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BURLINGTON BASH

Vermonters observe Juneteenth

V ER MON T’S INDE P ENDE NT VO IC E JUNE 9-16, 2021 VOL.26 NO.36 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

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Celebrating the frontline team that helped Vermont through a less-than-stellar time PAGE 3 2

PANDEMIC ALL STARS


CITY HALL PARK 12:30 PM

WEDNESDAYS JUNE 9 BIRDCODE JUNE 16 VERMONT JAZZ TRIO JUNE 23 MARCIE HERNANDEZ TRIO JUNE 30 THE BREVITY THING

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FRIDAYS JUNE 11 ANDREW RICHARDS ENSEMBLE JUNE 18 KERUBO

Antidote and Hired Hand brewing would love to thank our past and current staff members whose hard work and dedication made it possible to get through this past year and a half.

JUNE 25 TROY MILLETTE

Our Vergennes area community for riding this weird wave with us. PRESENTED BY

Sue Hamline, our fearless everyone eats delivery crew, and kitchen for just being amazing! We look forward to seeing everyone in our new rendition of Antidote and Hired Hand! Cheers Ian & Eliza

FULL PERFORMER DESCRIPTIONS AT BURLINGTONCITYARTS.ORG 2

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

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802.877.2555 :: 35 Green Street Vergennes :: barantidote.com 4T-Antidote/hiredHand060921.indd 1

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WE'RE BACK! Join Us for Drinks on the Patio! Mon-Thur, 2pm-9pm Fri-Sun, 12pm-9pm (weather dependent) Reservations recommended and walk-ins welcomed BARRHILL.COM Cocktails To-Go also available

Our retail shop is open 7 days a week, 12pm to Close.

Retail Store, Beer Garden and Taproom Now Open! Table Reservations required at LawsonsFinest.com 155 Carroll Rd, Waitsfield, VT • 802-496-HOPS Open Daily Sun-Thurs 11AM-7PM • Fri-Sat 11AM-8PM

116 Gin Lane, Montpelier, 1 6/8/21 Vermont 11:24 AM

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June Sunshine Fund donations support OUR House of Central Vermont, a Children’s Advocacy Program that works with victims of sexual abuse and their families.

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C

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commercial banking

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When it comes to commercial banking, we know the local landscape and the pathways to success.

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SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

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Co-op Member Drive

Strength in Community Join · Renew · Engage

Become a Member or renew between June 7-21 and be a part of a community-owned business committed to strengthening the local food system and increasing access for all community members!

Member Drive Incentives Save

$5

Discount Day

on $25 or more

Savings coupon with your equity purchase

Free reusable bamboo utensil set

Local & Made in VT Discount Day on June 16

Plus: Access many other year-round benefits of Membership!

New Members Already a Member? Join for just $15 per year

Renew this month for great incentives!

www.citymarket.coop/join

Downtown 82 S. Winooski Ave · Open 7am - 10pm every day South End 207 Flynn Ave · Open 7am - 9pm every day Burlington, VT 4

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

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WEEK IN REVIEW JUNE 2-9, 2021

FILE: CALEB KENNA

COMPILED BY SASHA GOLDSTEIN & MATTHEW ROY

RECEIVER TO RUN ELDERCARE HOMES

emoji that MOTHER TRUCKER

In a matter of days, two tractortrailers got stuck in narrow Smugglers’ Notch, snarling traffic. Another sign of summer.

SLOW AND STEADY

Our House Too in Rutland

A court-appointed receiver is assuming control over a group of four eldercare homes in Rutland after regulators found deteriorating conditions had led to abuse and a resident’s death. The residential care homes, known collectively as Our House, were shown to have similar problems in a 2019 Seven Days/Vermont Public Radio series on the industry. State regulators at the Vermont Department of Disabilities, Aging and Independent Living stepped in last month following what court filings describe as “troubling events” that show a pattern of understaffing and inadequate training. A judge’s June 4 order places an outside receiver in charge at the owner’s expense. For years, Our House has participated in a state program that allows it to admit elderly residents whose needs are intensive enough that they qualify for a traditional nursing home. About half of the residents at Our House, which caters to people with dementia, live there through the state program. Our House’s caregivers and aides have struggled to manage residents’ behavior. They’ve resorted to mechanical and chemical restraints and physical abuse, the state found. Hoping to avoid the “trauma” of relocating more than 20 residents, DAIL and the Vermont Attorney General’s Office proposed the receivership, interim DAIL Commissioner Monica White said. Our House co-owner Paula Patorti agreed, leading to the first voluntary takeover of a poorly performing eldercare home in Vermont.

802nice

DISASTER AVERTED

A bullet struck but didn’t seriously hurt a bystander in Burlington over the weekend. No one’s been arrested.

FIZZLED OUT

Some Vermont towns are scaling back or canceling plans for Fourth of July celebrations, VPR reported. Duds?

That’s how much a law firm linked to Jay Peak EB-5 defendant Ariel Quiros will pay in a legal settlement.

TOPFIVE

MOST POPULAR ITEMS ON SEVENDAYSVT.COM

1. “My Mom Lives Next Door to Drug Dealers, and I’m Worried About Her” by the Reverend. Our columnist has sage advice for a reader worried about safety. 2. “Essex Becomes a Battlefield in the Public School Culture Wars” by Derek Brouwer and Alison Novak. Dueling meetings on race and education highlighted a cultural divide. 3. “Vermont Is Planning to Install Rattlesnake Road Crossings” by Kevin McCallum. Route 22A in Rutland County will likely have tunnels one day to accommodate the endangered creatures. 4. “Cajun-Creole Restaurant Bourbon Street Opens for Takeout in Burlington” by Jordan Barry. Chef-owner Richard Lockwood opened his restaurant on May 25. 5. “Vermont Farmer-Researchers Explore the Potential of Perennial Vegetables” by Melissa Pasanen. Planting sea kale and other perennials would enable growers to avoid disturbing soil each year.

tweet of the week @vtcraghead Just saw a Québec plate at Petra Cliffs and had to resist the urge to hug the occupants. “Bienvenue! For the love of god bienvenue! We’ve missed you so much *sob*” #btv

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSVT OUR TWEEPLE: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/TWITTER

WHAT’S KIND IN VERMONT

COURTESY OF FLIGHT VT

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Last August, a caregiver at one of Patorti’s properties, Our House Too, was charged with assault for hitting a resident with dementia during an altercation. The 83-year-old was bleeding when another caregiver found him, Seven Days and VPR previously reported. Six months later, an agitated resident at sister facility Our House Outback charged a caregiver from behind, according to a recently released DAIL licensing survey. The worker turned a shoulder into the resident, who lost balance and fell over. The resident was knocked out and, hours later, was taken to a hospital by ambulance. The resident was diagnosed with a subdural hematoma and died two days later, according to the report. DAIL surveyors found that caregivers weren’t trained to manage difficult behaviors, nor did the home have the staffing levels it described in its applications to operate a dementia unit. One frustrated staffer punched through a wall in a resident’s room, according to the state surveys. Patorti opened Our House more than 20 years ago, in memory of her mother-in-law’s experience with dementia. “Our residents need us, and that hasn’t changed,” she said. Patorti said her homes, like many others, have had trouble finding and keeping enough caregivers. Of the receivership, she added: “We’re just looking at it as a positive situation, hoping that it will wrap up quickly and fairly painlessly.” Read Derek Brouwer’s full story at sevendaysvt.com.

Vermont inched toward Gov. Phil Scott’s goal of vaccinating 80 percent of the state’s eligible population. The countdown is on.

$32.5 million

A participant preparing to fly

FLYING HIGH Tyler Brown admits that he “wasn’t the most motivated student” as a teen attending South Burlington High School. But something clicked when he started in the aviation program at Burlington Technical Center. “Being around airplanes changed my life,” Brown said. “I went from being a typical student to a straight-A student.” He went on to work at the Vermont Flight Academy, which is based at the Burlington International Airport. Now the academy’s executive director, Brown wants to inspire the next generation by giving them an airborne experience. On June 5, the

academy and Beta Technologies partnered to officially launch Flight VT, a program that provides free hourlong aerial trips for young people. Beta brought its electric Alia aircraft for attendees to see, and the Vermont Air National Guard brought an F-35. “It was a frickin’ awesome event,” Brown said. The best part? “The faces on the kids,” he said. The academy and Beta are working with several youth-oriented nonprofits to find participants. About 15 took flights at the kick-off event, and the program aims to provide 100 total this summer. Each includes a pre- and post-flight briefing, and the journey goes over the kids’ hometown so they can see it from the air. Every participant gets a personalized logbook,

“which counts towards getting a license,” Brown said. “This isn’t a joyride,” he said. “They are literally going through flight training, and they’re literally the pilot in control of this airplane above the skies.” Brown said there’s a perception that flying is “reserved for the ultra-elitists.” The program, he said, aims to “make it attainable to everyone.” He acknowledges that not all participants will become pilots. The kids “can really challenge their preconceived notions of what they’re able to do,” Brown said. “That’s really what this is all about.” SASHA GOLDSTEIN SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

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BACKSIDE 405 SUMMER 2021

OH, MY STARS. founders/Coeditors Pamela Polston, Paula Routly publisher Paula Routly

deputy publisher Cathy Resmer

GREASEFACE + FATHER FIGUER + RIVAN C BARTOK+ JUNE 12 HIGH &BELLA’S MIGHTY BRASS BAND JUNE 11

JUNE 18

NEWS & POLITICS editor Matthew Roy

JULY 2 JULY 16

Colin Flanders, Courtney Lamdin, Kevin McCallum, Alison Novak, Anne Wallace Allen politiCAl Columnist Mark Johnson ARTS & LIFE editor Pamela Polston

AssoCiAte editor Margot Harrison

AssistAnt editors Dan Bolles, Elizabeth M. Seyler musiC editor Jordan Adams

CAlendAr writer Kristen Ravin

speCiAlty publiCAtions mAnAger Carolyn Fox

stAff writers Jordan Barry, Melissa Pasanen,

Ken Picard, Sally Pollak

proofreAders Carolyn Fox, Elizabeth M. Seyler AssistAnt proofreAders Katherine Isaacs,

Martie Majoros, Frank Smecker D I G I TA L & V I D E O

digitAl produCtion speCiAlist Bryan Parmelee senior multimediA produCer Eva Sollberger multimediA journAlist James Buck DESIGN CreAtive direCtor Don Eggert

Art direCtor Rev. Diane Sullivan

THE OL’ HONKY TONK TUESDAY BAND WITH BRETT HUGHES & FRIENDS

AUG. 7

STEVE GUNN + WILLIAM TYLER THE BUBS + THE HIGH BREAKS DWIGHT & NICOLE + ALI MCGUIRK ROUGH FRANCIS + GET A GRIP

AUG. 13

KELLER WILLIAMS

AUG. 14

MARTIN SEXTON

JULY 24 JULY 30 JULY 31

produCtion mAnAger John James

designers Jeff Baron, Kirsten Thompson SALES & MARKETING direCtor of sAles Colby Roberts

senior ACCount exeCutive Michael Bradshaw ACCount exeCutives Robyn Birgisson,

Michelle Brown, Logan Pintka

mArketing & events direCtor Corey Grenier

sAles & mArketing CoordinAtor Katie Hodges A D M I N I S T R AT I O N business mAnAger Marcy Carton

direCtor of CirCulAtion Matt Weiner CirCulAtion deputy Jeff Baron

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Benjamin Aleshire, Luke Baynes, Justin Boland, Alex Brown, Chris Farnsworth, Margaret Grayson, Amy Lilly, Bryan Parmelee, Jim Schley, Carolyn Shapiro, Molly Zapp CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS Luke Awtry, Harry Bliss, James Buck, Rob Donnelly, Luke Eastman, Caleb Kenna, Sean Metcalf, Matt Mignanelli, Marc Nadel, Tim Newcomb, Oliver Parini, Sarah Priestap, Kim Scafuro, Michael Tonn, Jeb Wallace-Brodeur C I R C U L AT I O N : 3 5 , 0 0 0 Seven Days is published by Da Capo Publishing Inc. every Wednesday. It is distributed free of charge in greater Burlington, Middlebury, Montpelier, Northeast Kingdom, Stowe, the Mad River Valley, Rutland, St. Albans, St. Johnsbury, White River Junction and Plattsburgh, N.Y.

Seven Days is printed at Quebecor Media Printing in Laval, Québec.

AUG. 20

THE STEEL WOODS

AUG. 21

KAT WRIGHT

AUG. 27

CLEVER GIRLS + FRANCESCA BLANCHARD

TICKETS & INFO: HIGHERGROUNDMUSIC.COM 405 PINE STREET • BURLINGTON, VT

DELIVERY TECHNICIANS Harry Applegate, Jeff Baron, Joe Bouffard, Pat Bouffard, Colin Clary, Elana Coppola-Dyer, Donna Delmoora, Matt Hagen, Nat Michael, Dan Nesbitt, Dan Thayer With additional circulation support from PP&D. SUBSCRIPTIONS 6-month 1st ClAss: $175. 1-yeAr 1st ClAss: $275. 6-month 3rd ClAss: $85. 1-yeAr 3rd ClAss: $135. Please call 802-864-5684 with your credit card, or mail your check or money order to “Subscriptions” at the address below. Seven Days shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, Seven Days may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher. Seven Days reserves the right to refuse any

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SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

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READER REACTION TO RECENT ARTICLES

Consulting editor Candace Page

stAff writers Derek Brouwer, Chelsea Edgar,

BOB WAGNER BLUES POWER FEVER DOLLS + PONS + PRINCESS NOSTALGIA MATTHEW MERCURY+ RYLEY WALKER START MAKING SENSE: TALKING HEADS TRIBUTE

JUNE 26

FEEDback

deputy editor Sasha Goldstein

MAX CREEK

JUNE 25

JULY 17

AssoCiAte publishers

Don Eggert, Pamela Polston, Colby Roberts

6/8/21 1:00 PM

ART-ICLE ERRORS

Thank you for the article about the “Cranbrook Connections” show on view at Studio Place Arts in Barre, prepared by Amy Lilly [“Motor City Mecca,” June 2]. I’m writing to correct a couple of details. First, Amy and I talked a bit about the annual rollout of innovative car designs in a fashion show event. While some in my extended family benefited from receiving late model cars annually, I did not. I have proudly driven my old jalopies well beyond their fashion expiration dates and didn’t own one until I was 24. Also, the Cranbrook Academy of Art did not share its mailing list with me, as it would be against its and most institutions’ privacy policies. I was pleased that its alumni department was willing to share our call for proposals via an email broadcast in its routine alumni communications. Finally, Jenny Swanson is the director of the ceramics studio at Dartmouth College, not at the Hood Museum at Dartmouth College. Sue Higby

BARRE

Higby is executive director of Studio Place Arts.

SUGGESTED READING ON PCBS

[Re “Chemical Reaction,” May 12]: In “The ABCs of PCBs: A Toxic Threat to America’s Schools,” a report written in October 2016 by Sen. Ed Markey, we learn that decades after the PCB ban in 1979, up to 14 million schoolchildren were still being exposed to PCBs from such sources as caulk, oil-based paints, floor finishes, leaking fluorescent light ballast and old electrical equipment — all from schools constructed between 1950 and 1979 — and that between 12,960 and 25,920 schools have PCB-containing caulk. Another source of information is the link mentioned by Sarah Vose, Vermont state toxicologist, which summarizes three studies from 2009 that connect exposure to PCBs and neurological development. It’s entitled “How PCBs May Hurt the Brain: New Studies Shed Light on Exposure to Environmental Toxin and Development of Brain Cells.” In the first study, Isaac N. Pessah, a professor of molecular biosciences, writes: “We’ve never really understood the mechanism by which PCBs produce


WEEK IN REVIEW

from Mickey Wiles, founder of Working Fields, saying he thinks the government’s enhanced unemployment benefit is keeping people out of the workforce. “As much as we would like to believe that people don’t do that, there is a certain amount of the population that is,” he said. What does he mean, “like to believe that people don’t do that”? Wiles would like people to work 40 hours a week to take home less money than they could get from unemployment? Working Fields helps people with addiction issues and criminal records find work, but it takes a portion of their paychecks for doing so. I dare Wiles, or anyone else who thinks the enhanced unemployment benefit is keeping people out of the workforce, to try and live on it. The minimum benefit plus $300 often comes out to around $400 a week after taxes. Maybe Wiles has forgotten what it was like to struggle as he’s made money from the work of people who still are.

TIM NEWCOMB

VERMO NT’S

INDEP ENDEN

T VOICE MAY 26-JUN E 2, 2021 VOL.26 NO.34 SEVEN DAYSV

T.COM

neurobehavioral problems in children. With these studies we have now shown how PCBs alter the development and excitability of brain cells. And that could explain why PCBs are associated with higher rates of neurodevelopmental and behavioral disorders.” In another of the studies, Pamela Lein, a University of California, Davis associate professor of molecular biosciences, reports that PCBs are altering dendritic growth and plasticity, which have been implicated in many neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism, schizophrenia and mental retardation. These studies help to explain why it is important to maintain Vermont’s higher standards for PCB exposure. The federal standards predated these more recent studies.

mother and immigrant family’s contribution to the war effort. In recounting the war stories of six veterans, ages 95 to 107, you remind us of the sacrifices made by millions of young Americans so we might live full and free lives. Although less than 1 percent QUIET REFLECTION of these heroes are among the living, PASSING THE BATON 70 million of their children are alive and will never forget their legacy — whether shared or silently endured in the years after World War II. T h i s s u m m e r, Antrim House Books will publish Mianus Village, my poetic recollections of a group of us baby boomers coming of age in a VA housing project in the years after the war. In a small way, it too pays tribute to members of the Greatest Generation, who just happened to be our parents.  Kudos to Seven Days for giving these six veterans a chance to speak to us. May their stories be widely circulated to our children and grandchildren and never be forgotten. BTV vigil honors Floyd on anniv George ersary PAGE 5

Dave Gram’s

PAGE 15

ALIVE TO TELL THE TALE

Deborah Messing

MONTPELIER

NEVER FORGET

Thank you for “Alive to Tell the Tale” [May 26], recalling the role of young Vermonters in the greatest conflagration in world history. Thanks, too, for Paula Routly’s “Remember This” [From the Publisher, May 26], a touching reminiscence of her

last Fair Game

INSIDE

Vermont’s rema survivors bear ining World War II witness

STORY BY STEVE GOLDS PHOT OS BY TEIN JAME S BUCK , PAGE 32

Jack T. Scully

COLCHESTER

WHAT’S WORKING

[Re “Help Really Wanted,” May 12]: Anne Wallace Allen’s article included a quote

Andrew Place

BRISTOL

Place is a former Working Fields associate.

VICIOUS CYCLE?

Your article about an evil “out-of-state” corporation wiping out local bike rentals misses the point entirely [“Cycle Killer?” May 19]. This is not a zero-sum game, and the protectionist arguments you cite are a bit alarming, especially given the post-pandemic boom in the outdoor space. If consumers prefer not to rent from the Skiracks of the world, then local shops need understand why that is and do better. That’s like eliminating Lyft and Uber because they eat into Green Cab’s business. I prefer local, but when not a single local cab can pick me up for a 7 a.m. flight, I’m grateful to have other options. Lastly, this is really about ditching the 20-miles-per-gallon Subaru for trips around town. Vermont is rural, and this FEEDBACK

» P.24

SAY SOMETHING! Seven Days wants to publish your rants and raves. Your feedback must... • be 250 words or fewer; • respond to Seven Days content; • include your full name, town and a daytime phone number. Seven Days reserves the right to edit for accuracy, length and readability. Your submission options include: • sevendaysvt.com/feedback • feedback@sevendaysvt.com • Seven Days, P.O. Box 1164, Burlington, VT 05402-1164

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WINES ON SALE! Boyal Cabernet Sauvignon 2019 Reg $11.99 Sale $7.99 Save $4! Laurent Miquel Auzines Albariño 2018 Reg $19.99 Sale $9.99 Save $10! Laurent Miquel ‘Solas’ Pinot Noir Réserve 2019 Reg $17.99 Sale $9.99 Save $8! Michel-Schlumberger Benchland Wine Estate Pinot Noir Dry Creek Valley 2018 Reg $19.99 Sale $9.99 Save $10! Summerland Cabernet Sauvignon 2017 Reg $17.99 Sale $9.99 Save $8! Vinosia Irpinia Rosato d’Aglianico 2018 Reg $7.99 Sale $5.99 Save $2!

1186 Williston Rd. So. Burlington, VT 05403 (Next to the Alpine Shop) Open 7 days 10am-7pm 802.863.0143 cheeseandwinetraders.com SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021 4v-cheesetraders060921.indd 1

7 6/7/21 11:50 AM


WITHOUT OUR

FRONTLINE

STAFF there would be no Ben & Jerry’s

Throughout the last year, our farmers, farm workers, manufacturing employees, and scoopers have been our unsung heroes and the backbone of our business.

Without the hard work and dedication of these individuals Ben & Jerry’s wouldn’t be, well, Ben & Jerry’s. The past 15 months have been challenging in so many ways, and we couldn’t have done it without the efforts and support of our folks on the frontline. In the midst of a global pandemic, with lockdowns, mask mandates, and business restrictions, these individuals at Ben & Jerry’s showed up everyday to keep things moving while keeping themselves and those around them safe. All of us at Ben & Jerry’s want to extend our most sincere thank you for the hard work and determination of our Vermont farmers, farm workers, manufacturing employees, and scoopers.

©Ben & Jerry’s Homemade, Inc. 2021 Cows: ©Woody Jackson 1997 34723

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contents JUNE 9-16, 2021 VOL.26 NO.36

COLUMNS + REVIEWS

SECTIONS

11 14 29 76 78 109

26 67 71 74 70 80 84 105 108

Magnificent 7 Fair Game WTF Album Reviews Movie Review Ask the Reverend

11

Life Lines Culture Art Music + Nightlife Movies Classes Classifieds + Puzzles Fun Stuff Personals

74

STUCK IN VERMONT

Online Now

Celebrating the frontline team that helped Vermont through a less-than-stellar time PAGE 3 2 COVER IMAGE MATT DOUGLAS • COVER DESIGN REV. DIANE SULLIVAN

17

NEWS & POLITICS 13

FEATURES 32

From the Publisher

Pandemic All-Stars

Unplanned Lesson

Essex Westford School District’s proposed equity policy prompts heated debate

A BTV Jubilee

Burlington prepares for its first-ever Juneteenth celebration

Charlotte Vision

Will Raap plans to turn Nordic Farms into a grain-based ag hub

Founders Hall is the oldest building on SUPPORTED BY: the Colchester campus of Saint Michael’s College. Rather than spend millions renovating the four-story brick edifice, the school has decided to take it down and repurpose many of the materials. Eva Sollberger toured the building and learned about its history.

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Celebrating the frontline team that helped Vermont through a less-than-stellar time

Small Pleasures

“It’s Smaller Than I Thought,” Safe and Sound Gallery

Talk It Out: ‘MOWED MUSIC’ A discussion of East Montpelier sound artist Glenn Weyant’s lawn mower record

67

CULTURE 67 Tuning Up

Find a new job in the classifieds section on page 90 and online at sevendaysvt.com/jobs.

Classical musicians prepare for a live concert season

Thank You Vermont!

Thank you, Vermont. We are grateful for your kindness, support & belief in local businesses.

Essex • Burlington • Rutland

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We have

6/7/21 6:56 PM

We are so proud of our amazing state & each of you who pulled together to support one another! We look forward to the bright days ahead. Thank you, thank you, Jewelry & Gifts thank you! The Gals at A Little Something

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shelburne bay plaza • 2989 shelburne rd 985.9909 • alittlesomethingvt.com next to the Shelburne Meat Market

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

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6/4/21 2:13 PM


BIPOC COVID-19 VACCINATION CLINICS EVERY SATURDAY Youth vaccinations now also available for ages 12-15! Open to all Vermont BIPOC residents age 12+ and all members of their household.

Register now to reserve your dose. Walk-ins welcome, subject to availability. Held at Cathedral Church of St. Paul, 2 Cherry St, Burlington, VT (Dates and location subject to change) Visit VermontHealthEquity.org for more information. To schedule your appointment by phone, contact the Burlington Resource and Recovery Center at 802-755-7239

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SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

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SCAN TO REGISTER

6/8/21 2:14 PM


COURTESY OF JOSEPH GRESSER

LOOKING FORWARD

SUNDAY 13

In Bloom How does your garden grow? Six local gardeners share their secrets with visitors on the second annual Hinesburg Garden Tour. Hosted by the Friends of Carpenter-Carse Library, this horticultural excursion allows folks to feast their eyes on private plots featuring azaleas and rhododendron, bridges and stone walls, local flora and vintage perennials. Purchase tickets from the library, Red Wagon Plants in Hinesburg or sevendaystickets.com.

MUST SEE, MUST DO THIS WEEK COMPI L E D BY KRISTEN RAVIN

LEARN MORE AT CARPENTERCARSE.ORG.

FRIDAY 11-SUNDAY 13

SHOW OF FORCE A performance by Glover’s Bread and Puppet Theater is not just a puppet show but a memorable combination of performance art and social commentary. Its latest offering, The Persians, for example, is an adaptation of Aeschylus’ ancient Greek tragedy critiquing warring empires. Watch the company’s large papier-mâché puppets in action, then enjoy housemade sourdough bread and aioli.

WEDNESDAY 16

Eating Green Just because a dish is nutritious doesn’t mean it can’t be delicious. Need convincing? Swing by Fisher Brothers Farm in Shelburne on Wednesday evenings through September 1 for vegan eats from Pingala Café’s Broccoli Bar Happy Hour. Sisters of Anarchy Ice Cream, which is made at the farm, is also on hand with farm-to-cone scoops. LEARN MORE AT FACEBOOK.COM/PINGALACAFE.

LEARN MORE AT BREADANDPUPPET.ORG.

SUNDAY 13

Songs of Support Held at Camp Meade in Middlesex, Salvation Farms Aid features favorite local musicians covering songs by national acts. Rik Palieri does Pete Seeger; Blues for Breakfast do the Highwaymen; Craig Mitchell does Prince. The best part? The show benefits Salvation Farms, a Morrisville nonprofit dedicated to building a resilient food system through agricultural surplus management. LEARN MORE AT SALVATIONFARMS.ORG.

TUESDAY 15

Write on Time For aspiring writers, sometimes the greatest challenge is finding time to put pencil to paper — or fingers to keyboard. One solution is to add River Arts’ ongoing drop-in Poetry Clinic to your calendar. The group meets via Zoom on the first and third Tuesdays of each month for writing exercises and respectful critiques.

CO U RT

ES Y

OF

LU

NA

FE

ST

LEARN MORE AT RIVERARTSVT.ORG.

THURSDAY 10

Moving Pictures “We are thrilled to again host LUNAFEST, a traveling film festival of award-winning short films by and about women,” reads the Vermont Works for Women website. Viewers pull into Colchester’s Sunset Drive-in for inspiring motion pictures, including “Knocking Down the Fences,” a documentary on professional softball player AJ Andrews. Proceeds support women and girls in Vermont. LEARN MORE AT VTWORKSFORWOMEN.ORG.

Submit your upcoming events at sevendaysvt.com/postevent.

ONGOING

Inside Out Two group shows at Jeffersonville’s Bryan Memorial Gallery consider contrasting perspectives on the pandemic year. In “Interior — Walls Within,” member artists share pandemic-era paintings of their indoor surroundings. “Main Street,” on the other hand, showcases scenes from main thoroughfares in New England cities and towns, reflecting the desire to get outdoors and into community life. Both shows are in the front two galleries through June 20. LEARN MORE AT BRYANGALLERY.ORG.

THIS IS A SAMPLING OF VERMONT’S IN-PERSON AND VIRTUAL EVENTS. BROWSE THE FULL CALENDAR, ART SHOWS, AND MUSIC+NIGHTLIFE LISTINGS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/EVENTS. SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

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LOOKING FOR A JOB?

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FROM THE PUBLISHER

Go, Team!

MATT DOUGLAS

Music. Sports. Traffic. Prom. There were so many signs of normal life on display last weekend, it would be reasonable to conclude that the pandemic is over — at least here in Vermont. Seizing this moment, of closure and appreciation, liberation and celebration, Seven Days rounded up a compelling roster of “Pandemic All-Stars.” Almost the entirety of this week’s paper is devoted to people, places and products that got us through the past 15 months, from the director of the local lab in charge of COVID-19 testing to the takeout chicken wings from Honey Road. Reading the stories of Vermonters who have been laboring behind the scenes is a reminder of something many have already forgotten — or blocked, perhaps. In the beginning, before anyone knew how the virus was contracted, health care workers, postal carriers and grocery-store clerks lived in constant fear of getting and spreading it. Our delivery drivers had to navigate that uncertainty, too, while our reporters and editors worked throughout the public health crisis to keep you informed. When ad revenue plummeted, we asked readers to help defray the cost of our efforts. That’s when you delivered. Nearly 3,000 readers sent us money — one-time donations and monthly recurring ones. The funds sustained us throughout the pandemic, financially and psychically. After 25 years of putting out a free-but-content-rich weekly newspaper, working at an almost unimaginable pace, we discovered that our customers appreciate what we do and are willing to pay for it. We have the Seven Days community of Super Readers to thank for this week’s issue — and the 60-plus pandemic-era papers before it. I really want to say, “Looks like we made it,” without conjuring Barry Manilow, and, more importantly, without sending the message that Seven Days can expect to survive long-term without you. The truth is: Our business model — of selling local advertising to pay for newsgathering — was imperiled long before COVID-19 shone a light on it. We’ve been innovating and diversifying our revenue streams for years. By virtue of being a for-profit media company, we don’t qualify for many of the grants our nonprofit competitors do. Further, “for-profit” doesn’t necessarily mean “profit-driven”; it just denotes a different kind of legal structure that permits the accrual of ownership — something that has allowed us to retain valuable workers in the very difficult, high-turnover field of local journalism. I can say with the utmost certainty: None of our 16 employee-owners is in this for the money. For the past 10 years, we’ve invested most of the company’s modest profits in a long-term succession plan, starting with buying the shares of my longtime partner, Pamela Polston, who is Interested in becoming a Super Reader? taking a first step toward retirement this Look for the “Give Now” buttons at the top summer. Some years were too lean to swing it. of sevendaysvt.com. Or send a check with The goal is to keep Seven Days forever your address and contact info to: local, in the hands of people who live and SEVEN DAYS, C/O SUPER READERS work here — not hedge-fund vultures from P.O. BOX 1164 BURLINGTON, VT 05402-1164 Wall Street. Turns out that you, dear readers, our Pandemic All-Stars, are a crucial part of For more information on making a financial that plan. contribution to Seven Days, please contact

We have the Seven Days community of Super Readers to thank for this week’s issue — and the 60-plus pandemic-era papers before it.

Paula Routly

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SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

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FAIR GAME

OPEN SEASON ON VERMONT POLITICS BY MARK JOHNSON

Red Scare

Former police chief del Pozo claims Burlington’s “Socialists” did him in

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TIM NEWCOMB

h, please. Not that tired old trope. Former Burlington police chief BRANDON DEL POZO is shifting responsibility for the social media scandal that cost him his job in Burlington in late 2019. Now he’s blaming “the Socialists” on the city council for his downfall. He also maintains that he resigned only after Mayor MIRO WEINBERGER refused to defend him from opponents who had “their knives out.” That’s different from the two men’s earlier claim that del Pozo’s behavior — trolling a critic on Twitter with a fake account — was the consequence of a serious concussion he suffered in a 2018 bike crash. Del Pozo was testifying recently to New Hampshire legislators about a bill on limited immunity for police officers when a Granite State lawmaker asked about his departure from Burlington. Del Pozo said his tenure had been going well until “the Socialists” took control of the city council and sought to overhaul his police department. Del Pozo started by noting that Sen. BERNIE SANDERS (I-Vt.) lives in “very leftleaning” Burlington. “Even as a very progressive police officer, I was seen by many people on the far left as some sort of right-leaning — I was a cop; I could do no right,” he said. Before he was hired as chief in 2015, del Pozo was a New York City police officer for 19 years.  “I had an excellent relationship with the [Burlington] community until … the Progressive Party, which is the Socialist Party, took over the city council [and] they decided to try and disarm my police officers, reduce the size of my police department. They said 40 percent of my officers were domestic abusers, and I reacted poorly to that,” he said.  At that point, he said he did what “many, many, many” people have done and set up an anonymous Twitter account and used it to taunt a critic. Progressives picked up two council seats in 2019 but didn’t actually gain a political plurality on the 12-member body until Town Meeting Day in 2020, three months after del Pozo departed. In June 2020, after intense community pressure, the council voted to reduce the police force by 30 percent and cap the number of uniformed officers at 74. The council reaffirmed that decision in February, even after acting Police Chief JON MURAD warned that fewer cops could limit police response.

The city is facing several excessiveforce lawsuits related to del Pozo’s four years in Burlington. Del Pozo told lawmakers he is a defendant in three federal claims. Raising the Red Scare is nothing new in Burlington. It was a frequent drumbeat during Sanders’ eight years as mayor. His 1981 upset win caused some local businesspeople to gasp, fearing that he would put into practice his belief that utilities, banks and major industries should be publicly owned. Sanders raised eyebrows when he went to Nicaragua to celebrate the sixth anniversary of the Sandinista National Liberation Front’s successful revolution. Then, shortly after he married JANE O’MEARA SANDERS in 1988, there was the “honeymoon” trip to Russia to set up a sister city program in Yaroslavl. But the fears of incipient socialism came to nothing during Sanders’ eight years as mayor. Local banks and industries remained safe from his clutches.

In addition to “the Socialists,” Del Pozo claimed his downfall was sealed when Weinberger wouldn’t expend the political capital needed to save his job. “My mayor said, ‘This is a tremendous fight; the Socialists have their knives out. I can invest in your career, but you’ve already applied to other jobs.’ So I resigned,” del Pozo told the lawmakers. By then, del Pozo said, he’d had two interviews to lead the Philadelphia Police Department and one at a philanthropic organization. Del Pozo didn’t get either job. The former chief did not respond to Fair Game’s several requests for an interview. He is currently a drug policy researcher at the Miriam Hospital, an affiliate of Brown University, in Providence, R.I. Weinberger remembers events differently. “Certainly, the Mayor would not refer to his colleagues on the City Council in such a derogatory way,” SAMANTHA SHEEHAN,

DEL POZO STARTED BY NOTING THAT

SEN. BERNIE SANDERS (I-VT.) LIVES IN “VERY LEFT-LEANING” BURLINGTON.

Weinberger’s spokesperson, said in a statement. “Former Chief del Pozo’s recollection of this period of time ... has proven to be unreliable and inconsistent with those of the City Attorney, the Mayor, the Mayor’s Chief of Staff, and others. None of the senior officials involved recall any awareness that the former Chief was an applicant for a job at that time, or that the former Chief ’s outreach to other cities played any role in the Administration’s support of him during this challenging period.” Del Pozo’s account of his departure didn’t sit well with Police Commission member MELO GRANT, who told fellow commissioners at their May 25 meeting that the former chief ’s “rhetoric” and “false narrative” were woefully misguided and “insulting” to residents. Grant said the former chief could use a “birds and the bees” lesson on how representative democracy works: Residents, some concerned about police misconduct, put those new city councilors in place, she said. “An attack on the city council is an attack on the community they represent, because that community voted them in,” Grant said.


GOT A TIP FOR MARK? MJOHNSON@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Polston Steps Back

The first time I saw PAMELA POLSTON, she was belting out a tune at Hunt’s as the lead singer for the Decentz in the mid-’80s. Later she edited my stories when we worked together at the Vanguard Press, before she and PAULA ROUTLY cofounded Seven Days. She’s cool, classy and sharp. In 2015, she and Routly were inducted into the New England Newspaper Hall of Fame. Polston recently told staffers that she will significantly reduce her role at the paper later this summer. She’ll continue to direct visual arts coverage and will keep writing, but she’ll retire as associate publisher and coeditor and step down from day-to-day duties as features editor. “It’s a win-win,” Polston said. “I get to keep doing things I love and step back a bit.”  Reflecting on their years together, Routly said, “Pamela and I have been collaborating and depending on each other for almost three decades … to build and sustain this company. Seven Days would not be the chronicle of local culture that it is without Pamela’s leadership, judgment, taste and award-winning arts writing. Thankfully, she’s cultivated reporters and editors, too. Two of them, both longtime staffers, will share Pamela’s outsize job of finding and shaping arts and features stories into the future.” Polston said business leaders early on advised the two founders to develop a succession plan. As part of that plan, Polston sold her ownership shares to several key employees over the years. Now she says her personal plan includes some traveling.  “My big love is Paris,” she said. “So I can’t wait to get back there.”

“If your business is selling maple creemees and the Vermont Supreme Court orders you to cut the amount of calories you sell in half, you’re going to have a lot of work to do to figure out a successful business plan,” McKibben told Fair Game.   The 350.org cofounder winced that 40 years’ worth of emissions reductions would have to be packed into this decade to meet the 2030 goals of the Paris climate accord. “Look what’s happening,” he said. “The Arctic is melting. We had the worst fire season around the world that we’ve ever seen. Last year we had the worst hurricane season in the history of the Atlantic. On and on and on. So we waited a very long time to get started. I have to restrain myself from saying, ‘I wish you’d listened to me back when.’” The investor pressure to change corporate boards, he said, is coming largely from hedge funds who fear sliding returns. Divestment worldwide is on steroids. According to Octopus Investments, a tracking group, more than $14 trillion has been divested from fossil fuel companies globally. That’s up from $52 billion in 2014, just seven years ago. Those who previously divested, McKibben said, “not only did a great service to the planet, they made out like bandits” as the overall market has gone to record highs.  McKibben said another factor driving alternatives such as solar is how much cheaper the technology has become. And the shift from gasoline-powered cars to electric vehicles by some of the major car companies has added to the demand to go green, McKibben said. In Vermont, the divestment tide has been turning. In some cases, such as at Middlebury College, it’s been an aboutface. In 2019, the college’s board agreed to phase out all fossil fuel investments. That was a reversal from seven years earlier, when college officials flatly rejected demands from activists, including McKibben, a scholar in residence at the college.   Last year, University of Vermont trustees agreed to divest after students and faculty brought their demands to the board.  Green Mountain Power, Vermont’s largest electric utility, divested its employee pension funds, an effort former GMP president MARY POWELL dubbed “a natural evolution of the dramatic culture change” during her 12 years leading the company. The divestment push came from inside the company, she said, fueled

POLITICS

Late Wins

Environmental activists, including Vermont’s BILL MCKIBBEN, are cheering several big wins in the boardroom and courthouse in the effort to slow the climate crisis. McKibben, whose 1989 book The End of Nature was the first layman’s volume to sound the alarm, said recent actions at home and abroad gave him hope. In the next breath, he sighed that they still may be too late. Here’s what happened. In the U.S., shareholders pushing big energy producers to shift from taking oil out of the ground to greener alternatives just won seats on the boards of Exxon and Chevron. In Europe, a court ordered Shell to cut its products’ emissions by 45 percent.

by employees who questioned investing in fossil fuels as GMP aggressively moved to make its own power portfolio all renewable. “I was ecstatic,” Powell said of the recent developments. “I think the big question is if they’re meaningful. Can they move the dial fast enough? The reality is, the scientists are telling us the brutal facts: that this is bearing down on us quickly.” State Treasurer BETH PEARCE has long opposed divestment, unconvinced that it changes corporate practices. She has been adamant that it would cost state pension funds money. This week she told Fair Game that the most recent corporate efforts from within show change can be made through “engagement.” The Vermont Pension Investment Committee supported the “dissident” shareholder replacements at Exxon and Chevron, she said. “I think that what you’re seeing is that a number of companies are recognizing the value of green investments, moving in that direction,” Pearce said. “And we want to be able to assist in that and incentivize that through our shareholder activism.”

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C You could have brought an umbrella to ALL F AL, Visit RESH WCAX-TV meteorologist SHARON MEYER’s our other final broadcast Friday night. locations The taped tributes hailed down from folks such as Gov. PHIL SCOTT and from her 63 Lower Main Street, MORRISVILLE fellow broadcasters, who shed enough 144 Main Street, STOWE tears live on the set to water all of her and CHARLIE NARDOZZI’s famed gardens. Open EVERY DAY • blackcapvermont.com Somehow Meyer made her way through a wonderful sign-off, unabashedly crying as she thanked all those who helped during her long career, including 6v-blackcapcoffee051221.indd 1 5/10/21 10:24 AM her weather predecessor and mentor, STUART HALL. The word “institution” is overused, but in Meyer’s case it fits. She joined the station in 1979 after graduating from UVM, started on air in 1986 and has been in our living rooms ever since. She’s covered it all: snow, ice storms, heat waves and weather disasters, including Tropical Find, fix and feather with Storm Irene. Nest Notes — an e-newsletter Meyer will continue to tape interviews filled with home design, with master gardener Nardozzi and will fill Vermont real estate tips in on the weather report from time to time. and DIY decorating But otherwise, she plans to put down inspirations. the map pointer and pick up a paddle. “I still love my job, but I love doing Sign up today at other things, too, like swimming, kayaksevendaysvt.com/enews. ing, hiking and traveling and look forward to having more time for those things now,” SPONSORED BY she told Fair Game. Let’s hope she and husband RENE BOURNE catch some good weather. m

obsessed?

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ELECTIONS

news

Scott Signs Universal Mail-In Voting Bill, Urges Legislature to Expand It

Beth Cobb (left) and Erin Maguire

B Y C O L I N F L A N D ER S colin@sevendaysvt.com

Unplanned Lesson

Essex Westford School District’s proposed equity policy prompts heated debate JAMES BUCK

B Y A L I SON NOVAK • alison@sevendaysvt.com

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n equity policy proposed for the Essex Westford School District has galvanized members of the suburban community in recent weeks, drawing hundreds of people to both virtual and in-person meetings. Critics of the policy say it is divisive and difficult to parse, and supports teachings that might make white students feel shame and guilt. Supporters, meanwhile, argue that grappling with issues of race and equity will help kids become critical thinkers and improve education for all students. Essex Westford school leaders assert that there is nothing that should be controversial about the proposed policy, which likely will be put to a school board vote on June 15. Instead, they say, the district’s commitment to equity is part of its overarching vision and aims to make school a place where all of its 4,500 students — 14.6 percent of whom are nonwhite — can succeed. This, they argue, is the fundamental charge of public education. “We want to remove barriers for students so that everyone is able to achieve high standards,” superintendent Beth Cobb said at a June 1 school board meeting. Around 150 community members joined that virtual meeting to opine on the policy and listen as the board reviewed it a second time. Another special board meeting on Monday night, attended by more than 200

EDUCATION

people, provided an additional opportunity for public comment. Most spoke in support of the policy. Founders Memorial School student Andre Redmond said that none of his teachers has been Black like he is. He said that classmates frequently touch his hair without asking. “I know that some people think students shouldn’t be at school board meetings, but our voices are important, too,” Redmond said. “I love school so much, but it’s hard to learn when I have people touching my body

committed to for many years now,” Gleason said. The community debate has raged for months and came to a head in late May, when supporters and critics of the policy held dueling gatherings across the road from one another. More than 100 people packed into Essex Center Grange Hall #155 to hear Cady speak alongside state Sen. Russ Ingalls (R-Essex/ Orleans) and Essex High School senior Alex Katsnelson. Cady conflated the district’s commitment to equity with critical race theory — an academic framework that has come under fire in recent months by Republicans across the country — and said that it has no place in schools. Meanwhile, at the Essex Center United Methodist Church, student members of the high school’s Social Justice Union spoke in favor of more candid conversations about racism in their classes. The school board voted unanimously last summer to raise Black Lives Matter flags at all district school buildings. And in the months that followed, a group of community members and students drafted the equity policy. It’s meant, in part, to help close gaps in student achievement, according to Erin Maguire, the district’s director of equity and inclusion. District data show that Black, lowincome, special education and Englishlearning students are not doing as well academically as their peers, Maguire said.

