age by 1 September of the year in which you are applying; • Complete Training Level 3; • Pass a Ministry of Transportation medical; • Pass a scholarship exam; • Have good school grades; • Appear before an Air Cadet League selection review board; and • Be recommended by the Commanding Officer Power Pilot Scholarship - PPS - (7 weeks) The power pilot scholarship includes a series of theoretical and practical lessons to train student pilots who have no previous experience in flight, in accordance with the standards of Transport Canada in order to obtain power plane pilot license. The prerequisits are similar to gliding except you must be 17 years of age and complete Level 4 of the Air Cadet program.

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NOTE: These courses require a great deal of self-discipline and are very competitive. There are approximately 30 flying scholarships and 30 glider scholarships awarded annually for all of BC’s 3500 Air Cadets. Glider Pilot and Power Pilot wings are worn above the left breast pocket of the tunic.

Medals and Awards Lord Strathcona Medal This Medal and Certificate of Merit is presented in recognition of a high performance in physical and military training at the senior levels of the cadet program. Royal Canadian Legion Cadet Medal of Excellence This is presented in recognition of individual endeavours in the area of citizenship and in meeting and enhancing the aims and objectives of the cadet organization. A recipient must be regarded by their peers and superiors to exemplify the model cadet and enhance their squadron through co-operation, comradeship, promoting morale, supporting and assisting fellow squadron members, aiding in development of group identity and cohesiveness as well as enhancing the image of the cadet organization in the local community. Duke of Edinburgh Award This program challenges young Canadians to broaden their horizons, and stretch themselves to set and achieve goals in personal development and community service. The Award recognizes achievements as the participants progress through the bronze, silver and gold levels of the award in areas of Community Service, Personal Skills, Physical Fitness and Expeditions. Other Awards There are awards that cadets can receive for their performance, community service or even bravery. Cadets are also able to receive any Canadian Order, Decoration or Medal that is available to Canadian citizens, such as the Medal of Bravery. Cadets also have a number of scholarships they are able to apply for to assist them with post secondary education costs. For more information on Canadian medals visit the Governor General’s website at: www.gg.ca Check out the following websites for other opportunities: www.bc.aircadetleagueofcanada.ca/provincialAwards.php www.aircadetleague.com/en/infoforcadetsandsquadron/awardscadets/

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Scholarships available through the Canadian Cadet Movement Steven-Guilles Bursary Begun in 2001, the Air Cadet League of Canada, BC Provincial Committee annually sponsors this award of $1,000. This bursary is open to Air Cadets of all Squadrons to aid a worthy Cadet to further their flight training beyond the level of Private Pilot or Glider Pilot. Royal United Services Institute “Cadet Spirit Award” The Royal United Services Institute of Vancouver Island annually presents three ‘Cadet Spirit Awards’, each of $250, to the Sea, Army and Air Cadets of Vancouver Island. The Cadet shall exemplify the ethos and spirit of the Canadian Cadet Movement and must be members in good standing of a Cadet Corps or Squadron on Vancouver Island at the time of nomination. Korea Veterans Association of Canada Major General J.M. Rockingham Bursary The bursaries, in the amount of $500 each, will be awarded to three Victoria area Cadets who have been selected to attend post-secondary education. The bursaries are based on school marks, performance at a Cadet Corps or Squadron, proof of application for enrolment to a college, university or accredited post-secondary education establishment; and need. R.C.A.F. Association 800 Pacific Wing – Bursary This bursary is available to any Cadet who has been an Air Cadet for one or more years, has qualities of character, and displays outstanding merit in any field of study; and who is in financial need.

