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Take On Layering Fall 2013


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CLOTHING ACADIANA FOR 37+ YEARS Brother’s on the Boulevard: An Established Leader In Fashion FALL 2013 With Spring behind us and Fall rapidly approaching, we look forward to cooler weather and the Fall fashions it will bring. Brother’s is the destination for fashion-aware men and women of every age and every style. WHAT YOU MAY NOT KNOW ABOUT BROTHER’S After more than 37 years in the fashion trade, Brother’s remains the only locally-owned and operated specialty store in Acadiana offering men’s and women’s clothing, shoes, accessories and gifts. An unparalleled commitment to customer service since 1976, combined with the finest fashion merchandise, allows us to constantly set ourselves apart as a leader in south Louisiana’s fashion scene. UPCOMING STORE EVENTS: Old Gringo Boots Trunk Show * Suit and Sport Coat Trunk Shows * “Soles 4 Souls” Campaign * Shopping Days to give back to community schools, events, causes * Fashion Week in Acadiana this Fall * Tinsels and Treasures Fashion Show

$

50

GIFT CERTIFICATE GOOD THROUGH SATURDAY, NOV. 23, 2013

WITH YOUR PURCHASE OF $150 OR MORE OF REGULAR-PRICED FALL &WINTER MERCHANDISE. *One coupon per customer. May not be combined with any other offer. Not valid towards previous purchases, special orders, or layaways. This coupon may not be redeemed for cash. *Further restrictions may apply.

SOCIALLY NETWORK WITH BROTHER’S: Brother’s can be found on the social networking scene with a Facebook timeline, a Twitter feed, a pin board on Pinterest, as well as on Instagram, Google+ and publications on ISSUU. Also visit our website for blogging and online shopping (coming soon): BrothersOnTheBlvd.com


FALL 2013

Made with pride in Canada coppley.com


D AV I D W O N

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THE MYTH OF MICRO

THE BEST EXPERIMENTAL WHISKEY COMES FROM NOT-SO-SMALL DISTILLERIES

E’S DR AV

KING IN

WHAT D

nnovation in booze is supposed to come from the little guys—the dozens upon dozens of new whiskey distilleries that have opened around the country over the last few years. Unlike the old-line Kentucky and Tennessee outfits, the Jims and the Jacks, these guys are each making at most a barrel’s worth a day, every drop under the personal supervision of a young artisan who’s passionately committed to extending the parameters of the craft. (That’s the theory, anyway.) While much of what they’re making comes off the still as standard bourbon or rye, there’s also a lot of less-standard stuff: straight corn whiskey, malt whiskey, millet whiskey, sorghum whiskey, spelt whiskey, whiskey made from mixed barley, oats, and rye, all kinds of things. The problem is whiskey is an interaction of two different processes: distillation and maturation. That maturation takes a long time to do its best work, a minimum of 4 years, a sweet spot of 10 or 12, and well beyond that in exceptional cases. Almost all American microdistilleries are un-

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der ten years old, and most of them are well under that. If they want to play around with fully matured whiskey, they’ve got to either buy it or, you know, wait. Meanwhile, some of those big old-line distillers have caught the innovation bug, and they’ve got plenty of mature whiskey to play with. Sometimes that results in bourbon flavored with cherries or whatnot, about which the less said the better. Far better to take the latest installment in Woodford Reserve’s Master’s Collection, [1] Four Wood ($100), a regular Woodford Reserve that’s been “finished” in sherry barrels, port barrels, and barrels made of maple after aging in oak (the standard wood). It’s like the regular Woodford but thicker, richer, chewier. Heaven Hill’s innovation series is the Parker’s Heritage Collection, named after its longtime master distiller, Parker Beam. This year’s installment is the [2] Master Distiller’s Blend of Mashbills ($80), which combines barrels from two lots of bourbon, both 11 years old: one made with rye in the mash and the other with wheat. It’s one of the

best bourbons we’ve had in years, a titanic whiskey. You’ve got to add water— it’s over 130 proof—but it’s Want to talk to David a shame to add too much. Wondrich? While the Woodford Download the revolutionary and the Parker’s experi(and free!) Talk ment with the end of the to Esquire app on your iPad maturation process, Bufor iPhone—or falo Trace’s Experimenscan here using your Netpage tal Collection was being app—and intertinkered with as far back act with Dave to discover a new as 1987. Previous years’ cocktail that’s releases have included just for you. For more innine-year-old whiskeys formation, see page 32. made with oats or rice in the mash bill (the latter has the startling aroma of Japanese rice crackers), 19- and 23-year-old bourbons aged in giant French oak casks rather than American oak barrels (very different results), and a host of other fascinating things. One of the most recent releases is the [3] Hot Box Toasted Barrel ($46), which spent more than 16 years in barrels toasted at high heat and steamed before assembly to bring out more flavor from the wood. It worked. The microdistilleries will get there, in time. In some cases, they’re damn close. One new distillery, [4] Hillrock Estate ($80), in New York’s Hudson Valley, has jump-started the process by blending its newly made whiskey with (purchased) older bourbon and letting them mingle in the barrel. What comes out has the floral notes of a young whiskey tempered by the nuttiness of an older one. The [5] Balcones True Blue 100 ($57) corn whiskey (made in Waco, Texas, from 100 percent Hopi blue corn), solves the problem by making something so different that it evades comparison with what you know. On the nose, it recalls now Scotch, now rhum agricole from Martinique. Sip it, which is no hardship, and it recalls café mocha as much as it does bourbon whiskey. It’s young and eccentric at the same time, and it’s found its own path to deliciousness. And that, after all, is the point. ≥