WE WANT TO REMOVE BARRIERS FOR STUDENTS

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without my permission or when I’m being treated differently than my white friends.” Alison Corcoran, who said her middle school son is a racial minority, told the board that she wants the policy put to a town vote. “You do not have my permission to teach my son that his friends treat him differently because of the color of his skin,” Corcoran said. “Equity reinforces victimhood … I do not think that is a recipe for success.” School board chair Kim Gleason and Liz Subin — a former school board member who was unseated in April by Liz Cady, a vocal critic of the equity policy — both said the policy simply codifies what’s already in practice. “This is work that the district has been

UNPLANNED LESSON

» P.22

Gov. Phil Scott on Monday signed legislation that allows mail-in voting for all future general elections, making permanent a pandemic-era rule designed to increase voter participation amid the public health crisis. He also urged lawmakers to return to the topic next session and extend the changes to primaries and local elections, too. “I’m signing this bill because I believe making sure voting is easy and accessible, and increasing voter participation, is important,” Scott said in a press release. “Having said that, we should not limit this expansion of access to general elections alone, which already have the highest voter turnout.” The bill, S.15, will require that town clerks mail ballots to all active, registered voters ahead of the biannual statewide elections. Voters could then mail their ballots, deliver them to the polls or vote in person. The state used the same system for last year’s recordbreaking presidential election, which resulted in a 74 percent voter participation rate, six points higher than in the 2016 presidential election. Having learned from last year’s process, lawmakers included in the bill a provision that grants voters a chance to fix ballots that were returned incorrectly. About 1,500 so-called “defective” ballots were identified last November. The new law also codifies several other pandemic-era election changes. Clerks can start processing absentee ballots up to 30 days ahead of Election Day, and towns will be able to offer outdoor or drive-through polling places. School districts and municipalities will also have the option to mail out ballots during local elections, though that will not be required. And the Vermont Secretary of State’s Office will be required to produce a report on how to improve access for non-Englishspeaking voters. Scott, a Republican, signed the bill at a time when GOP legislatures in several other states are moving to restrict voter rights. The Vermont Public Interest Research Group, which lobbied for the changes, celebrated the state’s efforts in a press release on Monday. “More than 9 out of 10 Vermonters support making voting easier,” wrote Paul Burns, the group’s executive director. “This legislation is one big step toward making Vermont the most voter friendly state in the nation.” m


A BTV Jubilee

Thank You!

Burlington prepares for its first-ever Juneteenth celebration

S

BY COURTN E Y L AMDIN • courtney@sevendaysvt.com

were free, more than two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. “The first question I was asked was, ‘What’s that?’” Green said of her colleagues in Vermont. “That was shocking to me because I was so used to people knowing what it is.” A little more than a year later, Burlington will celebrate its first Juneteenth on Saturday, June 19, with a day-long citywide festival of free food, educational exhibits, musical performances and more. A BTV JUBILEE

Caring | Honesty | Respect Responsibility

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LUKE AWTRY

hortly after moving to Burlington last year for a job in city government, Tyeastia Green pitched her new colleagues on celebrating Juneteenth. Green, the Queen City’s first director of racial equity, inclusion and belonging, had fond memories of the holiday from growing up in Minneapolis. Yet Green, the city’s only Black department head, says she was met with confused looks when she first mentioned the event. It’s a portmanteau of June 19, the day in 1865 when enslaved African Americans in Galveston, Texas, learned that they

To all our staff, members, and donors who have exemplified our core values over the past year — we wouldn’t be here without you. We our Y community.

PEOPLE ARE GOING TO BE ABLE

TO COME AND HEAL. T YEA ST I A GR EEN

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news NEWS

Burlington Lifts Mask Mandate for Municipal Buildings, Retail Stores Fully vaccinated people in Burlington no longer have to wear facial coverings in city buildings and retail stores. City councilors voted unanimously to lift the city’s mask mandate on Monday night. As of Tuesday, 79.4 percent of Vermonters age 12 and up had received at least one dose of the coronavirus vaccine. Gov. Phil Scott has pledged to lift any remaining COVID-19 restrictions once the state reaches the 80 percent vaccine threshold. Mayor Miro Weinberger had sought to rescind the city’s masking order in mid-May, after the state announced that fully vaccinated people could go mask-free in most situations. But a council majority voted to delay the action after some members raised concerns that younger retail workers may not be inoculated until June. The city’s mask order had been in place for more than a year. Unvaccinated people must still wear masks in Queen City buildings and stores, and businesses may turn away unvaccinated customers if they refuse to mask up, the council’s resolution says. Businesses may also “enact stricter requirements about face covering use than the State requires,” according to the measure. People are required to wear masks on public transportation, in schools and in health care facilities, regardless of their vaccination status. Later in Monday’s meeting, councilors passed a resolution that urges state and regional transportation officials to refocus a major study of Interstate 89 to consider nonmotorized modes of travel. The resolution, cosponsored by Progressives Jack Hanson (East District) and Jane Stromberg (Ward 8), targets the Chittenden County I-89 2050 Study, which is examining various road improvements and new exits along the corridor’s 37-mile stretch in the county. The councilors argued that the state should not be investing in vehicle infrastructure during the global climate crisis. The resolution asks that the study, also called Envision 89, instead consider how to reduce vehicle travel and “create a safer, more equitable, and more sustainable transportation system in Chittenden County.” The city will send a copy of the resolution to the Chittenden County Regional Planning Commission and Vermont Agency of Transportation, which are leading the study. “We were given the invitation and the opportunity to weigh in,” Hanson said. “I think it’s important that we do that and make our voice heard.” m

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Will Raap plans to turn Nordic Farms into a grain-based ag hub B Y SALLY P O L L AK • sally@sevendaysvt.com

E

ntrepreneur Will Raap, the founder of Gardener’s Supply and the Intervale Center, is purchasing Nordic Farms, the iconic 600-acre former dairy farm on Route 7 in Charlotte. Raap, 72, has an ambitious vision for the site. In collaboration with partners, he intends to build an agriculture center that showcases Vermont grains, botanicals and beverages on a working farm that produces these goods. Envisioned as an “ecosystem” of enterprises, the project would encompass private businesses, nonprofit organizations and agricultural education. Shorehambased WhistlePig Whiskey would have a tasting room and storage facility at Nordic Farms, which would also be home to the Cyrus Pringle Museum. Named for the Charlotte-born, 19th-century botanist and grain breeder who cofounded Horsford Gardens & Nursery, the museum will focus on grains in the Green Mountain State. A set of demonstration gardens will highlight the work of Gardener’s Supply, High Mowing Organic Seeds and Vermont Compost, according to Raap. The land will have walking trails and a migratory bird sanctuary. “I’m excited about the next generation of possibilities in Vermont agricultural innovation, which is what I think we’re going to do here,” Raap said. “An ecosystem of businesses can be more successful if they are thoughtfully designed to be in relation with one another.” Raap expects the deal will be finalized by the end of June. Andrew Peterson and Jay Canning, co-owners of the farm, confirmed the sale is in the works. “I am trying to do everything I can to get behind Will’s project and vision,” said Canning, owner of Hotel Vermont. The purchase price of the conserved farm is roughly $4.4 million, for which Raap is getting a $3.75 million bank loan, he said. He’ll be the principal owner, working with a handful of investors. Raap also plans to raise money for the project, in particular a nonprofit component, through philanthropy and grants. In its development phase, the project will be called Nordic 3.0. This refers to the evolution of the property from dairy farm to malthouse (under Peterson) to its new multifaceted incarnation. Nordic 3.0’s team includes chief operating officer Kos Parulekar, who moved to Vermont from

PHOTOS: JAMES BUCK

B Y COUR T NEY L A MDIN courtney@sevendaysvt.com

Charlotte Vision

Will Raap

AGRICULTURE

Nordic Farms

New York City during the pandemic, and facilities director Robin Jeffers, recently retired from a career in property management and real estate development at S.D. Ireland. The centerpiece of the farm will be grain production, with additional crops including hemp, hops, vegetables and fruit. Grains grown at the farm will be malted and milled there. A hub able to produce, process and distribute grain would meet a growing need in Vermont, said University of Vermont Extension agronomist Heather Darby. Grain centers similar to

the one envisioned at Nordic Farms have been successful in Québec, she said. This would be Vermont’s first. “Even though it’s Will Raap’s vision, in my mind it’s really critical to the long-term protection of our food system in Vermont,” Darby said. “It takes investment and somebody with the desire and passion to make that happen in a little state where, from a commodity model, we shouldn’t be growing grain.” Alan Newman is, like Raap, a Vermont entrepreneur in his seventies. Most recently he purchased ArtsRiot on Pine


A GIFT SHOP WITH ITEMS, SERVICES AND CLASSES TO HELP YOU CRAFT A MAGICKAL LIFE.

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Street, where he plans to build Burlington’s first distillery. A supporter of the Nordic Farms project, Newman suggested that the development of the Intervale 35 years ago, from a derelict dump to a flourishing urban agricultural center, might have been a “greater lift” in its day than Nordic 3.0 is today. “Will has always been looking for how to create agribusinesses in situations that would invite great benefit to both the local economy and the Vermont economy,” Newman said. The time frame for the project is contingent on several factors, including permitting and financing, according to an outline of the plan. In the “aggressive and optimistic version,” renovation of the big red-roofed barn into a welcome center would be complete in spring 2023. But by August of this year, planners said, there will be a farmers market at Nordic 3.0 that sells vegetables, flowers, baked goods, shrimp and beer. The products will come from businesses currently operating at the farm, including Sweet Sound Aquaculture, Slowfire Bakery and House of Fermentology. Larry Lewack, Charlotte’s town planner, said his interest is keeping Charlotte “open to sustainable and appropriate development, whether [for] housing or business.” Raap’s project, in fact, takes on both. One idea is to build a set of homes on the property for farmers who work there. For Jeff Kozak, CEO of WhistlePig, the possibilities at Nordic 3.0 are “super interesting.” Consumers want to know where their grain, whiskey and botanicals come from, he said. “If you can showcase that and people can touch and feel what’s happening with value-added agriculture, it makes sense,” Kozak said. The scope of the project — including using old tires to build berms and enlarging the fire pond and stocking it with trout for recreational fishing — might seem overwhelming. But maybe that says more about the person who envisions Nordic 3.0 than it does about the work ahead. “I think there have been enough entrepreneurs who have demonstrated that the impossible is only impossible to people who don’t see the path,” Newman said. m

Surprise Koffee Kup Buyer Emerges, Won’t Reopen Bakeries B Y ANN E WAL L AC E AL L E N anne@sevendaysvt.com Flowers Foods, a publicly traded Georgiabased company that makes Wonder bread and other well-known brands, stepped in Monday as the last-minute buyer of Koffee Kup Bakery’s assets. That’s bad news for those who had hoped that Koffee Kup’s bakeries in Burlington and Brattleboro, which closed abruptly in April, would reopen soon. “This acquisition brings brands and production capacity in the Northeast, a key growth market for our company,” said Ryals McMullian, president and CEO of Flowers Foods. “We have no immediate plans to reopen the bakeries but will be assessing how they may fit our strategic network optimization efforts in the future.” The change, noted during a hearing in Chittenden Superior Court, surprised the previously announced buyer, Blair Hyslop of Mrs. Dunster’s, a Canadian company. Mrs. Dunster’s had already started creating new employment contracts with former Koffee Kup workers. Hyslop said he had been planning a Zoom town meeting with employees from both Vermont locations for Monday night. “For now, I will just say that this has come out of left field, and we are shocked and dismayed at the news,” he said. The struggling 80-year-old Koffee Kup closed its plants in Vermont and Connecticut in April, displacing 500 workers. They included 156 in Burlington and 91 in Brattleboro. Its owners had negotiated unsuccessfully with KeyBank to resolve the company’s debt. Koffee Kup had been delivering bread, buns, English muffins and doughnuts to more than 4,500 places in the Northeast before it closed, according to a private equity firm called American Industrial Acquisition Corporation, which acquired Koffee Kup on April 1. The Flowers Foods announcement was made during a court hearing about the accrued paid time off that some employees lost when the bakery closed, according to the Brattleboro Reformer, which broke the story. A lawyer for the court-appointed receiver said Flowers Foods had purchased the company and would cover the money owed to employees, the Reformer reported.  According to Flowers Foods’ website, it had sales of $4.4 billion in fiscal 2020. It said it has 46 bakeries that concoct frozen bakery items, fresh breads, snack cakes and tortillas for more than 85 percent of the U.S. population. The company did not respond to questions about plans for Koffee Kup’s buildings. m

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news A BTV Jubilee « P.17 The city will spend $100,000 on the celebration, twice the amount it has budgeted for this year’s July 3 Independence Day event. Green’s office has raised another $149,000 in private donations and sponsorships. She hopes the festival will bring more awareness to Black people’s struggle and resilience — and to the barriers to equality that remain 156 years after the end of slavery. “People can learn about this complex, nuanced term that is ‘race’ in America,” Green said. “They can learn about that in a safe and fun and engaging way.” The celebration comes after a challenging first year for Green’s office, which started its work during a pandemic that has disproportionately affected Black Vermonters. The office has distributed coronavirus relief grants to businesses owned by Black, Indigenous and other people of color and helped organize BIPOC vaccination clinics this spring. The city has also grappled with issues of police violence and racial justice during the last 12 months. Spurred by the murder of George Floyd last May — on the Minneapolis block where Green grew up — Burlington activists took to the streets and convinced the city council to reduce the size of the police force. A monthlong occupation of Battery Park followed, at which protesters urged officials to fire Burlington police officers accused of violence against people of color. Racial justice themes dominated Mayor Miro Weinberger’s State of the City speech in April, when he described Juneteenth as a way to create a sense of belonging for all in Burlington. In his May budget address, he also proposed expanding Green’s office from three full-time staffers to eight in the next fiscal year. In an interview last week, the mayor said he only learned about the holiday a few years ago when he attended an event hosted by the New Alpha Missionary Baptist Church. “I see this as a moment for the community to come together and to celebrate and reflect,” Weinberger said. “When we make progress on racial justice, that’s progress for everyone.” Though Juneteenth has been observed for more than a century, the holiday has only gained traction nationally in recent years. Forty-seven states, including Vermont, recognize the day as a state holiday. In 2019, then-presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) campaigned to make Juneteenth a national holiday. Washington State will make it a paid day off for state workers next year, and Illinois lawmakers passed similar legislation last month. 20

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Burlington’s event kicks off at 10 a.m. with a brunch in City Hall Park featuring gospel music by the Lake Champlain Mass Choir and Band, as well as Southern cuisine cooked up by Great Northern chef/ owner Frank Pace. The brunch’s 150 seats are already spoken for, but onlookers can sit on the grass and take in the tunes. The city will close off Main Street from South Winooski Avenue to St. Paul Street — a stretch that includes the freshly repainted Black Lives Matter street mural — for artists and other vendors to sell their wares. That morning, the ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain will host a program about Black farming in Vermont. Afternoon events feature performances by Black artists, including Burlington’s own DJ Melo Grant, poet Rajnii Eddins and storyteller Ferene Paris Meyer. Two traveling museums will make a stop in Burlington to showcase artifacts from the 1700s through the 21st century. And a tent at Champlain Elementary School on Pine Street will become a “healing village” for Black people to practice yoga, get their hair done and light a candle for their enslaved ancestors. The space will allow “Black folks to have a good time with each other, be able to speak freely and be their authentic selves,” Green said. “People are going to be able to come and heal.” The day will also feature panel discussions, a youth poetry contest and three new murals unveiled around the city. Vendors such as Jamaican Supreme, Kismayo Kitchen and Hangry the Donut Bar will serve free food until it runs out. Attendees will have the chance to decorate a square of fabric that will be woven into a massive Juneteenth quilt to be displayed at city hall. City Councilor Zoraya Hightower (P-Ward 1) is one of five Black women participating in a panel called “Contextualizing Juneteenth.” The entire event, Hightower said, will be a time for Black joy after a tough year. “It’s about Black music and poetry and art,” she said. “I think we all need that.” Hightower also sees the celebration as an opportunity for both Black and white people to learn about the day’s significance. Hightower, who grew up in Oklahoma, said she was in college when she first heard of both Juneteenth and the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921, one of the country’s deadliest incidents of race-based violence. When she moved to Burlington in 2016, Hightower never expected to someday celebrate Juneteenth in the nation’s second-whitest state. “I feel like we’re becoming a place that diverse people want to live,” she said. “I’m feeling very grateful that this is part of what Burlington can be.”


Juneteenth celebrations weren’t always so welcome. News articles from nearly 100 years ago portrayed the event as a nuisance. The Burlington Free Press first printed the word “Juneteenth” on July 30, 1926, when it published a news brief from the Dallas News, which lamented that “many lawns went unmowed, many beds unmade and many shoes unshined … while a large proportion of the Negro population took the day off for ‘Juneteenth.’” Roy Hill II, a 78-year-old Black man, said he didn’t know of the holiday until he was in his fifties. The Fairfax resident organized the state’s first Juneteenth conference in 2002, and his wife, Shirley Boyd-Hill, was instrumental in winning state recognition of the holiday in 2008. Hill, who will be speaking at the Burlington event, said Juneteenth should be celebrated with the same fervor as the Fourth of July. The Declaration of Independence may say that “all men are created equal,” but the majority of its signers also owned slaves, Hill said. “Juneteenth is inclusive,” Hill said. “It means that there is hope.” The event will also acknowledge the country’s deep-seated racism. A Black History 101 Mobile Museum, which features 150 artifacts such as shackles, bills of sale for enslaved Africans and a hood worn by a member of the Ku Klux Klan, will set up at the Flynn Elementary School. Khalid el-Hakim, a Detroit native, brings the traveling exhibit all over the country, but his stop this month in the Queen City will be his first in Vermont. A lover of 1980s hip-hop culture, el-Hakim will also display a Public Enemy album whose cover

borrows a famous photograph of a lynching in Indiana in 1930. The image shows a crowd of white people staring up at two Black men hanging from trees. The objects may make some people feel uncomfortable, but el-Hakim said the collection is meant to evoke the struggles Black people have endured, as well as their strength. “We have to put our history to the forefront,” he said. “Having a Juneteenth festival sets the stage for people to have an experience that hopefully will widen people’s perspectives on a part of American history that is not talked about.” For Green, Juneteenth is a reminder that Black people continued to be oppressed even after slavery ended. Her great-grandparents in Mississippi were sharecroppers who farmed their former master’s land in exchange for rent. They later purchased a plot of that land, but it took their heirs until the 1980s to repay the debt. Many Black families share a similar story, which inspired a motto that will be printed on T-shirts commemorating Burlington’s Juneteenth celebration: “Free-ish since 1865.” Though the fight for equality continues, Green said the day will be a joyful event that celebrates being Black. “What I’m really trying to do here is to shift culture and make sure that every single person who’s living in Vermont, or even Burlington or Chittenden County, feels like they actually belong here,” Green said. “I know that’s a big goal to have, but it is definitely our main goal.” m

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JAMES BUCK

A similar percentage of Black and white elementary school students were proficient in reading, the data showed, but Advanced Placement and honors classes at the high school were disproportionately made up of white students. The policy says that the district “approaches equity through recognizing and redressing the impact of racism in the United States” and vows to provide all students with “what they need in support of their academic, social-emotional and career development.” The proposal lists 13 “indicators” that show the policy is working, such as diversifying the curriculum and faculty; providing mandatory professional development for staff around bias, stereotypes and equity; allowing students and staff who share an identity or common goal to meet in “affinity groups”; and teaching history in a way that undoes “revisionist frameworks that perpetuate inaccurate portrayals of people in privileged and subjugated positions.” “If a teacher is instructing around the arrival of Europeans to this country, whose lens are they teaching that concept through?” Maguire asked as an example during the June 1 board meeting. Sophomore Maddie Ahmadi, a member of the Social Justice Union, wants students to be taught a truthful account of history, even if it’s sometimes depressing. “I have never once been upset about learning about the failures of our past,” she said. “However, I have been upset by our failures.” Senior Ali Stevens agrees. “I think it’s important for all students to get a holistic and accurate idea of what our history is like and how things are today,” she said. Ahmadi thinks critics misunderstand the policy’s intent. “It’s not going to harm them, and it’s not going to make everyone the same,” she said. Instead, it’s “giving all

Ellie Martin saying the Pledge of Allegiance at an event at the Essex Grange

students the chance to shine and achieve their goals.” In an interview, Maguire said some of the community opposition to the district’s equity work comes from a misunderstanding of critical race theory, a term that has become a lightning rod in the public school culture wars. Republican-led legislatures in states including Idaho, Oklahoma, Georgia and Wisconsin have advanced bills or passed laws that ban the theory in schools or limit how teachers can speak about race. Locally, people such as school board member Cady and state Sen. Ingalls have seized on critical race theory, as has conservative commentator John Klar, who called it “toxic, hate-filled, race-based invective” being thrust onto Vermont children. “Since educators can’t think critically, parents had better do so,” Klar wrote in a piece published on the conservative website True North Reports. Klar unsuccessfully challenged incumbent Phil Scott for the Republican gubernatorial nomination last year. Klar and Cady will join others, including Rep. Arthur Peterson (R-Rutland) and Rutland City school board member Tricia O’Connor, to discuss critical race theory at a June 16 town hall in Rutland. It’s organized by the conservative group Vermonters

for Vermont, which aims “to educate all Vermonters on the dangers of Progressive and Democratic public policy plans.” Cady did not respond to multiple requests for comment. Despite the backlash, the focus on equity in education is moving ahead. This school year, the Vermont School Boards Association issued its own equity policy, and the Burlington School District created an Office of Equity. The Champlain Valley School District — the largest in the state — recently hired its first director of diversity, equity and inclusion. Critical race theory is not a curriculum or a course taught in Essex Westford schools, Maguire explained. Rather, it is a set of concepts and practices that helps people think about how race affects the world in which we live. “We’re not trying to form opinions for students. But what we are trying to do is make sure that they have an opportunity to engage across a myriad of different conversations, and right now, race is a really important part of the national conversation,” Maguire said. “To deny access to that feels inappropriate, at best.” Cobb, the superintendent, said that the politicization of the term “critical race theory” has complicated the district’s

equity work. “What we’re doing — it doesn’t matter what side you’re on. It’s about all people,” she said. “We need to come to the middle for our students.” The district’s 12 principals seem to agree. They all signed a letter last month saying they “commit to working to provide a safe and inclusive environment. “We have a shared responsibility to take an active role in identifying bias and antiracism to promote a more equitable, just and safe place for all EWSD students to grow and thrive,” the letter reads. Writing the equity policy was a monthslong process. A group of about 20 community members and students who identified as Black, Indigenous or people of color met multiple times with Tabitha Moore, a diversity, equity and inclusion consultant and former president of the Rutland Area NAACP. The draft policy then went to a subcommittee made up of two students, two parents, two board members and Maguire, before going to the full board for consideration. About 700 people also shared their views on equity through an online survey. Eighty-three respondents said they strongly opposed the equity work the district was doing, according to Maguire, “primarily due to the Black Lives Matter flag and critical race theory.” Maguire said it was clear from the feedback that those who had vastly different beliefs on such issues still had some common ground. They all agreed with statements such as, “Essex High School should allow students to take AP and honors classes,” “Every student has inherent value,” and “Every student should have the opportunity to receive the education and resources they need to flourish,” she said. Those statements, Maguire said, actually describe the equity policy at work. “When we are explicit about the work of equity, people seem to become afraid,” she said. “When we talk about it through the outcome, people seem comfortable.” m

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Well, Seven Days, you got me again. I just viewed the [June 3] Stuck in Vermont video of the demolition of Founders Hall Dmitri Repnikov at Saint Michael’s College, and I have BURLINGTON to say it was probably one of the most heartfelt tributes to an ultimate demise of a treasured An electric vehicle fasticon that I’ve ever seen. The charger in Waitsfield history, the memories and the dedication of the college to make sure that Founders Hall never really dies were just spectacular! The gentleman recycling the brickwork of a now long-gone local brickyard really capped it. His excitement that these aged and storied bricks will now live on in another place and possibly into another time EV REALITY really placed this demolition in a whole The green nature of electric vehicles is other light completely. I didn’t even go to certainly alluring. As [“Charged Debate,” this school, and the video made me tear May 19] rightly points out, convenient up. Literally. charging of EVs is essential to widespread Congratulations, Seven Days, you’ve acceptance. However, the practical reali- raised the bar on yourself. I’m sure you’ll ties of charging were almost entirely left clear it. out of the article; this is often the case The origin of St. Mike’s will live on! when discussing EVs. Christopher Maloney Consider these (non-Tesla) charging BARRE realities: 1) Level 2 recharge of two to four hours or more. Fast chargers can be used occasionally, but regular use degrades F-35S POISONING VERMONTERS the life of the battery. A Level 1 charge [Re “Flash Point,” May 5]: If Congress can take 12-plus hours. 2) Public chargers has its way, according to this article, as require planning and the ability to walk or of October only PFAS-free foams will bike to your ultimate destination, weather be used to fight fires at civilian airports and purpose permitting. 3) Battery condi- everywhere in the U.S. tioning (plug-in) is recommended below But PFAS will continue to be used at 32 and above 90 degrees to preserve Burlington International Airport because battery life, significantly increasing your of the F-35 training flights. electric bill. 4) Range reduction, up to PFAS will continue poisoning our 50 percent, in low temperatures, with a Winooski River, lake and water supply. Yet sweet spot of 50 to 80 degrees, reduced another reason the governor should use the further with winter tires. power the Constitution expressly reserves I like having an EV, but as a primary to the states over National Guard training vehicle it is limited. Investing in more to order a halt to F-35 training flights amid charging stations may look like the solu- Vermont’s most densely populated cities. tion, but there are many other factors Will the governor continue sacrificing that continue to limit the mass-market the health and safety of Vermonters to appeal. Maintenance costs will drop, but service the military-industrial complex? purchase price is high. Swapping gasoline Should Vermonters forever suffer from for electric may only be net-neutral or forever chemicals to collaborate in worse when you consider the fossil fuels forever wars? and pollution still created to generate that James Marc Leas “green” electricity. SOUTH BURLINGTON Perhaps our energy policy would


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OBITUARIES, VOWS, CELEBRATIONS

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Ruth Cilley Worden

Alex Wilson

DECEMBER 19, 1984-MAY 18, 2021 WESTFORD, VT. On May 18, 2021, Alex Wilson passed away suddenly and unexpectedly at University of Vermont Medical Center in Burlington, Vt. He was surrounded by his wife and close family. Alex set the world around him ablaze with his vibrant energy and succeeded in impacting the lives of more people than he will ever know. In 2005, Alex met the woman who would change his life and become his world: his wife, Melissa. Through 13 years of marriage, they have gone on countless adventures, conquered numerous obstacles, shared incredible amounts of laughter and experienced a love that few will ever understand. Some of their favorite times together were spent traveling around Europe, purchasing their home in Westford, Vt., and spending time with their animals. Faith and family were cornerstones of Alex’s life. He had faith in the goodness of his God, Jehovah, and faith in the goodness of people (often to a fault). Whether it was going hiking and camping with his wife and two dogs, showing off his chickens while watching a live online concert in Amsterdam, being “the cool uncle,” or spending time with his family near and far, Alex was most at home when he was with his family.

DECEMBER 12, 1917JUNE 4, 2021 COLCHESTER, VT.

Adopted and raised by the Wilsons as a toddler, he became a protector to his siblings and the mastermind behind all their troublemaking. Within the last few years of his life, Alex and his wife found his biological family, which led to an emotional reunion and special relationship with his biological father. Alex is survived by his wife, Melissa; parents Adam and Annette Wilson; sisters Jamie Ohanian and Katie Mayle; biological father, Mark Toedtli; biological mother, Christina Laurent; and three sisters including Theresa Evers; his loving dogs Odin and Orion; his hoard of chickens; and an endless list of loving grandmothers, aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces, nephews and friends who were like family. An intimate invitation-only memorial service was held Sunday, June 6, at 3 p.m. EST and was streamed via Zoom for all who wished to attend.

On June 4, 2021, Ruth Cilley Worden passed away at the age of 103. She was the youngest daughter of Charles and Carrie (Chase) Caswell of Colchester, Vt. She was born at the Mary Fletcher Hospital in Burlington, Vt., on December 12, 1917, and attended school in Colchester and graduated from Burlington High School. She married Clayton Cilley of Colchester on September 16, 1940. To this union, two sons were born: Hollis and Carleton Cilley. Both boys were victims of muscular dystrophy and passed away at the ages of 21 and 13. Clayton passed away in 1970.

Ruth was also predeceased by her second husband, Elmer Worden, and two sisters, Ila Brown of Florida and Fredith Sanderson of Williston, Vt., as well as several nieces and nephews. She is survived by a niece, Ardella Fughes, of Florida and several greatnieces and -nephews, greatgreat-nieces and -nephews, and many special friends from the United States and Canada. She was a member of the Baptist Church of Colchester and was involved with the Methodist Church of Winooski. She was a longtime member of the Grange, past state president of the Spanish-American War Veterans Auxiliary, and a member of the Green Mountain Folklore Society and the Colchester Historical Society. For 30 years, she worked for the State of Vermont

Department of Forests and Parks, in park operations in central and southeastern Vermont, retiring at the age of 76 as the park ranger at Mount Ascutney State Park in Windsor, where she had worked for eight years. She truly missed “my mountains,” “my hang-gliding friends” and the car racers. After moving to Country Park Apartments in South Burlington and believing life to be a learning experience, she was ready for a new challenge and worked as an assistant at Chamberlain School and the Shelburne town offices, where she was also a tourism hostess. Proud to be a native Vermonter, she spent much time tracing her family genealogy back to the Mayflower and leaving a legacy of stories and facts about her ancestors. She also wrote her memoirs

of 30 years in state park service. “I would like to thank my great-nephew and niece Roger and Debbie Curts and great-great-nieces and nephew Abbie and Ethan and Emily Curtis for all your love, caring and concern for me for many years. I don’t know what I would have done without you.” Ruth wrote her own obituary. She truly was an inspiration to all of us. We would like to thank all who cared for her at Green Mountain Nursing Home. She made special friends and would talk to everyone. We hope Aunt Ruth and her friend Rosemary are once again happy to be reunited. The funeral will be held on June 14, 2021, at 11 a.m. at the Colchester Cemetery in Colchester, Vt. Viewing at 10 a.m. before the funeral at Corbin and Palmer in Essex Junction, Vt.

IN MEMORIAM Richard “Seth” Schneehagen, 1990-2021 JUNE 20, 1990FEBRUARY 24, 2021 Please join us for a celebration of life on June 13, 2021, at 1 p.m. at the St. John’s Club, Burlington, VT 05401.

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lifelines

OBITUARIES, VOWS, CELEBRATIONS

OBITUARIES Daniel O Moran

a beautiful spot on a hill in Charlotte, Vt., lovingly referred to as “Windview.” Dan fought a courageous battle with stage IV kidney cancer for 14-plus years and was hopeful to the very last day, always telling us, “Don’t worry about me.” He was a friend to all, with a generous spirit and a hand up to those who needed it. Dan leaves behind his wife, Ceal; his father, Chub; his sister, Karen Moran

Lafayette; brothers Timothy and Sean; his father-in-law, Bruno Trahan Sr.; and Ceal’s brothers and sisters. He also leaves many special nieces, nephews, cousins, in-laws and friends. The family will receive visitors from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Thursday, June 17, 2021, at the Ready Funeral Home in Essex Junction (Mountain View Chapel, 68 Pinecrest Dr.). Remembrances of Daniel begin at 12:30 p.m. Burial immediately following at Lakeview Cemetery on North Avenue in Burlington. Please observe the State of Vermont COVID-19 guidelines in place on that date. The family requests that you wear face masks inside. Family, friends and coworkers are invited to share their stories, thoughts, experiences and photographs by visiting the site forevermissed.com/daniel-o-moran.

delights — all while having an immense amount of fun. She was born in Marblehead Mass., and her early years were characterized by a love of sailing and art. She often used sailing as a metaphor in her teachings and loved the intimate connection with the wild natural world of wind and water. Her artistic talents continued to manifest as construction projects in which she cared for minute details. Taihaku Gretchen Priest was a loving and playful mother and grandmother, and her life continues through her family — in

particular, her daughter and family, Leafye Pante, Marcus, Amelia and Sebastian; her son and family, Eben Broadbent, Angelica, Liana and Kai; her sister, Laury Lacy; and her brother, Robert Bradley Priest. Her life and legacy also continue through her dedicated Zen students, and her Dharma Heir, Kenzan. The family has suggested that in lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Shao Shan Temple via shaoshan temple.org/donations. A loving visionary, Rev. Taihaku Nichiren Daiosho, often spoke of the “700-year plan” for Shao Shan Temple’s continuation — a continuation well beyond her life and well beyond yours or mine. May we also be inspired by her vision to care for the present in a way that considers generations to come. Arrangements are in care of the Ready Funeral & Cremation Service. To send online condolences to her family, please visit readyfuneral.com.

JULY 9, 1958-MAY 22, 2021 PORT ANGELES, WASH.

Daniel O Moran of Port Angeles, Wash., formerly of Charlotte, Vt., passed on to join his beloved mother, Flo, on May 22, 2021. Dan was born on July 9, 1958, the son of Harold “Chubby” Moran and Florence (Laramee) Moran. He was the muchloved husband of Cecile (Trahan) Moran. He was also a beloved brother and uncle. Daniel was a computer programmer extraordinaire for IDX many years, and he worked for a number of other public and private entities. When there was a program to be created or a problem to be solved, they called Daniel. He built several homes with Ceal and filled them with his much-loved Boston terriers. For many years, Flo, Chub, Ceal and Dan shared

Rev. Taihaku Gretchen Priest WOODBURY, VT.

Having lived a life full of exuberance, caring and miraculous experiences, Rev. Taihaku Gretchen Priest passed away suddenly and peacefully in the early morning hours on Monday, May 24, 2021. As the founding abbot of Shao Shan Temple — a small Soto Zen temple in Woodbury, Vt. — she lived a life that influenced and inspired many people to find the still center in meditation. Her way of being in the world so beautifully embodied the Buddhist teachings of compassion and caring that she connected easily with people from all walks of life. She was capable of doing anything she chose — she could design and build a temple, train at a strict Soto Zen monastery in Japan, replace a toilet, grow basketball-size rutabagas, and create five-star culinary

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Raymond Keith Johnson Sr. MARCH 16, 1939MAY 22, 2021 BARRE TOWN, VT.

Raymond Keith Johnson Sr., 82, of Osborne Road in Barre Town, Vt., passed away peacefully at 1:40 a.m. on Saturday, May 22, 2021, at the McClure Miller Respite House in Colchester, Vt., with his loving wife of 48 years, Donna; son, Raymond Jr.; daughter, Louise; and granddaughter, Gianna, at his side, maintaining a constant vigil of love, care, kindness and comfort throughout his stay. In return, Raymond shared his unique sense of humor and many Texan stories with staff, family and friends. His gentle smile and contagious laugh were only second to his positive attitude and outlook on life. Born on March 16, 1939, in Lamesa, Texas, he was the son of Pauline Kee Johnson of Lamesa, Texas, and Othal Ray Johnson of Lindale, Texas. Raymond was very proud to be a Texan and proud of his multigenerational, hardworking family. His maternal grandfather was captain Enoch Magnus Sparks, a veteran of the Confederate Army who was honorably discharged in 1868. Raymond’s paternal grandmother, Mary Crow Johnson, was a native Cherokee Indian whom Raymond greatly admired and was proud to have as part of his heritage. In Raymond’s early years, summers were spent in East and West Texas, where he enjoyed farming, working in canneries with his cousins and crop-dusting in twoseater airplanes. Drag racing was always on the list of boyhood fun, as were the famous “Louisiana Hayrides,” where he and friends saw Buddy Holly and Elvis perform. Raymond’s grandparents taught him Bible studies, and this contributed to his love and respect for God, country and fellow man. After World War II, his father, Othal, was honorably discharged from the Army and moved the

family to Carlsbad, N.M., where Raymond graduated from high school. He later attended a branch of New Mexico State University. Raymond was always described by his peers as being self-motivated and selfsufficient. He was employed by U.S. Borax Company for nine years as the payroll manager for the extensive employees associated with the Potash Mines. He obtained his real estate license at the age of 19, assisting fellow miners in purchasing suitable housing. A few years later, he accepted a position at St. Francis Hospital in Carlsbad, N.M., where he became the office manager of all accounts. Raymond served in the Army National Guard of New Mexico for four years. His other civic duties included serving as president of the local Little League organization, and he was also a member of the Elks Club. In the late 1960s, Raymond moved to Memphis, Tenn., to accept a position with Wallace E. Johnson, the founder of Holiday Inns of America. Raymond was hired as the vice president of Medical Development Services Inc., which served as the medical division of Holiday Inns. Raymond oversaw the construction and management of various specialty hospitals and long-term care facilities throughout the Southern States. He was instrumental in the licensure of the first federal Medicare long-term facility in Wilmington, N.C. Upon completion of Doctors Memorial Hospital, a surgical hospital in Spartanburg,

S.C., Raymond met Donna M. Grippo, RN, BSN, the director of nurses. Raymond and Donna married in 1973. They later moved to Vermont, where he became co-owner and partner of Health Care Services in Berlin, Vt. In 1979, Raymond and Donna founded Hospitality Homes, residential care homes located in Vermont and New Hampshire. These residential care homes served many individuals and enabled people to live supervised yet independent and productive lives. Their motto was, “Share a home, share a life.” Raymond’s enjoyment of Vermont was found in biking, downhill skiing, snowmobiling, boating on Lake Groton, brush hogging the fields of the family home in Barre and cutting wood on his 100 acres. Raymond’s love of life and pride in family continues through his wife, Donna, of Barre; son, Raymond Jr., of Burlington; and daughter, Louise, and the “apple of his eye,” granddaughter Gianna, both of Milton; as well as his sister, Linda Johnson Hansen, and her husband, Rich, of Monument, Colo.; and nephews Kelly Farmer and his wife of Tokyo, Japan, and Shawn Farmer and his family of Modesto, Calif. Family and friends may call on Thursday, June 17, 2021, from 5 to 7 p.m. (a eulogy will be delivered at 6 p.m.) in the Hooker Whitcomb Funeral Home, 7 Academy St., Barre. A mass of Christian burial will be held on Friday, June 25, 2021, at 11 a.m. at Christ the King Church, 136 Locust St., Burlington. For a memorial guestbook, please visit hookerwhitcomb.com. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Heart Association, P.O. Box 417005, Boston, MA 02241 (heart.org), or to the McClure Miller Respite House, 3113 Roosevelt Hwy., Colchester, VT 05446 (uvmhomehealth.org/ donations/make-an-onlinedonation), or to Christ the King School, 136 Locust St., Burlington, VT 05401, where Raymond’s granddaughter attends (cksvt.org/supportcks).


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Susan Jo Parmer

drives, she later progressed through the positions of Vermont director of nursing, director of operations, senior director of collections and donor recruitment, and regional director of donor services. During the final eight years of her career, she held the position of CEO for the Northern New England Region, which proved to be one of the most successful blood services regions throughout the U.S. Most important in her experience, from her own words, is the gratitude she always felt toward her 400 regional employees and the countless blood and pheresis donors who selflessly gave their time and donations to help save lives. She was also proud of the work achieved through her

years with the Burlington Rotary Club, alongside her fellow members and community. In 2011, Steven and Susan retired to Sonoma County, Calif. They are grateful for the many friends they left behind, the new friends that they have made in retirement, and the many very dear and close friends that have enriched their lives. Susan and her family sincerely thank all the team members of the Multidisciplinary Cutaneous and T-Cell Lymphoma Clinic at Stanford Cancer Institute for their dedication and care. We wish to thank, in particular, Dr. Youn Kim, Dr. Michael Khodadoust and Natalie Leary, RN, who expressed great compassion and hopeful determination throughout her two-year struggle. In lieu of flowers or gifts, the family asks that you help fight this cancer by making a donation in her name to the Stanford University Cutaneous and T-Cell Lymphoma Clinic at med. stanford.edu/cutaneous lymphoma/community/ donate. Remembrances may be expressed at daniels chapeloftheroses.com For those who wish to attend her memorial service, please contact the family for the future date, time and planning.

well as at Trinity College in Burlington. She was also active in the Green Mountain Club as well as in church, where she met Ralph Martin McGregor. They married on October 20, 1990. Elise is survived by her daughter, Karen (Richard) Seas; son, Kenneth (Jane) Palmer; sister, Joan Birkett, of Invermere, British Columbia; brother, Ian Macklaier, of Pointe-Claire, Québec; nephew, Timothy (Lynn) Birkett, of Invermere;

nieces Jenifer Birkett (Clay Miller) of San Francisco and Lisa Birkett (Ted Hall); stepchildren James McGregor, Pat (Kurt) Fischer, Brian McGregor, Allan McGregor and Sheila McGregor, all of Vermont; grandchildren Jenifer, David and Laura Seas and Nathaniel, Emily and Zachary Palmer, as well as Michael (Annick) McGregor, Jennifer McGregor, Amy Fischer, Eric (Kirby) Fischer, Melanie (Shane) Landherr, Bruce (Andrea) McGregor and Rob McGregor; and six greatgrandchildren, EJ, Grayson, Sam, Henry, Zoe and Cian. A memorial service will be held at the Community Alliance Church in Hinesburg, Vt., on Sunday, June 27, 2021, at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to either St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105, or to Heidi’s Haven Animal Rescue, 140 Casino Rd., Williamstown, VT 05679.

JULY 22, 1952-JUNE 1, 2021 BURLINGTON, VT., & SANTA ROSA, CALIF. On June 1, 2021, Susan Jo Parmer passed peacefully at home with family and close friends by her side. After a two-year struggle, Susan succumbed to Sezary syndrome, a very rare form of T-cell lymphoma. Susan leaves behind her loving husband, Steven; their two sons, Jack and Christopher; her brother and best friend, Jerry Williams; and their respective partners and families. Susan was born in 1952 at the Portsmouth Navy Yard in Kittery, Maine. She was a 1970 graduate of Essex High School, a 1973 graduate of the University of Vermont School of Nursing and a 1980 graduate in anthropology at California State University, Long Beach. Susan worked in nursing for eight years in Vermont, Maine and California until returning to Burlington, Vt., where she worked at the American Red Cross for 29 years. Initially traveling throughout Vermont and northern New Hampshire as a mobile nurse for community blood

Elise Macklaier McGregor JUNE 6, 1926-JULY 27, 2020 WILLISTON, VT.

Elise Macklaier McGregor, a longtime resident of Williston, Vt., and beloved wife, mother, sister and aunt, passed to her eternal home on July 27, 2020, while residing at Mansfield Place Assisted Living, where she received great care. She was predeceased by her parents, former husband and a nephew, Peter Birkett. Elise was born on June 8, 1926, to William Fraser and Grace Isabel Macklaier in Montréal, Canada. She attended Westmount High School and then completed secretarial training and later attended Chamberlain School of Retailing in Boston. She married Kenneth Winfield Palmer on October 11, 1952, in Montréal. After moving to Burlington in 1979, she did secretarial and administrative work at Champlain College, as

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WHISKEY TANGO FOXTROT BY KEN PICARD

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og owners who routinely vaccinate their pets against common canine maladies have probably wondered, Why can my pup get a shot to prevent Lyme disease, but I can’t? We’ve all just experienced a year when drug manufacturers developed, mass-produced and distributed new vaccines in record time, slowing the spread of a virus that was unknown just two years earlier. So why haven’t they figured out how to prevent a rapidly spreading disease that’s been around for decades? Short answer: They already did. But, as is often the case with Lyme disease, the reason a vaccine isn’t available has less to do with science than with the fears, misconceptions and controversies surrounding this illness. Lyme disease was first identified in the mid-1970s among children in the Connecticut town of Lyme; since then, it’s become the most common vector-borne disease in the northern hemisphere. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 476,000 Americans are diagnosed and treated for Lyme each year. Vermont has one of the highest per-capita infection rates in the country. By now, anyone who spends significant time outdoors knows the story: Lyme is caused by a bite from a black-legged tick, aka the deer tick, that’s infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. According to the Vermont Department of Health, more than half of the black-legged ticks collected in the state have tested positive for that bacterium. Lyme’s symptoms, which appear within three weeks of the bite, include fever, headaches, fatigue, joint and muscle pains, and the classic bull’s-eye rash. Dr. William Raszka knows almost immediately when Vermont’s ticks start biting each spring based on the number of calls to his clinic. He’s a pediatric infectious disease specialist at the University of Vermont Medical Center, a professor of pediatrics at UVM’s Larner College of Medicine and Vermont’s go-to expert for treating Lyme in children. Raszka isn’t a vaccine researcher, but he follows the medical literature closely and has been treating Lyme since he saw his first case in 1994 in El Paso, Texas, where Lyme isn’t endemic. (His teenage patient had just moved there from Connecticut.) Raszka remembers the drug trials for two Lyme vaccines in the 1990s, which “showed pretty significant efficacy,” he said. As Raszka explained, both vaccines essentially worked the same way: They spurred the immune system to create antibodies to surface proteins on the Borrelia

Why Is There a Lyme Vaccine for Dogs but Not for Humans?

burgdorferi microbe. When a tick bit a vaccinated person and fed on their blood, those human antibodies bound to and killed the microbes in the tick’s gut, preventing transmission of the disease. In 1998, the U.S. Food & Drug Administration approved one of the vaccines, called LYMErix, which was about 80 percent effective in human trials. Just three years later, however, LYMErix was off the market, and the second vaccine, ImuLyme, never made it there. Why? Within two years of its FDA approval, LYMErix received extensive media coverage due to alleged adverse reactions. As the peer-reviewed journal Epidemiology & Infection reported in its January 2007 story “The Lyme Vaccine: A Cautionary Tale,” a Philadelphia law firm brought a class-action lawsuit on behalf of 121 people who claimed to have experienced significant side effects after getting jabbed. Growing public concern prompted the FDA to revisit the phase 3 drug trial data, causing use of the vaccine to plummet. Though the subsequent review showed no difference in side effects between recipients of the vaccine and those of a placebo, GlaxoSmithKline voluntarily withdrew LYMErix from the market in February 2002 amid negative publicity, litigation and declining sales.