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Squadron Trophies and Awards Kathleen Hunt Memorial Trophy (1968) Awarded for outstanding participation Brock Whitney Trophy (1968)

Best Drill Cadet

Hutton Trophy (1957)

Highest Marks in Flying Scholarship

Ross Whitmore Trophy (1972) Outstanding Rifle Drill and Colour Party NCO R.T. Hoard Trophy (1948)

Most Improved Cadet

Kenton Trophy (1948)

Most proficient Non-NCO

Jack Edwards Memorial Trophy (1962)

Outstanding Initiative and Ability

G/C E.A.(Mac)McGowan Memorial Cadet Best Exemplifying the Cadet Credo Trophy (1979) in Squadron and Community Activities S/L A.W.J. Smith Memorial Trophy - Air Force Officers Association of Vancouver Island Plaque

Outstanding senior NCO

800 Wing RCAF Association Trophy

Outstanding First Year Cadet

89 Squadron O’Brien Trophy (1979)

Most Deserving Cadet

Collard Bros Trophy (1971)

Rifle Marksmanship (22 Caliber)

Drummond Memorial Trophy

 op Cadet for Outstanding Community T and Fundraising Activities

Dave Marryatt Trophy (2004) Top Effective Speaking Award in the Squadron Mrs E.A. McGowan Award (1963)

Outstanding Contribution to the Squadron

Jackson Memorial Trophy

Most Proficient Flight of the Year

Sponsor Committee Award (1971)

Outstanding Band Cadet

Top Flag Party Cadet

Outstanding Flag Party Cadet

Tischart Memorial Trophy

Most Outstanding Drill Team Member

Maj C.S. Dorrington CF98 Trophy

Most Outstanding M.I.R. Cadet

The Symons Trophy (2007)

Outstanding Air Rifle Cadet

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Squadron Bursaries and Scholarships Support Association Bursary This award of $500 is presented at the end of the cadet year to a cadet planning to attend a Post Secondary education facility. The financial award is presented when the recipient provides proof of enrolment at a Post Secondary institution. Cadet to Regular Force Award This $250 award is presented to a Cadet who is going to serve in the Regular Force of the Canadian Armed Forces; this includes attending Royal Military College (RMC) or being enrolled in the Regular Officer Training Program through RMC.

The Air Cadet League of Canada The Air Cadet League of Canada is comprised of three levels of administration – National, Provincial and Local Sponsoring Committees. The Provincial level office in BC is located at Unit 56 – 4400 – 72nd Street, Delta, BC; its administration is comprised of 50 volunteers and one part-time secretary. Main areas of responsibility include: • The formation of new squadrons. • Assisting with the recruitment of officers and cadets. • Maintaining the fleet of tow planes and gliders. • To offer guidance and support to Local Sponsoring Committees. Air Cadet Administration Structure Department of National Defence (DND)

Air Cadet League of Canada (National)

Pacific Region

BC Committee, Air Cadet League (Regional)

RCO and RDCO

League Representative

Squadron Commanding Office

Support Association Chair

Squadron Officers and Instructors

89 (Pacific) RCACS Support Assn.

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Educational Credits The Air Cadet League has implemented a program for British Columbia Cadets whereby certain courses within the Cadet program will qualify for Educational Credits. This is very worthwhile as it allows cadets to acquire additional credits, which apply towards high school graduation. The Minister of Education approved a revision to the Graduation Credits Order to include credits for training received while enrolled in Cadets. Cadets may obtain up to twelve (12) credits towards Secondary School graduation. Four (4) credits may be obtained at Grade 10 by successfully completing Level Three squadron training, four (4) credits may be obtained at Grade 11 by successfully completing Level Four squadron training, or an approved six-week summer training course, and four (4) credits may be earned at Grade 12 for successfully completing Level Five squadron training, or an approved six-week summer training course. Employment as a Staff Cadet may be used as an alternative to a summer training course. Specific course information may be found on the BC Ministry of Education website at: www.est.gov.bc.ca/eval-acctblty/crsinfo/contents.htm