OLD-FASHIONED KENTUCKY WHISKEY TODDY The best thing you can do with really good old bourbon is put it in a glass and drink it. This might be the next best. At least it lets the whiskey have its say, almost without interruption. After all, the prime rule of mixology is, or should be, “First of all, do no harm.” In an old-fashioned glass, muddle a sugar cube with 1/2 ounce of water. Add a good-sized slug of bourbon—two or three ounces—and three or four ice cubes. Stir pen-sively, and then grate a little nutmeg on top. Do not otherwise garnish. —D. W.

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COOKING SCHOOL MONTH

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec HOW TO

MAKE A PAN SAUCE

F O R A N Y M E AT

[1] Cut shallots or onions into thin slices or small dice. Add to the hot pan after removing meat. They will release moisture, loosening flavorful bits of meat (“fond”) from the pan. This is the first deglaze. A pat of butter helps, too—the milk solids will caramelize and attach themselves to the fond.

THE ART OF STIRRING UP A SAUCE IN A PAN THAT’S STILL HOT

As told to Francine Maroukian

aking a sauce in the pan you just used to cook whatever the sauce will cover—in

this case, a beautiful steak—is all about perception. It looks (and tastes) like it takes more time and training than it actually does. That’s because the ingredients do a lot of the work for you—the meat, in a way, becomes part of the sauce. The fundamental technique here is called deglazing, and it’s one of those essential principles of cooking that chefs hesitate to give away because it’s so easy. Truth is it’s simple to master, and it will catapult your confidence as a cook in just a few minutes. The first thing to understand is that it’s a blessing to have little bits of meat stick to the pan when you’re cooking proteins like beef, pork, or chicken because those bits become the foundation of the sauce. The technical term for these little caramelized jewels is “fond,” and their flavor is everything here. Be careful not to burn them when you incorporate them into your sauce, because then the final product will taste . . . burned. So keep your heat moderate. Beyond that, it’s hard to mess this up. And the real beauty of deglazing lies in its speedy efficiency. By the time your steak has rested after cooking, everything’s — CHEF ADAM SOBEL ready to eat. RECIPE: Mushroom pan sauce for steak CHEF: Adam Sobel RESTAURANT: Bourbon Steak, Washington, D. C. SERVES : One

> First, cook a steak in a heavy-bottomed pan (preferably cast iron) on the stove.* Remove the meat and place the

still-hot pan over moderate heat. Add a medium-sized sliced shallot along with a small spoon of butter, approximately 1 tablespoon. When the butter melts, add about a half cup of sliced mushrooms—you can use button, shiitake, crimini, oyster, or pretty much whatever looks

good at the supermarket. Sauté the mushrooms for a few minutes, then deglaze the pan with a healthy splash of cabernet sauvignon— about 3 ounces, or about half a glass of wine—and reduce by half. Then add the same amount of beef or chicken stock and reduce

that by half, too. Add a pinch of salt and some cracked black pepper as well as a handful of chopped herbs—parsley, chives, tarragon, or all three. Finish by swirling in another tablespoon of butter, then spoon the sauce over your sliced steak and eat immediately.

[2] Add some cut-up vegetables, but nothing that takes long to cook or the sauce will evaporate and your protein will get cold. Try mushrooms, jarred artichoke hearts, or olives.

[3] The second deglaze is with liquid: first some wine, then some stock (or even water). This time, scrape the pan with a wooden spoon to get all the tasty bits incorporated into the sauce.

[4] Swirl in some butter, maybe a tablespoon. Use a spoon or pick up the pan and move it in quick circles over the burner. Done.

*For a foolproof seared steak, go to esquire.com/sear-a-steak.

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Deglazing: Use Netpage to watch and learn.

I L LU ST R AT I O N S BY J O E M CK E N D R Y

THE ONLY THING TO PUT ON YOUR STEAK


101 Arnould Blvd. Lafayette, LA 70506-6213 337-984-7749 Store Hours: 9:30 – 6:00 Monday – Saturday or by appointment Visit our websites at: www.brothersontheblvd.com www.getrealclothes.com


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