Raszka noted that about 5 to 10 percent of people who contract Lyme “feel rotten afterwards,” experiencing what’s called posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome. (Most physicians and researchers don’t call it “chronic Lyme.”) Lasting as long as six months or more, symptoms include pain, fatigue and brain fog, all of which Raszka has seen in his own patients. “The challenge we’ve had is that there are a lot of different approaches to this,” he said of the long-term syndrome. “What causes it is not known, and what’s the best management is also not known.” Some physicians believe in prescribing antibiotics to such patients long term, but the practice is so controversial that states have revoked doctors’ medical licenses for doing so. To prevent similar repercussions in Vermont, in 2014 the legislature enacted Act 134, which bars the Vermont Board of Medical Practice from disciplining doctors who treat Lyme patients with long-term antibiotics. What does all of this have to do with the viability of future Lyme vaccines? As Raszka explained, because vaccines stimulate an immune response, some people fear they will trigger symptoms that resemble posttreatment Lyme. Any new vaccine must be highly effective, he said, and its makers must alleviate those concerns.

But the landscape has changed since the withdrawal of LYMErix, when Lyme wasn’t nearly as prevalent as it is today. In 2005, Vermont had just 56 confirmed or suspected cases; in 2018, it had 614, according to health department data. Those numbers, which reflect nationwide trends, help explain why an experimental vaccine is back in the news. In March, collaborating drug makers Valneva and Pfizer announced the start of a phase 2 clinical study for a new human Lyme vaccine. The trial involves about 600 participants, including kids as young as 5. According to the companies’ press release, their VLA15 vaccine protects against six serotypes, or variants, of the bacteria that are prevalent in North America and Europe. Will the public embrace a new Lyme shot — or avoid it like the plague? Vaccine hesitancy has increased since the early 2000s, and one major argument for COVID19 vaccines — that they serve a community good — doesn’t apply to noncommunicable Lyme. As Raszka pointed out, “There’s no herd immunity with a Lyme disease vaccine … and nobody dies from Lyme.” m

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P R O D U C E D B Y 7 D B R A N D S T U D I O — PA I D F O R B Y P O M E R L E A U R E A L E S TAT E

LUKE AWTRY

UVM Students Contribute to Groundbreaking Cancer Research

BY 7D BRAND STUDIO

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ignificant advances in the fight against cancer aren’t always made by a single inspired scientist; often they’re accomplished by a team. The University of Vermont Cancer Center excels at supporting and promoting team science. Sometimes, those teams even include undergraduate students at UVM.

During their time at "Groovy UV," alumnae Lisa Wood, ’18, and Carolyn Marquis, ’19, contributed to foundational scientific research that could someday lead to new ways of fighting triple negative breast cancer. Both worked in a molecular physiology and biophysics lab run by UVM Larner College of Medicine associate professor Dr. Jason Stumpff. He's one of more than 210 members of the Cancer Center. Wood and Marquis began working in Stumpff’s lab during the summer after their sophomore years 30

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through the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship. It gives students the chance to be part of a real-world lab outside of a classroom setting. The experience was pivotal for both women. They had the opportunity to publish their findings in Nature Communications last February; Marquis was named as the article’s first author. “First author identifies the investigator who really drove the project,” Stumpff explains in a March article on the UVM website. It’s an unusual

From left: Sarah Vandal; Katie Queen; Hannah Poquette; Katie Schutt, PhD; Alex Thompson; Jason Stumpff, PhD; Carolyn Marquis; Leslie Sepaniac; and Cindy Fonseca, MS

accomplishment for a student without an advanced degree. “Carolyn also completed important experiments for a related project that was published in Nature Communications a few weeks ago. She is a coauthor on that study, which was a collaboration between six labs in five different countries.”

A NEW PATH FOR TREATMENT? Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women. There are multiple types, each requiring a different treatment. Triple negative breast cancer, a rare and aggressive form of the disease, doesn’t respond to many treatments. Chemotherapy

is effective against it but kills healthy cells, as well. Currently there aren't many other options. To develop new therapies, drug companies rely on researchers such as Stumpff and his colleagues to identify approaches that might work. For the last couple of decades, Stumpff has concentrated on understanding how cells divide. The research in which Wood and Marquis were involved focused specifically on a cell protein called KIF18A. The lab was able to show that this protein plays a larger role in the growth of triple negative breast cancer and colorectal cancer cells than it does in the growth of normal cells. In other words, that protein could be a new path for treatment. Observations made by Wood and Cindy Fonseca, a senior technician, led the lab to further investigate KIF18A. Stumpff says that, when they see initial evidence of a “high-risk, high-reward” finding — one that might not turn out to be significant — they’ll often have a student look into it further. “If it doesn’t pan out, the student still gets the benefit of having done research,” he says. That happens frequently. “There are a lot of days when things just don’t work,” Stumpff notes. But the protein discovery did — and it ended up providing Wood and Marquis with a basis for their honors theses. The research gave both undergraduates an opportunity to work with international collaborators, as well as a lab team that included a graduate student, a post-doc fellow, a senior technician, an oncologist, scientists from Vermont-based medical instrument company BioTek and two patient advocates — both breast cancer survivors with scientific backgrounds. “Receiving feedback from these individuals gave me a broader perspective on the project,” Marquis says, “and it reinforced that the work we do in the lab has real potential to help people.”


COURTESY OF LISA WOOD, CINDY FONSECA AND CAROLYN MARQUIS

Carolyn Marquis and Dr. Jason Stumpff

‘IT OPENED MY EYES’

actually helped her decide not to go A desire to help patients is what first to med school. When she was growdrew Marquis to this work. When she ing up, the Cancer Center was a big was 8, her grandfather was diagnosed part of her life: Her mother, Dr. Marie with pancreatic cancer. The doctors Wood, is an oncologist there. Lisa gave him eight weeks to live. “I didn’t sometimes came to work with her really understand why they couldn’t mom and saw how doctors fought to do anything,” she remembers. prolong their patient’s lives. That experience planted a seed; Though she had planned to follow her mom into oncology, Wood years later, the Nashua, N.H., native changed her mind after working came to UVM to pursue medicine. in Stumpff’s lab. Observing When she got her job in the science behind Stumpff’s lab, Marquis the development of remembers following cancer treatments technician Fonseca appealed to her, around and asking she says. “It defiquestions. And nitely opened my suddenly, things eyes to what the clicked into place. options are.” Wood “I remember just is now pursuing a thinking, ‘This is PhD at the Univerit. This would be a A triple negative breast cancer really cool way to be sity of Colorado cell involved,’” she says. Anschutz School of After graduation, Medicine and believes her Marquis delayed applying to lab experience was key to her medical school and went to work full acceptance in the program. Coincidentally, Marie Wood and time in Stumpff’s lab to see her project Stumpff shared office space when through to completion. She’s now he first arrived at UVM in 2011. They applying to schools for admission in purchased a coffee machine together the fall of 2022. For Wood, working in the lab to encourage the clinical staff and

ABOUT THIS SERIES: The University of Vermont Cancer Center in Burlington brings together research, medical education and state-of-the-art patient care, giving patients their best possible chance for survival. This 7D Brand Studio series, commissioned and paid for by Pomerleau Real Estate, explores some of the ways in which this extraordinary local resource benefits our community. Community donations support the exceptional research, education and care at the UVM Cancer Center. Please contact Lindsay at lindsay.longe@uvmhealth.org for information.

foundational scientists to congregate and get to know each other, Stumpff says. Efforts like those illustrate the Cancer Center’s collaborative “from bench to bedside” approach.

‘PASSIONATE ABOUT WHAT THEY DO’ Stumpff says mentoring students such as Marquis and Wood and training the next generation of researchers is one of the most rewarding things about his job. The first undergraduate he worked with at UVM just completed medical school and is doing a residency in emergency medicine at Dartmouth-Hitchcock medical center. When Stumpff was a biology major at Eckerd College in Florida, he assisted an orthopaedic surgeon for a time. He also worked as a vet tech rescuing dolphins and helping baby sea turtles find their way to the ocean. Between his junior and senior years, Stumpff worked in a lab at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He says he paid attention to all the various people he worked with over the years, noticing how happy they seemed to be in their jobs. “No one was quite as excited to go to work every day as the people who worked in the lab,” Stumpff recalls. Marquis says she sees the same drive at UVM. “Everyone I’ve worked with in our lab is really passionate about what they do. The energy level is really great,” she observes. “I think that makes a difference when the people who you work with love what they do.”  COMMISSIONED AND PAID FOR BY:

LUKE AWTRY

Lisa Wood

Cancer Center Offers Access to Breast Cancer Clinical Trials In addition to the groundbreaking scientific research taking place in Dr. Jason Stumpff’s lab, multiple clinical trials through the UVM Cancer Center are evaluating new and promising breast cancer treatments. Dr. Peter Kaufman, an oncologist, describes two of the trials as “very exciting, worldclass research”: a Phase 3 trial treating advanced metastatic breast cancer with a new drug combination — a large international clinical trial evaluating the widely used chemotherapy eribulin, but in combination with an exciting novel biological medication called balixafortide — and a study funded by Lilly Pharmaceuticals testing a new class of hormonal therapies known as selective estrogen receptor degraders, aka SERDs. Several UVM patients are already enrolled in both of these studies. “These trials are providing cutting-edge therapies to patients that are looking very promising, that they wouldn’t otherwise be able to access,” Kaufman says. He and his colleagues are in fact reporting the first results from the Phase I SERD trial at the annual American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting this week. This research means that Vermont breast cancer patients don’t need to travel to DanaFarber Cancer Institute in Boston or Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York to access top-notch treatment. They can find it here at home. Says Kaufman: “We’re all very proud of the quality of care, and the state-of-the-art level of care that our patients are able to receive here at the UVM Cancer Center.”

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MEET THE ALL-STARS

VAL HUSSEY, Hardwick lunch lady................33 HELEN REID, Department of Health............34 CASSIE MOLLEUR, East Calais Post Office............36 TODD BROWN, CVOEO............38 MICHAEL BILLINGSLEY, Plainfield Community Suppers.....................................40 ERIN DONAHUE, fitness instructor..................... 42 JULIA DOUCET, Open Door Clinic......................44 JARRELL WATTS, Sara Holbrook Community Center..................46 MYSTE AND GARY GREENO, To Go Tour.................................48 PAULA OTENTI, Pride Center .............................50 AILSA O’NEIL-DUNNE, vaccination scheduler............ 52 MATT DOW, City of Burlington....................54 LEIGH PELLETIER, Stowe relief organizer.............56 CARA GROGAN, UVM Medical Center................58 MELLISA CAIN, community organizer.............60 ALEX BUDNEY, DJ....................64

SURVEY RESULTS

Restaurant Takeout................35 To-Go Cocktails/ Mocktails................................... 37 Silver Linings............................38 Outdoor Dining.........................39 Grocery Stores...........................41 Farmers.....................................43 CSAs/Food Delivery.................45 Pick-Me-Up Treats................... 47 Outdoor Art ..............................48 Outdoor Performances.............49 Livestream Entertainers.........51 Drive-in Movies........................53 Staycation Lodging.................53 Walking Trails...........................54 Fitness Classes.........................55 Bucket List Destinations........56 Outdoor Outfitters................... 57 Retail Stores.............................59 Innovative Businesses........... 62

CONTRIBUTORS

Jordan Adams, Jordan Barry, Dan Bolles, Chelsea Edgar, Colin Flanders, Carolyn Fox, Margaret Grayson, Margot Harrison, Courtney Lamdin, Kevin McCallum, Alison Novak, Melissa Pasanen, Ken Picard, Sally Pollak, Kristen Ravin & Anne Wallace Allen

PANDEMIC ALL STARS Celebrating the frontline team that helped Vermont through a less-than-stellar time

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early 15 months after Gov. Phil Scott issued a “Stay Home, Stay Safe” order on March 24, 2020, the pandemic is no longer controlling every aspect of our lives. By Tuesday, 79.4 percent of eligible Vermonters had been vaccinated. Once we reach 80 percent, likely this week, all state-imposed COVID-19 restrictions will be lifted. It’s cause for cautious celebration. Even as the coronavirus rages elsewhere across the globe and new variants continue to emerge, Vermonters collectively hope the pandemic is “over.” We’re ready to step forward into life as usual — whatever that means now. And yet, there’s still so much to look back on and process. Before we can put this hard and often heartbreaking year behind us, we’re pausing to recognize the herculean efforts of those who helped get us through it. These Pandemic All-Stars, as we’ve dubbed them, are all around us. There are the hyper-visible players, such as Gov. Scott, Human Services Secretary Mike Smith and Health Commissioner Dr. Mark Levine, who together spearheaded our state’s levelheaded, science- and data-based response to the virus. As one reader wrote to us, “I think if I see any one of them in real life, I may have to hug them” — before adding, “Ha! Not really.” Because let’s admit it, even with vaccines, hugging strangers still feels a little iffy right now.

What did you miss most during the pandemic? Family/friends/humans 37% Hugs 27% Live music 19% Eating at restaurants 6% Bars 6% Travel 4% Other people’s dogs 1%

C ARO LYN FO X

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But, of course, the “quaran-team” of MVPs extends well beyond elected and appointed state officials. It includes those who worked overtime behind the scenes, from respiratory therapists to rural mail carriers, daycare providers to DJs who connected and entertained us. Our reporters sought out Vermonters who went above and beyond in roles that became more difficult or dangerous — from the chefs and community volunteers who creatively kept us fed to the wastewater managers who tested our poo for viral markers. Some made an impact well beyond the state’s borders. We also surveyed our readers on the people, places and programs that kept them going — and going. Those questions and answers shape this special issue, which highlights consensus favorites alongside virtually unknown individuals quietly doing an outstanding job. Space limitations prevent us from recognizing every person worthy of public praise. Behind each person featured here, there’s a team of equally pivotal players. As Helen Reid, acting director of the Vermont Department of Health Laboratory, noted about her staff when describing the team effort, “They’re true public servants ... They just want to do their work and feel like they’re making a difference.” By rising to the challenge with heart, courage and indomitable spirit, these Pandemic All-Stars sustained us all.


Val Hussey

JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

School food service director, Hardwick

From left: Val Hussey, Debbie DeVoe, Jayme Lowell, Shannon Walker and Ruth McAllister in the kitchen at Hardwick Elementary School

LUNCH LADY When Vermont schools abruptly shut their doors in March last year, Val Hussey scrambled to keep the kids in her community fed. The Hardwick native has been feeding neighbors for 35 years. Hussey, 62, and her ex-husband ran a quick-stop market and deli famous for its seafood chowder. She’s since spent more than two decades cooking in local schools. While some think school cafeteria workers should be called food service professionals or chefs, Hussey goes no-frills. “You go to the beach or store and kids are like, ‘There’s the lunch lady. Thank you, lunch lady!’” she said. “I always want to be the lunch lady.” Pre-pandemic, Hussey managed the teams that cooked breakfast and lunch for more than 200 elementary students in Hardwick and Woodbury. They bought from local farms, baked muffins and made shepherd’s pie from scratch. But on March 17, 2020, Hussey’s job took a hairpin turn. “The schools closed at

MEMORABLE M MENTS

the end of the day, and they told us, ‘We’re going to deliver meals to homes,’” she recalled. “Nobody could tell us how to do it because it hadn’t been done before.” School buses would handle delivery, but Hussey had to figure out — overnight — how to source, prepare and package about 2,000 meals a week. Hardwick has received a lot of publicity for being “the town that food saved,” part of the title of a 2010 book about the area’s agricultural renaissance. But within 10 miles of a cheesemaker who produces artisan wedges priced at $32 a pound, more than half of the town’s grade-schoolers qualify for free or reduced-price meals. And that was before the pandemic. Hussey knew that, with lockdown, layoffs and juggling work with full-time childcare, family budgets and nerves would be stretched to breaking. She was worried for the kids, especially younger ones. “They can’t go to the cupboard and get food and prepare themselves meals — and a lot of these homes don’t have food

in the cupboards,” she said. “We’re here to look out for these kids.” Hussey coped with shortages of staffing, as well as takeout packaging and single-serve foods, which school districts nationwide needed urgently all at once. “You got what you got, and you had to make it work,” she said. After Hussey realized it made sense to deliver milk in bulk rather than in small cartons, she created a color-coded chart detailing which size household got quarts and which gallons. When kitchen staffers were quarantined, paraeducators did dishes. A teacher helped deliver meals. “God bless her,” Hussey said. “We used a lot of bleach and a lot of gloves, and people showed up.” Over the last year, Hussey has added Greensboro’s elementary school food program to her management responsibilities at Hardwick and Woodbury and was promoted to food service director for the Orleans Southwest Supervisory Union. “Her great team says a lot about Val — the efficiency, the love and caring,” Hardwick Elementary principal Patrick Pennock said. Even with students back

in person, COVID-19 exposures have required several eleventh-hour switches back to delivery. “She turns on a dime to get meals out to kids.” “When I’d go home at night, I was always thinking of a more efficient way, of new items to serve,” Hussey recalled. “If so-and-so isn’t on my list, [I’d think], I wonder if they need food?” Thanks to emergency expansion of the federal school meals program, all kids currently qualify for free meals, but families must sign up. Josh Peets lives in Hardwick with his partner and two daughters. He kept working but with reduced hours initially. If not for the school meals, “I wouldn’t have been able to pay rent,” Peets said. His girls, he added, would stand watch for the deliveries: “They liked the routine.” Early in the pandemic, “some days were so chaotic that I would forget to sign up,” Peets explained. “Val would personally make sure [meals] got to the house. She didn’t have to do that. What a relief to come home to them.” ME LI S S A PAS AN E N

SUNSET POT-BANGING

In Vergennes, we grew to a townwide “bang and clang” parade every evening at 7 p.m. I was stunned when we’d made it to 50 straight days with multiple blocks participating! SIVAN COTEL, VERGE NNE S SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

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« CONTINUED FROM P.33 JAMES BUCK

Helen Reid Acting director, Vermont Department of Health Laboratory

PUT TO THE TEST Eight months. That’s how long Helen Reid thought she might be acting director of the Vermont Department of Health Laboratory in Colchester after the retirement of her predecessor in October 2019. She agreed to fill in until a permanent replacement could be hired.

The car honking that occurred when Biden was declared president. People were driving around hanging out of cars celebrating. O L IVIA TAYL O R , BUR L INGTO N

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didn’t have the tools to do their jobs the way they wanted to. It felt like we had one arm tied behind our backs.” Several months in, Reid and her staff were still working seven days a week, from early morning until late at night, going home only to eat and sleep. Normally, the lab conducts 30,000 to 35,000 tests annually across all of its programs. By last summer, before some COVID-19 testing was contracted out to other facilities, the lab was processing 5,000 to 6,000 tests per week. This created unforeseen health issues for lab employees, including repetitive-motion injuries from opening and closing test tubes. Compounding employees’ stress were fears and uncertainties about how the virus spreads and the dangers posed by being in the building. When the pandemic started, Reid, a single mother, had a 9-month-old at home. She worried that he’d contract the virus in daycare and give it to her, or she’d bring it home to him. And the devastating nursing home outbreaks last spring “took an emotional toll” on everyone, she said. Deputy Health Commissioner Tracy Dolan said that Reid was incredibly resourceful at taking charge and solving problems. “She stepped in when we needed her to, and, like everything Helen does, she did it with thoroughness and dedication and passion,” Dolan said. “Helen doesn’t do anything partway.” Nor will Reid take credit for what turned out to be an unprecedented team effort. “The people who work here are very dedicated to their jobs. They’re true public servants… and they do it quietly,” she said. “They just want to do their work and feel like they’re making a difference.”

KE N P I C ARD

FILE PHOTOS: LUKE AWTRY

MEMORABLE M MENTS

But four months into Reid’s “temporary” role, Vermont entered its worst public health crisis in a century. She found herself, along with the rest of the lab’s staff, in siege mode. The team oversaw one of the most important tasks for slowing the pandemic: implementing the

laboratory tests that determine who has contracted COVID-19. Reid is not a lab scientist by training. The 44-year-old Rochester, N.Y., native came into the job with a background in public policy and health care administration. Prior to getting hired four years ago as division director of health surveillance, which oversees health statistics, epidemiology and the state lab, Reid worked for Planned Parenthood of South Florida. Normally, the state lab conducts surveillance and testing for a panoply of public health threats: foodborne illnesses such as salmonella and E. coli; drinking water contaminants such as heavy metals; environmental hazards such as household lead and radon gas; and infectious diseases such as HIV, measles and tuberculosis. But by midMarch 2020, all but the most healthcritical tests were sidelined to make way for COVID-19. The public might think that testers simply send a swab to the lab and get back a result, but Reid pointed out that there were “a million things that needed to fall into place” to ensure that the thousands of tests were done quickly and reliably. Inaccuracies or delays could cost lives. “It’s very humbling. The staff here really educated me,” she said. “I learned a lot in a short amount of time.” Especially in the early weeks of the pandemic, processes and procedures could be chaotic and change hourly, Reid recalled, as state health officials often received little guidance, and even conflicting information, from the federal government. And while the health department routinely trains for pandemics, problems arose, such as supply shortages, which no one had anticipated. “It was really frustrating for our staff,” she said. “They saw the need but they


PANDEMIC

ALL STARS

Which Vermont restaurant took takeout to a whole new level?

HONEY ROAD

Thanks for making a differnce! We whole heartly thank all the frontline medical professionals, teachers, hospitality crews, postal sevice, grocery professionals, public transit team and so many more!

Burlington • honeyroadrestaurant.com The best sellers on Honey Road’s pandemic menu demonstrate the dueling dietary pulls of the last 15 months. The Eastern Mediterranean restaurant satisfied them both with bonus flamingo cocktail straws and a charming takeout window. According to chef/co-owner Cara Chigazola Tobin, customers couldn’t get enough of the kale salad with tahini-yogurt dressing, cucumber, feta and crunchy quinoa. “I joked that we were going to survive the pandemic just selling kale salad,” Chigazola Tobin said, hypothesizing that peopled craved something fresh and green. And then there were the doughnuts. Or, as multiple readers emphasized, “DONUTS!!,” “DONUTS!!!!!!” and “One word: donuts.”

Little City. Big Flavor. catering available 141 Main Street, Vergennes ■ 3squarescafe.com ■ 802-877-2772

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Honey Road falafel salads packed for takeout

“Honey Road took everything to a whole new level,” praised one Seven Days reader. “They really were thoughtful right away about what on their menu would travel well … and then they tackled doughnuts, which have been an amazing, amazing treat and have made the best damn gift to drop at friends’ doors.” When the Honey Road team members pivoted to takeout, they recognized that much of their dine-in menu was not designed to travel. “We decided we were going to be a shawarma shop with pita sandwiches,” Chigazola Tobin explained. Readers appreciated the necessary shift and the “totally delicious modified menu.” Once they hit their takeout groove, pastry chef Amanda Wildermuth launched her weekend doughnut menu, pairing the comfort food favorite with “all the great spices and flavors we’re known for,” she said. Varieties have included Boston cream made with Turkish coffee, cardamom and tangy labneh; raspberry and rose-glazed with homemade sprinkles; and old-fashioned maple and fenugreek. Honey Road is cautiously reintroducing seated dining — outside only for now — but Chigazola Tobin promised that doughnuts and takeout will stick around until fall. Beyond that, she said Honey Road might add a takeout-only spot “if we can find the right space.” Got a window?

THE CHARLMONT: This historic restaurant offered takeout, curbside pickup and free local delivery for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Who wants to flip their own omelettes during a pandemic, anyway? (Morrisville • thecharlmontvt.com)

Takeout Margs LOL. It also added a downtown creemee outpost and bulging burritos, which one reporter weighed at nearly a pound. “They travel better than tacos,” owner Charlie Sizemore told Seven Days. (Burlington • tacogordovt.com)

MARK BBQ: Besides serving up drool-worthy

THE WOODS LODGE: This former summer camp switched to selling weekly takeout meals for pickup and delivery when the pandemic closed lodging and restaurants. But more than the Italian wedding soup or breakfast-for-dinner casseroles, locals will remember the thousands of free heat-andeat meals the owners provided to those in need. Read more on page 62. (Northfield • thewoodsvt.com)

Texas-style smoked meats for takeout, owner Darrell Langworthy provided free meals for community members experiencing food insecurity. Now that’s good barbecue. (Essex Junction • markbbqvt.com) TACO GORDO: The Old North End’s popular

taco spot stuck to pickup and delivery, relishing the opportunity to serve

Hosting virtual or in-person classes? Spread the word in the Seven Days Classifieds.

CONTACT KATIE FOR A QUOTE AT 865-1020 x110 katie@sevendaysvt.com

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« CONTINUED FROM P.35 JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

Cassie Molleur Rural mail carrier, East Calais Post Office

SPECIAL DELIVERER Cassie Molleur would like to suggest an amendment to the unofficial motto of the U.S. Postal Service, which reads: “Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds.” “Notice it doesn’t say anything about pandemics?” quipped the rural mail carrier on a recent summerlike May morning while loading her Jeep outside the East Calais Post Office. Molleur, 46, who lives in Woodbury with her husband, also a postal carrier, has delivered mail to the 456 addresses in zip code 05650 for nearly 20 years. As the town’s lone carrier, she’s made her appointed rounds in blizzards, downpours, heat waves and the dark. She delivered while pregnant with both of her now-college-age children. The pandemic didn’t “stay” her either — though it presented unprecedented challenges. “My favorite time of year to deliver the mail used to be at Christmastime, because it was high-paced, high-demand,” Molleur said. Then, she added with a laugh, “But the pandemic dragged that out for about 14 months.” 36

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

Throughout the coronavirus crisis, isolated Vermonters have relied on the mail for everything from household goods to medicine to groceries — particularly in rural towns such as East Calais, a village in Calais, population 1,529. “Delivering toilet paper was a big deal,” Molleur said. Carriers also delivered stimulus checks, election ballots and paychecks. Molleur said she saw an uptick in personal mail, too: “greeting cards and care packages that people were sending to family members and loved ones that they could not see but still wanted to be in touch with. “Especially in the beginning of the pandemic, so many people didn’t go anywhere,” Molleur continued. She often delivered stamped envelopes to customers so they wouldn’t have to go to the post office for postage. “People really counted on us.” Molleur’s hours haven’t been much different during the pandemic — mail needs to be delivered and collected in the same time frame every day. But she explained that the volume and type of

mail she carried changed drastically. “Paper mail dropped, since businesses weren’t sending out mail,” she said. “But I was delivering four times as many packages.” The apex was January 2, according to East Calais postal clerk Anne Toolan. That day Molleur delivered 260 packages. Pre-pandemic, her route average was about 60. “You adjust your pace to get it done,” Molleur said. “You do what you gotta do.” “The stress levels were high,” Toolan acknowledged. “But we came in every day, we used humor, and we made it through.” Molleur said delivering mail amid the COVID-19 pandemic was “challenging in a way I never expected to have to deal with.” As an example, she recalled the initial days of the pandemic when the science was still out on how long the coronavirus could live on surfaces. A coworker would spray her packages with Lysol, she said, “because we weren’t sure if we were gonna die from handling packages.” As one of very few people out and about, especially during Vermont’s initial lockdown, Molleur had a unique window

on the pandemic in East Calais. She recalled the eerie feeling of driving empty roads. She said customers often wanted to talk — from a distance — since she was frequently their only outside human contact. Others left notes explaining that they opened their mailboxes with a stick so she wouldn’t have to worry about their “germs” on the handle. Still others washed their mailboxes with soap and hot water. “It seems so crazy to think about that now, but it was a thing,” Molleur said. As much as the mail was a lifeline for the residents of East Calais, Molleur said her customers also kept her going. Many would leave thank-you notes and other small gifts in their mailboxes, all of which she’s kept. “Having people leave notes saying how much they appreciated you with little bottles of hand sanitizer, it was like gold. It keeps you going, and I’m really proud of how we worked through the pandemic.” “That’s just who she is,” Toolan said of Molleur. “She wants to take care of her people.”

DAN BO LLE S


PANDEMIC

ALL STARS

Whose to-go cocktails or mocktails raised your spirits?

CALEDONIA SPIRITS

Montpelier • caledoniaspirits.com During the first few months of the pandemic, the 500-gallon copper still at Caledonia Spirits distilled something very different than its acclaimed Barr Hill liquors: hand sanitizer. “It was 80 percent alcohol, 100 percent Vermont and zero percent potable,” said Harrison Kahn, vice president of marketing. Caledonia Spirits collaborated with several other Vermont companies to make and deliver 30,000 gallons of hand sanitizer distilled from keg beer surplus caused by abrupt bar and restaurant closures. Some sanitizer was donated, but it was also sold at cost to first responders, hospitals and the public. Its production kept Vermonters employed while providing a safety supply worth its weight in gold at the time.

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KAYAKS are FINALLY IN! SMALL BOAT EXCHANGE

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A Barr Hill Eastbound & Down cocktail to-go

Then Caledonia Spirits turned back to the potable stuff. Seven Days readers appreciated the company’s provision of both. “You could pull up in front of their facility, get hand sanitizer, some spirits for home, and some awesome and creative drinks to-go,” one wrote. Kahn said the company’s cocktail experts were initially uncertain about how to ensure the quality of takeout. But they nailed it with mixed-to-order, homegrown drinks such as the Rhubie Can’t Fail (a nod to a Clash song), made with local rhubarb syrup, and perfectly executed classics, such as a barrel-aged negroni. “The variety and beauty of their cocktails continues to delight everyone I introduce these to,” praised another reader. Many also appreciated the reusable glass bottles, spiced nuts and community spirit that came with their drinks. “Not only did this incredible group of people continue to shake great cocktails, they raised money for nonprofits through their ‘no-tips’ program,” a reader highlighted. Over the course of the pandemic, Kahn said, customers have donated more than $55,000 via optional “gratuities” earmarked for a different nonprofit every month. Caledonia Spirits even offered free virtual classes, which one fan called “a blast.” Cocktails 101 included demos of two classics: a Bee’s Knees and an old-fashioned. A reader summed it all up with a quip: “They’re just the bee’s knees.”

THE 126: Formerly called Deli 126, the

EL CORTIJO TAQUERIA: Takeout margaritas

speakeasy-style lounge known for classic cocktails made drinking at home easier than ever with vacuum-sealed beverages, complete with garnish. All you had to do was open the grown-up juice box and pour it over ice, or punch in a straw. (Burlington • deli126vt.com)

— for one or two, plus a little extra — included the Cortijo Classic and fruit-filled options such as blood orange, passion fruit and coconut, ideal for pairing with chips and salsa. The Caliente Marg was a spicy reprieve from the mundanity of early quarantine. (Burlington, Winooski • cortijovt.com)

BURGER BAR: Who didn’t need a big drink over the past 15 months? The Painkillers, margaritas and Scorpion Bowls here were ready to take home in 32-ounce jars. (Colchester • burgerbarvt.com)

THE GREAT NORTHERN: “When you have a true legend like Jeff Baumann mixing up bevvies, you can’t go wrong,” said one reader. And it’s even more fun when the Fernet Sours, Mom’s Manhattans and Banana Hammocks are served in cute, recyclable glass flasks. (Burlington • thegreatnorthernvt.com)

We are beyond thankful to our amazing staff that has been on this wild ride with us. Thank you for being all in on the changes and adaptations the pandemic brought us. Onward to a bigger and better year! — Neil & Perry

Open daily 11am-8pm • thescalevt.com 373 Blair Park Rd, Williston 137 Pearl Street, Essex Junction Online & Walk-up Orders • Vegan & Gluten Free Options 3v-scalepoke060921.indd 1

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‘HOME’ MAKER

Was there a silver lining for you? EXPLORING VERMONT

Without my weekends scheduled, I was able to explore and see a lot more of Vermont ... The highlights included biking the Lamoille Valley Rail Trail, hiking at Taconic Mountains Ramble State Park, the single-chair foliage ride at Mad River Glen and Canteen Creemee in Waitsfield, and skating the Lake Morey ice skating trail. WHITNEY FEININGER, BURLINGTON

SLOWER PACE OF LIFE

So important for all of us living on this planet to stop, breathe and find ways to be comfortable in stillness. Remember all the animals that came out for the first time in a

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BEAR CIERI

Todd Brown was working at the Turning Point Center of Chittenden County in Burlington last spring when he learned that the state was planning to move its homeless population into hotels during the pandemic. The program needed staff for this massive undertaking, and his boss had suggested him. He was told to call a field director at the Agency of Human Services if interested. Brown, 39, was hesitant. COVID-19 was surging, and he feared bringing the virus home to his 16-year-old daughter. But his curiosity prevailed. Brown reached out for more information, and the conversation, he recalled, went something like this: “I’d like to have some idea of what I’m walking into.” “I couldn’t tell you.” “Cool. Let’s do it anyway.” A year later, Brown’s up-for-whatever attitude remains fully intact. As a temporary employee of the Champlain Valley Office of Economic Opportunity, he’s been working at the Holiday Inn Burlington since May 2020. The Williston Road hotel is among dozens still primarily serving unhoused people 15 months into the pandemic. More than 5,000 have been placed under the emergency program since March 2020, including 250 at the Holiday Inn. Brown sat for an interview with Seven Days last month inside one of the hotel’s conference rooms, which has been turned into a makeshift donation center offering residents everything from coats to kitchenware. As Brown summarized his job duties, it became

Todd Brown Housing advocate, Champlain Valley Office of Economic Opportunity, Burlington

clear that his title, housing advocate, didn’t begin to capture the breadth of the work. He and his colleagues have an office in the hotel lobby, but Brown spends most days walking around and holding case management meetings — both scheduled and impromptu. He’s helped people buy cellphones, find jobs and file taxes. He’s distributed food and arranged rides to appointments. He even helped a former resident swap out a rusty car battery; the vehicle had been sitting in the hotel parking lot for months.

long time! And how clean the air was. Truly life-altering. NANCY RIEGE, GREENSBORO

LESS POLLUTION

That’s about the only good thing you could say about it. Seeing places with terrible air quality suddenly be breathable due to the lack of traffic shows how nature can fight back. TED ADLER, BURLINGTON

SPENDING MORE TIME WITH PETS

Finally got a dog! MARA IVERSON, MONTPELIER

One day in particular stands out for Brown: He helped an older couple move into an apartment in Essex. The woman was so happy to have her own space that she spent five minutes telling Brown what she planned to cook that night. “Just to see how excited they were about all this stuff that I don’t think about when I go home, that was really special,” he said. Of course, not all endings are happy. There have been overdoses, deaths, people who left and never returned. Brown’s background helps him

navigate it all and easily connect with clients. After his drug and alcohol issues led to a couple of stints in rehab, Brown returned to school and earned a psychology degree, then became a certified recovery coach. He understands how a confluence of circumstances can derail even the most stable life. “He’s just got a very grounding way about him,” said Dave Gundersen, director of CVOEO’s emergency housing program. “He approaches the folks we serve here, regardless of their background or history, with just such consistent respect and compassion. “Even when people have been rude to him or there’s been damage to a relationship,” Gundersen continued, “I’ve seen him just come back to give people another shot so many times.” Brown’s gig will soon come to an end: The state is winding down the hotel program, citing its unsustainable cost, and the Holiday Inn plans to close for renovations later this month. Much of Brown’s time is now spent working with the 80 or so people still living there to determine what comes next. He faces a similar question in his own life. Brown said he’d love to continue working for CVOEO but isn’t sure whether the organization will be able to keep him on after the hotel program closes. Either way, he said, the experience has been worthwhile. “Working here has solidified that I’m doing the right type of work,” Brown said. “This is where I feel most at home.”

C O LI N FL AN DE RS

CLARITY ABOUT WHAT MATTERS

The pandemic forced us apart, yet offered a big pause in the hectic pace of daily life, for people and the planet. Appreciating the many and varied hardships, we had time with ourselves, with the people in our pods — time to think about what really matters, what it means to be human and to truly take care of each other and our communities. And we all experienced the pandemic — a rare event with impact of some kind on everyone. SARAH GENTRY TISCHLER, ST. GEORGE

WORKING FROM HOME

I had my best garden ever, discovered dozens of bird species that I’ve been living alongside and had time in the morning to pick up a new hobby of watercolor painting. I miss the people, but I don’t miss the extra two hours of my day taken up by getting ready and driving. KATRINA MEYERS, COLCHESTER


STOP

PANDEMIC

ALL STARS

the cruel and

COURTESY OF EVAN WILLIAMS

The deck at Waterworks Food + Drink

indiscriminate use of hounds to hunt bobcats, bears, and other wildlife on Vermont’s National Wildlife REFUGE.

At what restaurant did you find the best outdoor eating experience? FILE: JORDAN BARRY

With outdoor dining, it’s all about the views. WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK serves up a so-close-youalmost-need-a-rain-poncho view of the Winooski River from its plant-filled patio. “It’s just beautiful there!” said one diner. For the past year, the restaurant experience was all about safety, too. Waterworks delivered on that front with streamlined takeout, strict social distancing and free weekly grocery pickup for employees when the restaurant was temporarily closed. “We have a great staff that raises the bar,” owner David Abdoo told Seven Days in November. “They’re my No. 1 concern.” (Winooski • waterworksvt.com)

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On the patio at Great Northern

The GREAT NORTHERN and ZERO GRAVITY CRAFT BREWERY kept the doors shut to their adjacent indoor spaces throughout the pandemic, but the combined businesses’ walk-up window was open rain, snow or shine for takeout and outdoor dining. Customers bundled up (or donned beer jackets) to enjoy coffee and waffles, pints and Detroit-style Coney dogs, or ramen and cocktails on an expanded patio, warmed with hefty hockey-rink-style heaters. “Even when it was 10 degrees out!” one Seven Days reader exclaimed. “[They] installed heaters so people could dine safely outside,” said another. “Very badass!” (Burlington • thegreatnorthernvt.com, zerogravitybeer.com)

AMERICAN FLATBREAD BURLINGTON HEARTH:

LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: The bistro’s outdoor

A banner hung outside the restaurant read “Love. Be Kind. Keep Each Other Well.” Convivial diners kept that advice in mind as they enjoyed fireside flatbreads on the patio. (Burlington • americanflatbread.com)

dining on the Church Street Marketplace has always been popular, but it was busy all summer as diners opted for the great outdoors. Chef/owner Donnell Collins said guests braved the elements during the winter holidays, too, bundling up in snow gear to sit under the patio’s gas-flamed lanterns. (Burlington • leunigsbistro.com)

BLACK FLANNEL BREWING & DISTILLING: The expansive brewery, distillery and pub opened in the Essex Experience during the pandemic and doubled down on outdoor seating. Diners ate veggies cooked on a wood-fired Argentine grill on the front patio and listened to live music while enjoying beer and snacks in the biergarten out back. (Essex Junction • blackflannel.com)

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6/3/21 11:08 AM


« CONTINUED FROM P.39 JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

Michael Billingsley Volunteer, Plainfield Community Suppers

PROACTIVE AND PERSISTENT Before the first case of the coronavirus was identified in the United States, in early January 2020, Michael Billingsley and other members of the Plainfield Hazard Mitigation Committee started studying the coronavirus pandemic in China. Though the group is typically concerned with more commonplace issues, such as flooding, the committee “looks ahead at things that could happen and does everything possible to keep impact low,” Billingsley said. “We’re very proactive and don’t want to expose people to danger.” By February, the mitigation committee was “writing to people [in local government] to try to get them to form a public health response,” Billingsley said. In March 2020, it became clear that an upcoming event — the Plainfield Community Supper — could be a risky occasion. The sit-down meal for about 80 people, hosted each month by a different local group, normally convened at the Grace United Methodist Church in the center of town. “I immediately went to a different model,” said Billingsley, 75, “and contacted my volunteers and said, ‘Who’s willing to work with masks and gloves on?’” 40

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

The new model is a takeout meal of soup, bread and dessert; it’s available for pickup at the church on the fourth Tuesday of the month. The food is primarily for Plainfield residents — but everyone’s welcome. “If somebody pulled up in a RollsRoyce, I would give them soup,” Billingsley said. At the meal’s first iteration in March 2020, soup was donated by Joe’s Kitchen at Screamin’ Ridge Farm in Montpelier, and bread was courtesy of Red Hen Baking in Middlesex. Each month since, soup for the suppers is purchased from Joe’s Kitchen with money donated by community members; Red Hen continues to donate the bread. “People are always giving us money to do this,” Billingsley said, adding that it costs about $325 for 120 or so meals. The dessert course includes apples and a gluten-free option made by longtime Plainfield resident Helen Rabin. “She’s a very supportive and important component of this whole thing,” Billingsley said. Andrea Stefani, 70, used similar words to describe Billingsley’s involvement with

the whole affair. The retired language and science teacher has lived in Plainfield for 37 years. “Michael rose up to the challenge,” Stefani said, noting that his effort ranges from organizing volunteers to fundraising to picking up the soup. “It’s a really wonderful, beautiful gesture,” she continued, “and I just admire the persistence and the commitment he put into it.” Billingsley, who grew up in Northfield, taught media arts

at local colleges; he’s also a musician and a sound engineer/record producer. At his home in Plainfield, he raises chickens and goats. Billingsley built an expansion in the church doorway that serves as a counter

from which people retrieve their meals between 6 and 7 p.m. on the fourth Tuesdays. Folks sometimes pick up food for their neighbors or others who can’t get to the church. Leftover meals are donated to the Onion River Food Shelf in Marshfield. “I’ve had people say they were very thankful,” Billingsley said. “We are enough of a constant that it reassures people, and they’ve told me that. And it gets people out of the house. Just to get out of the house and pick up food is a big deal for some people.” The community suppers will stop during the summer, when people cherish warm-weather evenings and late sunsets. The extended daylight gives people time to work in their gardens and tackle household projects. “Summer evenings are so precious to people,” Billingsley said. The Plainfield Hazard Mitigation Committee has been disbanded, but the community suppers will resume in the fall. Although Billingsley doesn’t know yet what form they’ll take, he’s hopeful they’ll be indoors — maybe in smaller groups.

S ALLY P O LL AK


PANDEMIC

ALL STARS FILE: JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

What locally owned grocery store came through for you?

Customers awaiting porch pickup at Craftsbury General Store

Is there anything grocers haven’t done for us these past 15 months? Vermonters piled praise upon supermarkets, co-ops and general stores alike for their myriad pandemic pivots that kept us safe and well stocked. Curbside pickup at Montpelier’s HUNGER MOUNTAIN CO-OP made “those of us older and higher-risk people feel so lucky and protected,” said one shopper. “It took the anxiety away. I can’t imagine what pandemic shopping without this service would have been like.” Another agreed: “They deserve a parade and many medals of honor.” “Without the JERICHO CENTER COUNTRY STORE, our lives would have been much more isolated and lonely,” another shopper weighed in. “The cooks and clerks always asked, as did Jon St. Amour, the owner, what they might do for me, since I am 83 and live alone down the street from the store.” CITY MARKET, ONION RIVER CO-OP in Burlington “offered protective gloves and hand sanitizer to everyone for free” and “paid a security company to count people upon entry,” noted two shoppers. In February, when the downtown location closed for a weekend due to staffing issues related to an employee’s positive COVID-19 test, the co-op demonstrated “clear communication” and “a dedication to safety for both staff and patrons.” In a year of racial reckoning, SWEET CLOVER MARKET in Essex Junction “made the decision that tips for drivers and staff would be collected and redistributed to local nonprofits and their anti-racist initiative,” offered one reader. The market is matching customer donations for six organizations, including the Vermont Racial Justice Alliance and the Peace & Justice Center, up to $5,000. CRAFTSBURY GENERAL STORE in rural Orleans County “stayed open [and] made deliveries to people who could not get to the store,” observed one customer, who called it “an amazing pivot to keep food available in the community, where the [next] nearest store is a good half-hour drive away.” Another reader expressed a widespread sentiment: “Much love and gratitude to all of the frontline staff at all of the supermarkets.”