Air Cadet League Awards Continuation Flying Training Awards Established to provide continuation flying training cash awards for cadets who have won Air Cadet power or glider wings. Applications are mailed annually directly to each flying and glider scholarship recipient for that year. Graduates of that year and the qualifying cadets from previous year’s scholarships should submit their applications to the National League headquarters before the 31st October deadline. Harry Astoria Memorial Gliding Award This award is available to Air Cadets who are selected as the Top Glider Graduate in British Columbia. This award has been initiated in memory of Harry K. Astoria and his long time dedication and service to the Air Cadet League of Canada, in particular for his leadership and dedicated service to the British Columbia Provincial Committee Air Cadet League of Canada. This award has a cash value of $500.00. The Harry Astoria Memorial Gliding Award is for presentation annually commencing August 2001. Bill Batchelor Continuation Flying Training Award In memory of our long-term President and mentor, the Air Cadet League of Canada, British Columbia Provincial Committee, has established the Bill Batchelor Continuation Flying Training Award, to be presented annually to the Top Graduate of the provincial Flying Scholarship program. The award has a cash value of $500.00.

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89 (Pacific) RCACS Support Association The Air Cadet program is a partnership between the Department of National Defence (DND) and the Air Cadet League, which have national, provincial and local committees. Funding for the cadet program by DND is limited; therefore, each squadron has a sponsor such as a community group, service club, or organization established for the sole purpose of acting as the sponsor (e.g. RCAF Association Wing, Legion, Parents’ Committee). The Sponsor for 89 Squadron is the 89 (Pacific) Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron Support Association made up predominantly of cadet parents who have been screened with a police check and interviewed to ensure they are safe to interact with youth. The 89 (Pacific) RCACS Support Association’s Board of Directors are elected by its members each year at the Annual General Meeting (usually held in November). The membership is made up of parents and guardians of cadets and Friends of the Squadron. Responsibilities of the Support Association are: • Paying all costs associated with the squadron operations that are not covered by DND. These costs can include charges for training facilities, transportation, rations, band instruments and repairs, music, flags, rifles, radios, trophies, computers, training aids, and social events • Co-coordinating volunteer resources required for cadet functions • Recruitment of Cadets • Fundraising • Organizing social events for cadets and/or parents The Executive and Board of Directors manage the overall affairs of the Support Association. This group meets once a month to review financial statements, correspondence and upcoming events; consult with the Commanding Officer and deal with any issues. All meetings are open to all parents and friends of the Squadron but only the Directors can vote at the monthly meetings. Throughout the year, the Sponsoring Committee will inform parents of squadron activities, upcoming events, fundraisers, or changes in policies. Membership Becoming a member entitles you to vote at the Annual General Meeting and participate at any cadet functions. The annual dues to belong to the Association are $10 per year or a life membership can be obtained for $100.

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For the safety of the Cadets any parent/guardian or Friend of the Squadron who volunteer for more than two functions in a year (where you are interacting with the cadets) are subject to: • A Criminal Record Check (as and when required and for members of a nonprofit society the fee for this is usually waved). Criminal Record checks are valid for five years. • A committee interview Upon successful completion of the screening process you are entitled to participate in all events as a volunteer. Information Board A bulletin board is located on the wall just outside the administration office. Here you will find information such as meeting dates or other pertinent information. Fundraising The Sponsoring Committee is faced with ever increasing expenses, which are required to help deliver the Air Cadet program. As such, the Committee is always looking for sources of income to cover these various expenses. Throughout the year, we ask cadets and parents to help in several fundraising events (Tag Days being one of the main events) to help maintain the high level of activities planned for the training year. Although the majority of the Air Cadet program is funded through the Department of National Defence; a lot of the program and equipment is still funded by the Support Association. Familiarization power flying, transportation to some squadron events, the purchase of musical instruments and band accessories and other incidentals are some of the items not funded by DND. We must pay administrative costs such as telephone, contents insurance, trophies, awards and sponsoring costs. Parents and friends of cadets may wish to make a financial donation to the Support Association to help offset the many operating costs as identified above. A receipt for tax purposes will be issued on request for donations over $10.00. If you wish to make a contribution, please contact the Support Association chairperson or treasurer. Cheques and/or donations can be made payable to 89 (Pacific) RCACS Support Association. Canteen and Food Services Our canteen operates every Parade Night (Monday evenings) from 1900 to 21:00 (7:00 to 9:00 pm) (cadets have a 15 minute break) and for special events as needed. The canteen operates on a cash only basis. Cadets with specific food allergies or restrictions will be accommodated and parents can advise the canteen staff of this information and it will be noted but the cadet is ultimately responsible to ensure that they only purchase those items that they are able to enjoy.