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4/26/21 3:38 PM


« CONTINUED FROM P.41 SARAH PRIESTAP

MOVER AND SHAKER As her 8 a.m. outdoor exercise group was limbering up, Erin Donahue gave a sleepy newcomer the brief lowdown. “All the exercises are written down there,” she said, pointing to a cardboard sheet in the grass scrawled with purple marker. “Do as much as you’re comfortable with,” she continued, smiling and bouncing like a spring from foot to foot. “And at any point, you can stop and just dance.” As if on cue, Robin Osborne, clad in purple workout clothes, gave a fluttering little shimmy to the strains of “Can’t Get Enough of Your Love, Babe” emanating from a Bluetooth speaker. “I hope you like Barry White!” Donahue chirped before turning to lead the small class — Osborne, Stephanie Carney, three dogs and an out-of-shape reporter — on a light warm-up jog along a mown path through a scenic grassy field at Osborne’s East Thetford home. At the end of a lap and some informal, huffing small talk, we returned to our small circle of yoga mats and hand weights in the yard. As we prepared to get into our first set of lunges, Osborne offered: “This class saved my life.” Later, Osborne, a psychologist, clarified that she didn’t mean that literally. But for her and many others in the White River Junction area over the last 15 months, Donahue’s informal, pandemicera exercise classes have at the very least been a lifeline. “Erin always puts a hand out to anyone that needs help,” class regular Amanda DeRoy said in a phone interview. When COVID-19 closed Vermont gyms in March 2020, Donahue and the other members of the Upper Valley Aquatic Center in White River Junction were left out in the cold. Thanks to Donahue, that’s where they stayed, and happily so.

MEMORABLE M MENTS

Erin Donahue Informal fitness instructor, East Thetford

“We were all terrified about this pandemic,” Donahue recalled, “but I knew we had to keep working out.” Like Osborne, Donahue is a therapist. “We both knew how important moving is to mental health and de-stressing — and seeing people and fighting isolation,” Donahue said. “So, this class did all three.”

WINTER IS A (VIRTUAL) DRAG BALL This experience of having the Drag Ball — an annual treat that I was worried we’d miss — pulled together online, with entertainers from all over the state and nation, was genuinely touching and sweet ... I got to see Vermont’s arts community come together for a good cause. I cried and laughed, and it felt like a solid through line from 2020 into the future. PE TE R JACO BS E N, BUR L INGTO N

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With the fitness center’s blessing, Donahue, who had taken CrossFit classes but had no experience leading them, organized informal morning sessions in the UVAC parking lot on Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 8 a.m.

“They were completely supportive, which I was so grateful for,” Donahue said of the fitness center. “They loaned us some of their stuff,” Osborne added. Donahue’s first classes drew six people. As word got out, that number grew to 20 to 25 regulars per class. The exercisers represented a range of ages, genders and professions, from out-of-work restaurant staff to published authors to erstwhile Dartmouth College professors and at least one famous chef. “It was a cool cross section of the Upper Valley,” Donahue said. “We would go down in all weather, unless it was below about 20 degrees,” Osborne recalled. “Especially in the beginning of the pandemic, it just felt good to have somewhere to go.” “So no one would get bored,” Donahue said, she drew up new circuits for every class, writing them on the backs of cardboard boxes from mail-order companies such as Chewy, the pet supply company. And she made fresh playlists on Spotify. When UVAC reopened along with other Vermont gyms on July 1, 2020, Donahue moved the classes to Osborne’s yard rather than continue in the center’s parking lot. “It didn’t feel ethical, and I wanted people to use their memberships and go to the gym if they felt safe enough,” Donahue explained. In the following months, attendance dipped to a smaller core group that has continued meeting three days a week at Osborne’s home — save for a stretch on Zoom in January when it got too cold. “I remember at least once we were out here wearing microspikes,” Osborne said. Added Carney, a retired elementary school teacher and former yoga instructor, “We’re the die-hards.”

DAN BO LLE S


PANDEMIC

ALL STARS Which farmstand or farmers market provided easy access to fresh, local foods?

NORWICH FARM CREAMERY

Why not swing by the Philippines while you’re at it!

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SARAH PRIESTAP

It all started with spinach. Laura Brown, co-owner of Norwich Farm Creamery, remembers vividly how quiet the roads were in the spring of 2020 when she would drive 15 minutes to the Sharon Park & Ride to pick up 50 pounds of spinach from Suzanne Long of South Royalton’s Luna Bleu Farm. “The [winter] farmers market had been canceled, and I reached out to Suzanne because I knew she had lost that business,” Brown recalled. “When I came home, there’d be this line of people waiting. We’d sell out in 48 hours.”

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Brown and her husband, Chris Gray, were already running a small farmstand to sell their own fresh dairy products: plain and chocolate milk, ricotta, yogurt, and rice pudding. The couple started building the creamery in 2015 in partnership with the Norwich farm’s thenowner, Vermont Technical College. The original plan was to develop a mutually beneficial dairy education collaboration, but the college sold the farm to the Upper Valley Land Trust, jeopardizing Brown and Gray’s future there. Despite that uncertainty, the couple worked hard to expand to meet the needs of their community during COVID-19. “Without skipping a beat, this farmstand reached out to their farmers market vendors, who were also impacted by the pandemic, and created a new market for their products,” said a Seven Days reader. “This small stand stepped up big-time to feed our community,” another elaborated. “It went from a little place to pick up milk to a place to get food from over 60 local producers.” Several readers noted that shopping at the farmstand felt safer than big grocery stores, but it was also more than just a shop. One shared that she and her daughter made a tradition out of the four-mile bike ride to the farm after the remote school day was over. “They make the absolute best chocolate milk anywhere,” another devotee said. “When the pandemic made me sad, I had some chocolate milk and things seemed a little better.”

BREAD & BUTTER FARM: The farm on the Shelburne-South Burlington town line offered curbside pickup through a new online store. Customers could fill their carts with grass-fed beef and veggies, along with prepared meals to-go from Blank Page Café and products from other local farms and food producers. (Shelburne • breadandbutterfarm.com)

THE ROOTS FARM MARKET: The corner market at the intersection of routes 2 and 100B is owned and operated by Bear Roots Farm, and its shelves have remained stocked with organically grown vegetables. Beyond that, shoppers stopped by for local dairy, tortillas, maple, ferments, and even popsicles and doughnuts. (Middlesex • bearrootsfarm.com/ the-roots-farm-market)

BURLINGTON FARMERS MARKET: Things are close to normal at the weekly market on Pine Street this summer after a year of navigating guidelines for one-way traffic flow, preorders and limited capacities. But even with regulations in place, the 2020 season had market shoppers filling their baskets with bounty, including flowers, mushrooms, sausages, radicchio, coffee, jam and marshmallows. (Burlington • burlingtonfarmersmarket.org)

SHELBURNE FARMS: The Inn at Shelburne Farms is still closed, but the produce from its seven-acre market garden has been available for purchase at the farm’s Welcome Center & Farm Store throughout the pandemic. That produce was also made into prepared meals, such as lasagna, macaroni and cheese, and lemon risotto with pickled pole beans. (Shelburne • shelburnefarms.org)

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6/7/21 12:09 PM


« CONTINUED FROM P.43 CALEB KENNA

Julia Doucet Open Door Clinic outreach nurse, Middlebury

FARMING OUT HEALTH CARE Julia Doucet of Middlebury’s Open Door Clinic had just vaccinated two workers on an Addison County dairy farm last month when she spied another one a short distance away, walking toward an outbuilding. “Don’t you want the COVID vaccine?” Doucet called out in Spanish. “Why not, right?” she nudged gently. The man paused and approached the folding table set up within view of a cow peeking out of the barn. “Perfecto!” Doucet said with a warm smile. The owner, who requested that the farm not be identified, also got a shot. He watched incredulously as his employee rolled up a sleeve. “He was totally against getting it,” he said. When the worker was asked, via clinic educator Magdalena Deloya, what changed his mind, he replied that he

MEMORABLE M MENTS 44

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

trusts the Open Door Clinic. “He feels better that we are here,” Deloya translated. “That’s what giving the vaccinations is all about: being in the right place at the right time,” Doucet said. When there are extra doses, she said as she packed up, she drops into local businesses and offers them to employees. Since 1990, the nonprofit Open Door Clinic has provided free health care for uninsured and underinsured Addison County residents. About 50 percent of its current patients are migrant farmworkers, many from Mexico. Due to transportation and other barriers, it can be difficult for them to get to the clinic’s Middlebury or Vergennes locations. Doucet has been the outreach nurse for a decade, cultivating relationships that ease the way for on-farm preventative care. She couldn’t have anticipated that

work would facilitate providing critical care during a pandemic. Doucet, 50, came to nursing later in life and has only ever worked for the Open Door Clinic. After she had her first child, she left a career in outdoor education and travel, including leading sea kayak tours in Mexico. Doucet vividly remembers being home with her three kids and listening to a Vermont Public Radio story about Spanish-speaking migrant workers. She loved speaking Spanish, and working with the farmworker population in her own county appealed. “I like to be outside, and I like building relationships,” Doucet said. “I have a public health/community health nurse hat that I wear. It feels right.” For the first few months of the pandemic, it was almost eerily quiet. Doucet took the clinic cellphone home on nights and weekends so farmworkers could reach out via an internet-based messaging app. Few have cell service, she explained.

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As lockdown eased, Doucet and her team assembled kits with ibuprofen, masks, hand sanitizer, thermometers and information about COVID-19 symptoms and delivered them to 47 farms. “We dropped them off and spoke to workers outside, masked up, about what was going on, just saying, ‘We’re here,’” she recalled. Things were going well until midFebruary, when a patient canceled an appointment due to a sore throat. “We went out and tested him, and he was positive,” Doucet said. The virus spread quickly through the county’s farms, resulting in 67 cases. Doucet’s team delivered supplies, administered tests, explained quarantine requirements and helped with contact tracing. No one was hospitalized, but, she said, “Some were sick enough that they couldn’t work — which is very sick.” In mid-March, the clinic launched its traveling vaccine operation with support from Moira Cook, district director of the Department of Health in Addison County. Doucet and her team have since administered almost 1,100 vaccines at 57 farms. Cook said state data show that 95 percent of the county’s residents who identify as Hispanic — 673 people — had received at least one vaccine dose as of May 21, versus 70 percent of non-Hispanics. That success, Cook said, is due to Doucet’s long-standing relationships with farmers and farmworkers: “Everyone trusts she has their best interests at heart.” During three farm visits in mid-May, Doucet joked easily in Spanish and English. She plied them with chocolate, explained potential vaccine side effects, and left packages of tea and honey. At Goodrich Family Farm in Salisbury, co-owner Danielle Goodrich said the clinic visits “give us a huge sense of security. It’s really important to know that there are people who care about our employees.” After receiving her second dose, Goodrich farmworker Rosalba de la Cruz said through a translator, “I was afraid, very nervous,” about COVID-19. “We are very grateful for the clinic. They are always reaching out to us.” ME LI S S A PAS AN E N


PANDEMIC

ALL STARS

What CSA or local food delivery program made your mouth water?

INTERVALE FOOD HUB

Burlington • intervalefoodhub.com For Burlingtonians, food doesn’t get more local than the offerings of the Intervale Food Hub — from products to placement. Part of the nonprofit Intervale Center, the hub aggregates food from local producers and delivers it to Burlington residents. The groceries might include jam, yogurt, onions, broccoli, greens, chicken and coffee. When the pandemic shut down nonessential businesses during “parsnip season,” sales at the food hub quadrupled in a month, said Reid Parsons, sales and marketing manager. The organization doubled the number of producers it worked with to roughly 70, including 40 farms. Three grow produce right at the Intervale.

COURTESY OF REID PARSONS

Intervale Food Hub drivers Taylor Firestein (left) and Kristen McDowell

“We didn’t really have to change anything,” Parsons said. “We just had to grow really rapidly.” For customers, weekly delivery of locally sourced food was a pandemic comfort and delight. Folks placed orders online, and groceries were left outside their homes, including at co-ops, senior housing and apartments. Customers were alerted by text when their food had arrived. “No-contact delivery throughout the pandemic was a lifesaver,” one consumer wrote to Seven Days. For a while last spring, before a second driver was added in June, operations coordinator Taylor Firestein would load her 14-foot refrigerated truck at 6 a.m. and make deliveries until late afternoon or early evening. “It was a crazy time,” Parsons said. “It was wild. We just added a lot more stops. It’s more efficient to have a denser route.” While 75 percent of customers get home delivery, people who live outside of Burlington can order through the hub and pick up their food at the Intervale. The hub also recently resumed drop-offs at two work sites. At the end of the 2020 summer season, customers rated the hub 9.8 out of 10 in an internal survey, according to Parsons. One Seven Days reader explained why: “Very nice service. Excellent products.” And, they added, “Reid is so nice!”

BREAD & BUTTER FARM: This farm’s CSA shares were as adaptable as the farmers themselves during the pandemic. Shares were available in three sizes and three seasons, with the option to add meat. Pickup was a DIY affair: Members selected their items from a bountiful veggie display. (Shelburne • breadandbutterfarm.com)

FOOTPRINT FARM: With pickups in Bristol, Hinesburg and Burlington, this organic vegetable farm’s CSA draws a wide-ranging and loyal group of customers. In 2020, it launched an online store with à la carte add-ons, giving members exclusive access to extra farm veggies and rotating items such as honey, bread, meat, ferments and mushrooms. (Starksboro • footprintfarmvt.com)

FARMERS TO YOU: The online business

founded more than a decade ago was ahead of the curve in aggregating local products and distributing them to customers — an adaptation many farms made during the pandemic. It continued to bring grains, vegetables, cheese, milk, fruit and bread from about 100 farms and producers to customers in Vermont and Boston. (Middlesex • farmerstoyou.com)

PETE’S GREENS’ GOOD EATS CSA: In the last

two weeks of March 2020, about 200 families joined the organic farm’s CSA, bringing the membership to about 600 families. Sign-ups continued through the year as more Vermonters than ever sought out local produce. “It’s just been nutty. I didn’t really expect it,” owner Pete Johnson told Seven Days at the time. (Craftsbury • petesgreens.com)

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« CONTINUED FROM P.45 LUKE AWTRY

Jarrell Watts Elementary program director, Sara Holbrook Community Center, Burlington

THERE FOR THE KIDS The ever-changing world of hybrid learning left some working parents searching for help. When in-person school was not an option, they needed a safe and nurturing place to send their kids. Since August, Jarrell Watts, elementary program director of Burlington’s Sara Holbrook Community Center, has been providing that support. In the fall of 2020, the North Avenue center served as a free, full-day remote learning hub — one of more than 80 sites in the state — where some 35 students in kindergarten through fifth grade could get academic support and take part in enrichment activities when they weren’t in school. Watts supervised a staff of about 11, plus a handful of college interns, who brought their passions — from art to

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tinkering, gardening to Italian language — to create engaging programming for kids. As schools shifted to more in-person learning, Sara Holbrook’s offerings adapted to meet families’ needs. In April, when Burlington’s elementary schools began offering four and a half days of in-person instruction, the center offered afterschool care Monday through Friday. Ashley Parker, whose kindergartner attended the Sara Holbrook remote learning hub, praised Watts’ “go-withthe-flow” demeanor and his ability to make the elementary program a place where her daughter could “just be a kid” during a very tumultuous and uncertain year. Watts arranged to open the center half an hour early so Parker could drop off her daughter and still get to work

by 9 a.m. He also ran camps during February and April vacations, including a circus-themed one that featured an animal-balloon day. “He was always there for us,” Parker said. “We are so grateful to him.” On a recent Thursday morning, Watts — known to the kids as Mr. Jarrell — showed off the elementary school space: the indoor gym, a shelf displaying nature paintings made by members of the center’s Bob Ross Club and a windowsill lined with plants sprouting in paper cups. The big picture window above the sill boasts a killer view of Lake Champlain and the Adirondack Mountains. The scene is a far cry from the Las Vegas desert where Watts was born and raised. He grew up playing football

“every day, all day,” earned his associate’s degree in exercise science, and then played semipro football for two years before tearing his Achilles tendon. After that injury, “I had to find something else to strive for,” he said. Afterschool programs were instrumental in Watts’ early life, providing a structured environment that helped him stay on the right path, he noted. A career in youth development seemed like a natural fit. After working in programs in Utah and Nevada for a decade, Watts saw a job opening at Sara Holbrook and decided to take a chance, even though he’d never been to the East Coast. “I am just someone that loves to have an experience,” Watts said. “I had an opportunity, and I landed here in Vermont.” The pandemic experience made it a year like no other. “The best thing we could do is try to be as compassionate and as understanding as possible,” Watts said. Since COVID-19 protocols prohibited parents from entering the building, Watts made sure they felt in the loop with frequent phone and email check-ins. He directed families in need to an on-site food pantry where they could get groceries. Sara Holbrook’s executive director, Christine Lloyd-Newbury, said Watts has been a great asset to the center. “He’s incredibly personable, and he has a really wonderful ability to build relationships with both kids and families, and colleagues, as well,” she said. This summer, Watts is looking forward to directing two programs for about 40 kids — a literacy-based one that will support English language learners, and another more traditional camp program based at Burlington’s Sustainability Academy. Students missed out on so many opportunities last year, Watts said, so this summer, “we’re planning to have as much fun as possible.”

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ALI S O N N O VAK


PANDEMIC

ALL STARS

Who made your favorite pandemic pick-me-up treat?

NORTH COUNTRY DONUTS

F U R N I T U R E !

Morrisville • northcountrydonuts.com

Have you ever driven an hour and a half for an apple fritter? One way? Well, one Seven Days reader did, and it was “Absolutely to. die. for,” they wrote. The destination was Morrisville’s North Country Donuts. The doughnuts were such a draw during the pandemic that owner Nicole Maddox changed the business’ name — and its focus — from North Country Cakes. “We recently realized the demand for doughnuts is so out of control that the only way to even attempt to meet it was to focus all our efforts and labor into that,” she explained. Maddox said her teammates’ flexibility is what allowed them to conquer big Caramel-coconut-chocolate doughnuts shifts during the pandemic. from North Country Donuts They added online ordering early on — something she’d been thinking about for years but hadn’t implemented. They’ve also been extra communicative on social media, letting customers know how to order, where to pick up and what flavors to expect each day. Those changes let doughnut seekers plan their trips to the bakery and avoid disappointment if the popular treats sold out. North Country stuck to weekend hours, selling between 500 and 1,000 doughnuts a day, Thursday through Sunday, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. — or until the goods were gone. “I think that turned into a really big highlight in people’s weeks,” Maddox said. “That they could still do some normal thing, like go out and get doughnuts.” The doughnuts’ seasonally inspired flavors include strawberry-rhubarb jelly, blueberry-honey-lemon and maple-glazed. “It’s undeniably unpretentious comfort food,” Maddox said. “Even though we use local ingredients and make everything from scratch, there’s still just something kind of approachable about them.” Or, as another reader put it, “Their donuts are dangerously delicious.”

Rough Francis chicken sandwich at Misery Loves Co.

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MISERY LOVES CO.: The restaurant returned

to its food truck roots with sandwiches to-go, including the much-loved Rough Francis (fried chicken with hot sauce and blue cheese). Together with fancy pantry staples, housemade specialties from the eateryturned-market — such as tater tots and Old Bay aioli — made home cooking almost restaurant-worthy. (Winooski • mlcvt.com) ROOKIE’S ROOT BEER: Locals love their

Rookie’s Root Beer. But owner Jenny Rooke’s dancing dino deliveries — in an inflatable T. rex costume — lifted spirits and put smiles on people’s faces as much as the soda did. (Burlington • facebook.com/rookiesrootbeer)

6/8/21 10:50 AM

FILE: JAMES BUCK

BLANK PAGE CAFÉ: Breakfast tacos stuffed with farm-fresh ingredients brightened up Friday mornings throughout the pandemic. The on-farm café’s specialty coffee, gluten-free baked goods and hearty meals to-go kept bellies full the rest of the week. (Shelburne • blankpagecafe.com)

F U R N I T U R E !

SATURDAY, JUNE 19 • 2021 ALL EVENTS ARE FREE AND RAIN OR SHINE COVID GUIDELINES WILL BE ENFORCED

JUNETEENTHBTV.ORG

SHY GUY GELATO: Freezers all over town were packed with preordered pints of Fior di Latte, creamy Concord grape and beet gelato as the go-to gelateria shifted its model during the pandemic. It was only a matter of time before the biz posted its “sold out” message online each week. (Burlington • shyguygelato.com)

PRESENTED BY

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FILE: KEN PICARD

Myste and Gary Greeno Founders of To Go Tour, Middlebury

JAMES BUCK

SERVER SAVIORS

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couple explained the gift. She immediately said, “Well, I will be sharing the envelope with all my server friends and the people that work here.” That generous gift wasn’t the only one the restaurant’s 24 staff members received that night, according to owner Paris Rinder-Goddard. After hearing about the Greenos’ Tip Challenge, two other groups of customers were inspired to pitch in. “A couple of longtime regulars were sitting at the bar, and when they went to sign their credit card slip, they left $500,” Rinder-Goddard said. “And then another patron wanted to see the kitchen taken care of as well, and they left $550. Everybody was feeling pretty warm and fuzzy — and not just the financial aspect of it but the feeling of being appreciated.” The Tip Challenge is just one part of what Myste, 46, and Gary, 48, have created with To Go Tour. At the beginning of the pandemic, the couple quickly realized that their jobs — hers as an insurance broker and his in commercial HVAC — wouldn’t be affected. But their friends in the restaurant industry weren’t in the same boat. “We were just like, ‘Holy cannoli. These restaurants are really struggling!’ And we wanted to do something to help keep them open,” Myste said. “All of these great places Vermont is so known for could be gone.”

JO R D AN BARRY

With more than 50 large-scale sculptures scattered atop picturesque fields, LEMON FAIR SCULPTURE PARK “is a hidden gem in Addison County,” wrote one Seven Days reader. East Shoreham residents and art enthusiasts Frank and Elaine Ittleman first opened their property to the public in 2016 for free, self-guided tours along a mowed path — and they’ve continued to welcome visitors, in season, throughout the pandemic. One Vermonter summed up the experience: “Being able to walk with a friend outdoors amongst these giant art installations was a wonderful way to be able to socialize safely.” (East Shoreham • lemonfairsculpturepark.com) FILE: AMY LILLY

When Myste and Gary Greeno dined at Fire & Ice Restaurant in Middlebury on March 6, 2021, it was the first time they’d eaten together with their neighbors in a restaurant since November 14. At the end of the meal, Myste dug around in her purse and pulled out an envelope for their server, Stephanie Curtis. “We are giving you a thousand dollars,” Myste said, handing over a thick white envelope. As grateful as the Essex Junction couple was for the great service and butter-like prime rib, Gary quickly explained that the $1,000 wasn’t a tip — they left one of those, too. It was a gift, raised by the more than 22,500 members of To Go Tour, the Facebook group the couple founded a year prior to help keep Vermont’s bars and restaurants open during the pandemic. The gift was part of the Greenos’ Tip Challenge, which they ran almost weekly from September through April. Members of To Go Tour would donate money and nominate restaurants around the state; the couple would spin a wheel to randomly determine where they’d head for dinner. They’d pick up their takeout or enjoy their meal on-site, then surprise their server with a stack of cash — all while streaming live so that the group’s members could watch it happen. In the video from Fire & Ice, Curtis was visibly taken aback, tearing up as the

In late March 2020, Myste started calling restaurants to gather information to share in the group. Chuck LaClair volunteered to make videos, and they started posting promotional commercials with restaurants’ hours and instructions for how to order and pick up meals to-go. The Greenos made To Go Tour a positive place. The group’s rules were clear: no negative posts or comments, no bad reviews or complaints, and no political posts. They reminded customers to be patient as restaurants adapted to the restrictions of the pandemic. A couple weeks in, the group had grown to 700 members. And it didn’t stop. “Every day we wake up and there’s more requests to join,” Myste said. “It’s astonishing.” “They did a really great job of helping people understand and manage their expectations,” Rinder-Goddard said of the Greenos. “Everybody in the industry knows pivoting to a new business model was not smooth or easy, and what they did was fantastic.” The Greenos have stepped back a bit for the summer to focus on family, but the group is still active. Members post photos of their lobster rolls, creemees, brunch spreads and takeout meals, shouting out favorite spots and making recommendations. As the industry’s restrictions lift and life inches closer to normal, it’s clear that the Greenos have achieved their goal: The restaurants are still here.

What outdoor art installation inspired you during the pandemic?

From January through March 2021, HIGHLAND CENTER FOR THE ARTS hosted

a trailblazing art experience — literally. Its Open Air Gallery Ski & Snowshoe Trail invited visitors to walk, snowshoe or cross-country ski a 1.8-mile path past 17 works of locally made art. To counter the cold, the center’s café offered hot chocolate, spiked coffee and grilled cheese sandwiches by socially distanced bonfires. “This winter we snowshoed to look at art [and] ate outdoors sitting on a log around a fire,” reminisced one reader. It was “a safe, normal-feeling atmosphere” and “a reason to get out of the house,” noted two others. (Greensboro • highlandartsvt.org)


PANDEMIC

ALL STARS Zach Nugent performing outside at Stowe Cider

Which outdoor live music performance or series moved you most?

STOWE CIDER

Stowe • stowecider.com At different points throughout the pandemic, Vermonters have gone without certain perks — vacations, buffets, movie theaters and even hugs. Thanks to presenters such as Stowe Cider, live music hasn’t always been lacking. Located on scenic Town Farm Lane in Stowe, the cidery and taproom made the most of its outdoor space to offer live tunes in a socially distanced atmosphere up to four nights a week. Last August alone, nearly a dozen local artists performed in the “cider garden,” the beverage maker’s backyard-turned-venue. Among them were formidable fiddler Patrick Ross, pop singersongwriter Isaac French and Grateful Dead-loving rocker Zach Nugent, a frequent act. Along with the jams, food and drink complete the good-time trifecta. Known for valuing dryness over sweetness in its beverages, Stowe Cider has both on-site consumption sales in the backyard and cider to-go from a pickup window. Its street food cart serves up delicious eats for concertgoers. Last summer’s menu options included a build-your-own entrée of bread, protein, sauce and toppings. Of course, masking, distancing and other precautions have been in place as required. Concerts have provided an outlet for music lovers nonetheless. As one Seven Days reader put it, “It almost felt normal to see music there!” The cidery’s calendar is already filling up with this season’s shows, so check the website often for upcoming events.

HIGHER GROUND DRIVE-IN EXPERIENCE:

South Burlington live music venue Higher Ground teamed up with the Champlain Valley Exposition in Essex Junction to provide a creative alternative to indoor concerts. Queen City musicians including Kat Wright and Dwight & Nicole took to a freshly constructed stage to serenade drive-in audience members, who watched on a 27-foot LED video wall. (South Burlington • highergroundmusic.com)

KeruBo

FILE: LUKE AWTRY

LYRIC THEATRE: This Burlington-based theater company has kept busy throughout the health crisis, hosting an outdoor movie last July (a musical, of course) and collaborating with the Vermont Symphony Orchestra for an open-air concert as part of the Flynn’s Hurly Burly series. Its standout production, though, was New Leaf — An Outdoor Musical Cabaret. “Change” was the theme of this Broadway musical revue. (Burlington • lyrictheatrevt.org)

HURLY BURLY: “If people can’t come to the arts, then we’ll bring the arts to them,” wrote Flynn artistic director Steve MacQueen in a 2020 press release. To that end, the Burlington performing arts center hosted diverse acts such as Latin jazz trumpeter Ray Vega and Afro-fusion singer KeruBo on an improvised stage affixed to a flatbed truck in August and September 2020. (Burlington • flynnvt.org)

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Paula Otenti Coordinator of Momentum at Pride Center of Vermont, Middlesex

ZOOMING ALONG In 2010, Paula Otenti was living in Lake Placid, N.Y., where she never felt totally comfortable being out as queer. “I could never be who I am over there, that’s for sure,” she said. One day, in a Lake Placidarea circular, she saw an ad for RU12?, now called the Pride Center of Vermont. She thought, I should probably check this place out. But Otenti, who was a firefighter in Massachusetts for 26 years and later served as the emergency management coordinator in Middlesex, doesn’t merely check things out. By 2018, Otenti was overseeing all of the Pride Center’s volunteers — also a volunteer role — and helping to plan the annual Pride Festival & Parade. That’s when lead festival organizer Justin Marsh first witnessed Otenti’s knack for deep-sixing inefficiencies and anticipating minutiae.

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“She created a timeline for us so that next year we could look at it and know when we needed to do even the most mundane things, like, ‘This is when we have to call Casella,’” Marsh said, referring to the waste management company. “And I’ve used it ever since.” In 2019, Otenti became the coordinator of Momentum, a Pride Center program for LGBTQ adults age 40 and up. In prepandemic times, a dozen or so regulars would meet for coffee on Tuesday mornings at the Pride Center; on the occasional Sunday, they’d gather for brunch. But Otenti soon realized that these meetups tended to draw the same people, most from Chittenden County. “Everything we were doing was so Burlington-centric,” she said. “I decided that we needed to take it further.” By the end of 2019, Otenti had

teamed up with Rainbow Umbrella of Central Vermont to organize queer socials in Middlesex, Montpelier and St. Johnsbury. Then the pandemic struck. Otenti, who lives in the broadband barrens of Middlesex, went to considerable lengths to cope with the sudden pivot to Zoom. “We’d have these committee meetings, and Paula would be sitting in her car somewhere, trying to connect to a Wi-Fi hot spot,” said Mike Bensel, executive director of the Pride Center. “That’s how dedicated she is.” From municipal parking lots across central Vermont, Otenti kept Momentum’s weekly gatherings alive. In the frantic early days of the pandemic, Otenti said, those Zoom sessions offered more than just human

interaction; they allowed people to process their fears and parse fact from fiction amid the deluge of public health misinformation. She wanted Momentum to reach an even wider audience, but she recognized her limits. “I’m 68 years old,” she said. “My biggest weakness is social media.” In July 2020, she persuaded Bensel to let her take on an intern, L Covey, a Champlain College senior. Thanks to Covey’s social media savvy, more people began to attend the Zoom events. By early fall, Momentum had added a weekly virtual dinner. Covey, who uses they/them pronouns, had some trepidation about working with an older population. “I was nervous that they might dismiss me, because I haven’t had the experiences they’ve had,” Covey said. But Otenti made them feel valued and respected, and Momentum-goers embraced Covey, too. Eventually, Otenti asked Covey to facilitate a meetup. Covey was anxious about flying solo, but Otenti was encouraging. “If you were playing in a basketball game, Paula would be that fan in the stands with, like, a huge gaudy sign with your name and photo on it,” Covey said. “She’s just there to show you that you rock 100 percent of the time.” At the end of May, Otenti left her role at Momentum to join the board of the Central Vermont Council on Aging, where she advocates for LGBTQ seniors. But the Pride Center program remains in good hands: This summer, Covey will become the interim coordinator. “Momentum is Paula’s legacy, and I’d love to see her stay involved as much as she wants to,” Covey said. “I know I’m going to be texting her for advice, because she’s taught me so much.” Otenti has learned a lot from Covey, too. “L texted me one night and said, ‘I shared the Google doc with you,’” she said. “And I was like, ‘What the hell is a Google doc?’”

C HE LS E A E DGAR

Getting my vax at the DoubleTree. In the room where many a conference or Comic-Con has been held, it was surreal walking in to see the Guard and Richmond Rescue running such a smooth operation of vaccines. I was weeping with gratitude and pride in Vermont as I waited to get my shot. LLU MU LVAN E Y- S TANAK (AK A D J L L U) , BUR L INGTO N


PANDEMIC

ALL STARS

What presenter gets a standingup-from-the-couch ovation for its livestream performing arts events?

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB

Burlington • vermontcomedyclub.com In his 2014 book Ha!: The Science of When We Laugh and Why, cognitive neuroscientist Scott Weems theorizes that humor is a coping mechanism for dealing with complex messages. He calls it a “response to conflict and confusion in our brain.” Thank goodness, then, that Vermont Comedy Club owners Natalie Miller and Nathan Hartswick continued to provide this invaluable outlet even after the downtown Burlington club temporarily closed. “We found that, over time, people just want to see other humans having fun together,” Miller told Seven Days this March as the club was preparing to host Hellebration. The 24-hour virtual comedy marathon, which marked one year since Vermont’s stages went dark, is just one of the ways VCC has kept folks smiling through dark times. Weekly streams have included Quaran-TEAM, a game night with local improv team the Unmentionables; the variety show “Talk to Us! (Please) w/Natalie & Nathan”; a virtual open Nathan Hartswick mic; and a family-friendly and Natalie Miller comedy show for kids. Embracing the audio realm, last August Hartswick launched the “MacGyver”-themed podcast “Duct Tape & Paperclips” with Vermont expat comedian Annie Russell. The club also teamed up with the Vermont Department of Tourism & Marketing to host the showcase “Little State, Big Laughs: A Vermont Comedy Club Livestream Event” last November, touting the Green Mountain State as a comedy destination. Though Hartswick expressed some nervousness about stepping back into the spotlight — and the public in general — in a hilarious essay on reentry anxiety for Seven Days in April, VCC is expected to reopen its doors this fall. In-person outdoor classes for this summer are open for registration at vermontcomedyclub.com.

LYRIC THEATRE: One of the region’s largest

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GRATEFUL HEARTS

6/3/21 11:23 AM

RYAN MONTBLEAU: Burlington’s Ryan Montbleau brought his folk-rock stylings to many a virtual music series. He sang and strummed for online shows hosted by venues in Vermont, New York and New Hampshire, including Higher Ground’s variety show “The Comments Section.” Fortunately for fans, his Facebook events page is once again populated with in-person gigs. (ryanmontbleau.com) VERMONT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: With its

aptly titled series “Music for Days Like This,” the VSO met the moment with livestream concerts highlighting both new and familiar compositions. In three shows between November 2020 and March 2021, listeners heard fresh works by local high school composers, beloved pieces by the likes of Johannes Brahms and Franz Schubert, and classical and jazz music by artists of color. (Burlington • vso.org)

MOUNTAIN BIKE BRISTOL TRAIL BUILDING CREW

STARTING A NEW BUSINESS IN THE MIDDLE OF A GLOBAL CRISIS COULD NOT HAVE HAPPENED WITHOUT THE SUPPORT OF OUR INCREDIBLE COMMUNITY. THANKS EVERYONE!

STAY SAFE. STAY COOL. KEEP IN MOTION! CO

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community theater groups, with a history dating back to 1973, tackled the virtual realm during the pandemic. Streamed performances ranged from the musical Songs for a New World to the holiday variety show Miracle on Green Tree Drive. With this summer’s A Year With Frog and Toad, the entertainment also moved outside to farms, libraries and museum campuses. (Burlington • lyrictheatrevt.org)

Friday, June 18, 2021

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ALIT: The singer-songwriter also known as Alison Turner swapped her touring schedule for an ongoing livestream show called AliTV. Most Friday nights, fans can tune in via Facebook to hear Turner play originals and covers from her Royalton bedroom. She even found time to revamp older songs from her catalog for her 2021 album, The Makeover. (sheisalit.com)

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ALEX BUDNEY: If there’s one thing Alex Budney knows, it’s entertainment. A former manager at Burlington nightclub Nectar’s, Budney (aka DJ Steal Wool) kept the party going by hosting the weekly online DJ set Wooly Wednesday, as well as virtual open mics for musicians near and far. Read more about him on page 64. (alexbudney.com)

COUNTRY AMERICANA AND VERMONTIANA

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Volunteer vaccination scheduler, Burlington

Ailsa and Gus O’Neil-Dunne

TEEN VACCINE It all started with a text in late January to Burlington High School sophomore Ailsa O’Neil-Dunne from her grandmother in New Jersey. COVID-19 vaccination appointments had opened to residents 65 and older on January 14, but she’d been trying to book an appointment for weeks with no luck. She wondered if her grandkids might be able to help. When 16-year-old Ailsa began to investigate, she was shocked by how complicated the process was. After several weeks of constantly checking and refreshing the scheduling website for Meadowlands Racing & Entertainment, a vaccine mega-site, a slot showed up. But Ailsa didn’t fill out the online form fast enough to snag it.

MEMORABLE M MENTS

Eventually, she got an appointment for her granny and called to tell her the news. “That was such a great moment,” said Ailsa. The experience made her wonder: “How many other seniors are out there who don’t have someone to do this for them?” As a result of attending school remotely, Ailsa had a relatively flexible schedule. She told her granny that if she had any friends who needed help, they should contact her. The first email she got was from Cathy and Art Del Colliano, who’d been friends with her grandmother for 40 years.

MASK COMPLIANCE

People on the streets, in stores, on the trail, wearing masks and keeping distance. No fuss, no whining, no invective, no vitriol, no conspiracy theories, even if we don’t like it much. People just do it because it’s the right thing for our community. This is what makes VT great. KATHRY N TRINKAU S , BUR L INGTO N

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Since you could only sign up one person at a time, Ailsa enlisted her 14-year-old brother, Gus, to help. Within 24 hours, they’d secured appointments for the Del Collianos at Meadowlands that week. Cathy told her book club about her experience, and six members contacted Ailsa. She was able to get them appointments within days. Then, those people told friends and relatives. Word of the young woman in Vermont with a knack for vaccine scheduling began to spread, not unlike the virus itself. “I kept saying, ‘Is this too much for her?’” said Cathy. “But I think she enjoyed doing it … It blows your heart away.”

JAMES BUCK

Ailsa O’Neil-Dunne

Soon, Ailsa was fielding multiple requests a day. She learned when vaccination sites would release batches of appointments, and she and Gus would stay up until midnight, or set an alarm for 4 a.m., to book them. At first their clientele was mostly senior citizens: her aunt’s former firstgrade teacher, a 9/11 survivor, a 90-yearold woman who’d beat cancer four times. Some had new grandchildren they hadn’t been able to meet. Others had lost family members to COVID-19. As more people became eligible, the teens began booking appointments for younger people who didn’t have time to refresh their browsers obsessively, including workers at Newark Liberty International Airport, people who emailed her in Spanish and a hairstylist who’d already had the virus. Many of the vaccine clinics were only open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., which highlighted inequities in the public health system, Ailsa said. From late January through April, Ailsa — aided by Gus during busy times — booked more than 300 vaccine appointments, mostly for New Jersey residents. And on April 17, the day she became eligible for the vaccine herself, she registered for her first shot in Vermont. “For me, it meant freedom and a chance to return to normalcy,” Ailsa said. For many of those she helped to register, she realized, the stakes were a lot higher. “As far as I’m concerned, she saved a lot of people’s lives,” said Cathy. Many have reached out to Ailsa to share their appreciation. One woman knitted her a white hat with a fluffy blue pom-pom. Another, upon learning Ailsa was a book lover, sent her a sparkly travel mug customized with her name and the words: “The world was hers for the reading.” The hairstylist promised a free cut when she visited New Jersey. Ailsa keeps a stack of heartfelt thankyou notes in a shoe box. “I got my second dose of the vaccine today. Thank you so much for helping me get it,” one of them reads. “It is a gift to me. And you were like an Angel who came into my life and made it possible.”

ALI S O N N O VAK


PANDEMIC

ALL STARS

From the bottom of our hearts, all of us at Sweeney Designbuild would like to thank

Which drive-in or presenter hosted your favorite al fresco film experience? FILE: LUKE AWTRY

Before the pandemic, many Vermonters regarded drive-in movies as quaint relics of the sock hop era. But by summer 2020, after a long winter and spring at home, folks were itching to get out of their home theaters and find safe ways to mingle. With social distancing already built into their setup and new precautions in place, the owners of Vermont’s three permanent drive-ins were happy to host them. In August, the SUNSET DRIVE-IN in Colchester was jammed with families who camped out in truck beds to watch classics such as The Goonies. The four-screen theater usually closes in October, but in 2020 it kept right on cranking — through the first snowfall and Christmas and into the New Year. “I tell people to dress warm, bring a blanket,” owner Peter Handy told Seven Days in December. “We are a sense of normalcy for these people during these COVID-unsafe times.” Sunset Drive-In Our readers agreed, naming the Sunset Drive-In among their favorite al fresco film experiences. “They kept movies going for us movie buffs,” one reader wrote. “Without them, I would not have made it through.” A lot of love also went to the “pop-up” drive-in movie experiences that proliferated around the state in summer 2020. “I really missed going to the movies, but this made up for it,” a reader wrote of ESSEX CINEMAS’ parking lot drive-in. In Morrisville, the BIJOU CINEPLEX set up two outdoor screens for “a fun and affordable place to watch movies,” another reader wrote. Yet another sang the praises of CATAMOUNT ARTS’ Drive-In to Stay Safe Movie & Music Series, writing, “Having something to look forward to and somewhere to go every weekend was a lifesaver for couples and families.” Even as Vermonters return to indoor theaters, many will treasure their memories of that summer of popcorn spilled in the back seat, when the on-screen action vied for their attention with the stars.

The shot givers. The health care providers. The mental health supporters. For your unwavering leadership during one of the most challenging tests of our time. FILE: CALEB KENNA

Blueberry Hill Inn

What local hotel, retreat or bed-and-breakfast served up a revitalizing staycation? BLUEBERRY HILL INN:

HOTEL VERMONT:

Goshen • blueberryhillinn.com

Burlington • hotelvt.com

BRASS LANTERN INN:

THE INN AT THE ROUND BARN FARM:

Stowe • brasslanterninn.com

Waitsfield • theroundbarn.com

THE ESSEX CULINARY RESORT & SPA:

JAY PEAK RESORT:

Essex • essexresort.com

Jay • jaypeakresort.com

THE GREEN MOUNTAIN INN:

RANSOM BAY INN & RESTAURANT:

Stowe • greenmountaininn.com

Alburgh • ransombayinn-vt.com

HIGHLAND LODGE:

STERLING RIDGE RESORT:

Greensboro • highlandlodge.com

Jeffersonville • sterlingridgeresort.com

Governor Scott Commissioner & Dr. Levy Commissioner Pieciak Commissioner Harrington Commissioner Kurrle Secretary Smith Secretary Moore and their support staffs.

From the very start, the courage you all showed in the face of this pandemic made us all proud to be Vermonters. Your calm, your weekly communications, your sleepless nights, your optimism, your hope, the time away from your families, the sacrifices you made, will not be forgotten. Thank you for leading us through.

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Wastewater facilities manager, Burlington

TESTING THE WATERS Matt Dow has spent most of his adult life talking about what happens after you flush the toilet. The second-generation wastewater operator manages the City of Burlington’s three treatment plants. His late father was the superintendent of the South Burlington wastewater plant, and his mother’s cousin runs the Essex facility. Needless to say, it wasn’t uncommon for sewage to be a topic of dinnertime conversation. These days Dow, 40, is more likely to be found behind a desk than out in the field, but the coronavirus pandemic offered him a hands-on assignment. Last summer, Dow and the city’s COVID-19 Analytics Team began testing wastewater for viral markers of the coronavirus to track and prevent outbreaks. Dow, a 16-year department veteran, chose the testing locations, collected specimens from manholes and packaged up hundreds of samples to be processed in labs off-site. Dow deflects praise, but city officials who worked with him are eager to dish it out. 54

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“There’s nothing in this project that would have worked without his intervention and his commitment,” said Brian Lowe, the city’s chief innovation officer, who leads the analytics team. “Matt made it easy.” Dow started by taking samples at the city’s treatment plants but soon expanded his collection points to places where the virus was spiking. He deployed a fleet of portable samplers, each resembling an armless R2-D2, to manholes around the city. Suspended from a metal bracket, the machines dangled a 25-foot hose into the passing wastewater, siphoning up poop particles at various intervals. The logistics were challenging. When it snowed, Dow had to remove the samplers when there was little traffic,

C O U R T N EY L AMDI N

FILE: HEATHER FITZGERALD

LUKE AWTRY

Matt Dow

lest a car slide into him or his crew. When a manhole was in the dead center of a busy intersection, Dow asked the street department to help keep traffic flowing. Dow’s department was also shortstaffed. Two longtime operators retired before the sampling program even started, taking with them a combined 60 years’ worth of field experience. Dow eventually hired replacements, but he found it easier to collect and process the samples himself. He frequently schlepped the cargo to the FedEx Ship Center in Williston before turning north to go home. Dow lives in Georgia with his wife, Noranne, and their two young children. “He was immediately all in,” said Carolyn Felix, a former analyst for the City of Burlington who worked with Dow. “Despite having an already really heavy workload and all the challenges that come with balancing work and family during a pandemic, Matt just was one of those persons [to show up] when he’s needed.” And the program worked. In November, the city ramped up free testing in the New North End after wastewater samples in that area detected high levels of the coronavirus. In February, Mayor Miro Weinberger announced that samples from the main treatment plant downtown revealed low levels of the B.1.1.7 variant, the first evidence of the highly contagious strain in Vermont. For Dow, the program’s greatest success was when the city was able to alert eldercare homes about high viral loads in their area. In one case, a facility’s decision to conduct additional tests found an asymptomatic case that otherwise might have spread. When Dow realized that the simple warning could have saved a life, he was moved to tears. “If this helps one person either not get super sick or die, if there’s any true benefit that comes from this, it makes it worth it,” he said. The city’s testing program has slowed in recent weeks as COVID-19 case counts continue to drop. Dow has stopped doing fieldwork and is back at his desk, and he wishes his dad could see how far he’s come. “That was one of the bittersweet things,” Dow said. “He just would have been so proud of me.”

Little River State Park

Where do you prefer to hoof it now that you’ve explored new walking trails? COLCHESTER POND:

Colchester • wvpd.org THE INTERVALE:

Burlington • intervale.org LITTLE RIVER STATE PARK:

Waterbury • vtstateparks.com MILTON TOWN FOREST:

Milton • miltonvt.gov MISSISQUOI VALLEY RAIL TRAIL:

Franklin County • mvrailtrail.org MOBBS FARM:

Jericho Center • facebook.com/mobbsfarm ROCK POINT CENTER:

Burlington • rockpointvt.org SHELBURNE FARMS:

Shelburne • shelburnefarms.org STOWE RECREATION PATH:

Stowe • stowerec.org TRAIL AROUND MIDDLEBURY:

Middlebury • maltvt.org


PANDEMIC

ALL STARS

Whose fitness classes kept you moving?

HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

REV INDOOR CYCLING

Help your global community.

In a year when the pandemic confined most Vermonters to one place, it’s fitting that the exercise classes that kept many of us moving were held on stationary bikes. Like all law-abiding local fitness centers, REV Indoor Cycling closed to indoor workouts in March 2020. But unlike many area gyms, REV didn’t reopen when the state eased restrictions on indoor exercise facilities last summer. “It just didn’t make sense,” owner Sarah DeGray explained to Seven Days in January. “Indoor cycling is such a cardiovascular activity. There’s sweat, there’s spit, people breathing heavily.”

Participate in a research study to help develop a Zika Vaccine. We are looking for healthy adults aged 18-50. 6 month-long research study involving screening, a dosing visit, and 13 follow-up outpatient visits. Volunteers are eligible for compensation up to $1490.

revindoor.com

Outdoor fitness class with REV Indoor Cycling

VACCINE TESTING CENTER

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Instead, DeGray — a member of the Restart Vermont task force that advised Gov. Scott on reopening protocols for fitness centers — hosted a variety of outdoor classes in the parking lot outside her South Burlington studio throughout the spring, summer and fall. “Not only did they bring their cross-training classes outside, but they brought bikes out so we could spin in fresh air and under the stars,” one Seven Days reader wrote. “It was incredible!” The studio also offered a wide variety of live and prerecorded virtual classes. “REV did an incredible job continuing to offer local fitness at a virtual level,” wrote another reader. DeGray closed her physical facility permanently in November and has shifted to an entirely virtual model, positioning REV as a local alternative to the likes of Peloton and other corporately owned online exercise platforms. “From spin to strength classes, [DeGray] motivated us to exercise and take care of ourselves,” another reader said. “I couldn’t have gotten through the pandemic without her.”

802 CROSSFIT: With a mix of indoor and outdoor classes, 802 CrossFit continued putting its members through their paces — including bicycle crunches, burpees, dumbbell kickbacks and devil’s presses — throughout the pandemic. (Essex Junction • 802crossfit.com)

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QUEEN CITY YOGA & FITNESS: Outfitted with a state-of-the-art HVAC system that turns air over six times per hour, Queen City Yoga & Fitness reopened on June 1, 2020, after pivoting to online classes early in the pandemic. (South Burlington • queencityyogavt.com)

HOT YOGA BURLINGTON: Vermont’s first infrared-heated yoga studio moved to online and outdoor classes for much of the pandemic. Hot Yoga Burlington is open again but continues its online offerings, as well as outdoor sessions in scenic spots around Burlington. (Burlington • hotyogaburlingtonvt.com) JAZZERCISE WILLISTON FITNESS CENTER:

Online and in person, Jazzercise kept the beat alive through high-intensity workouts that blend strength training, cardio and killer dance moves. (Williston • jazzercise.com)

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802.985.8482 | TheAutomasterMercedesBenz.com 2021 GLA 250 shown in Denim Blue metallic paint. Optional equipment shown. *MSRP excludes all options, taxes, title, registration, transportation charge and dealer prep. Options, model availability and actual dealer price may vary. See dealer for details. ©2020 Authorized Mercedes-Benz Dealers For more information, call 1-800-FOR-MERCEDES, or visit MBUSA.com.

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« CONTINUED FROM P.55 JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

Leigh Pelletier Relief fund organizer, Stowe

HUMBLE HEROINE During one of many food drives organized last year, Rep. Heidi Scheuermann (R-Stowe) marveled at how the community had come together to support one another during the pandemic. The Stowe C19 Team General Relief Fund had raised thousands of dollars for people in need. It provided meals for those whose jobs evaporated when the tourism industry tanked. And it forged innovative partnerships with local businesses, such as one distributing $20 gift certificates for purchases at a local dairy. There’s plenty of credit to go around for the success of the overall effort, but Scheuermann said one person stands out for having gone above and beyond.

“We would never have been able to do what we did without Leigh,” Scheuermann said. “Not in a million years.” Leigh Pelletier stepped up to help lead the fundraising drive but ended up doing much more, according to Scheuermann. She became the brains and the brawn of the operation. “I remember she had a dolly with these three big boxes of food she was hauling out to load into my truck,” Scheuermann said. “That was Leigh. She was there on the ground getting done whatever needed to be done.” A former Massachusetts prosecutor, Pelletier moved to Stowe with her husband, John, and three sons about 12 years ago, primarily to give the family a healthier quality of life.

Soon after the shutdown last year, organizers of the response team realized they needed to raise significant funds to meet the community’s needs. Pelletier didn’t have formal fundraising experience, but she was involved in local schools and isn’t shy. “I don’t have a problem asking people to chip in, so that’s where I came in,” Pelletier said. She worked with the nonprofit Friends of Stowe Vibrancy to manage donations to the fund and set up a GoFundMe page. Together they helped raise more than $110,000. Pelletier also collaborated with local restaurants, including the Skinny Pancake and Edelweiss Mountain Deli, and other groups to assemble and deliver meals and food boxes to families in need. And she helped orchestrate a fundraising effort by artisans whose work was sold

in several local stores; the proceeds went to the emergency fund. And yet Pelletier steers the kudos for these and other initiatives toward others, including Elise McKenna, president of Friends of Stowe Vibrancy; Jeff Clarke, co-owner of Edelweiss; and Katie Ziegler, who made 500 Hope Hats and donated them to sell in local shops. “If I’m to get credit for anything, it was just recognizing early on that people really wanted to have a venue to be able to help,” Pelletier said. She has spent much of her time linking donors with existing charity channels. One donor, for example, wanted to make sure that, in addition to holiday food boxes, families with children had gifts for the holidays. The $20 gift certificates to Mansfield Dairy were another way to bring together two needy groups — hungry families and a local dairy facing a 70 percent drop in revenue as restaurant business disappeared. The pandemic may be waning now, but Pelletier vividly recalls the desperation people felt when they remained in its grip. In the fall, she said, one young family had to quarantine for six weeks after one child, and then another, and then a parent tested positive for COVID-19. “It just snowballed. It was just horrible,” she said. “They were stuck. It was just so overwhelming for them.” When Pelletier delivered food boxes to the shut-in family, the parents told her they appreciated getting help locally without having to navigate the state benefit system. While she found it gratifying to help, Pelletier insisted that accolades should go to those who set up the emergency fund and donated to it, and to legions of fellow volunteers. That kind of humility doesn’t surprise Scheuermann one bit. “That’s just who she is. She doesn’t want credit,” Scheuermann said. “She just wants to make sure she’s doing good, and she’s done an incredible amount of good during these last 14 months.”

KE VI N MC C ALLU M

Which outdoor destination did you cross off your Vermont bucket list? BILLINGS FARM & MUSEUM:

LAKE MOREY RESORT:

Woodstock • billingsfarm.org

Fairlee • lakemoreyresort.com

BOLTON VALLEY RESORT:

LAKE WILLOUGHBY: Westmore

Bolton Valley • boltonvalley.com

LAMOILLE VALLEY RAIL TRAIL:

CRAFTSBURY OUTDOOR CENTER:

St. Johnsbury to Swanton • lvrt.org

Craftsbury Common • craftsbury.com

TACONIC MOUNTAINS RAMBLE STATE PARK:

DOG MOUNTAIN: St. Johnsbury • dogmt.com

Hubbardton • vtstateparks.com

INTERVALE SEA CAVES AT ARTHUR PARK:

Burlington • enjoyburlington.com

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SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

VERMONT INSTITUTE OF NATURAL SCIENCE: Ice skating at Lake Morey

Quechee • vinsweb.org


PANDEMIC

ALL STARS

Help KEEP LAKE CHAMPLAIN CLEAN!

FILE: JAMES BUCK

What outdoors and rec store helped you gear up for adventures?

Stormwater runoff brings pollutants, dirt, and chemicals into lakes, rivers, and streams. Over time, this affects the entire ecosystem, including plants and animals that live in Lake Champlain.

Shoppers at Outdoor Gear Exchange

OUTDOOR GEAR EXCHANGE

BUT YOU CAN HELP! There are a number of small

Burlington • gearx.com

When the going got tough during the pandemic, Vermonters went outside to play, and in even greater numbers than usual. For many Seven Days readers, that meant stocking up on equipment at Outdoor Gear Exchange. The Burlington business is “always ready to supply an adventure,” said one reader. Another noted that the store “provided great gear to all during one of the biggest surges in outdoor activities.” Indeed, co-owner Marc Sherman saw interest soar in activities that could be done while socially distancing — notably, cycling, paddling, skiing and camping. But high global demand, supply chain shortages and shipping bottlenecks of that gear left OGE’s team scrambling to restock its inventory, especially hard-to-get items made of aluminum, including tent poles, bicycles and bike parts. New kayaks sold out this year even before the paddling season began, and OGE doesn’t expect to have more until September. Though 2020 was a challenging year, Sherman said that sales weren’t down as much as he initially feared. Some losses, incurred while the store was closed last spring, were balanced by increased online sales and greater foot traffic later that year, he said. Also, declines in sales of “soft goods,” such as footwear, clothing and accessories, which typically result from in-store browsing, were largely offset by increased purchases of “intentional goods,” such as camping and climbing gear. Sherman predicted that customers who took up new sports during the pandemic, or upgraded older gear for activities they were already into, will stick with those pastimes for years to come. Most importantly, Sherman believes customers appreciated the measures OGE adopted to keep everyone safe, from screening shoppers at the door to offering curbside pickup. “For the most part, our customers have been receptive to our efforts and see that we’re doing the right thing,” he said.

NORTH STAR SPORTS: 2020 was a hectic

year for bike sellers, due to massive demand but limited supplies. Yet North Star Sports kept the gears turning through sales, rentals and repairs of conventional and electric bikes. With e-bikes taking off, North Star is now capitalizing on its decades of experience in that market. (Burlington • northstarsportsvt.com)

MEMORABLE M MENTS

SKIRACK: Since 1969, Skirack has been outfitting Vermonters for solo sports of all kinds, including cycling, running, snowshoeing, skiing, snowboarding and inline skating. Though the pandemic initially limited in-store access, Skirack’s curbside pickups and free shipping for items of $75 or more helped keep customers on the go. (Burlington • skirack.com)

VERMONT STATE PARKS In the midst of the pandemic, hiking with other Vermonters, even with distancing, made us feel like a community. DIANE TAY E BY, CHARL O T TE

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« CONTINUED FROM P.57 OLIVER PARINI

Cara Grogan Respiratory therapist, University of Vermont Medical Center, Burlington

BREATHING EASIER Cara Grogan had worked at the University of Vermont Medical Center for about three years when she decided to take a year off to be a traveling respiratory therapist in California. The then-30-year-old Hyde Park native assumed that she and her partner would spend the year exploring the West Coast; Grogan would work short stints at different hospitals while her partner attended a yoga retreat to get certified as an instructor. “I gave my notice before really knowing that something was brewing,” Grogan said, referring to the pandemic. By the time she arrived at her first assignment, at El Camino Hospital in Mountain View, Calif., in April 2020, “life just transformed for us.” Due to the nature of COVID-19, respiratory therapists, who specialize in treating patients with pulmonary diseases, were in high demand. They provide inhaled medications and gases, they keep patients’ airways clear of obstructions, and they manage the medical equipment, such as ventilators and CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) machines, that help patients 58

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

breathe easier when their lungs won’t function properly on their own. Grogan’s initial assignment at El Camino Hospital was supposed to last 13 weeks. Instead, she stayed on for nearly a year, caring almost exclusively for patients in the COVID-19 intensive care unit. Early on, she recalled, there was a lot of concern “and even some panic,” among staff about the availability of personal protective equipment to keep themselves safe. “It was really scary, thinking about exposing my family and friends,” she said. “I found myself trying to find ways to stay calm, because if you don’t, it gets overwhelming.” Though some of Grogan’s patients were elderly or had preexisting conditions such as diabetes, many were young and healthy before contracting the coronavirus. El Camino Hospital calls itself “the hospital of Silicon Valley.” But as Grogan explained, it also draws patients from immigrant and working-class communities, many of whom don’t have the luxury to work remotely and who live in crowded

housing where the disease can spread rapidly. At times, she said, “we had entire families in the ICU together.” But knowing another family member was in a nearby bed rarely made the experience easier for patients, Grogan said. Typically, COVID-19 patients in the ICU couldn’t talk to each other or anyone else, especially if they were on respirators. “Being in the ICU is scary enough. And not being able to breathe is really scary,” she said. “Unfortunately, it’s really busy, so staff can’t sit with you. Even at the end of life, there’s nobody in there with you. It was really depressing and sad.” Grogan and her partner lived in Groveland, Calif., a small town just outside of Yosemite National Park, about a threehour drive from Mountain View. When Grogan went to work — typically, three 12-hour shifts each week — she stayed alone in a motel near the hospital for two nights before returning to the mountains.

But even her alpine retreat could be stressful. “It didn’t help that there were a lot of wildfires where we were,” she said. “We had to [evacuate] from the house and the town for a week.” Grogan was relieved when she finally returned to Vermont in March. Bradley Holcomb, manager of respiratory care, the pulmonary function lab and pulmonary rehab at UVM Medical Center, was glad to welcome her back. Describing Grogan as “calm, positive, compassionate and dependable,” he said, “I’m grateful to have her back on our respiratory team and in Vermont with us.” Still, Grogan took a month off before going back to work to decompress and process all the pain and suffering she witnessed. “I think if you’re not in health care, you don’t understand the extent of what’s happening,” she said. “Professionally, it’s great to challenge yourself and get any experience you can. But I wouldn’t sign up for that again.”

KE N P I C ARD


PANDEMIC

ALL STARS

Which local retail goods shop perfected contact-free shopping?

~ Catch us if you can! ~

See our website to find our food truck locations to pre-order full meals for delivery & take-out!

COMMON DEER

Burlington • commondeer.com

Though most nonessential retailers shut down only after the governor’s “Stay Home, Stay Safe” order in March 2020, Common Deer was ahead of the curve. As co-owner Sarah Beal explained, her shop was among the first to close before the mandate. “It was really clear to us that this was going to be a lot longer than everyone assumed,” she said, “so we hunkered down and made big decisions for how we wanted the [coming] months to go.” The downtown Burlington gift shop and home accessories retailer, which supports more than 500 local artisans and craftspeople, has long had a strong online presence. Years ago, Common Deer tried, unsuccessfully, to offer deliveries throughout the greater Burlington area. “It’s funny,” Beal noted, “but it took a pandemic for it to really blow up.” Indeed, as one appreciative Seven Days reader commented, Common Deer’s delivery service last spring “saved the day for Easter and Mother’s Day.” Last summer, as other retailers reopened to foot traffic, Common Deer, Sharon (left) and Sarah Beal which normally relies on sales to tourists, took it slow, adopting appointment-only shopping and curbside deliveries. As Beal explained, “We weren’t about to throw our staff into a situation where they were mingling with people who maybe weren’t caring as much about social distancing and stuff.” From September through November, normally its busiest season, Common Deer went “dark store,” she said, meaning that it was open for pickup and shipping but closed to foot traffic — for the safety of both the public and its own team. “In general, the pandemic has been a slog ... and we’re not out of the woods yet,” Beal added. “But it’s crazy how well the community supported us.” BEAR POND BOOKS: Since the start of

the pandemic, Bear Pond Books has offered back door pickups and free local deliveries, which co-owner Claire Benedict said “were so popular, we are still doing them and don’t plan to stop.” In response to surging sales of jigsaw puzzles, the store sponsored a Facebook Live puzzle event, giving homebound Vermonters another way to pass the time in isolation. “Don’t laugh!” said Benedict. “It’s been the year of jigsaw puzzles.” (Montpelier • bearpondbooks.com) GOLDEN HOUR GIFT CO.: The past year saw

Golden Hour Gift Co. (formerly Birdfolk Collective) prioritize customer and staff safety by installing Plexiglas barriers, HEPA air filters and hand sanitizer stations, as well as providing curbside delivery for those skittish about shopping indoors.

Staff “politely ask[ed] customers to correct their actions” if they violated store policies, store owner Nicole Carey said, and were “willing to lose a sale if it meant keeping everyone safe.” (Burlington, Winooski • goldenhourgiftco.com) OUTDOOR GEAR EXCHANGE: To protect

customers and a staff of 140, co-owner Marc Sherman closed the store on March 18, 2020, maintaining only a skeleton crew to fill online orders and provide curbside delivery and bike repairs. When in-person shopping resumed in mid-June, customers were screened at the door to ensure compliance with Vermont’s travel restrictions. As one reader wrote, OGE did “more than Plexiglas [shields] and one-way arrows on the floor. They really made a space to reduce transmission!” (Burlington • gearx.com)

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KubotaUSA.com *Claim is based on speeds published on company websites as of 11/25/2019 for the following 52"- 54" zero-turn models: Gravely Pro-Turn ZX, Scag Patriot, Exmark Radius S Series, Toro Titan HD 2000 Series, Hustler Fastrak SDX.


PANDEMIC

« CONTINUED FROM P.59

HELPER IN THE HOOD

ALL STARS Mellisa Cain Community organizer, Burlington

MEMORABLE M MENTS 60

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

LUKE AWTRY

When Mellisa Cain started distributing cloth face masks in May of last year, she thought she’d buy and give away a few hundred in Burlington’s Old North End; she had funding with a small grant from her Neighborhood Planning Assembly. Recalling it in a recent interview, she laughed at the contrast between that initial plan and what actually happened: In the first year of the pandemic, Cain led an effort to obtain and distribute some 40,000 masks. They filled up her one-bedroom apartment and took over her life. She bought and cut fabric for volunteers to sew 7,000 masks. She tie-dyed a few thousand and screen-printed the Black Lives Matter logo on others. She walked through the streets, stopped in businesses and hung out in parking lots, giving masks away. Before long, she was being recognized as the neighborhood’s “mask lady.” “Enough people know me at this point,” Cain, 29, said of her connections to the community. “I used to live two doors down from the Shopping Bag for six years, and a lot of kids know me. So I have no problem just going, ‘Hey, you need something?’” Cain, an educator, consultant and community organizer, has lived in Burlington for nine years. Her business, Iceburg Consulting, was steadily growing at the beginning of 2020, and she’d hoped to take it full time by the end of the year. But 2020, of course, had other plans. Cain managed to fill her time — and then some — taking on volunteer projects. Beyond the mask initiative, she cofounded a website offering translations of coronavirus information and guidance, ran a clothing drive, founded a pop-up mutual aid program, and launched a GoFundMe campaign to raise money for the moving expenses of Mawuhi African Market, a North Winooski Avenue staple.

WAKING WINDOWS 2020

This is how Cain operates: She sees a need, and she starts working to fill it. “I’m able to get people things,” she said. “People come to me, and they’re like, ‘I have this, do you have someplace that needs it?’ And then another group would be like, ‘I need 50 water bottles.’ I’ve always been that network.” Cain was frustrated by the gaps she saw in state and city government’s distribution of masks and coronavirus information, especially when it came to New American communities. For the translation site she created with Mohamed Jafar, a service coordinator at the Burlington Community Justice Center, Cain searched the internet for resources that were already translated. She also asked her own connections from years of living abroad to translate some of Gov. Phil Scott’s mandates and infographics. She worked on this project some 80 hours a week for three months, unpaid — that is, until a friend launched a crowdsourcing campaign to compensate Cain for her efforts. Between that and a few grants, Cain estimated she made “like $3 an hour” for the project. Jafar said it was vital that Cain built and maintained the site, and he noted that the translations expanded to include information about food resources and how to navigate online schooling. “There’s a lot of crucial information that I think a lot of people would have missed otherwise,” he said. Will Clavelle, a business projects and policy specialist at Burlington’s Community Economic Development Office, said Cain is able to work with and serve New American communities because she’s spent a lot of time with them, shopping at Old North End businesses, volunteering and just chatting with people. “It takes a commitment to going to them just to check in and see how they’re doing, and not going to them because you need something from them,” Clavelle said. “She’s spent years building up that trust and doing this, which is hard to do.” MARGARE T GRAYS O N CONTINUED ON P.62

They held an online version of the music fest in May 2020 and delivered pizza to me and a whole bunch of other people to keep the pizza party tradition going. It was the best. R O BYN BAYL O R , S O UTH BUR L I N G T O N

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PANDEMIC

« CONTINUED FROM P.60

ALL STARS

Which Vermont business pivoted the most to serve a greater good?

HEINEBERG COMMUNITY SENIOR CENTER

UNION MUTUAL

Montpelier • unionmutual.com

Burlington • heinebergcsc.org

The last thing Beth Hammond wanted to do was close the doors of the Heineberg Community Senior Center. As COVID-19 spread, she knew seniors would be isolated at home, some without access to meals and some with depression, said Hammond, executive director of the Burlington nonprofit. “The very real fallout of our response to trying to keep everyone healthy and COVID-free was of concern for me,” she said. “We wanted to keep the social contact the safest and best way we could.” The problem was that many of the volunteers Heineberg relied on were seniors themselves, who had higher risk of complications from the virus. So, Hammond reached out to the community, partnering with organizations such as HANDS (Helping and Nurturing Diverse Seniors), a meal delivery group led by Megan Humphrey. Together, they used their network of friends and family to develop a volunteer base that could deliver meals, make check-in phone calls and provide other help to about 600 homebound seniors as Vermonters lived under quarantine rules.

A Heineberg volunteer delivering a meal

It was a big ask, and the group needed to mobilize quickly. But, Hammond said, “we had more volunteers than we needed at one point.” Heineberg’s nimble adaptation included working with the University of Vermont Medical Center to provide a telehealth site and volunteers who could help patients log on. The center offered virtual cooking, art and physical movement classes through Zoom. And this year it shifted its AARP tax assistance program from in-person to contact-free. All of this earned kudos from locals. “The center was instrumental in keeping our older adult population healthy and secure through the pandemic,” wrote one Seven Days reader. It wasn’t all business, either. Heineberg created a drive-in birthday party for seniors older than 90 in the Burlington Elks Lodge parking lot — complete with a DJ, dinner served in cars and a speech from Mayor Miro Weinberger. Wrote another fan: “Without their help, many seniors would have had little or no contact to help them get through the pandemic.”

Lisa Burr at the Woods Lodge

THE WOODS LODGE

Northfield • thewoodsvt.com When it’s time to reminisce about the COVID-19 pandemic, the Burr family will remember spending Friday nights assembling meals for delivery to local food banks and churches. Married couple Lisa and Jonathan Burr co-own the Woods Lodge catering and events facility in Northfield. As the pandemic closed lodging and restaurants, they switched to selling takeout meals for their regular customers, Lisa said. But after a few weeks, their children, young adults in their twenties who had both recently returned to live at home, said they’d like to provide meals to Vermonters who couldn’t afford to buy them. So, the family found one-pound takeout containers with lids and labels and packed free meals for the Northfield food shelf. “That became the family thing we were doing together on Fridays,” Lisa said. “It was an assembly-line kind of thing.” The meals were a hit the very first week. “They said, ‘Wow, can you do 60 next week?’” said Lisa, referring to the food shelf. The family ended up preparing 150 meals each week and distributing them through various programs, thanks to a major benefactor in town and federal COVID-19 emergency funding. Patrons picked up meals at five different houses of worship and a community center in Montpelier, as well as at the food shelf. The family is still preparing those takeout meals, now for Vermont Everyone Eats!, a state meal program created in response to the pandemic. (See spotlight at right.) “They did not do any of this for publicity, but rather to keep their business alive and help their community at the same time,” said one customer. “They have continually [aided] people in the community whenever there is a crisis where they can provide food or lodging,” said another, mentioning 2011’s Tropical Storm Irene, the 2015 Amtrak derailment in Northfield and the pandemic. The family helped others “at times when they incurred great challenges themselves.”

When Vermont companies closed their doors, sending employees home, leaders at Union Mutual in Montpelier wondered how neighboring restaurants would fare. The insurance company alone had 80 employees who would no longer be traveling into town for work. Union Mutual immediately started ordering sandwiches and meals to be delivered to essential workers and anyone else who might need a lunch. Nancy Martel, who co-owned the Montpelier deli Pinky’s on State, said the company’s action created “a positive frenzy of open-ended generosity.” Then led by Michael Nobles, Union Mutual ended up ordering hundreds of sandwiches as businesses endured a widespread shutdown to prevent the spread of the virus. Nobles — who passed away in June 2020 — had staff place orders for sandwiches, chips and cookies and deliver them to the charity of Pinky’s choice from March through May of last year. “This was his and Union Mutual’s way of helping our business stay alive while he indirectly helped others, as well,” said Martel. (Pinky’s stayed open until December, when the business was sold.)

David Thomas (left) of Langdon Street Tavern and Nathan Magne of Union Mutual preparing to deliver meals

“It all started with Michael Nobles, and we thank him,” she said. “He never asked for any recognition whatsoever, either for himself or the company.” Seven Days readers praised Union Mutual for its volunteer action during the pandemic. The company distributed its meal requests and donations among many restaurants in the state capital. Anna S. Grearson, a branding and communications specialist for Union Mutual, said other companies followed its lead and donated restaurant meals to local responders, hospitals, grocery store workers and homeless Vermonters. “It was just amazing how it took off,” she said. She estimated that Union Mutual spent more than $10,000 on local meals. “It was like, ‘These are our friends,’” she said of local restaurateurs. “We realized we could help two neighbors with one dollar.”

Preparing meals for Everyone Eats

VERMONT EVERYONE EATS! vteveryoneeats.org

Vermont Everyone Eats! has served more than 1,024,000 meals to residents impacted by COVID-19. The program helped save an estimated 500 restaurant jobs and provided consistent business to some 200 eateries when that industry was dealt a severe pandemic blow. The meals — from chicken-and-leek pie with salad to chicken sausage with couscous and green beans — even include local ingredients. Yet before the state legislature established the program in August 2020 with $5 million in CARES Act relief funds, a grassroots movement sprang up across the state to feed people in need. These early efforts — swift business pivots that involved a collaboration of restaurants and nonprofits — included ShiftMeals in Burlington, organized by the Skinny Pancake; a partnership in Vergennes among the city’s Boys & Girls Club, Bar Antidote and Three Squares Café; and a southern Vermont initiative, Nourishing Artists, conceived and organized by the Downtown Brattleboro Alliance. Together, the programs provided a model for government action when the need was clear: Food insecurity rose 33 percent during the pandemic. “[Then-lieutenant governor] Dave Zuckerman and I got on the phone, but it was more like farmer boy and restaurant dude,” recalled Matt Birong, a Democratic state rep from Vergennes who also owns Three Squares Café. (Zuckerman co-owns Hinesburg’s Full Moon Farm.) “We were like, ‘How can we work this [money] into restaurants, feeding people who are experiencing food insecurity while still propping up our local food systems?’” Birong said. Everyone Eats was the answer. And, according to Seven Days readers, the program and its related initiatives — including a Localvore Passport app that facilitates access — are working. “They gave those of us who had difficulty making ends meet a way to keep fed. They are all ROCK STARS!” one wrote. Another reader applauded the effort as a “trifecta of goodness,” singling out three factors: “monies to restaurants, food to folks, and ... an excitement and energy [that] was created for all involved.”

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PANDEMIC

« CONTINUED FROM P.62

ALL STARS JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

Alex Budney DJ, musician, Fayston

VIRTUAL DJ Musicians and DJs were hit especially hard when the pandemic disrupted the status quo. Their revenue streams, not to mention their raisons d’être, were completely obliterated. The internet became the sole place where they could continue to work. Practically overnight, Alex Budney, who goes by DJ Steal Wool, became Vermont’s livestreaming exemplar. A manager and talent buyer at Nectar’s for many years, Budney left the Burlington nightclub a few years ago to pursue music full time. He plays in the wedding and events band the Josh Panda Party, as well as the Seth Yacovone Band and his own funk outfit, Al’s Pals. In 2017, Budney began hosting the weekly open mic night at Waitsfield’s Localfolk Smokehouse and fronting its house band. “Alex is a great ambassador for the [Mad River Valley],” wrote Tom Theohary in an email. He plays guitar in Waitsfield robotic surf-punk band the Tsunamibots. On March 14, 2020, Budney played a wedding in Jersey City, N.J., with the Josh Panda Party. It was a few days after the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had first used the word 64

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“pandemic” in describing the coronavirus outbreak. “That was very frightening,” he said of the Jersey City gig. Budney immediately began to worry about his open mic community, not to mention his livelihood. “What am I gonna do to replace this?” he recalled thinking at the time. “How am I gonna prevent myself from losing my mind?” At the beginning of the pandemic, when spirits were lowest, Budney took action by taking his DJ skills to the web. He provided a palpable morale boost and helped people stave off the initial wave of cabin fever like few other locals. Budney has a huge vinyl collection in his Fayston basement, one that he said he “needed to get to know.” Pre-pandemic, his experience with livestreaming was minimal. But he quickly learned the ropes and turned his man cave into an underground club for one. For the first month, Budney used Facebook Live to broadcast his DJ sets. Since he has thousands of contacts, it was the logical place to set up shop. “Until I was banned,” he said bluntly. Through algorithmic sorcery, the

social media platform can detect when copyrighted material is being broadcast without a license. As of April 20, he was locked out of his DJ Steal Wool account. “I was getting hundreds, if not thousands, of warnings,” he said. To this day, he still receives threatening messages from Facebook that reference his archived streams from more than a year ago. “I was like, I don’t care. Fuck Facebook. I’m just gonna keep doing this, and if they kick me off, I’ll figure it out,” he said. Budney says people passionately embraced his virtual sets, even getting dressed up in their own homes for “formal Saturdays.” He soon moved to Mixcloud, an online platform that launched right around the time Budney found himself persona non grata on Mark Zuckerberg’s network. Mixcloud is designed specifically for DJs to stream their sets, and it has licensing agreements with major media companies, such as Warner Music Group. While creating his initial wave of DJ sets, Budney decided to take his open

mic to the virtual space. Because he still had access to his personal Facebook account, he was able to organize virtual open mics within a Facebook group. At its peak, he spent eight hours a week coordinating the events in four-hour blocks on two different days. He served as booker, talent wrangler and audience traffic controller. Budney’s fans came from all over. He engaged his neighbors by posting on Front Porch Forum. And since Mixcloud is based in the UK, scores of British viewers tuned in, too. Last summer, his activity tapered off a bit because his audience was beginning to engage with the real world again. By the fall, he’d scaled down the number of weekly DJ sets to just one: Wooly Wednesdays. He even “toured” around the area, broadcasting from empty venues, such as Nectar’s. While doing so, he raised thousands of dollars for local charities. “Alex is 100 percent into music,” Theohary wrote. “You can tell it’s a passion and not just a side hustle. His passion is contagious and really heated up the local scene.”

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The Vermont Foodbank recognizes the tremendous impact that love for community has had, and will continue to have, during this challenging time. To everyone who offered help and everyone who asked for help, we honor you. Now let’s make sure that recovery includes everyone. Give Help and get help at vtfoodbank.org. 66

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culture

campus to the Elley-Long Music Center this year. Six weekday artist faculty concerts include “Mysterious Beauty” on July 9, which starts with John Cage’s Nocturne and ends with Johannes Brahms’ Piano Quintet in F minor. Hiromi Fukuda — the anchor of Vermont’s Champlain Trio — plays piano.

Rochester Chamber Music Society

COURTESY OF BILL JALBERT

July 1 through August 15, various times, at Federated Church of Rochester. Donations. rcmsvt.org

Artistic director Cynthia Huard, a pianist and harpsichordist, has scheduled four concerts in this picturesque central Vermont village, including a final one featuring herself and violinist Mary Rowell playing works by Johann Sebastian Bach, Franz Schubert and Arvo Pärt. Audiences can make their own music at the Community Music Share on July 17, from 1 to 3 p.m., “where we have invited any level musicians in the community to share 4 to 5 minutes of music that sustained them during the pandemic,” Huard wrote in an email. Vermont Symphony Orchestra concert tent

Tuning Up

Classical musicians prepare for a live concert season

Sunday, July 11, 6 p.m., at Trapp Family Lodge grounds in Stowe. $30 in advance; $35 at the gate; $10 for kids and teens 5 to 18; free for kids under 5. stoweperformingarts.com

CLASSICAL MUSIC

B Y A M Y L I L LY• lilly@sevendaysvt.com

O

n a Wednesday in mid-May, I entered the Stowe Community Church to see the first live performance of classical music I had experienced in more than a year: Middlebury pianist Diana Fanning playing works by Maurice Ravel, Fédéric Chopin and Franz Schubert. The formidable entrance requirements included emailing an image of my COVID-19 vaccination card to Stowe Performing Arts, which hosted the concert. Audience members were led to seats spaced six feet apart. But the payoff was hearing those nuances of interpretation and volume that virtual mediums never quite capture. As masks fall away and the weather warms, classical musicians’ schedules are filling up with live gigs, and festivals are reviving their summer seasons. There’s even a new concert series in a Jericho barn. With so many performances cropping up as the state lifts its pandemic restrictions, the following list is only a sample — but a good start for enjoying Vermont talent in person again.

Music in the Barn Various Wednesdays, June 23 through September 15, 7:30 p.m., in Jericho. $20. Limited capacity; email liamjohnvt@gmail.com to check availability; bring your own chair and beverages.

Essex-born Liam John, who studied with Vermont Symphony Orchestra principal cellist John Dunlop, recently returned to Vermont to attend the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont and — in his free time — to start a concert series. “People yearn for that in-person experience,” the 27-year-old cellist noted by phone. The informal series Music in the Barn

evolved from John’s friendship with Dunlop, the latter’s violinist partner, Laura Markowitz, and violinist Sofia Hirsch. The venue, an “amazing” barn untouched since the 1940s, is attached to the renovated milkshed apartment that John rents from Dan and Amanda Goosen; the couple has agreed to let him host six concerts in the barn’s hayloft. Two string quartets will perform: Eclectica (Hirsch, Markowitz, Dunlop and Ana Ruesink on viola) and the Jennings String Quartet (Hirsch, Ruesink, Ira Morris on violin and Perri Morris on cello). At some concerts, the string players accompany indie-folk duo Cricket Blue. 

A Far Cry

Saturday Sounds

Saturday, June 26, 11:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m., at Shelburne Museum. Free. shelburnemuseum.org

Vermont Symphony Orchestra flutist Anne Janson and Rebecca Kauffman, a Burlington-based harpist who is the principal harpist of Pennsylvania’s Harrisburg Symphony Orchestra, pair up for this half-hour program. “For both of us, this program is a celebration of the joys of live music. We just rehearsed the other day, and we were enjoying every second of it,” Kauffman wrote in an email. Programming includes François-Joseph Gossec’s jaunty “Tambourin” and Maurice Ravel’s “Pièce en forme de habanera.” The latter, originally composed for wordless voice and piano, is beguiling when played by flute and harp.

Green Mountain Chamber Music Festival June 30 through July 20, various times, at Elley-Long Music Center, Colchester. $25. gmcmf.org

Artistic director Kevin Lawrence has moved the festival and its students — emerging string players — from the UVM

The acclaimed, self-conducted early music chamber orchestra of 18 Bostonbased musicians includes violinist Jesse Irons from Berlin, Vt. The concert is part of Music in the Meadow, presented by Stowe Performing Arts.

Marlboro Music Festival Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2:30 p.m., July 17 through August 15, at Persons Auditorium, Marlboro College. $30; sold out; wait-listed tickets only. marlboromusic.org

The premier destination for top chamber musicians and their audiences is back after a virtual season in 2020.

Craftsbury Chamber Players Wednesdays and Thursdays, July 14 through August 19, at various venues in South Burlington, Colchester, Hardwick and Craftsbury Common. Donations. craftsburychamberplayers.org

The venerable six-week chamber music series, led by cellist Fran Rowell and violinist Mary Rowell, is now in its 55th continuous season: It toured outdoor venues last year using a refurbished trailer. This season, the sisters will present one indoor and one outdoor concert each week. Programming melds traditional and pop music because, Fran said by phone, that’s how it’s always been: “Maroon Five did Pachelbel’s Canon a few years ago, and Mozart had to write minuets for dances because he TUNING UP SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

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SINCE 1974

Come in to see and taste why. Tuning Up « P.67 had to feed his kids.” One representative program moves from Freddie Mercury’s “Bohemian Rhapsody,” arranged for solo violin, to Jesse Montgomery’s “Strum” for string quartet. It finishes with “Craftsbury Trio” for violin, cello and piano — written for the group by former Vermont composer Gwyneth Walker. “Yes, we are schlepping a Yamaha upright around this summer” on the trailer, Fran confirmed.

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Wednesdays, July 21 through August 4, 6 p.m., at Charlotte Town Beach. Free. billandeva@gmavt.net

The Charlotte recreation committee is sponsoring three evenings of music featuring a string quartet of rotating VSO musicians, according to music coordinator Jane Kittredge. The opening concert features Kittredge and Woonkuo Soon on violin, Russell Wilson on viola, and cellist Dunlop playing a “tour de folk,” according to Kittredge, including “works by [Antonín] Dvorák, [Alexander] Glazunov, [Gwyneth] Walker, [William Grant] Still, and a suite of classic American musical favorites.”

Vermont Symphony Orchestra’s Summer Under the Stars Saturday, July 24, 7:30 p.m., on the Green at Shelburne Museum; and Sunday, July 25, 6 p.m., at Vermont State Fairgrounds in Rutland. $5-35. vso.org

These two outdoor concerts, conducted by VSO creative projects chair Matt LaRocca, feature 25 musicians playing arrangements from Georges Bizet’s hummable opera Carmen and selections from Harlem Renaissance composer William Grant Still’s summery orchestral suite Wood Notes. Francesca Blanchard, a French-born singer-songwriter based in Burlington, will sing several of her songs to orchestral arrangements by LaRocca and fellow Vermont composer Kyle Saulnier. The VSO also has three traveling chamber-group tours (on various dates). The Breweries Tour features the Jukebox Quartet (violinists Letitia Quante and Brooke Quiggins, Stefanie Taylor on viola, and cellist John Dunlop) at four Vermont breweries, including Foam Brewers in Burlington. The Gazebos & Bandstands Tour hits four of those picturesque structures with brass quintet performances by Andrew Sorg and Stephen Banzaert on trumpet, Shelagh Abate on horn, Matthew Wright on trombone, and Takatsugu Hagiwara on tuba.  Finally, various wind and string ensembles appear in eight different venues on the

Homes & Gardens Tour, including Snow Farm Vineyard in South Hero and Dog Mountain in St. Johnsbury.

Barn Opera presents Tosca by Giacomo Puccini Wednesday, August 18, 7:30 p.m., at Isham Family Farm in Williston; Friday, August 20, 7:30 p.m., at Cedar Meadow in Castleton; and Saturday, August 21, 7:30 p.m., at Estabrook Park in Brandon. $50. barnopera.com

Rivaling the trials of the pandemic are the herculean efforts of Floria Tosca in this opera to save her lover, Mario Cavaradossi, which end in the death of both. Barn Opera artistic director and tenor Joshua Collier said the production will be the first postpandemic live opera in Vermont. “We all have such a renewed sense of how important the communal element of live opera is,” he said by phone. “This is an opportunity to be completely awash in the glory of the human voice.”  Collier’s “multinational, multiethnic” cast includes Nigerian American soprano Andrea Chinedu Nwoke as Tosca and Collier himself as Cavaradossi. The fully costumed production uses projections in place of sets; English supertitles are included. Felix Jarrar provides piano accompaniment. 

Lake Champlain Chamber Music Festival Saturdays and Sundays, August 21 through 29, at the Elley-Long Music Center in Colchester. Pricing not available at press time. lccmf.org

Northern Vermont’s premier festival has undergone some changes recently. Resident composer David Ludwig was named dean and director of music at the Juilliard School in New York City, so his presence at LCCMF will be virtual this year. And new executive director Robert Whipple replaces Jody Woos, who is retiring. Married artistic directors Soovin Kim, a violinist, and Gloria Chien, a pianist, named the festival’s 13th season (intended to be its 12th) “Epiphanies” for its now-timely focus on works of music that “respond to big, life-changing events,” Kim said by phone.  Among these are pieces written just before each composer’s death, including Franz Schubert’s String Quintet in C major and Richard Strauss’ Four Last Songs. The fest will also see the premiere of a new chamber opera, A Song by Mahler, by Marc Neikrug, co-commissioned by LCCMF and four other chamber music entities. Written for two singers, string quartet and clarinet, it tells the story of a singer with early-onset Alzheimer’s and her accompanist-husband. “There’s something undeniably powerful about these works,” Kim said. m


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art

Small Pleasures Art review: “It’s Smaller Than I Thought,” Safe and Sound Gallery B Y PA M EL A POL ST O N • pamela@sevendaysvt.com

COURTESY OF MARIN HORIKAWA

M

ost everyone who sees “Mona Lisa” at the Louvre Museum in Paris has the same first impression, and hence is likely to smile knowingly at the title of a current Burlington exhibition. “It’s Smaller Than I Thought,” at Safe and Sound Gallery, features an invitational collection of two-dimensional artworks inspired by Leonardo da Vinci’s most famous painting. Gallery owner Marin Horikawa said he “cold emailed” 60 artists — from as near as Vermont and as far as Tokyo — of whom 15 came through. The result was an impressive variety of interpretations. Suffice it to say that Renaissance Lisa would not relate to most of them. For that matter, the Florentine noblewoman would surely be stupefied to find herself an international icon five centuries after she posed with that enigmatic smile. Horikawa is enthusiastic about engaging children in making and learning about art. To that end, he had line-drawing versions of “Mona Lisa” printed in actual size for kids to take home and color. At the show’s reception last week, those sheets were stacked on a table in the gallery. (That’s how I discovered the painting is actually bigger than I remembered: 30 by 21 inches.) A couple of the entries in the show realistically mimic da Vinci — up to a point. Jake Scharbach’s oil painting, titled simply “Mona Lisa, Leonardo da Vinci, 1503,” is so exacting it could be a convincing fake. The Brooklyn-based artist is known for mixing images from the classical world with contemporary cultural detritus. In this case, Scharbach handily circumvents a charge of art fraud by adding a white plastic bag over Lisa’s head and a slice of pizza hovering in front of la donna’s left breast. The bag features a large smiley face and the omnipresent imperative “Have a Nice Day.” At last week’s reception, that painting was the first to acquire a red “sold” dot. Janice Wu’s “2020 Mona” also depicts

his acrylic painting “Highway Blue” was inspired by “a line in a Bob Dylan song where he sings, ‘Mona Lisa must have had the highway blues, you can tell by the way she smiles.’” While Dylan made lyrical reference to an ancient artwork, the Massachusetts artist seems to borrow from more modern masters. His simple shapes in two shades of blue with white outlines call to mind both the cutouts of Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso’s elegant line drawings.

SCHARBACH HANDILY CIRCUMVENTS A CHARGE OF ART FRAUD BY ADDING

A WHITE PLASTIC BAG OVER LISA’S HEAD.