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HISTORY Air Cadets in Canada In 1940, during the height of the Second World War, the Air Minister of Canada realized the need of a select corps of youth who would devote their time to prepare for the day that they would take their place as aircrew in the RCAF. He called in a group of influential civilians to ask them to set up and sponsor this movement along with the partnership of the RCAF. On November 11, 1940, an Order in Council PC 6647 was passed, creating the formation of the Air Cadet League of Canada. This order also set forth the responsibilities of both the civilian and RCAF bodies. In 1941, this league was granted a Dominion Charter to operate as a charitable, nonprofit corporation. By May 1943 there were 315 squadrons with 23,000 cadets participating. It was the character building aspect of Air Cadet training that appealed to youth leaders. Today there are 448 squadrons with approximately 27,000 Air Cadets or approximately 44.5% of the total number of cadets in Canada. Service clubs, Educators, Boards of Trade and Veteran groups offered their service to assist the youth in becoming good citizens. Today there is no longer the expectation of following through in a military career, as the emphasis is now placed on fostering aviation knowledge along with moral and social responsibility of one’s self within the league and in the community. The air cadet program in BC is very active; currently there are over 3,600 youth in 57 squadrons in BC. Air Cadets in British Columbia Messers Nick Carter, Vic Clerihue and Mr. Bell-Irving were three of the driving forces behind the Air Cadet Movement in British Columbia. In 1939 when King George VI and Queen Elizabeth visited Vancouver, S/L Carter had over 100 Air Cadets lining the street - two years prior to the official recognition of Air Cadets. The Air Cadet League of Canada and The British Columbia Provincial Committee were granted their Charter in 1941. October 1941 saw the establishment of 22 Squadron Powell River. Year 1942 welcomed: 89 Sqn Victoria, 111 Sqn Vancouver, 135 Sqn Vancouver, 147 Sqn Chilliwack, 204 Sqn Kamloops, 205 Sqn Nanaimo, and 223 Sqn Vernon. 1943/1944 saw the addition of five new squadrons. Each decade has seen an increase in squadrons in BC where we now have 57 Air Cadet Squadrons. The administrative and operational control of the B.C. Squadrons is provided by the Commanding Officer and Staff at Pacific Region HQ, Victoria. The Department of National Defence (DND) also provide uniforms - training aids - funding of mandatory training - training and pay for Cadet Officers and Instructors - summer courses. In addition to each Squadron’s military staff, there is a Sponsoring Committee staffed from 5 to as many as 15 civilians from the local community.