“Mona Lisa, Leonardo da Vinci, 1503” by Jake Scharbach

the original, except it’s meticulously rendered, in pencil and gouache, as a jigsaw puzzle with a lot of pieces missing. At 36 by 60 inches, the work surpasses da Vinci’s portrait in size, but most of it is empty — that is, white Arches paper — as if inviting the viewer to finish the puzzle. British Columbia-based Wu writes that

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her illustration “embodies the quiet uncertainty, anxiety and longing for familiarity that was instilled in our collective psyche during the pandemic.” It has indeed been a puzzling time. Wu’s piece itself is enigmatic, suggestive both of what has been lost and what is still to be found. Christopher DeLorenzo writes that

With “Renaissance,” an acrylic painting on unstretched canvas, Swiss artist Naomi C. Gallay contributes racial reckoning to the exhibition. Her Lisa is rendered in flat, graphic blocks of color representing multiple skin tones and set against a deep green background. Though featureless, the portrait instantly speaks volumes about human history. Gallay’s title refers less to da Vinci’s era than to a February Time magazine essay by Ibram X. Kendi, “The Renaissance Is Black.” In it, the author delivers a withering takedown of the ubiquitous, entitled “white gaze” while applauding a rising tide of Black creativity and “spiritual emancipation.” The racial groups evoked here, Gallay’s painting practically says out loud, are equal. “No More Smile” is the title of Kevin Foote’s work in acrylic, gouache and graphite. In the context of this themed show, the background is easy to recognize as resembling that of “Mona Lisa.” But the viewer may only register this after SMALL PLEASURES

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Find exhibits, events, talks and call-to-artist listings at sevendaysvt.com/art. If you’re planning a virtual or IRL event or exhibition, submit the details for a free listing using the form at sevendaysvt.com/postevent. You may also email information to galleries@sevendaysvt.com. Accompanied, identified and credited photographs are encouraged where applicable. SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

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"A woman with green hair" by Yoshi47

Small Pleasures « P.71 examining the subject — a young girl standing with her back to us — and the stunning execution of her checked dress, glossy braids and luminous skin. It’s an unusual portrait, to be sure, not only because we cannot see the girl’s face but because her head is bent forward — in shame? shyness? — and her hands are clasped tightly behind her back. Wisconsin-based Foote pairs the romantic landscape with a regionalist, distinctively American psychology. The painting’s murky tones recall Andrew Wyeth’s earthy palette; its emotional resonance even conjures up his famous composition “Christina’s World.” Foote writes in his artist statement that he likes to “[leave] the viewer in a sense of wonder.” He has succeeded, and exquisitely so. Vermont artist Nori Pepe describes the methodology of her print-making as “almost the antithesis” of da Vinci’s process and “a cathartic expression of the year we just endured.” She created “Mona” with layers of monotype and chine-collé prints and multiple pieces of paper. Rather than embracing the Italian artist’s rich tones, as Pepe writes, her palette “seemed to start in the shadows.” The resulting linocut reflects her complicated process and focus on pandemic challenges, yielding an image with a lot to parse in terms of both technique and content. Pepe offers a Lisa who looks like she’s been through the wringer, but whose composure remains undaunted. Yoshi47, by contrast, brings levity to the exhibition: The artist’s “A woman with green hair” is hilarious. Said woman is, of course, Lisa. But forget enigmatic; her curved-up smile is enormous and shows 72

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"Renaissance" by Naomi C. Gallay

"Mona Works From Home" by Katie Benn

way too many teeth. Her buggy eyes, too, express manic excitement. Other characters scattered about the canvas wear that same Cheshire-caton-uppers grin — a Yoshi47 signature. He describes the work as “a portrait of a girl who normally shines in the dark in company with so many creatures she created in her mind.” Indeed. While it’s a teensy bit creepy, the Japanese artist’s candy-colored acrylic painting is still magical and joyous. Any viewer who remains unmoved by Yoshi47’s irrepressible energy has a cold, cold heart. San Francisco artist Katie Benn’s “Mona Works From Home” is funny, too, with what can only be called an attitude. The petite oil pastel work is cartoonish: Lisa’s flat face has large brown circles for eyes and a red slash for a mouth. Her shoulder-length bobbed hair is bright blue. With her arms crossed over her plaid dress, our girl looks resigned, her expression a 21st-century “whatever.” Benn’s explanation: “A global pandemic forced the Louvre to temporarily close its doors. Mona couldn’t afford to do nothing; she had to get a job.” Beside Lisa’s head, the artist handprinted, ‘OK, OK, OK.” Maybe she means “Yeah, sure” or “Enough already.” “It’s Smaller Than I Thought” was not necessarily intended as a response to the pandemic, but how could it not be? As one of the first local shows to open for in-person viewing, this collection is a satisfying jolt of provocation, fun and catharsis. m

IMAGES COURTESY OF MARIN HORIKAWA

"Mona" by Nori Pepe

INFO "No More Smile" by Kevin Foote

“It’s Smaller Than I Thought,” on view through August 31 by appointment at Safe and Sound Gallery in Burlington. safeandsound.gallery


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music+nightlife

TALK‘MOWEDITMUSIC’OUT:

S

even Days receives loads of album submissions, but Glenn Weyant’s MOWED MUSIC is the first to feature nothing but a lawn mower. The record consists of a single 30-minute track in which the East Montpelier sound artist’s gas-powered Toro mower is the lone “instrument.” With his mower “roughly tuned to B-flat,” according to the album cover/liner notes, the resulting recording emphasizes “tonalities and harmonics of distance, direction and so on.” Also the occasional mowed-over stick. Former music editor Dan Bolles, current music editor Jordan Adams and future music editor Chris Farnsworth had some thoughts about MOWED MUSIC, presented in the following free-flowing conversation.

A discussion of East Montpelier sound artist Glenn Weyant’s lawn mower record B Y J ORDAN ADAMS, D AN BO L L E S & C H R IS FAR NS W O R TH

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SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

PHOTOS COURTESY OF GLENN WEYANT

Glenn Weyant

JORDAN ADAMS: According to its Bandcamp page, MOWED MUSIC deconstructs “harmonic contextual relationships explored and reassembled in the lag-time void of pre-neural and post-molecular perceptions.” But actually, Weyant just set up four microphones around his yard, fired up his lawn mower and called it music. I can push myself pretty far outside my comfort zone, but this just seems like a post-hoc elevation of a weekly chore. What meaning, if any, do you extract from this? CHRIS FARNSWORTH: The short answer is, too much. When faced with a sort of tabula rasa of a record like MOWED MUSIC, you can either go all in or all out. My guess is 99.9 percent of people will choose the out door after a few minutes of listening to, you know, a lawn being mowed. But for the rest of us — aka those who are actually paid to listen to stuff like this — there are things that can be extrapolated. The easy in for the record would be to consider it a sort of autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR) experience. Every night when I go to sleep, I tee up YouTube and pass out to the sound of starship engines idling, sampled from “Star Trek: The Next Generation.” (Hey, whatever works.) I can see a small but dedicated group of people who find the sound of a lawn being mowed incredibly relaxing. Maybe they have mower parties?

Well, they’re starting up again, and we’re here to help. Find live music, DJs, comedy and more at sevendaysvt.com/music. If you’re a talent booker or artist planning live entertainment at a bar, nightclub, café, restaurant, brewery or coffee shop, send event details to jordan@sevendaysvt.com or submit the info using our form at sevendaysvt.com/postevent.


GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

They just swallow some Ambien, turn on their John Deere and drift off. It’s 2021, man, don’t tell me you couldn’t see it happening. Still, I’m convinced there is a deeper meaning to Weyant’s mower music. DAN BOLLES: I firmly believe that when an album comes into your life is as critical to its impact on you as how good it is. It’s why Being There is my favorite Wilco record, even though I know that Yankee Hotel Foxtrot is objectively “better.” (At the time, cigarettes tasted so good, and I was so misunderstood.) Speaking of dad rock, let’s talk lawn mowers. Last fall, I bought a house with nearly two acres of lawn to mow, then I got a Cub Cadet XT1 riding mower. I now spend an absurd amount of time either mowing my lawn or thinking about mowing my lawn. And yeah, I’ve googled how to mow checkerboard patterns.  Point is: Mowing has become both a blessing and a curse. On one hand, carving out time to do the job every week is a pain in the ass. On the other, actually mowing is two uninterrupted hours of Zen. So if ever MOWED MUSIC was going to enter my life and leave a mark, now is the time. JA: Weyant explains the meaning of MOWED MUSIC in the liner notes/site map/album art. The map shows a rough sketch of the concentric circles that denote his path around the space, passing each of his four microphones at different distances as he clears more grass. But, as David Letterman would say, “Is this anything?” To me, it’s all incidental, whereas much of Weyant’s other work is intentional. For instance: his recordings at the U.S.-Mexico border wall, which were featured on a 2006 broadcast of NPR’s “All Things Considered.” “I would love to set up a day where people from the U.S. side, [and] musicians on the Mexican side would agree to meet on either side of that wall and then start playing it, to actually join together and take this wall and demolish its concept, remove it as a wall,” Weyant said in the broadcast. At the wall, he makes a gnarly sound that’s interesting, stimulating and, most relevantly, doesn’t exist unless he decides to make it. Even without explaining his intentions at the wall, it’s obvious that Weyant wants to make something beautiful out of a symbol of hate. Presumably, his

mower makes the same sounds, whether he calls it art or not. CF: It’s funny, but now that I’m thinking about Dan’s admission of lawn-mowing Zen, I think I can see (maybe) where Weyant is coming from with this record. If the intention with his border-wall recording was to make something lovely out of the ugly, perhaps this is an attempt to lock a specific vibe in amber. To be clear, I believe that he definitely wanted to experiment with tone, distance and harmonics, and much of his mission statement can be attributed to the farranging curiosity of a man with a highly musical mind. Jordan isn’t wrong, though. I think it’s fair to listen to this and say, “But whyyyy?”

properly processing ambient sounds as music? I legitimately lose sleep over this idea. I met a science fiction author once who told me he believed trees and rocks communicate using what we hear as ambient sound. That every time we hear wind blow through branches, there’s language encoded in those noises. Yes, we had both just smoked a joint, but that’s not the point. Are we missing an entire language, an entire form of music we don’t recognize? Maybe Weyant is more attuned to this than we are. Maybe when he hears his mower played back to him in quadrophonic sound, he hears a symphony. DB: Did you guys see the story about Italian artist Salvatore Garau, who recently sold an invisible sculpture for $18,000? As he

MOWED MUSIC album art

But the more I listen, the more I feel like someone who saw “Twin Peaks,” didn’t get it, but kept watching until it started to make some sort of sense. Like, right around the 9:20 mark, Weyant’s trusty Toro hits a stick or something and I’m convinced it could be to ambient music what Phil Collins’ drum fill on “In the Air Tonight” is to rock. When the mower hits that stick, I envision an arena full of ambient fans all nodding in silent satisfaction. Maybe one of them, overcome by the sound of the blades snapping the wood, even goes so far as to whisper a “fuck, yeah” before being shushed. What if our Western minds are just not

explained, presumably with a straight face, the sculpture isn’t “nothing” — it’s a vacuum. “The vacuum is nothing more than a space full of energy, and even if we empty it and there is nothing left, according to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, that ‘nothing’ has a weight,” Garau said. “Therefore, it has energy that is condensed and transformed into particles, that is, into us.” That our boy Sal was able to parlay that mumbo jumbo into a cool $18K is, of course, ridiculous. But he does sorta have a point. If the sucker who bought the sculpture believes they bought condensed energy particles that are now beaming through them, who’s to say they didn’t? Likewise,

if Weyant does indeed hear a symphony in B-flat mower on his Toro, who are we to rob him of that splendor in the grass? JA: I had not heard about this, Dan. But I did hear a story about an emperor who got some new clothes this one time. I think you both make good points about context and perspective. Even if I think MOWED MUSIC is kind of silly, I’m glad Weyant submitted it, because it turned me on to him as a creator and his bountiful library. MOWED MUSIC is his 148th Bandcamp upload, by the way. I think I might be the kind of listener who can get more into abstract work in person. Maybe I should sit blindfolded in the center of Weyant’s yard so he can give me the live show. CF: I think you’re on to something with this, Jordan. I was wondering last night how someone could do a record release for something like this. I envisioned four microphones onstage at Higher Ground surrounding Weyant and his mower. Maybe it’s on a patch of Astroturf or something. There are definitely some fog machines doing their thing. Throw in some lasers… But, no, it would be so much cooler as a one-on-one experience. You buy a ticket, go to Weyant’s yard, put the blindfold on and sit at the nexus of the mowing sounds. I legitimately know several people who would microdose just to do this. (Note to Weyant if you’re reading this: If you actually do an album release for this, I will 100 percent be there and cover it. Allergies be damned.) DB: As I gaze out upon the quiet, pastoral majesty of my incessantly growing lawn, I’m struck by a question related to yours, Chris: Does Weyant do house shows? If so, I can envision an entire seasonal series that I would gladly pay money to see him perform at my house on a weekly basis: Symphonies for String Trimmer, Leafblower Lullabyes and Snowblower Sonatas. In all seriousness, there is artistic value in experimenting for experimentation’s sake. Is MOWED MUSIC something most people will want to listen to? Doubtful. But it doesn’t need to be. The mere fact that someone looked out at an unkempt lawn and not only wondered what it would sound like to record but then actually did it is laudable. m

INFO MOWED MUSIC is available at sonicanta. bandcamp.com. SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

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GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

REVIEW this Knit and Purl, Loop Gloss, Vol. 1 and Side B

OPEN 8-5 DAILY! 2638 Ethan Allen Hwy New Haven, VT 05472 802-453-5382 greenhavengardensandnursery.com

(SELF-RELEASED, DIGITAL)

Rebecca Mack and John ThompsonFigueroa, a couple and local musicians with eclectic backgrounds, have teamed up for a new project called Knit and Purl. Mack leads Amerykanka, a choral 16T-greenhaven041421.indd 1 4/6/21 6:08 PM group focused on Eastern European harmonies, while Thompson-Figueroa is a trusty sideman known for his work in bands such as psychotropical jazz outfit Guagua and klezmer-folk  group Inner Fire District. Their first record, Loop Gloss, Vol. 1, is a REGGAE EAST SPECIALS bit of a letdown, as is Side B, a collection of SUNDAYS > 10:30 p.m. material lifted from the debut and released simultaneously. Both are so cluttered with ideas that Mack and Thompson-Figueroa seem to trip over their own feet. Hopefully

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6/7/21 11/2/20 12:06 3:07 PM

OrphanWar, Leech Eater (WOODSMAN MUSIC GROUP, DIGITAL)

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Being a metalhead in the ’80s seemed so romantic. To be fair, I was a little kid. But the Satanic Panic was on, pentagrams were all over the backs of denim jackets, the Parents Music Resource Center folks were out there wagging their fingers, my mom let me have a mullet for a hot minute … It was wild. In contrast, I always thought metalheads in the ’90s were so … I don’t know, morose? Pre-emo? Particularly the death-metal kids. There was such a woe-is-me vibe to all the people wearing Cannibal Corpse and Entombed shirts. We’d all get our shitty high school weed from the same people and, whenever the crossover would happen, I just couldn’t get over how seriously they seemed to take everything. I think I was missing something important in the music, though, something OrphanWar’s new LP Leech Eater has

they’ll work out some kinks on future installments. In an email to Seven Days, Mack said that a friend who was given a sneak peek of the project likened Knit and Purl’s style to the Books and DJ Shadow. Both pioneers of early-2000s triphop, those artists approach music as a collage, layering fluttering instrumentation, chill beats and esoteric samples. Knit and Purl do something similar on a superficial level, but their meaningless hodgepodge of looped instruments, samples and field recordings fails to please. The only through line in this junk drawer of sound is anarchy, an approach that yields diminishing returns. Loop Gloss, Vol. 1 and Side B are a collision of chamber music, hip-hop and avant-garde elements. There’s a modicum of satisfying material on a few tracks,

however. Loop Gloss, Vol. 1’s elegant, rain-soaked opener “Good Evening” hums with emotive resonance, recalling Björk’s a cappella masterpiece Medúlla. “May 9, the Universe and Everything” is a prickly, harp-laden gem with an ancient air. Unfortunately, the record is less than the sum of its parts. Most of the songs follow a repetitive formula: sound fragments in seemingly random order, lacking nuance or grace. The constant stream of new ideas is the aural equivalent of channel surfing. Knit and Purl employ vinyl scratching haphazardly; it butts in like an unwanted party guest who presumptuously interrupts a conversation. Mack and Thompson-Figueroa have produced some high-quality work in the Burlington scene, which makes Loop Gloss, Vol. 1 and Side B all the more bewildering. Obviously, anyone can and should make any kind of art they want — but results will vary. Loop Gloss, Vol. 1 is available at knitandpurl.bandcamp.com.

brought to light. The doomiest of doom metal, OrphanWar is a bit of a vanity project for Waterbury’s Bishop LaVey, aka Kane Sweeney. LaVey produces a healthy amount of material, most of which falls squarely into the fascinating genre of doom folk. As OrphanWar, however, LaVey clearly channels a deep love of death metal. There’s nothing inauthentic about Leech Eater. Crushing, bruising riffs abound, and LaVey has the perfect growl-toscream ratio for a singer who’s shouting about force-feeding someone fecal remains (from the song, um, “Force Fed Fecal Remains”). The album would benefit from a live, organic drummer, but LaVey has made improvements in his drum sampling since 2020’s Knife to a Skin Fight. It’s the tongue-in-cheek feel of Leech Eater that got me, though. Sonically punishing and heavy songs such as “Self Inflicted Circumcision” are also pretty fucking funny. “Bursting at the Stretch Marks” actually made me guffaw, once I was able to figure out the lyrics. There are some close parallels

between OrphanWar and Dethklok, the fictional band that starred in the Adult Swim animated classic “Metalocalypse.” The cartoon death-metal band was the brainchild of series creator (and killer guitar player) Brendon Small; its doomladen opuses, such as “Briefcase Full of Guts” and “Mermaider,” feature a kind of stoner humor that seems to have influenced OrphanWar. Listening to “Cyborg Apocalypse II: The Reckoning” — the final and strongest track on Leech Eater — it becomes clear that LaVey finds merit in doom metal. Indeed, he’s lovingly created an ode to the genre. But he also understands the potential to have a laugh while he’s at it. This is what I’d missed when I rolled my eyes at classmates in Type O Negative or Cattle Decapitation shirts. Yes, they were trying to be “metal as fuck,” but they were also having a lot more fun than I ever gave them credit for. They were in on the joke, but also knew it wasn’t a joke. That is exactly the feel of Leech Eater, a quality that eventually charmed me. I’ve also started listening to fellow metal spoof artists such as Witch Taint and Cannabis Corpse, so I think I’m starting to get it, too. Download Leech Eater by OrphanWar at orphanwar.bandcamp.com.

GET YOUR MUSIC REVIEWED:

JORDAN ADAMS

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ARE YOU A VT ARTIST OR BAND? SEND US YOUR MUSIC! DIGITAL: MUSIC@SEVENDAYSVT.COM; SNAIL MAIL: MUSIC C/O SEVEN DAYS, 255 S. CHAMPLAIN ST., SUITE 5, BURLINGTON, VT 05401


PAULA ROUTLY

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movies COURTESY OF KINO LORBER

There Is No Evil HHHHH SEE NO EVIL Fateful moral choices define the lives and deaths of the characters in Rasoulof’s anthology film, made in secret.

O

ur streaming entertainment options are overwhelming — and not always easy to sort through. This week, I watched There Is No Evil, which won the Golden Bear at the Berlin International Film Festival weeks before the coronavirus outbreak shut down all such events. Iranian director Mohammad Rasoulof (Manuscripts Don’t Burn) made the anthology film in secret while appealing a prison sentence for making movies that the government deemed “propaganda against the system.” As of an interview with Filmmaker magazine in May 2021, he was still free and working on his next film, though dogged by ominous updates from the authorities. You can see There Is No Evil via Vermont International Film Foundation’s Virtual Cinema (vtiff.org) through June 30.

REVIEW

The deal

There Is No Evil is composed of four short films that share a common theme but no characters. The first (and titular) film details a day in the life of a family man 78

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

(Ehsan Mirhosseini) who seems normal and pleasant in every way. (He literally saves a cat!) The surprise comes at the end. In the second film, “She Said, ‘You Can Do It,’” set in a prison, a young military conscript (Kaveh Ahangar) tries desperately to get out of his assignment to execute a condemned man at dawn. His refusal to kill contrasts with the attitude of the more jaded soldier (Mohammad Valizadegan) at the center of the third film, “Birthday,” whose priority is getting three days’ leave so he can propose to the woman he loves (Mahtab Servati). Finally, the long-term consequences of such choices become clear in the fourth film, “Kiss Me,” in which a German college student (Baran Rasoulof ) visits her Iranian relatives and learns a family secret.

Will you like it?

There Is No Evil keeps surprising the viewer. Watching the first film — a drab, meticulous and devastating slice-of-life drama — in no way prepares us for the action-packed climax of the second film or the pastoral beauty and romanticism of the third one. As the movie goes on, its settings shift, too, from the cramped urban cars and

apartments of “There Is No Evil” and the tense chamber drama of “She Said, ‘You Can Do It’” to the wide-open spaces of the last two chapters. “Birthday” takes place in lush green woods, with water (purifying, cleansing, mourning) as a recurrent motif. “Kiss Me” unveils a barren yet breathtaking mountainscape haunted by wolves. Yet all four parts circle the same dark reality: State executions are commonplace in Iran. Though the guilt or innocence of the condemned people isn’t central to the film, “Birthday” makes it clear that ideological dissidents are often among them. To refuse to perform an execution — like Pouya, the protagonist of the second chapter — is to risk joining their ranks. Another constant in the film is stellar acting. If Rasoulof’s plots sometimes seem a touch programmatic or reliant on coincidence, they’re inhabited by characters who are fully human. In the first film, for instance, Mirhosseini endures the ups and downs of family life like a classic sitcom dad, with a bemused, amiable passivity that makes the story’s twist both fitting and shocking. Pouya, the conscript who refuses to kill, is initially a more off-putting character: He

whines, schemes and even weeps, making us wonder if his fellow soldiers are right to dismiss him as shirking responsibility rather than making a meaningful statement. Watching this segment of There Is No Evil, I found myself realizing that American movie viewers, at least, have been conditioned to assume heroes must be stalwart and stoic, while cowards are sloppy and emotional. That’s not the case in Rasoulof’s world. In this movie, resistance can be awkward and messy, while stoicism is sometimes the refuge of those who choose to tolerate the intolerable. What about those who don’t? We gradually learn that the rural landscapes of the last two films are places of exile, refuges for people who refuse to comply with the regime — like the island where director Rasoulof himself now lives, according to Filmmaker. (Read the interview for fascinating details of how he managed to camouflage this film’s production, including a scene shot in a busy grocery store.) While There Is No Evil is certainly a film about what Hannah Arendt called the “banality of evil,” it also affirms and embodies the opposite possibility — in Rasoulof’s words from the interview, “the beauty in spite of the hardship of resistance and saying ‘No.’” Right now, that’s a message of relevance to everyone.

If you like this, try...

• The Salesman (2016; Amazon Prime Video, rentable): The nature of culpability is also a central question in this Oscar-winning film from Iranian director Asghar Farhadi (A Separation), in which a married couple struggles with the aftermath of an assault. • This Is Not a Film (2011; Kanopy, Mubi, the Criterion Channel): Iranian filmmaker Jafar Panahi made this documentary about his experiences under house arrest in secret and smuggled it to the Cannes Film Festival in a birthday cake. • Offside (2006; rentable): There Is No Evil shows how Iran’s mandatory military service works as a tool of social control. In this film from Panahi, banned in Iran, conscripted soldiers help a group of female fans sneak into a World Cup soccer match from which they’re barred because of their gender. MARGO T HARRI S O N margot@sevendaysvt.com


IN THE HEIGHTS: Lin-Manuel Miranda’s musical about the dreamers of New York’s Washington Heights neighborhood comes to the screen, starring Anthony Ramos and Corey Hawkins and directed by Jon M. Chu (Crazy Rich Asians). (143 min, PG-13. Capitol Showplace, Essex Cinemas, Marquis Theater, Savoy Theater) PETER RABBIT 2: THE RUNAWAY: The titular bunny meets some shady characters in the city in the second family animation based on Beatrix Potter’s tales. With the voices of James Corden and Elizabeth Debicki. Will Gluck directed. (93 min, PG. Essex Cinemas, Marquis Theater)

NOW PLAYING THE CONJURING: THE DEVIL MADE ME DO ITHH1/2 A murder suspect uses demonic possession as a defense in the latest installment of the horror franchise, starring Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga. Michael Chaves directed. (112 min, R. Capitol Showplace, Essex Cinemas, Sunset Drive-In) CRUELLAHHH Disney gives the villain of 101 Dalmations her own live-action prequel, with Emma Stone playing her as a young aspiring fashion designer. Craig Gillespie (I, Tonya) directed. (134 min, PG-13. Capitol Showplace, Essex Cinemas, Stowe Cinema, Sunset Drive-In) DEAR COMRADES!HHHH In 1962 Russia, a devout Communist Party member (Yuliya Vysotskaya) finds her faith shaken by a brutal crackdown. Andrey Konchalovskiy (Paradise) directed the BAFTA nominee. (121 min, NR. Savoy Theater)

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DEMON SLAYER THE MOVIE: MUGEN TRAINHHHH A team of demon slayers embarks on a new mission as the popular manga/anime series jumps to the big screen. Haruo Sotozaki directed. (117 min, R. Essex Cinemas [dubbed and subtitled])

THE TRUFFLE HUNTERSHHHH1/2 This acclaimed documentary examines the work of a group of elderly Italians who carry on an ancient tradition. Michael Dweck and Gregory Kershaw directed. (84 min, PG-13. Savoy Theater)

DREAM HORSEHHH1/2 This fact-inspired drama tells the story of a Welsh bartender (Toni Collette) who crowdfunds a race horse. With Damian Lewis. Euros Lyn directed. (113 min, PG. Savoy Theater)

OLDER FILMS

GUNDAHHHH1/2 Calling farm fans! Viktor Kosakovskiy’s festival fave documentary takes a black-and-white deep dive into the daily life of a sow, her piglets, two cows and a one-legged chicken. (93 min, G. Savoy Theater, Sat & Sun only) THE PERFECT CANDIDATEHHH1/2 Haifaa Al Mansour (Wadjda) directed this Golden Lion nominee about a young Saudi doctor who defies tradition when she runs for a citywide political office. (104 min, NR. Savoy Theater, Mon & Wed only) A QUIET PLACE PART IIHHH1/2 Terrorized by monsters that hunt by sound, a family must venture outside its farm enclave in this sequel to the horror hit, starring Emily Blunt. John Krasinski again directed. (97 min, PG-13. Capitol Showplace, Essex Cinemas, Stowe Cinema, Sunset Drive-In) RAYA AND THE LAST DRAGONHHHH A young warrior seeks the help of the last living dragon in this Disney animated fantasy. Don Hall and Carlos López Estrada directed. (114 min, PG. Sunset Drive-In) SPIRIT UNTAMEDHH1/2 In this animated adventure, a city girl displaced to a small town tries to save her new mustang friend. With the voices of Isabela Merced and Jake Gyllenhaal. Elaine Bogan and Ennio Torresan directed. (87 min, PG. Capitol Showplace, Essex Cinemas, Stowe Cinema, Sunset Drive-In)

COURTESY OF JONNY COURNOYER/PARAMOUNT PICTURES.

NEW IN THEATERS

Emily Blunt in A Quiet Place Part II

BACK TO THE FUTURE (Fairlee Drive-In, Fri & Sun only) E.T.: THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL (Sunset Drive-In) FURIOUS 7 (Essex Cinemas, Fri-Sun only; Bijou Drive-In) A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET (Sunset Drive-In) TOP GUN (Sunset Drive-In)

OPEN THEATERS BIJOU DRIVE-IN: 157 Route 15, Morrisville; and Stafford Ave., Morrisville, 888-3293, bijou4.com CAPITOL SHOWPLACE: 93 State St., Montpelier, 229-0343, fgbtheaters.com ESSEX CINEMAS & T-REX THEATER: 21 Essex Way, Suite 300, Essex, 879-6543, essexcinemas.com FAIRLEE DRIVE-IN THEATER: 1809 Route 5, Fairlee, 333-9192, fairleedrivein.com MARQUIS THEATER: 65 Main St., Middlebury, 388-4841, middleburymarquis.com THE SAVOY THEATER: 26 Main St., Montpelier, 229-0598, savoytheater.com STOWE CINEMA 3PLEX: 454 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4678, stowecinema.com SUNSET DRIVE-IN: 155 Porters Point Rd., Colchester, 862-1800, sunsetdrivein.com

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HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

classes

Help your global community.

THE FOLLOWING CLASS LISTINGS ARE PAID ADVERTISEMENTS. ANNOUNCE YOUR CLASS FOR AS LITTLE AS $16.75/WEEK (INCLUDES SIX PHOTOS AND UNLIMITED DESCRIPTION ONLINE). SUBMIT YOUR CLASS AD AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTCLASS.

Participate in a research study to help develop a Zika Vaccine. We are looking for healthy adults aged 18-50. 6 month-long research study involving screening, a dosing visit, and 13 follow-up outpatient visits. Volunteers are eligible for compensation up to $1490.

VACCINE TESTING CENTER

For more info, visit uvmvtc.org, call 802-656-0013 or email uvmvtc@uvm.edu 6h-uvmdeptofmed(zikatree)062718.indd 1

Radio Vermont 96.1 96.5 98.3 101.9 AM550

Keeping an Eye On Vermont while CBS Keeps an Eye On the World

3

Daily Eight hours DAILY of IN-DEPTH, News LOCALLY-PRODUCED news, Specials weather, sports and commentary:

5:00 – 9:00 AM Morning News Service Noon – 1:00 PM Noon News Hour 4:00 – 5:30 PM Afternoon News Service

6/28/18 11:41 AM

MORE LOCALLY PRODUCED NEWS EVERY DAY THAN ANY OTHER VERMONT RADIO STATION

World and National News on the Hour Headlines on the Half-Hour NEWS PARTNERS

climbing

language

CLIMBING CLINICS AND LESSONS: Come to Petra Cliffs and start or improve your climbing. We offer evening three-week adult coed and women’s clinics that run regularly beginning the first week of every month. Intro, intermediate and lead climbing levels. Private lessons can be catered to individual needs and schedules. 3-week clinics: weekday evenings. Private lessons: anytime. Cost: $160/3 2-hour sessions for clinics, varying costs for members, multiple sign-ups. Location: Petra Cliffs Climbing Center, 105 Briggs St., Burlington. Info: Andrea Charest, 657-3872, info@petracliffs.com. petracliffs.com.

LEARN SPANISH LIVE & ONLINE: Broaden your world. Learn Spanish online via live videoconferencing. High-quality, affordable instruction in the Spanish language for adults, students and children. Travelers’ lesson package. Our 15th year. Personal small group and individual instruction from a native speaker. See our website for complete information or contact us for details. Location: Spanish in Waterbury Center, Waterbury Center. Info: 585-1025, spanishparavos@gmail.com. spanishwaterburycenter.com.

culinary

VERMONT BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU: This school was developed to communicate the importance of proper, legitimate and complete Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu instruction. We cover fundamentals of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu with a realistic approach to self-defense training skills in a friendly, safe and positive environment. All are welcome; no experience required. Develop confidence, strength and endurance. Julio Cesar “Foca” Fernandez Nunes was born and raised on the shores of Copacabana, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Earning his black belt and representing the Carlson Gracie Jiu-Jitsu Team, Julio “Foca” went on to become a five-time Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu National Champion, three-time Rio de Janeiro State Champion

CLASS: MEDITERRANEAN MEZE: Learn to make an assortment of traditional Mediterranean appetizers, dips and salads, perfect for summer entertaining! We will learn the traditional methods for making hummus, baba ganoush, muhammara, tzatziki, the Levantine strained cheese, labneh, turshi (quick pickle turnips and beets), and marinated olives with herbs and spices. Recipe packet included. Wed., Jun. 30, 5:30-7 p.m. Cost: $25/1.5-hour class & recipe packet. Location: Livestream Zoom class, online. Info: Anna Mays, 484-459-1916, anna. mays@gmail.com.eventbrite. com/e/livestream-cookingclass-mediterranean-mezetickets-155665596991.

drumming DJEMBE & TAIKO DRUMMING: JOIN US!: New hybrid classes (Zoom and in-person) starting! Taiko, Tue. and Wed. Djembe, Wed. Kids and Parents, Tue. and Wed. COVID-19-free rental instruments, curbside pickup, too. Private Hybrid Conga lessons by appointment. Let’s prepare for future drumming outdoors. Schedule/register online. Location: Online & in-person at Taiko Space, 208 Flynn Ave., Suite 3G, Burlington. Info: 9994255.burlingtontaiko.org.

VERMONT

Interviews with political and business leaders, authors, educators, and others in the with Ric Cengeri 9:00 – 11:00 AM news with call-ins from listeners.

VIEWP INT

Local, regional, and national sports news, interviews & features with listener call-ins. 5:30 – 7:00 PM

martial arts

and two-time IBJJF World JiuJitsu Champion! Julio “Foca” is the only CBJJP, USBJJF and IBJJF-certified seventh-degree coral belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and self-defense instructor under late grand master Carlson Gracie Sr. currently teaching in the USA. Accept no Iimitations! Location: Vermont Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, 55 Leroy Rd., Williston. Info: 598-2839, julio@bjjusa.com. vermontbjj.com.

yoga EVOLUTION YOGA: Whether you are new to yoga or have been at it for years, you’ll find the support you need to awaken your practice. Now offering outdoor in-person classes overlooking Lake Champlain! Livestream and recorded classes continue. Flexible pricing based on your needs, scholarships avail. Single class: $0-15. Weekly membership: $10-25. 10-class pass: $140. New student special: $20 for 3 classes. Location: Evolution Yoga, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington. Info: 864-9642.evolutionvt.com.

Locally Owned and Operated Since 1931 STREAMING 80

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

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CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES 5/10/21 12:02 PM


Welcome Back Our outdoor patio seating is now open!

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MAKE YOUR

Finding Hope: Healing from Trauma

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WED., JUN. 9 VIRTUAL EVENT

Hinesburg Garden Tour SAT., JUN. 13 HINESBURG LIBRARY

Seasons of Life: A Supportive Community for Women WED., JUN. 16 VIRTUAL EVENT

VCET Lunch & Learn: Accelerate Your Sales WED., JUN. 23 VIRTUAL EVENT

The Junction Dance Festival — Summer Fundraiser

802.865.5200

SAT., JUN. 26 THE BARN IN CORINTH

133 BANK ST

Ethiopian and Eritrean Cuisine Takeout SAT., JUN. 26 O.N.E COMMUNITY CENTER, BURLINGTON

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BURLINGTON, VERMONT

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6/8/21 1:02 PM

Park Dancing: A Community-Made Dance SUN., JUN. 27 THE CENTER COMMONS, WATERBURY CENTER

The Chaine Du Vermont Presents: A Bastille Day Fete

Discover our newly expanded collection of local art and gifts!

WED., JUL. 14 HOTEL VERMONT, BURLINGTON

ChetFest 2021

SAT., JUL. 31 WAYSIDE FARM, BROOKFIELD

breakfast • lunch • weekend brunch outdoor seating first come, first served order in-person or online for takeout

Living with Loss: A Gathering for the Grieving WED., AUG. 4 VIRTUAL EVENT

WED-FRI: 7:30 AM - 2 PM • SAT & SUN: 9 AM - 2 PM

coffee, espresso drinks, breakfast, brunch, lunch, salads, smoothies and juice

Vermont Be True Yoga Festival 2021 FRI., AUG. 6 MILLDALE FARM CENTER FOR WELLNESS, FAIRLEE

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6/8/21 3:04 PM

29 Stowe Street Waterbury Village 882-8229 stowestreetcafe.com SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

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104.7 FM Montpelier | Burlington | Plattsburgh 93.7 FM Middlebury | Burlington | Shelburne 95.7 FM Northeast Kingdom: Essex | Orleans | Caledonia

Vermont Independent Radio pointfm.com 2H-ThePoint042821 1

4/26/21 3:38 PM

And on the seventh day, we do not rest. Instead we bring you...

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Humane

Society of Chittenden County

housing »

Oreo SEX: Neutered male BREED: Domestic rabbit AGE: 6 years old REASON HERE: His previous owner was moving and could not take him along. ARRIVAL DATE: May 7, 2021 SUMMARY: Meet handsome gent Oreo! He is an established bun looking for a home that better fits his needs, as he adores his alone time and affection on his terms. He loves to snack on compressed hay cubes, but his absolute favorite treat is banana! When he’s not happily snacking, you can usually find him reclining in a comfy spot in his enclosure, getting ready for his next bout of exploration. Stop by to find out whether your home is just the place for Oreo to begin his new adventure!

DID YOU KNOW?

We currently have several rabbits looking to bounce their way into your heart! Whether you are an experienced bun owner or hoping to add one to your family for the first time, we can help make the right match for you. Visit hsccvt.org/ small-animals for info on all available bunnies!

Sponsored by:

Visit the Humane Society of Chittenden County at 142 Kindness Court, South Burlington, Tuesday through Friday from 1 to 6 p.m., or Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 862-0135 or visit hsccvt.org for more info.

NEW STUFF ONLINE EVERY DAY! PLACE YOUR ADS 24-7 AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM.

APARTMENTS, CONDOS & HOMES

on the road »

CARS, TRUCKS, MOTORCYCLES

pro services »

CHILDCARE, HEALTH/ WELLNESS, PAINTING

buy this stuff »

APPLIANCES, KID STUFF, ELECTRONICS, FURNITURE

music »

INSTRUCTION, CASTING, INSTRUMENTS FOR SALE

jobs »

NO SCAMS, ALL LOCAL, POSTINGS DAILY

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

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CLASSIFIEDS on the road

CARS/TRUCKS 2010 PORSCHE CAYMAN 6 CYL 2.9L, 7-speed aut. RWD. Speed yellow/ sand beige leather interior. One owner. Highly maintained. Clean title. Garaged on concrete. Complete service record. Incl. 2nd set of tires/wheels. Original carpeted floor mats: new. Non smoking vehicle. 53K miles. VIN: WPOAA2A89AU760360

265 HP, 221 lb.-ft. torque, PSM, ABS, ASR, BD, 17-inch tires/ wheels. Stainless steel exhaust. New battery. Speed-activated rear spoiler. Cruise, remote entry alarm, Home Link, AM/FM/CD plus more. 16.9-gal tank. $29,000 (Montpelier). Serious inquiries only. Contact info: 802-279-2444 or email: styles.signature@ yahoo.com.

housing ads: $25 (25 words) legals: 52¢/word buy this stuff: free online services: $12 (25 words)

display service ads: $25/$45 homeworks: $45 (40 words, photos, logo) fsbos: $45 (2 weeks, 30 words, photo) jobs: michelle@sevendaysvt.com, 865-1020 x121

OFFICE/RETAIL SPACE AT MAIN STREET LANDING on Burlington’s waterfront. Beautiful, healthy, affordable spaces for your business. Visit mainstreetlanding.com & click on space avail. Melinda, 864-7999.

34 Blair Park Rd., Suite 104, #243 Williston, VT 603-254-1617

dongordon35@ CASH FOR CARS! gmail.com We buy all cars! Junk, high-end, totaled: It doesn’t matter. Get free incl. all utils. & shared towing & same-day W/D. Off-street 6/7/21 parking. cash. Newer models,LgClassyDisplay-Gordon060921.indd 1:31 1 PM Near North Beach too. Call 1-866-535(10-min. walk). On North 9689. (AAN CAN) Ave. in Burlington. Contact Morton Bostock BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR! at 802-862-7602 or We edit, print & 802-238-2153, or email distribute your work us at morton.bostock@ internationally. We do gmail.com. We Pick Up the work; you reap the rewards! Call for a free & Pay For Junk KEEN’S CROSSING IS NOW LEASING! Author’s Submission Automobiles! 1-BR, $1,026/mo.; 2-BR, Kit: 844-511-1836. (AAN $1,230/mo.; 3-BR, CAN). $1,422/mo. Spacious interiors, fully applianced kitchen, fitness Route 15, Hardwick center, heat & HW incl. 802-472-5100 Income restrictions CLEANLINESS IS KEY 2-BR AVAIL. 09/01 apply. 802-655-1810, 3842 Dorset Ln., Williston Specializing in Very nice 2-BR. Avail. keenscrossing.com. carpet deep-cleaning 802-793-9133 09/01/2021. $1,700/mo. & shampooing. Taking home, office & auto clients. Other jobs sm-allmetals060811.indd 7/20/15 1 5:02 PM considered. Schedule w/ us today! 802-735-8903 or email jbushey917@ appt. appointment gmail.com. FACTORY BUILDING FOR LEASE apt. apartment In Hardwick. Suitable for food & beverage or other BA bathroom light manufacturing or storage. 2,200 sq.ft., EVENTS BR bedroom PHOTOGRAPHER sprinklered, town water Reasonably priced & sewer, ample parking DR dining room & turnaround for tractor photojournalist avail. for DW dishwasher special events, weddings. trailers, loading door, Update your headshot. 14- to 23-feet ceilings, HDWD hardwood Training on all aspects office space. Avail. of digital photography. immediately. Contact HW hot water Visit boblphoto.com/ Katie: katie.boyd@ events & boblphoto. caledoniaspirits.com or LR living room com/headshots for 802-472-8000, ext. 1. samples. Contact: bob@ NS no smoking motorcycle-vermont.com. OFFICE SPACE FOR OBO or best offer RENT $10 per sqft., up to refs. references 5,000 sqft. avail. Call Samantha at sec. dep. security deposit 802-879-1863. billing@ ATTENTION ACTIVE champlainobgyn.com DUTY & MILITARY W/D washer & dryer VETERANS! Begin a new career and earn your degree at CTI! Online computer & medical training avail. for veterans & families! EQUAL HOUSING readers are hereby informed that all To learn more, call OPPORTUNITY dwellings advertised in this newspaper 855-541-6634. (AAN All real estate advertising in this are available on an equal opportunity CAN). newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair basis. Any home seeker who feels he

services

BIZ OPPS

housing

CLEANING

FOR RENT

CLASSIFIEDS KEY

OFFICE/ COMMERCIAL

CREATIVE

EDUCATION

Housing Act of 1968 and similar Vermont statutes which make it illegal to advertise any preference, limitations, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, sexual orientation, age, marital status, handicap, presence of minor children in the family or receipt of public assistance, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or a discrimination. The newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate, which is in violation of the law. Our

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or she has encountered discrimination should contact: HUD Office of Fair Housing 10 Causeway St., Boston, MA 02222-1092 (617) 565-5309 — OR — Vermont Human Rights Commission 14-16 Baldwin St. Montpelier, VT 05633-0633 1-800-416-2010 hrc@vermont.gov

ENTERTAINMENT DISH TV $59.99 for 190 channels + $14.95 high-speed internet. Free installation, smart HD DVR incl., free voice remote. Some restrictions apply. 1-855-380-2501. (AAN CAN).

FINANCIAL/LEGAL

print deadline: Mondays at 4:30 p.m. post ads online 24/7 at: sevendaysvt.com/classifieds questions? classifieds@sevendaysvt.com 865-1020 x110

Kelman, Underhill. 30+ years’ experience. Also energy healing, chakra balancing, Reiki, rebirthing, other lives, classes, more. 802-899-3542, kelman.b@juno.com.

AUTO INSURANCE Starting at $49/mo.! Call for your fee rate comparison to see how much you can save. Call: 855-569-1909. (AAN CAN).

HOME/GARDEN

DO YOU OWE OVER $10K to the IRS or state in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Let us help! 855-955-0702. (Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-5 p.m. PST).

LONG-DISTANCE MOVING White-glove service from America’s top movers. Fully insured & bonded. Let us take the stress out of your out-of-state move. Free quotes! Call: 888-8410629 (AAN CAN).

SAVE BIG ON HOME INSURANCE! Compare 20 A-rated insurances companies. Get a quote within mins. Average savings of $444/year! Call 844-712-6153! Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Central. (AAN CAN).

NEVER PAY FOR COVERED HOME REPAIRS AGAIN! Complete Care Home Warranty covers all major systems & appliances. 30-day risk free. $200 off + 2 free months! 1-877-673-0511, hours: Mon.-Thu., Sun.: 9:30 a.m.-8 p.m. Fri: 9:30 a.m.-noon (all times Eastern) (AAN CAN).

HEALTH/ WELLNESS HEARING AIDS! Buy 1 & get 1 free! High-quality rechargeable Nano hearing aids priced 90% less than competitors. Nearly invisible. 45-day money-back guarantee! 1-833-585-1117. (AAN CAN).

buy this stuff

FIREWOOD

MASSAGE NEEDED Massage at my home in Burlington, need not be licensed but be good. Call Dave, 561-629-4990.

FIREWOOD SPLIT & DELIVERED Hardwood cut: split firewood from logs that were harvested this past winter. Delivered to Chittenden, Franklin & Lamoille counties. $240/cord.

PSYCHIC COUNSELING Psychic counseling, channeling w/ Bernice

2-cord minimum. Call 802-326-2129.

FURNITURE TWO TWIN BED BASES Sleep Number 360 Flex Fit 2. Two twin bases remote activated. Brand new. Will fit any twin mattress. Extras also avail. at discounted prices/OBO. 425-2644.

GARAGE/ESTATE SALES HUGE ESTATE/GARAGE SALE Collectibles, quilts, cars, furniture, household items, art prints, records, sheet music, DVDs, bar decor, musical instruments & more. 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat., Jun. 12-Sun., Jun. 13. 29 Spruce Ln. off North Williston Rd., Williston. 210-542-1364.

MISCELLANEOUS 4G LTE HOME INTERNET Now avail.! Get GotW3 w/ lightning-fast speeds + take your service w/ you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo.! 1-888-519-0171. (AAN CAN). ATTENTION, VIAGRA & CIALIS USERS! A cheaper alternative to high drugstore prices! 50-pill special: $99 + free shipping! 100% guaranteed. Call now: 888-531-1192. (AAN CAN).

CABLE PRICE INCREASE AGAIN? Switch to DirecTV & save + get a $100 visa gift card! Get more channels for less money. Restrictions apply. Call now. 877-693-0625 (AAN CAN). DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS Your donation helps fund the search for missing children. Accepting trucks, motorcycles & RVs, too! Fast, free pickup. Running or not. 24-hour response. Maximum tax donation. Call 877-2660681 (AAN CAN). HUGHESNET SATELLITE INTERNET Finally, no hard data limits! Call today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1-844-416-7147. (AAN CAN). SAVE UP TO 80% ON YOUR MEDICATION Eliquis, Xarelto, Viagra, Cialis & more. Licensed & certified. Lowest price guaranteed. Call 855-750-1612 & get free shipping on your first order. (Open Mon.-Fri.) (AAN CAN). STILL PAYING TOO MUCH for your medication? Save up to 90% on RX refill! Order today & receive free shipping on first order. Prescription required. Call 1-855-7501612 (AAN CAN).

MUSIC »

Homeshares CHARLOTTE

Share rural farmhouse w/ senior woman who enjoys literature & classical music. Seeking housemate to cook 2-3 meals/wk, assist with gardening & share companionship. $300/mo. Furnished bdrm; private BA. Must be cat-friendly; no add’l pets.

FLETCHER Delightful, travelled senior gentleman offering reduced rent of $200/mo. in exchange for household help & transportation. Private BA.

UNDERHILL Nature-lover in her 80s seeking housemate to help weed gardens, shovel in the winter & cook twice a week. $300/mo. Must love pets! Private BA.

Finding you just the right housemate for over 35 years! Call 863-5625 or visit HomeShareVermont.org for an application. Interview, refs, bg check req. EHO Homeshare-temp2.indd 1

6/7/21 12:51 PM


Calcoku SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS »

Using the enclosed math operations as a guide, fill the grid using the numbers 1 - 6 only once in each row and column.

1-

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8+ 3-

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BY JOSH REYNOLDS

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Fill the grid using the numbers 1-6, only once in each row and column. The numbers in each heavily outlined “cage” must combine to produce the target number in the top corner, using the mathematical operation indicated. A onebox cage should be filled in with the target number in the top corner. A number can be repeated within a cage as long as it is not the same row or column.

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Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each 9-box square contains all of the numbers one to nine. The same numbers cannot be repeated in a row or column.

Fresh. Filtered. Free. What’s that

buzz?

Find out what’s percolating today. Sign up to receive our house blend of local news headlines served up in one convenient email by Seven Days.

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Legal Notices If you feel that any of the District Commission members listed on the attached Certificate of Service under “For Your Information” may have a conflict of interest, or if there is any other reason a member should be disqualified from sitting on this case, please contact the District Coordinator as soon as possible, and by no later than June 22, 2021.

ACT 250 NOTICE MINOR APPLICATION #4C05828D 10 V.S.A. §§ 6001 - 6093 On February 10, 2021, TAGDAG, LLC, 46 Merchant To learn more, contact Street, Barre, VT 05461 and Vermont Tire hydrogen.vermont@gmail.com & Service, Inc., 1877 Williston Road, South BASS, GUITAR, DRUMS, Burlington, VT 05403 filed application number VOICE LESSONS & 4C0582- 8D for a project generally described as MORE by the hour in the Remote music lessonsSmClassyDisplay-Pierce060921.indd heart of the South End10:241 AM change in use of the existing building from a steel 6/8/21 fabrication to a tire merchandise and distribution are an amazing way to art district. Monthly facility, the closure of a dry well and associated spend time at home! arrangements avail., site improvements. The project is located on Lot Learn guitar, bass, piano, as well. Tailored for #7 of the Sunderland Industrial Park at 94 South voice, violin, drums, flute, music but can be Oak Circle in Colchester, Vermont. sax, trumpet, production multipurpose. info@ & beyond w/ pro local burlingtonmusicdojo. The District 4 Environmental Commission is instructors from the com, 802-540-0321. reviewing this application under Act 250 Rule Burlington Music Dojo 51— Minor Applications. A copy of the application on Pine St. All levels & and proposed permit are available for review at styles are welcome, incl. the office listed below. The application and a absolute beginners. draft permit may also be viewed on the Natural Come share in the music! Resources Board’s web site (http://nrb.vermont. burlingtonmusicdojo. gov) by clicking on “Act 250 Database” and com, info@burlington entering the project number “4C0582-8D.” musicdojo.com.

That Chapter 26 Wastewater, Stormwater and Pollution Control, Article II Sewers, Wastewater and Pollution Control, Division 3 Wastewater and Water Pollution Control Charges, and Chapter 31 Water, Article II Meters and Article III Rates and Changes, of the Code of Ordinances of the City of Burlington be and hereby are amended as follows: Chapter 26. Wastewater, Stormwater and Pollution Control. Article I. As written. Article II. Sewers, Wastewater and Pollution Control. Division 1. As written.

26-51—26-52. As written. 26-53. Wastewater rates and fees; charges. For any user the wastewater charge shall be based upon the consumption of water upon the premises as measured by the city water meter or meters or as estimated where appropriate by the public works department. (a) Monthly wastewater rates and fees shall be in accordance with a schedule prescribed by the water division of the department of public works and approved by the City Council in the city’s budget or otherwise, and charges shall be categorized as follows: (1) Fixed Charge: Based on the size of the meter or meters.

FROM P.85

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PUZZLE ANSWERS

Rules suspended and placed in all stages of passage: 05/24/21 Second reading: Action: Dates: 05/24/21 Signed by Mayor: 06/02/21 Published: 06/09/21 Effective: 06/30/21 It is hereby Ordained by the City Council of the City of Burlington as follows:

Division 3. Wastewater and Water Pollution Control Charges.

CITY OF BURLINGTON IN THE YEAR TWO THOUSAND TWENTY-ONE, AN ORDINANCE IN RELATION TO BURLINGTON CODE OF ORDINANCES— CHAPTER 31 WATER— CHAPTER 26 WASTEWATER, STORMWATER, AND POLLUTION CONTROL— AMENDMENTS RE RATE STRUCTURE & BILLING ORDINANCE 6.06 Sponsor: Department of Public Works Public Hearing Dates: First reading: Referred to:

3

HYDROGEN VERMONT Stop greenhouse gases entering Earth’s atmosphere. Join action group devising public information strategies advocating banning fossil fuel exhaust by switching to hydrogen fuel. Contact: hydrogen. vermont@gmail.com.

PLACE AN AFFORDABLE NOTICE AT: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/LEGAL-NOTICES OR CALL 802-865-1020, EXT. 110.

Division 2. As written.

By: _/s/Rachel Lomonaco___________ Rachel Lomonaco, District Coordinator 111 West Street Essex Junction, VT 05452 802-879-5658 Rachel.Lomonaco@vermont.gov

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REHEARSAL SPACE Safe & sanitary music/ creative spaces avail.

VOLUNTEERS

Dated at Essex Junction, Vermont this 1st day of June, 2021.

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STUDIO/ REHEARSAL

misc.

No hearing will be held and a permit may be issued unless, on or before June 22, 2021, a person notifies the Commission of an issue or issues requiring the presentation of evidence at a hearing, or the Commission sets the matter for a hearing on its own motion. Any person as defined in 10 V.S.A. § 6085(c)(1) may request a hearing. Any hearing request must be in writing to the address below, must state the criteria or sub-criteria at issue, why a hearing is required and what additional evidence will be presented at the hearing. Any hearing request by an adjoining property owner or other person eligible for party status under 10 V.S.A. § 6085(c)(1)(E) must include a petition for party status under the Act 250 Rules. Prior to submitting a request for a hearing, please contact the district coordinator at the telephone number listed below for more information. Prior to convening a hearing, the Commission must determine that substantive issues requiring a hearing have been raised. Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law may not be prepared unless the Commission holds a public hearing.

Parties entitled to participate are the Municipality, the Municipal Planning Commission, the Regional Planning Commission, affected state agencies, and adjoining property owners and other persons to the extent that they have a particularized interest that may be affected by the proposed project under the Act 250 criteria. Non-party participants may also be allowed under 10 V.S.A. Section 6085(c)(5).

1

GUITAR INSTRUCTION Berklee graduate w/ 30 years’ teaching experience offers lessons in guitar, music theory, music technology, ear training. Individualized, step-by-step approach. All ages, styles, levels. Rick Belford, 864-7195, rickb@rickbelford.com.

If you have a disability for which you need accommodation in order to participate in this process (including participating in a public hearing, if one is held), please notify us as soon as possible, in order to allow us as much time as possible to accommodate your needs.

4

INSTRUCTION

5

music

The fuel of the future. Help save our atmosphere. Volunteer!

3

HYDROGEN

a. A fixed meter charge may be temporarily waived in accordance with policies prescribed by the water division of the department of public works and as approved by City Council as part of the Water Resources Assistance Program. (2) Volumetric Charge: Based on the customer classification and the volumetric usage of wastewater upon the premises as measured by the city water meter or as estimated where appropriate by the water division of the department of public works. 26-54. Minimum charge. There may be a minimum monthly wastewater charge based upon a schedule prescribed by the public works commission water division of the department of public works and approved by the city council.

6 4 1 2 3 5

26-55. As written.

(a) Abatements, credits, and refunds of wastewater rates, fees and charges shall be in accordance with policies prescribed by the water division of the department of public works and approved by the City Council. (b) Any premises to which city water is supplied for manufacturing, commercial, or irrigation purposes, in such a manner that a substantial portion of the same is not returned to the city sewer system, shall be entitled, upon application therefore, to such abatement in the wastewater charge, as the director shall determine to be equitable under the circumstances. Any person dissatisfied with such determination by the

1-

2 5 8 4 6 7 5 2 714+ 3 9 1 3 9 4 6 1 8

6 6+ 9 8 3 4 5 31 37 2

7 1 31- 5 2 4 24x 9 8 18+ 2 6 7 5 6 8 9 4 3

8 9 4 6 7 6x 2 1 3 5 7 1 6 5 8 3- 9 4 2 3 9+ 2 4 8 3 5 1 9 Difficulty 6 7 - Hard 1-

Using the enclosed math operations as a guide, fill the grid using the numbers 1 - 6 only once in each row and column.

Calcoku

No. 691

Difficulty - Medium

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

3 2÷1 9 10+ 4 6 8 2÷ 7 2 5

86

26-56. Adjustment of charges in special cases. Abatements; credits; refunds.


c mmercialworks CLASS A OFFICE SPACE

802.280.5044 notchgroupllp@gmail.com

director may apply first to the public works comto the city council whose decision shall be final. 26-57—26-70. As written. Division 4. As written. Article III. As written. Chapter 31. Water. Article I. As written. Article II. Meters. 31-39—31-44. As written. 31-45. Two or more meters.

Water used through two (2) or more meters upon the same premises, for the same business, and to supply the same pipes used for a common supply shall be rated as passing through one (1) meter, but if used through separate pipes or for different kinds of business, each meter shall be rated separately. In no case, however, shall water be furnished to a meter for less than the established minimum meter rate fixed meter charge, as described in Sections 31-48 and 31-61. 31-46. As written. 31-47. Faulty meter. If from any cause a meter fails to register the amount of water passing through it, the owner shall be charged at the average daily rate usage as shown by the meter when in order. 31-48. Minimum Monthly charge. The monthly charge for water shall not be less than the minimum monthly charge for furnishing water to meters subject to the minimum. There may be a minimum monthly water charge based upon a schedule prescribed by the water division of the department of public works and approved by the City Council. 31-49—31-50.

As written.

31-51—31-61 60 Reserved. Article III. Rates and Changes. 31-61. Rates and Fees; Charges Monthly water rates and fees shall be in accordance with a schedule prescribed by the water division of the department of public works and approved by the City Council in the city’s budget

homeworks

JEFFERSONVILLE | 185 CHURCH ST.

Christopher Preston

CW-NotchGroupOffice060921.indd 1 thereof, and thereafter mission for an adjustment

(INCLUDE 40 WORDS + PHOTO). SUBMIT TO: KATIE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM BY MONDAYS AT NOON.

FOOD TRUCK SPOT!

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Newly converted/renovated garage, class A office/retail. ~520 SF of usable office, ~150 SF of usable patio, and ~175 SF. rentable/shared lobby and bath (ADA Compliant). ~4800 average daily vehicle traffic per VTRANS. Monthly/Yearly modified gross leases available, includes radiant heat, trash/recycling, and 100% of CAM. Lessee responsible for electric/internet.

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High traffic/visibility in this newly converted/renovated garage, class A office complex. ~4800 average daily vehicle traffic. Hookups include a NEMA 14-50 outlet and a standard cold-water spigot with anti-siphon. Daily/Weekly/Monthly rates available, includes trash/ recycling and 100% of CAM, lessee responsible for electric.

Christopher Preston 802.280.5044 notchgroupllp@gmail.com

Call or email today to get started: 865-1020 x110, homeworks@sevendaysvt.com

or otherwise, and charges shall be categorized as 6/8/21 CW-NotchGroupOffice1-060921.indd 10:02 AM 1 follows:

calendar month, the rates, fees and charges shall 6/8/21Untitled-26 9:55 AM 1 be prorated based on a 30-day period.

(1) Fixed Charge: Based on the size of the meter or meters.

31-66—31-73. As written.

a. A fixed meter charge may be temporarily waived in accordance with policies prescribed by the water division of the department of public works and as approved by City Council as part of the Water Resources Assistance Program. (2) Volumetric Charge: Based on the customer classification and the volumetric usage of wastewater upon the premises as measured by the city water meter or as estimated where appropriate by the water division of the department of public works. (3) Private Fire Protection Charge: Based on the presence of private fire protection infrastructure, meaning a fire hydrant outside the right of way and a service line that feeds a fire protection system. (4) Other fees and charges related to billing, and administrative and field services, including rates, fees and charges set by the State of Vermont. 31-62. As written. 31-63. No sSpecial rates. There shall be no special rates for furnishing water within the City of Burlington and the water division shall receive the same compensation for water furnished for public use as for the same service furnished to a private individual or corporation within the City of Burlington. The water division of the department of public works may negotiate special rates for consolidated water districts as provided for in 24 V.S.A. Chapter 91, upon approval of the public works commission. 31-64. Abatements; refunds. No abatement of the water rate charges shall be allowed by reason of disuse or diminished use or vacancy of premises, nor shall a payment be refunded or abatement made by reason of the occurrence of any of the matters or things mentioned in section 31-7. 31-65. When rates commence. Meter rates of the minimum class shall, if the use commences before the fifteenth of any month, date from the first of such month. If after that date, the bill shall date from the first of the following month. The rates, fees and charges, as described in Section 31-61, shall commence upon the date of installation of a meter, and if that date is not the first of the

*

Material stricken out deleted.

**

Material underlined added.

IF YOU HAVE OWNED REAL PROPERTY IN OR AROUND BENNINGTON OR NORTH BENNINGTON, VERMONT, IN THE AREA OF PFOA EXPOSURE, YOUR RIGHTS MAY BE AFFECTED BY A CLASS ACTION LAWSUIT. You may be affected by a class action lawsuit called Sullivan, et al. v. Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics Corporation, No. 5:16-cv-125, in the United States District Court for the District of Vermont. Residents of Bennington and North Bennington have sued Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics Corporation (“Saint-Gobain”). They allege that Saint-Gobain contaminated their property and drinking water with a chemical called Perfluorooctanoic Acid (“PFOA”). The Court has allowed the lawsuit to proceed as a class action. The Property Class includes any natural person (not a corporate entity) who owned real property on March 14, 2016 in the Zone of Concern, an area delineated by the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation (“DEC”) in and around Bennington and North Bennington, or who purchased real property after March 14, 2016 that was subsequently added to the Zone of Concern by the Vermont DEC. The Property Class is seeking compensation for loss of value of real property and other property-related damages. A map of the Zone of Concern can be found at www. BenningtonVTClassAction.com. If you are a property owner in the Zone of Concern, your legal rights are affected, and you must decide whether to stay in the lawsuit and be bound by the results of the lawsuit OR ask to be excluded no later than August 2, 2021 and maintain your right to pursue your own separate lawsuit against Saint-Gobain. More information, including a detailed notice, is available at: www.BenningtonVTClassAction.com or by calling 855-711-2079. NOTICE OF SELF STORAGE LEIN SALE: FORT ETHAN ALLEN MINI STORAGE 120 Hegeman Ave., Colchester Vt. 05446 8026547779

following will be sold to the public by sealed bid. 6/6/16 4:34 PM The sale is being held to collect unpaid fees ,late charges and expenses of the sale. Elizabeth Lowe unit 68 Donald Nicoles unit 147 Anita Vorsteveld unit 112 Storage unit sale will take place on June 9th,2021 beginning at 10A.M, at Fort Ethan Allen Mini Storage ,120 Hegeman Ave., Colchester Vt. 05446. The winning bidder must remove all contents.

NOTICE: REQUEST FOR BIDS ReArch Company has been hired by Cathedral Square Corporation as the Construction Manager for the new construction of Bayview Crossing located in South Hero, Vermont. The project is new construction of a 30-unit multi-family housing that includes underground parking with steel framing and deck. The above ground building will be a wood frame construction with an asphalt membrane roofing and will require a full fit-out of exterior and interior finishes. ReArch will be issuing a Bid Package for all scopes of work on 6/8/21 with proposals due 6/30/21. Project has a construction schedule starting 9/1/21 and ending by 8/15/22. This being new construction we are looking for all trades including, not limited to: Concrete, Steel, Rough & Finish Carpentry, Cabinets & Countertops, Thermal & Waterproofing Barriers, Siding, Roofing, Interior & Exterior Openings, Interior & Exterior Finishes, Specialties, Elevators, Fire Suppression, Mechanical, Electrical, Sitework, and Landscaping. Any interested contractors, subcontractors and material providers should contact Ethan McDonald at (802)-734-5731 or ethanm@rearchcompany.com for more info. Please note this project is funded by both federal and state sources and will adhere to Federal Procurement and Contracting Guidelines, including Fair Labor Standards and Davis Bacon wage rates. Minority-Owned, Women-Owned, and Section 3 businesses are encouraged to apply. Cathedral Square Corporation is an equal opportunity employer. Davis Bacon and Section 3 will require a monthly reporting through the course of construction. Again, if you are interested, please reach out to Ethan McDonald at ReArch Company by the contact information provided above.

PRIVATE AUCTION OF STORAGE UNIT CONTENTS Grace Saint Francis, last known address of 108 Fairfield Street Saint Albans, VT 05478 has a past due balance of $648.00 owed to Champlain Valley

Notice is hereby given that the contents of the

LEGALS » SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

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Legal Notices PLACE AN AFFORDABLE NOTICE AT: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/LEGAL-NOTICES OR CALL 802-865-1020, EXT. 110. Self Storage, LLC since 1/31/21. To cover this debt, per lease dated 6/6/20 the contents of unit #283 will be sold at private auction on, or after June 19, 2021. Merissa Bushey, last known address of 30 Pine Street South Burlington, VT 05403 has a past due balance of $537.00 owed to Champlain Valley Self Storage, LLC since 02/28/2021. To cover this debt, per lease dated 11/25/2015 the contents of unit #097 will be sold at private auction on, or after June 19, 2021.

thinking.

Wesley Mercy, last known address of 93 Mabel way South Hero, VT 05486 has a past due balance of $1,050.00 owed to Champlain Valley Self Storage, LLC since 10/31/2020. To cover this debt, per lease dated 03/11/2020 the contents of unit #212 will be sold at private auction on, or after June 19, 2021. Timothy Stillwagon, last known address of 20 West Canal Street Winooski, VT 05404 has a past due balance of $790.00 owed to Champlain Valley Self Storage, LLC since 12/31/2020. To cover this debt, per lease dated 2/10/2020 the contents of unit #032 will be sold at private auction on, or after June 19, 2021. Auction pre-registration is required, email info@ champlainvalleyselfstorage.com to register.

PUBLIC NOTICE FOR INFORMATIONAL MEETING The Town of Colchester Department of Public Works will be presenting an update on the Bayside Intersection Roundabout project at the June 22, 2021 Selectboard meeting. The Selectboard meeting is scheduled to start at 6:30 pm. Selectboard meetings are held on the third floor of the Town Hall located at 781 Blakely Road. You are cordially invited to attend. This meeting will serve as an overview of the project with a 20-30 minute presentation. The presentation will discuss a general overview of the design, schedule and complexities. Questions will be welcome.

for all.

STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT PROBATE DIVISION WASHINGTON UNIT DOCKET NO.: 633-10-20-WNPR In re ESTATE of Jean L. Jasman

To the Creditors of Jean L. Jasman, late of Montpelier, Vermont.

Dated: November 13, 2020 Fiduciary: C. Kenneth Dean Executor/Administrator: C. Kenneth Dean 31 Loomis Street Montpelier, Vermont 05602 Name of Publication: Seven Days Publication Date: June 9, 2021 Vermont Superior Court Washington Probate Division 65 State Street Montpelier, Vermont 05602 TOWN OF BOLTON: NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The DRB will hold a virtual public hearing on Thursday, June 24, 2021, starting at 6:30 pm, to consider the following applications: Application 2021-27-DRB: Applicant: Samantha Avant, Property Owner: Samantha Avant and SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

2v-free.indd 1

6/18/12 6:54 PM

This will only be a virtual hearing, accessible by computer or phone. To participate by computer (GoToMeeting), use the following link: https:// global.gotomeeting.com/join/179833437 To participate by phone, call +1 (571) 317-3112. The access code is 179-833-437. Additional information can be obtained by contact the Zoning Administrator at 802-434-5075 x225, or by email at zoningbolton@gmavt.net. Pursuant to 24 VSA § 4464 and § 4471, participation in this local proceeding, by written or oral comment, is a prerequisite to the right to take any subsequent appeal. If you cannot attend the hearing, comments may be made in writing prior to May 28 and mailed to: Zoning Administrator, 3045 Theodore Roosevelt Highway, Bolton, VT 05676 or via email to: zoningbolton@gmavt.net.

TOWN OF ESSEX ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT PUBLIC HEARING JULY 1, 2021 6:00 PM This meeting will be held remotely. - Join via Microsoft Teams at https://www. essexvt.org/870/5481/Join-ZBA-Meeting - Join via conference call (audio only): (802) 377-3784 | Conference ID: 480 347 627# - Public wifi is available at the Essex municipal offices, libraries, and hotspots listed here: - Visit our website www.essexvt.org 1. VARIANCE: James & Gina Barrett: Proposed 10’ variance from the property line fronting 157 Sand Hill Road (corner lot) to accommodate stair replacement and deck addition. Property is located in R2 Zone. Tax Map 45, Parcel 58. 2. Minutes: May 6, 2021

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

I have been appointed to administer this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the first publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to me at the address listed below with a copy sent to the Court. The claim may be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month period.

88

Daniel Jones – Appealing Zoning Administrator’s denial of application #2021-26-ZP to build an 8’ x 8’ & 16’ x 16’ deck at 3477 Stage Rd. Applicants are requesting a setback waiver to reduce 50 ft. minimum setbacks for side property lines. The property is located in the Rural II District. (Tax Map #11-0033477).

TOWN OF JERICHO- DEVELOPMENT REVIEW BOARD NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Jericho Development Review Board will hold a public hearing at 7:00 pm on WEDNESDAY June 23, 2021 at the Jericho Town Hall to consider the following. A request to the DRB by Melissa and Sefton Hirsch for a conditional use review. This property is located at 6 Borden Drive which is in the Low Density Residential Zoning District. An appeal to the DRB by David Villeneuve for a Notice of Violation. This property is located at 261 Vermont Route 15 which is in the Commercial Zoning District. A request to the DRB by David Villeneuve for a conditional use review for a change of use (Kates Food Truck) to a Restaurant/Tavern. This property is located at 261 Vermont Route 15 which is in the Commercial Zoning District. All interested persons may appear and be heard. Additional information related to this application may be viewed at the Jericho Planning and Zoning Office during regular business hours. Chris Flinn Zoning Administrator cflinn@jerichovt.gov


Calcoku SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS »

Using the enclosed math operations as a guide, fill the grid using the numbers 1 - 6 only once in each row and column.

1-

6+

10+

11-

6x

24x 14+

8+ 3-

39+

2

3 1 8 4 9

Difficulty - Hard

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

2 4 9

6

3

No. 691

SUDOKU

5 1 8 4

3

Difficulty - Medium

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: HH

4

5

3 2 5 6 7 1 8 9 4 ANSWERS ON 1 P. 868 4 9 3 5 6 7 2 H = MODERATE HH = CHALLENGING HHH = HOO, BOY! 9 6 7 8 2 4 1 3 5 4 5 2 3 9 8 7 1 6 6 7 3 4 1 2 5 8 9 CITY HITS ANSWERS ON P. 86 » 8 9 1 5 6 7 4 2 3 7 3 9 1 5 6 2 4 8 2 4 6 7 8 9 3 5 1 5 1 8 2 4 3 9 6 7

Fill the grid using the numbers 1-6, only once in each row and column. The numbers in each heavily outlined “cage” must combine to produce the target number in the top corner, using the mathematical operation indicated. A onebox cage should be filled in with the target number in the top corner. A number can be repeated within a cage as long as it is not the same row or column.

2

4

1

6

5

5

1

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6

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4 6 2 5 3 1 crossword

Extra! Extra! There’s no limit to ad length online.

1

9 6

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: HHH

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Open 24/7/365.

View and post up to

Post & browse ads Complete the following puzzle by using the 6 photos per ad online. at your convenience. numbers 1-9 only once in each row, column and 3 x 3 box.

4 5 7 3 9 9 1 4 7

3-

CALCOKU

ShowSudoku and tell.

Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each 9-box square contains all of the numbers one to nine. The same numbers cannot be repeated in a row or column.

Fresh. Filtered. Free. What’s that

buzz?

Find out what’s percolating today. Sign up to receive our house blend of local news headlines served up in one convenient email by Seven Days.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/DAILY7 8v-daily7-coffee.indd 1

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Legal Notices If you feel that any of the District Commission members listed on the attached Certificate of Service under “For Your Information” may have a conflict of interest, or if there is any other reason a member should be disqualified from sitting on this case, please contact the District Coordinator as soon as possible, and by no later than June 22, 2021.

ACT 250 NOTICE MINOR APPLICATION #4C05828D 10 V.S.A. §§ 6001 - 6093 On February 10, 2021, TAGDAG, LLC, 46 Merchant To learn more, contact Street, Barre, VT 05461 and Vermont Tire hydrogen.vermont@gmail.com & Service, Inc., 1877 Williston Road, South BASS, GUITAR, DRUMS, Burlington, VT 05403 filed application number VOICE LESSONS & 4C0582- 8D for a project generally described as MORE by the hour in the Remote music lessonsSmClassyDisplay-Pierce060921.indd heart of the South End10:241 AM change in use of the existing building from a steel 6/8/21 fabrication to a tire merchandise and distribution are an amazing way to art district. Monthly facility, the closure of a dry well and associated spend time at home! arrangements avail., site improvements. The project is located on Lot Learn guitar, bass, piano, as well. Tailored for #7 of the Sunderland Industrial Park at 94 South voice, violin, drums, flute, music but can be Oak Circle in Colchester, Vermont. sax, trumpet, production multipurpose. info@ & beyond w/ pro local burlingtonmusicdojo. The District 4 Environmental Commission is instructors from the com, 802-540-0321. reviewing this application under Act 250 Rule Burlington Music Dojo 51— Minor Applications. A copy of the application on Pine St. All levels & and proposed permit are available for review at styles are welcome, incl. the office listed below. The application and a absolute beginners. draft permit may also be viewed on the Natural Come share in the music! Resources Board’s web site (http://nrb.vermont. burlingtonmusicdojo. gov) by clicking on “Act 250 Database” and com, info@burlington entering the project number “4C0582-8D.” musicdojo.com.

That Chapter 26 Wastewater, Stormwater and Pollution Control, Article II Sewers, Wastewater and Pollution Control, Division 3 Wastewater and Water Pollution Control Charges, and Chapter 31 Water, Article II Meters and Article III Rates and Changes, of the Code of Ordinances of the City of Burlington be and hereby are amended as follows: Chapter 26. Wastewater, Stormwater and Pollution Control. Article I. As written. Article II. Sewers, Wastewater and Pollution Control. Division 1. As written.

26-51—26-52. As written. 26-53. Wastewater rates and fees; charges. For any user the wastewater charge shall be based upon the consumption of water upon the premises as measured by the city water meter or meters or as estimated where appropriate by the public works department. (a) Monthly wastewater rates and fees shall be in accordance with a schedule prescribed by the water division of the department of public works and approved by the City Council in the city’s budget or otherwise, and charges shall be categorized as follows: (1) Fixed Charge: Based on the size of the meter or meters.

FROM P.85

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PUZZLE ANSWERS

Rules suspended and placed in all stages of passage: 05/24/21 Second reading: Action: Dates: 05/24/21 Signed by Mayor: 06/02/21 Published: 06/09/21 Effective: 06/30/21 It is hereby Ordained by the City Council of the City of Burlington as follows:

Division 3. Wastewater and Water Pollution Control Charges.

CITY OF BURLINGTON IN THE YEAR TWO THOUSAND TWENTY-ONE, AN ORDINANCE IN RELATION TO BURLINGTON CODE OF ORDINANCES— CHAPTER 31 WATER— CHAPTER 26 WASTEWATER, STORMWATER, AND POLLUTION CONTROL— AMENDMENTS RE RATE STRUCTURE & BILLING ORDINANCE 6.06 Sponsor: Department of Public Works Public Hearing Dates: First reading: Referred to:

3

HYDROGEN VERMONT Stop greenhouse gases entering Earth’s atmosphere. Join action group devising public information strategies advocating banning fossil fuel exhaust by switching to hydrogen fuel. Contact: hydrogen. vermont@gmail.com.

PLACE AN AFFORDABLE NOTICE AT: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/LEGAL-NOTICES OR CALL 802-865-1020, EXT. 110.

Division 2. As written.

By: _/s/Rachel Lomonaco___________ Rachel Lomonaco, District Coordinator 111 West Street Essex Junction, VT 05452 802-879-5658 Rachel.Lomonaco@vermont.gov

6

REHEARSAL SPACE Safe & sanitary music/ creative spaces avail.

VOLUNTEERS

Dated at Essex Junction, Vermont this 1st day of June, 2021.

2

STUDIO/ REHEARSAL

misc.

No hearing will be held and a permit may be issued unless, on or before June 22, 2021, a person notifies the Commission of an issue or issues requiring the presentation of evidence at a hearing, or the Commission sets the matter for a hearing on its own motion. Any person as defined in 10 V.S.A. § 6085(c)(1) may request a hearing. Any hearing request must be in writing to the address below, must state the criteria or sub-criteria at issue, why a hearing is required and what additional evidence will be presented at the hearing. Any hearing request by an adjoining property owner or other person eligible for party status under 10 V.S.A. § 6085(c)(1)(E) must include a petition for party status under the Act 250 Rules. Prior to submitting a request for a hearing, please contact the district coordinator at the telephone number listed below for more information. Prior to convening a hearing, the Commission must determine that substantive issues requiring a hearing have been raised. Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law may not be prepared unless the Commission holds a public hearing.

Parties entitled to participate are the Municipality, the Municipal Planning Commission, the Regional Planning Commission, affected state agencies, and adjoining property owners and other persons to the extent that they have a particularized interest that may be affected by the proposed project under the Act 250 criteria. Non-party participants may also be allowed under 10 V.S.A. Section 6085(c)(5).

1

GUITAR INSTRUCTION Berklee graduate w/ 30 years’ teaching experience offers lessons in guitar, music theory, music technology, ear training. Individualized, step-by-step approach. All ages, styles, levels. Rick Belford, 864-7195, rickb@rickbelford.com.

If you have a disability for which you need accommodation in order to participate in this process (including participating in a public hearing, if one is held), please notify us as soon as possible, in order to allow us as much time as possible to accommodate your needs.

4

INSTRUCTION

5

music

The fuel of the future. Help save our atmosphere. Volunteer!

3

HYDROGEN

a. A fixed meter charge may be temporarily waived in accordance with policies prescribed by the water division of the department of public works and as approved by City Council as part of the Water Resources Assistance Program. (2) Volumetric Charge: Based on the customer classification and the volumetric usage of wastewater upon the premises as measured by the city water meter or as estimated where appropriate by the water division of the department of public works. 26-54. Minimum charge. There may be a minimum monthly wastewater charge based upon a schedule prescribed by the public works commission water division of the department of public works and approved by the city council.

6 4 1 2 3 5

26-55. As written.

(a) Abatements, credits, and refunds of wastewater rates, fees and charges shall be in accordance with policies prescribed by the water division of the department of public works and approved by the City Council. (b) Any premises to which city water is supplied for manufacturing, commercial, or irrigation purposes, in such a manner that a substantial portion of the same is not returned to the city sewer system, shall be entitled, upon application therefore, to such abatement in the wastewater charge, as the director shall determine to be equitable under the circumstances. Any person dissatisfied with such determination by the

1-

2 5 8 4 6 7 5 2 714+ 3 9 1 3 9 4 6 1 8

6 6+ 9 8 3 4 5 31 37 2

7 1 31- 5 2 4 24x 9 8 18+ 2 6 7 5 6 8 9 4 3

8 9 4 6 7 6x 2 1 3 5 7 1 6 5 8 3- 9 4 2 3 9+ 2 4 8 3 5 1 9 Difficulty 6 7 - Hard 1-

Using the enclosed math operations as a guide, fill the grid using the numbers 1 - 6 only once in each row and column.

Calcoku

No. 691

Difficulty - Medium

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

3 2÷1 9 10+ 4 6 8 2÷ 7 2 5

86

26-56. Adjustment of charges in special cases. Abatements; credits; refunds.


c mmercialworks CLASS A OFFICE SPACE

802.280.5044 notchgroupllp@gmail.com

director may apply first to the public works comto the city council whose decision shall be final. 26-57—26-70. As written. Division 4. As written. Article III. As written. Chapter 31. Water. Article I. As written. Article II. Meters. 31-39—31-44. As written. 31-45. Two or more meters.

Water used through two (2) or more meters upon the same premises, for the same business, and to supply the same pipes used for a common supply shall be rated as passing through one (1) meter, but if used through separate pipes or for different kinds of business, each meter shall be rated separately. In no case, however, shall water be furnished to a meter for less than the established minimum meter rate fixed meter charge, as described in Sections 31-48 and 31-61. 31-46. As written. 31-47. Faulty meter. If from any cause a meter fails to register the amount of water passing through it, the owner shall be charged at the average daily rate usage as shown by the meter when in order. 31-48. Minimum Monthly charge. The monthly charge for water shall not be less than the minimum monthly charge for furnishing water to meters subject to the minimum. There may be a minimum monthly water charge based upon a schedule prescribed by the water division of the department of public works and approved by the City Council. 31-49—31-50.

As written.

31-51—31-61 60 Reserved. Article III. Rates and Changes. 31-61. Rates and Fees; Charges Monthly water rates and fees shall be in accordance with a schedule prescribed by the water division of the department of public works and approved by the City Council in the city’s budget

homeworks

JEFFERSONVILLE | 185 CHURCH ST.

Christopher Preston

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(INCLUDE 40 WORDS + PHOTO). SUBMIT TO: KATIE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM BY MONDAYS AT NOON.

FOOD TRUCK SPOT!

JEFFERSONVILLE | 185 CHURCH ST.

Newly converted/renovated garage, class A office/retail. ~520 SF of usable office, ~150 SF of usable patio, and ~175 SF. rentable/shared lobby and bath (ADA Compliant). ~4800 average daily vehicle traffic per VTRANS. Monthly/Yearly modified gross leases available, includes radiant heat, trash/recycling, and 100% of CAM. Lessee responsible for electric/internet.

ATTENTION REALTORS: LIST YOUR PROPERTIES HERE FOR ONLY $45

List your properties here and online for only $45/ week. Submit your listings by Mondays at noon.

High traffic/visibility in this newly converted/renovated garage, class A office complex. ~4800 average daily vehicle traffic. Hookups include a NEMA 14-50 outlet and a standard cold-water spigot with anti-siphon. Daily/Weekly/Monthly rates available, includes trash/ recycling and 100% of CAM, lessee responsible for electric.

Christopher Preston 802.280.5044 notchgroupllp@gmail.com

Call or email today to get started: 865-1020 x110, homeworks@sevendaysvt.com

or otherwise, and charges shall be categorized as 6/8/21 CW-NotchGroupOffice1-060921.indd 10:02 AM 1 follows:

calendar month, the rates, fees and charges shall 6/8/21Untitled-26 9:55 AM 1 be prorated based on a 30-day period.

(1) Fixed Charge: Based on the size of the meter or meters.

31-66—31-73. As written.

a. A fixed meter charge may be temporarily waived in accordance with policies prescribed by the water division of the department of public works and as approved by City Council as part of the Water Resources Assistance Program. (2) Volumetric Charge: Based on the customer classification and the volumetric usage of wastewater upon the premises as measured by the city water meter or as estimated where appropriate by the water division of the department of public works. (3) Private Fire Protection Charge: Based on the presence of private fire protection infrastructure, meaning a fire hydrant outside the right of way and a service line that feeds a fire protection system. (4) Other fees and charges related to billing, and administrative and field services, including rates, fees and charges set by the State of Vermont. 31-62. As written. 31-63. No sSpecial rates. There shall be no special rates for furnishing water within the City of Burlington and the water division shall receive the same compensation for water furnished for public use as for the same service furnished to a private individual or corporation within the City of Burlington. The water division of the department of public works may negotiate special rates for consolidated water districts as provided for in 24 V.S.A. Chapter 91, upon approval of the public works commission. 31-64. Abatements; refunds. No abatement of the water rate charges shall be allowed by reason of disuse or diminished use or vacancy of premises, nor shall a payment be refunded or abatement made by reason of the occurrence of any of the matters or things mentioned in section 31-7. 31-65. When rates commence. Meter rates of the minimum class shall, if the use commences before the fifteenth of any month, date from the first of such month. If after that date, the bill shall date from the first of the following month. The rates, fees and charges, as described in Section 31-61, shall commence upon the date of installation of a meter, and if that date is not the first of the

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IF YOU HAVE OWNED REAL PROPERTY IN OR AROUND BENNINGTON OR NORTH BENNINGTON, VERMONT, IN THE AREA OF PFOA EXPOSURE, YOUR RIGHTS MAY BE AFFECTED BY A CLASS ACTION LAWSUIT. You may be affected by a class action lawsuit called Sullivan, et al. v. Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics Corporation, No. 5:16-cv-125, in the United States District Court for the District of Vermont. Residents of Bennington and North Bennington have sued Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics Corporation (“Saint-Gobain”). They allege that Saint-Gobain contaminated their property and drinking water with a chemical called Perfluorooctanoic Acid (“PFOA”). The Court has allowed the lawsuit to proceed as a class action. The Property Class includes any natural person (not a corporate entity) who owned real property on March 14, 2016 in the Zone of Concern, an area delineated by the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation (“DEC”) in and around Bennington and North Bennington, or who purchased real property after March 14, 2016 that was subsequently added to the Zone of Concern by the Vermont DEC. The Property Class is seeking compensation for loss of value of real property and other property-related damages. A map of the Zone of Concern can be found at www. BenningtonVTClassAction.com. If you are a property owner in the Zone of Concern, your legal rights are affected, and you must decide whether to stay in the lawsuit and be bound by the results of the lawsuit OR ask to be excluded no later than August 2, 2021 and maintain your right to pursue your own separate lawsuit against Saint-Gobain. More information, including a detailed notice, is available at: www.BenningtonVTClassAction.com or by calling 855-711-2079. NOTICE OF SELF STORAGE LEIN SALE: FORT ETHAN ALLEN MINI STORAGE 120 Hegeman Ave., Colchester Vt. 05446 8026547779

following will be sold to the public by sealed bid. 6/6/16 4:34 PM The sale is being held to collect unpaid fees ,late charges and expenses of the sale. Elizabeth Lowe unit 68 Donald Nicoles unit 147 Anita Vorsteveld unit 112 Storage unit sale will take place on June 9th,2021 beginning at 10A.M, at Fort Ethan Allen Mini Storage ,120 Hegeman Ave., Colchester Vt. 05446. The winning bidder must remove all contents.

NOTICE: REQUEST FOR BIDS ReArch Company has been hired by Cathedral Square Corporation as the Construction Manager for the new construction of Bayview Crossing located in South Hero, Vermont. The project is new construction of a 30-unit multi-family housing that includes underground parking with steel framing and deck. The above ground building will be a wood frame construction with an asphalt membrane roofing and will require a full fit-out of exterior and interior finishes. ReArch will be issuing a Bid Package for all scopes of work on 6/8/21 with proposals due 6/30/21. Project has a construction schedule starting 9/1/21 and ending by 8/15/22. This being new construction we are looking for all trades including, not limited to: Concrete, Steel, Rough & Finish Carpentry, Cabinets & Countertops, Thermal & Waterproofing Barriers, Siding, Roofing, Interior & Exterior Openings, Interior & Exterior Finishes, Specialties, Elevators, Fire Suppression, Mechanical, Electrical, Sitework, and Landscaping. Any interested contractors, subcontractors and material providers should contact Ethan McDonald at (802)-734-5731 or ethanm@rearchcompany.com for more info. Please note this project is funded by both federal and state sources and will adhere to Federal Procurement and Contracting Guidelines, including Fair Labor Standards and Davis Bacon wage rates. Minority-Owned, Women-Owned, and Section 3 businesses are encouraged to apply. Cathedral Square Corporation is an equal opportunity employer. Davis Bacon and Section 3 will require a monthly reporting through the course of construction. Again, if you are interested, please reach out to Ethan McDonald at ReArch Company by the contact information provided above.

PRIVATE AUCTION OF STORAGE UNIT CONTENTS Grace Saint Francis, last known address of 108 Fairfield Street Saint Albans, VT 05478 has a past due balance of $648.00 owed to Champlain Valley

Notice is hereby given that the contents of the

LEGALS » SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

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Legal Notices PLACE AN AFFORDABLE NOTICE AT: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/LEGAL-NOTICES OR CALL 802-865-1020, EXT. 110. Self Storage, LLC since 1/31/21. To cover this debt, per lease dated 6/6/20 the contents of unit #283 will be sold at private auction on, or after June 19, 2021. Merissa Bushey, last known address of 30 Pine Street South Burlington, VT 05403 has a past due balance of $537.00 owed to Champlain Valley Self Storage, LLC since 02/28/2021. To cover this debt, per lease dated 11/25/2015 the contents of unit #097 will be sold at private auction on, or after June 19, 2021.

thinking.

Wesley Mercy, last known address of 93 Mabel way South Hero, VT 05486 has a past due balance of $1,050.00 owed to Champlain Valley Self Storage, LLC since 10/31/2020. To cover this debt, per lease dated 03/11/2020 the contents of unit #212 will be sold at private auction on, or after June 19, 2021. Timothy Stillwagon, last known address of 20 West Canal Street Winooski, VT 05404 has a past due balance of $790.00 owed to Champlain Valley Self Storage, LLC since 12/31/2020. To cover this debt, per lease dated 2/10/2020 the contents of unit #032 will be sold at private auction on, or after June 19, 2021. Auction pre-registration is required, email info@ champlainvalleyselfstorage.com to register.

PUBLIC NOTICE FOR INFORMATIONAL MEETING The Town of Colchester Department of Public Works will be presenting an update on the Bayside Intersection Roundabout project at the June 22, 2021 Selectboard meeting. The Selectboard meeting is scheduled to start at 6:30 pm. Selectboard meetings are held on the third floor of the Town Hall located at 781 Blakely Road. You are cordially invited to attend. This meeting will serve as an overview of the project with a 20-30 minute presentation. The presentation will discuss a general overview of the design, schedule and complexities. Questions will be welcome.

for all.

STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT PROBATE DIVISION WASHINGTON UNIT DOCKET NO.: 633-10-20-WNPR In re ESTATE of Jean L. Jasman

To the Creditors of Jean L. Jasman, late of Montpelier, Vermont.

Dated: November 13, 2020 Fiduciary: C. Kenneth Dean Executor/Administrator: C. Kenneth Dean 31 Loomis Street Montpelier, Vermont 05602 Name of Publication: Seven Days Publication Date: June 9, 2021 Vermont Superior Court Washington Probate Division 65 State Street Montpelier, Vermont 05602 TOWN OF BOLTON: NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The DRB will hold a virtual public hearing on Thursday, June 24, 2021, starting at 6:30 pm, to consider the following applications: Application 2021-27-DRB: Applicant: Samantha Avant, Property Owner: Samantha Avant and SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

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This will only be a virtual hearing, accessible by computer or phone. To participate by computer (GoToMeeting), use the following link: https:// global.gotomeeting.com/join/179833437 To participate by phone, call +1 (571) 317-3112. The access code is 179-833-437. Additional information can be obtained by contact the Zoning Administrator at 802-434-5075 x225, or by email at zoningbolton@gmavt.net. Pursuant to 24 VSA § 4464 and § 4471, participation in this local proceeding, by written or oral comment, is a prerequisite to the right to take any subsequent appeal. If you cannot attend the hearing, comments may be made in writing prior to May 28 and mailed to: Zoning Administrator, 3045 Theodore Roosevelt Highway, Bolton, VT 05676 or via email to: zoningbolton@gmavt.net.