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There are approximately 400 citizen volunteers associated with and assisting our Sponsoring Committees within British Columbia. Each Sponsoring Committee is responsible for: obtaining and funding the squadron accommodation needs, funding for the squadron activities not covered by DND, encouraging enrolment of youth in Air Cadets, working with the Squadron CO in selecting Air Cadets for training and reward activities, and awarding of trophies and other special inducements for proficiency. Our Squadrons are geographically grouped into six wings each with a Wing Chair: Vancouver Island Wing; Okanagan Wing; Northern wing; Lower Mainland Wing; Kootenay Wing; Fraser Valley Wing. The Flying/Gliding Program is conducted under the command of the Regional Cadet Air Operations Officer at CFB Comox. Each spring and fall, Air Cadet gliding is conducted at a dozen gliding sites throughout BC. Under the Memorandum of Understanding between DND and the Air Cadet League of Canada, each cadet is given the opportunity for at least one glider flight each training year. The Air Cadet League in BC owns six L19 Tow Planes, and twelve 2-33 Schweizer Gliders and is responsible for the cost of major maintenance, engine overhauls, etc., and the aircraft insurance. DND are responsible for the operational control, daily servicing and regular maintenance. The British Columbia Provincial Committee is administered by a ten member Board of Directors. The directors are elected by the members of the British Columbia Provincial Committee at the Annual General Meeting which is normally held in Kamloops in September. 89 (Pacific) Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron History When the Air Cadet League was formed, the various squadrons were known as the Canadian Air Cadets. Parliament changed that by enacting the Royal Canadian Air Force Act June 26, 1946, and the *Royal* was added to the cadet title. To this day, the movement retains the title Royal Canadian Air Cadets. In the summer of 1941, scores of Victoria men and women became involved in the war effort by joining the newly formed Canadian Air Cadet Corps. In fact they were joining hundreds of other British Columbia high school students who were being groomed for possible service with the Royal Canadian Air Force after graduation. For three hours a week, they were to be guided through basic RCAF military procedures and special courses in aeronautics by specially trained high school teachers and air force personnel. Twenty-five British Columbia teachers were given intensive instruction at the Patricia Bay Airport near Sidney, site of the present day Victoria International Airport. They were taken on RCAF flights and after rigorous classroom lessons, subjected to stiff examinations. After passing, they became cadet civilian instructors with officer rank. Six of those original instructors were Victorians. They were Lewis Clark, G.A. Brand, John White, John D. Proudfoot, Robert Huddleston, and P.C. Routley who served as the first Commanding Officer of the Victoria High School Squadron, later to become 89 (Pacific) RCAC Squadron.

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The RCAF was expecting the student cadets, age 15 to 18, to join the air force after their cadet service. Indeed, many of them did go on to become RCAF pilots, navigators, airframe and aero-engine technicians and to fill many other vital air force roles. When the Air Cadet movement was in its formative years, the RCAF was reluctant to fly the Cadets in military aircraft. With some persuasive arm-twisting the powersthat-be gave in and familiarization flights became a tradition that Air Cadets enjoy to this day. Historical reports show that air cadet squadrons were set up at Victoria High School, Oak Bay High, Mount View High, Mount Douglas High, Esquimalt High and later at Victoria College. Today, only the Victoria High 89 Squadron still exists. Before the end of the Second World War, the Victoria squadrons turned out hundreds of model aircraft which were actually used in RCAF classrooms as teaching aids to train aircrews in the art of flying. In addition, the early Cadets were schooled in aviation, aircraft recognition, radio, Morse Code and military discipline on the Parade Square. After the war, the high school air cadet squadrons were disbanded. Ottawa officials thought their services were no longer needed. However, the Air Cadet League, the B.C. Provincial Committee, the RCAF itself, and hundreds of Air Cadets and their families thought otherwise, and by 1947 a new wave of Air Cadet programs were sprouting up across Canada. In Victoria, 89 Squadron regrouped under its original identification number. With great assistance from R.H.B. Ker, a Dominion Director of the League and RCAF Air Cadet Liaison Officer P.C. Routley, 89 Squadron gained the use of some old army barracks at Macaulay Point. Former wartime RCAF personnel joined in the action and peacetime Air Cadet training took off in Victoria. The Squadron formed a full drum and bugle band, and a couple of Link flight simulators were acquired. Today, members who qualify receive power flight training in Comox. Summer glider flight training is held at CFB Comox. Other summer training courses are held at Cadet Centres at Albert Head, Blackdown, Kingston, Penhold, and St. Jean as well as CFB Cold Lake and CFB Trenton. During the 1960s and early 1970s, the Kinsmen organization played a key role in sponsoring the Squadron. Various training programs and trips outside the Victoria area were provided through Kinsmen support. In 1971, Squadron sponsorship changed hands to the Royal Canadian Air Force Association, 800 (Pacific) Wing. This organization provided dedicated support for the squadron for 25 years. In 1994 the 89 (Pacific) RCACS Support Association was formed and together with the RCAFA 800 (Pacific) Wing sponsored the Squadron. As of March 31, 1996, the 89 (Pacific) RCACS Support Association is the sole sponsoring body for the Squadron.

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