TOWN OF ESSEX ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT PUBLIC HEARING JULY 1, 2021 6:00 PM This meeting will be held remotely. - Join via Microsoft Teams at https://www. essexvt.org/870/5481/Join-ZBA-Meeting - Join via conference call (audio only): (802) 377-3784 | Conference ID: 480 347 627# - Public wifi is available at the Essex municipal offices, libraries, and hotspots listed here: - Visit our website www.essexvt.org 1. VARIANCE: James & Gina Barrett: Proposed 10’ variance from the property line fronting 157 Sand Hill Road (corner lot) to accommodate stair replacement and deck addition. Property is located in R2 Zone. Tax Map 45, Parcel 58. 2. Minutes: May 6, 2021

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

I have been appointed to administer this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the first publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to me at the address listed below with a copy sent to the Court. The claim may be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month period.

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Daniel Jones – Appealing Zoning Administrator’s denial of application #2021-26-ZP to build an 8’ x 8’ & 16’ x 16’ deck at 3477 Stage Rd. Applicants are requesting a setback waiver to reduce 50 ft. minimum setbacks for side property lines. The property is located in the Rural II District. (Tax Map #11-0033477).

TOWN OF JERICHO- DEVELOPMENT REVIEW BOARD NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Jericho Development Review Board will hold a public hearing at 7:00 pm on WEDNESDAY June 23, 2021 at the Jericho Town Hall to consider the following. A request to the DRB by Melissa and Sefton Hirsch for a conditional use review. This property is located at 6 Borden Drive which is in the Low Density Residential Zoning District. An appeal to the DRB by David Villeneuve for a Notice of Violation. This property is located at 261 Vermont Route 15 which is in the Commercial Zoning District. A request to the DRB by David Villeneuve for a conditional use review for a change of use (Kates Food Truck) to a Restaurant/Tavern. This property is located at 261 Vermont Route 15 which is in the Commercial Zoning District. All interested persons may appear and be heard. Additional information related to this application may be viewed at the Jericho Planning and Zoning Office during regular business hours. Chris Flinn Zoning Administrator cflinn@jerichovt.gov


READY TO

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See who’s hiring at jobs.sevendaysvt.com. New job postings weekly from trusted, local employers in Seven Days newspaper and online.

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S NEW JOB ! K THIS WEE

• Search for jobs by keyword, location, category and job type. • Set up job alert emails using custom search criteria. • Save jobs to a custom list with your own notes on the positions. • Apply for jobs directly through the site. • Share jobs on social media channels.

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Recruiters: Need some new talent? Our readers are planning their next career moves. Employers get results with Seven Days Jobs in print and online. See our mobile-friendly, digital job board in action at jobs.sevendaysvt.com. Get a quote when you post your positions or contact Michelle Brown directly at 865-1020, ext. 21 and michelle@sevendaysvt.com.

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ATTENTION RECRUITERS: POST YOUR JOBS AT: JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POST-A-JOB PRINT DEADLINE: NOON ON MONDAYS (INCLUDING HOLIDAYS) FOR RATES & INFO: MICHELLE BROWN, 802-865-1020 X121, MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

YOUR TRUSTED LOCAL SOURCE. JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

DEVELOPMENT CONSULTANT

Lead the organization’s fundraising and communication activities, with a focus on foundations. Full description and to apply: bit.ly/3ifnuB1

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EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF STRATEGIC COMMUNICATIONS AND MARKETING For position details and application process, visit jobs. plattsburgh.edu and select “View Current Openings” SUNY College at Plattsburgh is a fully compliant employer committed to excellence through diversity.

CONANT METAL & LIGHT IS HIRING PRODUCTION MAKERS AND A SHOP MANAGER. You must be a creative problem-solver, team player, good with your hands and capable of mastering a broad array of processes. Please visit our website: conantmetalandlight.com/ employment for more information or send a resume detailing your interest, experience, and skills to jolene@conantmetalandlight.com.

MULTIPLE POSITIONS OPEN

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Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital has a variety of open positions including: Vermont Tent Company is currently accepting applications for immediate employment as well as future summer/fall employment starting in May. We have full time, part time, after school and weekend hours available for each position. Pay rates vary by position with minimum starting wage ranging from $15-$20/ hour depending on job skills and experience.

PHARMACY TECHNICIAN TRAINEE - OUTPATIENT Now offering sign on bonuses of $3,000 to extremal candidates! The Pharmacy Technician Trainee duties include filling prescriptions, answering to customers and their inquiries, providing excellent customer service, updating patient records, keeping the pharmacy clean, neat and organized, ensuring proper inventory management, dealing with insurance companies and completing tasks as assigned. High School Diploma or GED required. Previous Retail or Inpatient Pharmacy experience preferred. Learn more and apply: uvmmed.hn/sevendays and search “pharmacy”

Opportunities include: 4t-UVMMedCenter060921.indd • Tent Installation/ Delivery Team • Driver/Warehouse Team – Event Division • Drivers/Delivery • Inventory Maintenance Team – Wash Bay & Warehouse • Load Crew Team Members For job descriptions and application. vttent.com/employment

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Full-time, part-time and per diem schedules available. Shift differentials and per diem rates offered. FT and PT employees are eligible for excellent benefits including student loan repayment, generous paid time off, wellness reimbursement, low cost health insurance and 401k with company match! APPLY TODAY AT NVRH.ORG/CAREERS.

WATER RESOURCES ENGINEER – PROJECT MANAGER

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EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER

The Missisquoi Valley School District Early Childhood Program is seeking three licensed (or eligible for Vermont educational license) Early Childhood Special Educators to form a new team to serve the Franklin, Highgate and Swanton communities. For additional information, interested candidates are asked to apply electronically via SchoolSpring.com (job ID#3521285) or email a letter of interest and resume to wendy.cunningham@mvsdschools.org In matters related to employment, the school district does not permit or condone discrimination based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, genetic information, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, marital/civil union status, HIV status, or any other characteristic protected by Federal or State Law. EOE

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RNs, LNAs, Diagnostic Imaging, Coding & Administrative.

5/14/21 2:15 PM

This dynamic role provides project ownership and hands-on involvement from initial client meetings through the design, permitting and construction phase, including frequent contact with architects, builders, and property owners/developers. You’ll enjoy the mutual support and help of coworkers, while helping grow, strengthen, and improve the communities around us. Grenier values the range of its staff members' professional and life experience, and strives to be a welcoming and inclusive employer. We’re also happy to explore a part-time, flexible, and fully remote work arrangement until a candidate can shift to a full-time blend of in-office and remote. Our strong compensation package includes: starting pay of $25-30/hour, depending on qualifications, yearly bonuses, 100% employer-paid health, dental, life and disability insurance, and a company-matched retirement plan. To apply, or contact our search partner for a confidential exploratory conversation, visit bethgilpin.com/current-openings.

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FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR BROWSE POSTS ON YOUR PHONE AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

91 JUNE 9-16, 2021

Want to make a positive impact on people’s lives? SD Associates is hiring Behavioral Instructors (BIs)! SD Associates is an Applied Behavior Analysis company that has been serving children and families in Vermont since 1990.We provide direct services in the form of ABA therapy for clients with a wide variety of behavioral challenges across the state of Vermont. We are currently seeking compassionate, energetic individuals who are dependable, professional, enthusiastic, and who have a strong commitment to co-workers, clients and their families.The Behavioral Instructor (BI) role is the most important, influential and valued position in our company.They are the individuals who work each day to make impactful, positive behavioral changes for the population that we serve. No experience necessary! Bachelor’s degree preferred! Currently hiring in Chittenden, Franklin,Washington, Lamoille and Windsor counties. Exclusively, for a limited time: Choose between $500 or 2.5 paid days off sign on bonus!

CONSUMER LOAN PROCESSOR – BURLINGTON Vermont Federal Credit Union is recruiting for a Consumer Loan Processor out of our Burlington branch.

Highway Maintenance

The Consumer Loan Processor does a variety of lending support functions including: • Process approved loans, coordinate and close loans and finalize loan disbursements.

The Town of Hinesburg is currently seeking individuals to fill various positions within the Highway Department. While not required, a Class B CDL (commercial driver’s license) with tanker endorsement is preferred.

• Contact Members to obtain and follow-up on required paperwork processing and loan closing documents. • Verifies accuracy of information on loan applications. • Files loan documentation with the appropriate agencies. Qualified candidates should apply online via our website: vermontfederal.org Please be sure to attach your resume. Applications without an attached resume will be considered incomplete. Vermont Federal Credit Union is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

6/4/21 CASE MANAGER—RESTORATIVE JUSTICE

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The Orange County Restorative Justice Center, located in Chelsea, is seeking a full-time Case Manager to work with youth and adults referred for service navigation related to mental health and substance misuse and restorative justice programs. The ideal candidate will be passionate about social/racial/ economic justice and restorative approaches to address harm, with a demonstrated ability to engage with youth and families, those who have experienced trauma, and people who come from all racial, economic, and other backgrounds. 32-hours/week, with generous benefits and paid time-off. The Orange County Restorative Justice Center is committed to diversity, equity, and inclusion. BIPOC, people with disabilities, LGBTQ+ applicants, and people from other underrepresented groups, are encouraged to apply.

Apply today at sdplus.org Full-time and seasonal positions or email us your resume to are available. Full-time positions employment@sdplus.org. offer competitive pay, post winter bonuses and an excellent benefits package. If you would like to learn more about these opportunities, 2:58 PM 4T-SDAssociates060921.indd 1 6/3/21 please contact the Town Manager at todit@hinesburg.org or 482-4206. A job description and employment application are located on the town website hinesburg.org. BioTek, now a part of Agilent, is a market leader in detection Questions may be directed to and imaging instrumentation for life science and drug discovery Todd Odit at 802-482-4206. research. Our global customers include academic, government, and biotech/pharmaceutical companies. The Town of Hinesburg is Find out more at our Hire Up Session: an equal opportunity employer.

1:30 PM

Wednesday, June 16, Noon.

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For full job description, visit ocrjvt.org/employment-opportunities. Contact Jessie at jessie@ocrjvt.org.

Currently Hiring: •

CNC Machinists

Electro-Mechancial Assemblers

For full descriptions and to apply: https://careers.agilent.com/

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ASSISTANT MANAGER, FARM AND FOOD PROGRAM Saint Michael’s College is inviting applications for a temporary full-time salaried position assisting in the management of and teaching on our campus farm. Training will be provided in the variety of knowledge and skills to operate an institutional student farm; however, applicants should have 3-5 years of agricultural experience. Applicants should have substantial experience in diversified vegetable and berry farming and farming in the community and teaching-farm setting. Applicants should be flexible, dependable and motivated to work and mentor students. An offer of employment will be contingent upon the successful completion of a background check and a driving record check. For a complete job description and to apply online, please visit: interviewexchange.com/jobofferdetails.jsp?JOBID=131489

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6/8/21 Plainfield Co-op seeks experi- 4t-BioTek/Agilent060921.indd 1 enced grocery buyer for our small co-op. Buyer will cover several departments, grocery being the largest. Research, purchase, stock WORK AT CCS AND SUPPORT OUR MISSION and maintain a high quality mix TO BUILD A COMMUNITY WHERE EVERYONE of natural , local, and/or organic products that meet department PARTICIPATES AND BELONGS and store product and profitability Champlain Community Services is proud to be voted as one of the standards. Works with buyer team “Best Places to Work in Vermont” for the third year in a row and we to gather and analyze information want you to be a part of our team! At CCS, employees find a positive and design sales promotions. work culture, excellent training and support, opportunities for Attention to detail and ordering personal development and professional advancement, as deadlines a must.

Est. 30 hours/wk. $15-16/hr, commensurate with experience. PTO, holidays, generous staff discount. Send resume and three professional references to Peter@PlainfieldCoop.com.

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well as a strong benefits package including paid time off, affordable health insurance, paid holidays and more. Why not have a job you love? Join our dedicated team and together we’ll build a community where everyone participates and belongs.

ccs-vt.org

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E.O.E. 6/4/21 10:53 AM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

JUNE 9-16, 2021

Administrative Assistant

We are hiring! If you are interested in working at a mission-based organization focused on justice work, consider being our:

STORE MANAGER IN-TRAINING (FULL TIME) FINANCIAL MANAGER (PART-TIME) Both positions provide health insurance and generous time off benefits. Managers at the PJC earn between $19 and $23 per hour. For more information and to apply, go to our website at pjcvt.org/jobs. 3h-Peace&JusticeCenter060921.indd 1

6/7/21 12:52 PM

The Town of Hinesburg, Vermont is seeking a qualified person to fill an Administrative Assistant position that supports the Town Manager and Planning and Zoning Departments. This position provides administrative and clerical support for those departments. The Administrative Assistant is responsible for assisting applicants, processing development applications, scheduling meetings and hearings, filing, coordinating distribution of correspondence and materials, responding to public inquiries, processing overweight permits, posting committee minutes and agendas to the website and other general office duties as assigned. This position reports to the Town Manager and Director of Planning and Zoning. For an employment application and a full job description with requirements and education/training, visit the Town Manager Department on the Town website (hinesburg.org) or contact the Town Manager’s office (todit@hinesburg.org; 482-4206). The Town of Hinesburg is an equal opportunity employer. This is a part-time position of approximately 16 hours/week with a starting pay range of $17.00 to $19.00 per hour based on qualifications and experience. This position is not eligible for benefits.

HIRING MANUFACTURING OPERATORS

Hinesburg (population 4,400) is a vibrant community located in northwest Vermont, approximately 12 miles from the City of Burlington. Hinesburg is a rural Chittenden County community with a thriving village center surrounded by rural agricultural and forest lands.

$17.50/hour on Day Shift $19.69/hour on Night Shift

Apply online: http://bit.ly/HinesburgAdminAsst.

Offering $2,250.00 Sign-on Bonuses for limited time! Our company produces microelectronic chips, right in your backyard. These chips go into cell phones, computers, tablets, vehicles, medical devices, and much more! Come be a part of a company that is changing the industry that is changing the world through our high-end technology. No experience required; we will train you when you join our team.

Hinesburg is an equal opportunity employer and values diversity and inclusiveness in the community and workplace.

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PROPERTY MANAGER/

PROPERTY MANAGER TRAINEE Is there anything more fundamental than housing? Our mission is to provide safe, decent, and affordable housing to families of all kinds. Will you join our team?

Location: Essex, VT Schedules: 7pm-7am or 7am-7pm *Work approximately only 14 days per month: Three days one week and four days the next week.

The Winooski Housing Authority is seeking a property manager or property manager trainee. WHA is interested in building quality relations with our tenants who come from all over the world. The ideal applicant will demonstrate effective communication and writing skills and a proficiency in basic math. If you have five years’ experience in customer service or social services or a college degree and three years’ experience and want to help families get and stay housed, please apply. We are looking for you.

Benefits on Day 1: • Medical, Dental & Vision • 401k matching up to 4.5% • Paid Vacation Time: Approx. 3 weeks • Paid Sick Time: 80 hrs per year • Paid Parental Leave: Up to 20 weeks • Gym Reimbursement • Quarterly Bonuses • Occasional Overtime • Opportunity for Growth

Work is family friendly, with hour negotiated from 30 – 40 hours a week. Excellent benefit package. Interested applicants should email a cover letter and resume to: Winooski Housing Authority, c/o Debbie Hergenrother 83 Barlow Street, Winooski, VT 05404. Or email Debbie Hergenrother at dch@winooskihousing.org

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93 JUNE 9-16, 2021

COMMUNITY LIVING SUPPORT STAFF Are you seeking an opportunity to make a difference in people’s lives? We have openings for all shifts at an exciting new and innovative supported apartment project. Opportunities for both part time contracted shifts and fulltime positions with benefits. We offer a supportive and collaborative work environment with opportunities for training and professional growth. Previous experience working with people coping with mental health challenges is preferred, but creativity, openness to learning, and empathy are essential. Applicants should possess excellent communication skills, the ability to work with individuals with patience, insight, compassion, and the personality to work well in a team environment. Valid driver’s license, good driving skills, and occasional use of car are necessary. Work close to home and join a special team! Apply online: csac-vt.org/careers. E.O.E.

Vermont’s premier continuing Care Retirement Community seeks members to join our Health & Resident Services Team!

COMPANION DRIVER Full-Time

Our driver will provide on and off-campus transportation services to residents and staff. Duties include driving, assisting residents into and out of vehicles, escorting residents to destination if necessary, and general maintenance/cleaning of vehicles. This position requires timely adherence to transportation schedules and safety protocol, and excellent customer service. Applicants must have LNA, PCA or related experience, possess a valid VT Driver’s license (CDL not required) and a stellar driving record.

STAFF NURSE (RN OR LPN) AND LNAS Full Time Evenings

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6/8/21 12:42 PM

Line Cook at Dedalus Wine in Stowe

Our health care staff are licensed in Vermont and work collaboratively to provide high quality care in a fast paced residential and long-term care environment, while maintaining a strong sense of “home.” We offer an opportunity to build strong relationships with staff and residents in a dynamic community setting. Interested candidates please send resume and cover letter to HR@wakerobin.com or visit our website, wakerobin.com, to complete an application. Wake Robin is an equal opportunity employer.

We are looking for ambitious, creative team players who are eager to create exciting food to pair with great wine. Dedalus 5v-WakeRobin060921.indd 1 seeks to create a jovial, celebratory atmosphere and a great cook WISE works to end gender-based is a key player in fostering that energy and enthusiasm. A great violence in the Upper Valley. We line cook should be quick, focused, detail-oriented, and be able to are hiring key positions within remain calm under pressure. our core programs. Benefits include: $18-$25/HR, $500 sign-on bonus after 3 months, Health Care benefits including vision and dental, PTO, Sick Days, 35% discount on products offered in store

PROGRAM ADVOCATE: RESOURCE COORDINATOR

For a more detailed description and how to apply: https://dedaluswine.com/pages/jobs-line-cook

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6/8/21 12:45 PM

6/7/21 10:11 AM

Program Advocates are responsible for providing highquality, well-coordinated advocacy support for victims of domestic and/or sexual violence and stalking, their family members and friends. The Resource Coordinator is responsible for the organizational knowledge of community resources and access processes available to survivors of domestic and sexual violence.

PREVENTION AND EDUCATION PROGRAM EDUCATOR This position works with students, educators, and parents across 9 school districts to provide prevention education, student leadership to end violence, and youth advocacy for survivors. The perfect candidate has experience designing learning activities and developmentally appropriate curriculum, loves working with young people to build their leadership in social change, and is committed to the mission of WISE to end gender-based violence.

We have part time, full time, and key leadership roles available throughout our stores in Vermont.

HIRING IN ALL DEPARTMENTS!

Meat Cutter SIGN-ON Bonus is available in most Vermont stores.

These are both full time positions joining our team of dedicated and innovative staff committed to ending violence. Please visit our website at wiseuv.org/join-us for job descriptions. To apply, send cover letter and resume to peggy.oneil@wiseuv.org.

Apply online

jobs.sevendaysvt.com

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Hannaford.com/Careers

or contact your local Hannaford and ask to speak to a hiring manager.

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5/10/21 10:27 AM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

94

POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

JUNE 9-16, 2021

VSJF Program Coordinator

Project Manager

Join our values driven team and be responsible for program coordination, contracts management and some office management for our innovative programs an services aimed at strengthening Vermont’s economy. Employee health and dental insurance, generous paid time off, and retirement contribution. VSJF is an equal opportunity employer. Full job description at vsjf. org/about-vsjf-vermont/ job-openings. Apply by 5pm, 6/29/21 at jobs@vsjf.org.

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PRODUCTION WORKER

Select is looking for a talented and dedicated project manager to own internal and external workflow to support the achievement of high-quality outcomes for our growing base of consumer brand clients.

We are a very busy screen printer looking for help in the area of production. Hours are relatively flexible but with 35-40 hours expected. Work days are Monday through Friday. Must provide your own transportation to Essex Junction.

Responsibilities: collaborate and communicate with internal stakeholders, create and manage workflow timelines, support the management of interdepartmental resources and budgets, navigate deliverable quality control, and liaise with clients as appropriate.

Send resumes to: dennis@ eastcoastprinters.com WHERE YOU AND 6/7/21 YOUR WORK MATTER...

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Qualifications: Consumer brand, advertising, or marketing agency experience, strong attention for aesthetic and details, ability to organize and monitor progress of projects to meet deadlines, facilitate communication of and provide solutions for perceived challenges. Bachelor’s degree required. Apply: careers@selectdesign.com

When you work for the State of Vermont, you and your work matter. A career with the State puts you on a rich and rewarding professional path. You’ll find jobs in dozens of fields – not to mention an outstanding total compensation package.

Full Listing: www.selectdesign.com/careers 208 Flynn Ave., Burlington, VT (802) 864.9075

VR PROJECT COORDIN ATOR – WATERBURY

VocRehab Vermont is looking for an energetic, self-initiator. The VR 5v-SelectDesignSALES042821.indd 1 6/8/21 Project Coordinator will work closely with project managers to create comprehensive action plans concerning resources, budgets and time frames for projects. This position coordinates meetings, resources, equipment, and information. Must possess strong project management The Champlain Water District, an and leadership skills, be very organized, have excellent technology skills award winning regional water provider as well as writing, proof reading and editing skills. For more information, having the distinction of receiving the contact Amanda Arnold at amanda.arnold@vermont.gov or 802-279-8310. “First in the Nation Excellence In Water Treatment Award” from the Department: Disabilities Aging & Independent Living. Status: Full Time. Partnership for Safe Water, announces a position opening within its Location: Waterbury. Job ID# 16786. Application Deadline: June 14, 2021. existing Distribution Department that assures high quality drinking water is distributed throughout Chittenden County.

DIRECTOR OF DISTRIBUTION

M E N T A L H E A LT H S E R V I C E S D I R E C T O R – W A T E R B U R Y

Managerial work at an executive level. Provides organizational leadership for Department priorities including development, planning and implementation requirements for the state-run facilities. Provides leadership through extensive collaboration with other Agency departments and various community non-profit organizations. Extensive interaction at the state and federal levels with mental health and health care leaders, advocates, board members, citizens, legislators and former patients. For more information, contact Mourning Fox at Mourning.Fox@ vermont.gov or 802-241-0137. Department: Mental Health. Status: Full Time. Location: Waterbury. Job ID #16417. Application Deadline: June 15, 2021.

M U LT I P L E U I P O S I T I O N S – M O N T P E L I E R

The Vermont Department of Labor is hiring for several positions in the Unemployment Insurance (UI) Division. if you possess strong analytical skills and enjoy complex problem solving, this might be a great position for you. We are hiring a team of people to help investigate suspected UI fraud. if you have strong customer service skills and would enjoy helping people through application and eligibility processes, consider applying for one of these openings. To find out what positions are available please follow the link https://www.careerarc.com/job-search?job_group=67350. For more information, contact Beth Meyer-Ehrich at beth.meyer-ehrich@vermont. gov. Status: Full Time. Location: Montpelier.

Learn more at :

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This position works under the direction and supervision of the Director of Distribution. This position supervises and coordinates the operation, maintenance, and construction of the water distribution systems owned and/or managed by the District Distribution Department. Exercises direct supervision over distribution maintenance staff and provides technical assistance to the Director of Distribution. This employee will work in collaboration with the Director of Transmission and the Director of Water Quality & Production in projects and responsibilities of mutual concern, as well as other Directors/Departments as necessary.

9:13 AM

Looking for a Sweet Job? Our mobile-friendly job board is buzzing with excitement.

Start applying at jobs.sevendaysvt.com

Requires a minimum of five (5) years operations, maintenance, construction experience in water system facilities, or other related fields including two (2) years of supervisory experience. Construction experience including installation and startup of water related infrastructure and equipment or equivalent. Supervisory experience including personnel management and progressive leadership responsibilities. Graduation from a college or university with an Associates Degree in civil or mechanical engineering, or construction management preferred. Competitive salary and benefit package. Resume with cover letter to: tracy.bessette@champlainwater.org

The State of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity Employer

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1/28/20 3:38 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR BROWSE POSTS ON YOUR PHONE AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Parks Maintenance Crew Member

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Web Application Developer

Want to make a difference this summer, work outside, and be a part of a talented team providing recreation access and natural resource management? Winooski Valley Parks District seeks selfmotivated, hardworking, energetic individuals to assist in maintaining 19 Natural Areas in the Winooski River watershed, based in Burlington, Vermont. Applicants must be able to work 40 hours/week (M-F, 8am-4pm). The position runs from mid-May until the end of October (some flexibility with start/end date.)

RETAIL AND GUEST SERVICES MANAGER

Select is looking for an experienced Web Application Developer to support workflows, automate tasks, and ensure work is done on the right tasks across the disciplines of design, production, and content.

Qualifications: 2+ years of application or web development experience, basic understanding of database concepts, and a fundamental understanding of UI/UX design.

Please e-mail a resume and brief letter of interest to timlarned@wvpd.org. Applications will be accepted until the positions are filled.

Full Listing: www.selectdesign.com/careers

COVER Home Repair, a professionally led, volunteerpowered organization seeks a Work Crew Leader for its innovative urgent home repair and weatherization programs. Work with a dynamic team of dedicated, mission driven professionals and help make a positive impact in the Upper Valley. We seek an innovative problem solver with carpentry skills, home repair experience, and the ability to teach or coach volunteers. Will pay a wage commensurate with experience including health insurance, dental insurance, life insurance, disability income insurance, and paid vacation. Contact Rachel Smith at: office@coverhomerepair.org

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The ideal candidate will have significant experience in retail buying, ability to multitask while working on multiple projects, and demonstrate leadership skills in a fast paced work environment. This position will be full time, non-exempt and will be generally scheduled Tuesday through Saturday. Occasionally, this position will be required to work full weekends, holidays and evenings. For a full job description please visit echovt.org/jobs.html

Apply: careers@selectdesign.com

ECHO is an Equal Opportunity Employer and welcomes candidates for employment who will contribute to our diversity. Please submit a cover letter and resume to jobs@echovermont.org with Retail and Guest Services Manager in the subject line. Apply by June 15th.

208 Flynn Ave., Burlington, VT (802) 864.9075

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Work Crew Leader

ECHO is seeking an experienced Retail and Guest Services Manager. The Retail and Guest Services Manager is essential for managing the front end of ECHO’s daily operations. This position works to support the guest service team in providing excellent customer service while also managing multiple revenue streams by buying merchandise for the museum store and cafe. This position will work with the Director of Sales to continuously increase retail offerings as well as work with the Development and Communications team to create and deliver strong social media marketing for retail offerings.

Responsibilities: Collaborate with internal stakeholders to develop solutions that will improve the utilization of Select’s internal web application. Plan for and maintain continuous changes through writing code and optimizing database queries. A desire to level up your skills and become a key team member is a must.

Duties include landscaping and carpentry, and equipment, trails, buildings, and grounds maintenance. Experience or a desire to learn about mower use/ maintenance and trails upkeep necessary. Applicants must be able to work outside in all weather conditions, lift 50 lbs., and be on your feet all day.

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TRAINING & COACHING SPECIALIST - FULL TIME Work independently and as part of a strong team to implement a comprehensive training program for the State of Vermont, Division of Family Services. Provide consultation, training and coaching to Family Services Staff. Engage with FSD staff, trainers, and community partners to include work with diverse populations. Participate in assessment of learning needs, curriculum development, evaluation and training, utilizing a variety of media & technologies. Master’s degree in social work or a related field and three to four years’ experience in child welfare and/or youth justice required. Knowledge and experience in child protection, youth justice, child/ family health/mental health, trauma informed care, racial equity, human development, foster care and/or adoption required. Experience designing curricula and teaching/training for adult learners required. Coaching and supervision experience desired. Ability to manage multiple deadlines and strong written and verbal communication skills required. Ability to travel frequently to off-site work locations around the state required. The University is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the institution. Applicants are required to include in their cover letter information about how they will further this goal. Main office located on the UVM campus, off-site work locations may also be available. Please apply online at https://www.uvmjobs.com/postings/44830

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95 JUNE 9-16, 2021

6/3/21 4:51 PM

Bridge Community Media Seeks Inspiring Newspaper and Web Editor The Bridge is seeking a passionate and energetic person to serve as full-time editor/reporter to cover all aspects of life in and around Montpelier, Vermont, the nation’s smallest state capital. This is the lead position on a nonprofit community newspaper that posts regular stories online and publishes a free print edition, currently every three weeks. The paper, with a print circulation of 10,300, covers city government, local schools, a vibrant business community, health issues, outdoor activities, the environment, and tells the unique stories of local residents. Responsibilities include writing articles for our print issue and the website, coordinating with staff, editing freelance and volunteer writers, taking photos and videos, and meeting with and reporting to the Board of Directors, which sets the general direction for the organization. Work is to be primarily performed in our office at the Vermont College of Fine Arts. The following qualifications are preferred but not required: five or more years of experience reporting and/or working in an editorial role, journalism or English degree, and social media and digital photography skills. Competitive salary commensurate with experience. Email a resume, three published news or feature articles, and a brief explanation of what community journalism means to you to: bridgehiringcommittee@gmail.com. Applications must be received by June 21, 2021

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6/4/21 3:11 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

96

POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

JUNE 9-16, 2021

Retail Position OR Ski/Bike Shop Mechanic Power Play Sports in Morrisville has openings for a ski/bike mechanic as well as a retail associate for our storefront. Ideal candidates are sports enthusiasts, dedicated to customer service and interested in working at a shop that is the cornerstone of the local recreation community. Great opportunity for the right person! Pay is $12-$20/hour depending on experience. Retirement and other benefits available. Apply: pps.caleb@gmail.com.

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6/1/21

MARKETING MANAGER The Marketing Manager will work closely with our COO and leadership team in spearheading customer acquisition, conversion and retention initiatives, and in building omnichannel brand awareness as we expand our footprint in the global marketplace. This position involves strategy and hands-on execution, giving you the opportunity to be both a thought leader and roll up your sleeves to take action and drive results. This position requires a strong leader who will be responsible for developing and executing both a short and long term marketing strategy to support the company's revenue and sales goals. You’ll love this role if you enjoy applying the left-brain-right-brain balance to analyzing and measuring data while co-creating beautiful content. This role will have you working in the exciting health and wellness space helping to grow a new, innovative healing modality with cutting edge tools which is fast becoming a disruptor in the 9:37 AM industry. The successful candidate will bring entrepreneurial and go getter spirit, to a startup type environment.

Part-time Custodian

Winooski Housing Authority, a progressive owner, manager and developer of affordable housing, seeks a highly motivated PartTime, 20 hour per week Custodian to join our team. Experience in general facilities maintenance a plus. Competitive salary.

RESPONSIBILITIES • Develop and refine sales, marketing & social media strategies (short & long-term) to ensure effective positioning, creating demand and maximizing sales across all Biofield Tuning channels. • Develop & successfully execute a marketing calendar along with all relevant communications, timelines, milestones & accountabilities. • Develop and successfully execute marketing campaigns on email, Instagram, Facebook and all other relevant social media outlets. • Identify and execute partnership and collaboration opportunities.

WHAT WE ARE LOOKING FOR • Bachelor’s degree in Marketing, Business or related field. Proven Please send your resume experience developing and managing marketing programs. to Debbie at: • Deep knowledge of the current and projected wellness and health landscape - trends, aesthetics, players. dch@winooskihousing.org or • Strong project management, multitasking and decision-making mail in (stop in for application) to: skills. Ability to oversee, manage & direct strategy pertaining to WHA, 83 Barlow Street, Winooski, multiple business units. VT 05404. Attn: Debbie. E.O.E. • Excellent oral communication and interpersonal skills. Keen wit and sense of humor - clever copywriting and written communication skills. 2v-WinooskiHousingAuthorityCUSTODIAN051921.indd 5/14/21 12:21 1 PM• Refined aesthetic sense. Good eye for good design. Athens Diner, • Experience in social media, email marketing, digital media. Colchester VT • Experience with marketing automation and CRM tools.

is now hiring.

BENEFITS Medical, Dental, Vision, Vacation, and Sick Time available following a 90-day probationary period. If you feel like this was written for you, drop us an email telling us why!

Wait Staff We are looking for PT or FT wait staff, open 7 days per week, 6am-2pm.

HR@BIOFIELDTUNING.COM

Dishwasher/Line Prep Cook

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Northfield Savings Bank, founded in 1867, is the largest banking institution headquartered in Vermont. We strive to serve our employees as well as our communities. We are seeking a professional to join our Enterprise Banking Department as a Cash Management Representative in one of our Chittenden County locations.

JOB RESPONSIBILITIES & REQUIREMENTS • The Cash Management Representative will be responsible for supporting online banking, cash management services (online wires, ACH origination, positive pay, etc.), remote deposit services, Federal Reserve’s ACH-EDI service – all from application to installation to troubleshooting and beyond. • The successful candidate will be able to foster great relationships with NSB customers as well as work alongside our Commercial Lenders for business development. This role requires efficiency and effectiveness to elevate our customer’s NSB experience. • A high school diploma or equivalent and three to five years of experience in banking is required.

OPPORTUNITY FOR GROWTH • NSB encourages career development and has a variety of training platforms available, including tuition reimbursement. • Average Years of Service at Northfield Savings Bank is above 9! If you’re looking to settle your career in the Banking industry, join our team!

WHAT NSB CAN OFFER YOU • NSB offers a competitive compensation based on experience. • Benefits package including medical, dental, vision, combined time off, 10 paid holidays, a wellness program and more! • Profit sharing opportunity and an outstanding employer-matching 401(K) retirement program. • NSB offers professional development opportunities, and a positive work environment supported by a team culture. • Hours of operation are Monday – Friday, generally 8:00am to 5:00pm. We understand the importance of having evenings and weekends with our friends, families, and our community. Please send an NSB Application + your resume in confidence to: Careers@nsbvt.com, or mail to: Northfield Savings Bank H.R. P.O. Box 7180, Barre, VT 05641-7180 Equal Opportunity Employer

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POST YOUR JOBS AT: PRINT DEADLINE: FOR RATES & INFO:

Apply: athensdinerHR@ dairbhre.com 3h-ContactInfo.indd 1 6/3/21 1:38 PM

There is no better time to join NSB’s team!

5/17/21 4:07 PM

ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

We are looking for experienced dishwasher(s) and line prep cook(s), willing to train the right candidate.

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CASH MANAGEMENT REPRESENTATIVE

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTMYJOB NOON ON MONDAYS (INCLUDING HOLIDAYS) MICHELLE BROWN, 802-865-1020 X21, MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

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10/29/19 12:12 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR BROWSE POSTS ON YOUR PHONE AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

97 JUNE 9-16, 2021

Work at Summer Camp!! June-August, 2021

MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN TOWN ADMINISTRATOR The Town of Fairfield Selectboard is seeking a Town Administrator.

Experienced professional to help us maintain our brewery and taproom equipment.

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGER

IS CURRENTLY SEEKING

VEHICLE DETAILING SHOP LEAD https://bit.ly/34H0Ppl

The administrator Lead our HR function assists the five-member to ensure positive Selectboard in the general employment experiences. administration of the town. Day-to-day responsibilities Apply here: lawsonsfinest. include supporting all departments as needed, com/about-us/join-our-team. monitoring budgets, attending and participating in all Selectboard 2v-Lawsons060921.indd 1 6/7/21 2v-Spectrum060921.indd 11:22 AM meetings, public relations, and coordination with the town’s elected and appointed officials.

SUPPORTED HOUSING YOUTH COACH https://bit.ly/3oSDlH9

The starting salary for this full-time position is negotiable but is expected to be in the range of $35,000 to $40,000 depending on experience and qualifications. The town offers an excellent benefit package. The successful candidate will have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree in public administration, political science, or business management or at least five years’ experience in an administrative or managerial capacity in either municipal government or business, or a combination of relevant experience and education. To apply in confidence, please email a cover letter, resume, and contact information for three references to townadmin@ fairfieldvermont.us with Fairfield Town Administrator as the subject, or mail to: Town of Fairfield Selectboard Fairfield Town Administrator Search PO Box 5 Fairfield, VT 05455 Resumes accepted until position is filled. E.O.E.

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SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES PROGRAM DIRECTOR

1

Garden Staff Bring your knowledge in gardening and cooking to kids! This role includes managing an educational garden and instructing fun activities with its produce and tending. In this role you are a member of great team who shares responsibility to help with a variety of other outdoors activities. Starting salary $2,500. Room-and-Board included.

Interested? Contact: Mollie Farnham-Stratton | Mollie@Campdudley.org

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The Vermont Natural Resources Council (VNRC) has an exciting opportunity for a motivated individual to help guide policies and programs related to community development, land use planning, natural resource conservation and climate resilience. Working with a committed staff in Montpelier, the Sustainable Communities Program Director will oversee VNRC’s work on local and state land use and community development policy; provide technical support to members, state and regional agencies and municipalities; and work closely with our other programs on an integrated approach to meeting the challenges facing Vermont’s environment, communities and people. Occasional in-state travel and evening meetings will be required. The successful candidate must be self-directed and have excellent communication skills; the ability to work collaboratively in a busy work-environment; a practical understanding of smart growth principles; the skills necessary to advocate for smart growth policies before state and municipal agencies; a passion for protecting the environment; and a belief that individuals working together can affect positive change. We welcome applications from those with academic training in community planning, and we recognize that formal education is not the only pathway to gaining relevant experience. We invite candidates with any combination of academic, professional, and life experience who can demonstrate outstanding ability and commitment to building sustainable communities. VNRC is committed to a process of centering equity, diversity and inclusion in our work through such values as humility & reciprocity, collaboration and power sharing, and integrity and accountability, and applicants should share a commitment to this effort. Starting salary is commensurate with experience, with total salary and benefits package ranging between $70,000-$80,000. Email a letter of interest, resume and three references to aconnizzo@vnrc.org. Letters should be addressed to Brian Shupe, Executive Director. Position will remain open until filled. VNRC is an EOE. Learn more at vnrc.org.

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Camp Kiniya is a beautiful summer camp for girls located on Lake Champlain in Colchester. We are seeking staff who enjoy working with youth 9-14 years old, are team oriented, and like being in a community dedicated to fun, service and leadership development. Waterfront Staff Join a team of fun-loving people teaching paddling, swimming, and sailing to Campers. Water experience helpful. Lifeguard certification provided on-site.

6/8/21 11:52 AM

OPEN HOUSE JOB FAIR

*Free pair of socks to every attendee June 12th — 9am–4pm 150 Pilgrim Park Road, Waterbury, VT

CURRENT OPENINGS

Waterbury Weekday Shifts: 9-hour shifts, Monday – Thursday: 1st Shift 6AM-3PM , 2nd Shift 2PM-11PM 3rd Shift 10PM-7AM

Waterbury Weekend Shifts: 12-hour shifts, Friday – Sunday: Weekend Days 6AM-6PM Weekend Nights 6PM-6AM Northfield: 8-hour shifts Monday – Friday: 1st Shift 7AM-3PM, 2nd Shift 3PM-11PM 3rd Shift 11PM-7AM Employee Benefits: ✓Family-friendly schedules ❏ ✓Paid Maternity/Paternity leave ❏ ✓Excellent wages/medical benefits ❏ ✓401(k) with Employer Matching and more ❏ See more opportunities at darntough.com/careers or call (802) 221-4246

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6/7/21 9:34 AM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

98

POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

JUNE 9-16, 2021

READY TO HIRE FULL-TIME HELP FOR YOUNG MAN Box Office Manager

Middlebury College is looking for a Box Office Manager. This person will manage the day-to-day operation of the Mahaney Arts Center box office, ensuring excellent, efficient, professional ticketing services and customer service. The Box Office Manager will work with students, departments, student activities, athletics, and the College administration to meet the ticketing needs across campus. This includes programming the ticketing software, conducting ticket sales, completing daily deposits and revenue allocations, trouble-shooting software issues, resolving customer inquiries, and supporting marketing efforts for events. We are seeking an energetic, organized candidate who enjoys a fast-paced environment and giving great customer service. For a complete list of responsibilities, please see the full job description. For more information, or to apply please visit: https://apptrkr.com/2280775 Why work for us? Middlebury College employees enjoy competitive wages; health, dental, retirement, and vision benefits; and educational assistance programs. Middlebury is an equal-opportunity employer where diversity, equity, and inclusion are core values. Middlebury encourages applications from women, people of color, people with disabilities, and members of other protected classes and historically underrepresented communities. 5h-MiddleburyCollege060921.indd 1

Positions available to work as a team with a young adult autistic man in the community and at his home. The successful candidate will be a responsible person who enjoys helping others, has good athletic skills, and has a musical repertoire. Highly skilled training will accompany this job. A college degree is required. This is a 8:30 am - 4:00 pm Monday - Friday schedule with great summer hours. However, the job is year-round. Pay is very competitive, starting at $25/hr. This is a full-time position and one that will allow you to grow professionally. Please send your resume, cover letter and 3 references with their contact information to the nbgteamvt@gmail.com. Resumes submitted without cover letters or reference contacts will not be considered. It will be necessary that you are fully COVID-19 vaccinated at the time of employment. Thank you for your interest, NBG Team

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Engaging minds that change the world

Seeking a position with a quality employer? Consider The University of Vermont, a stimulating and diverse workplace. We offer a comprehensive benefit package including tuition remission for on-going, full-time positions. Research Project Manager - ARS Food Systems Research #S2835PO - The University of Vermont is hiring a Research Project Manager to work with UVM Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Food Systems Research. The manager will provide leadership and coordination for research and outreach projects, synthesize data and results for public dissemination, oversee communication and relationships with key stakeholders, and facilitate operational components of the research. Qualifications include a Master’s degree in agricultural sciences, food systems, or a related field and at least 2 years of specialized experienced. Project management skills are required, as well as computer/software skills in word processing, spreadsheet applications, social and web media, and effective communication, writing, and interpersonal skills required. Dairy Herd Management Educator - St. Johnsbury Office #S2843PO - The University of Vermont Extension seeks to hire a part-time, 0.50FTE (18.75 hours weekly), Dairy Herd Management Educator in our St. Johnsbury Office, with a possibility of another location. The Dairy Herd Management Educator will deliver dairy management outreach education and manage complex technical assistance projects. The educator will work directly with dairy farm business owners and managers in the areas of milk quality, dairy nutrition, animal husbandry, animal housing and facilities, and personnel management. This position will deliver individualized dairy herd management advising and prepare solutions–based management reports for small. This position will initiate and oversee dairy management teams to identify, evaluate and recommend implementation plans related to solving operational problems for small ruminant, organic and small-herd cow dairies. Qualifications includes a Bachelor’s degree in agriculture, dairy science or related field, and one to three years’ related experience required, as well as having basic knowledge of a wide range of dairy herd management practices, challenges, and benefits. Bilingual in English/Spanish is a plus. The University is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the institution. Applicants are encouraged to include in their cover letter information about how they will further this goal. For further information on these positions and others currently available, or to apply online, please visit www.uvmjobs.com. Applicants must apply for positions electronically. Paper resumes are not accepted. Open positions are updated daily. Please call 802-656-3150 or email employment@uvm.edu for technical support with the online application. The University of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

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5/25/21 10:04 AM

Seven Days Issue: 6/9 Due: 6/7 by 11am Size: 3.83 x 7 Cost: $570.35 (with 1 week online)

Maintenance Technician Full Time

OPERATIONS ANALYST VEDA has an opening for a full-time Operations Analyst to join our team. This is an excellent opportunity for someone with experience working with loan systems, is comfortable working in a paperless environment, knows how to problem solve, and takes pride in the accuracy of their work. VEDA provides financing to businesses and farms across Vermont, often in partnership with private financial institutions and government agencies. This position’s primary responsibilities will be to support VEDA’s loan servicing functions and to develop solutions that drive optimal operating efficiencies.

Winooski Housing Authority, a progressive owner, manager and developer of affordable housing, seeks a highly motivated Maintenance Technician to join our team. Experience in general facilities maintenance a plus. Must possess a valid driver’s license, an acceptable literacy level and be willing to be a part of the on-call rotation. Competitive starting salary with a generous benefits package. Please send your resume to Debbie at: dch@winooskihousing.org or mail (stop in for application) to: WHA, 83 Barlow Street, Winooski, VT 05404. Attn: Debbie. E.O.E.

The position requires a solid understanding of VEDA’s programs 5/18/21 1 and services, information technology, loan systems and processes. 2v-WinooskiHousingAuthorityMAINT051921.indd Responsibilities include inputting and analyzing loan data; processing loan payments; preparing reports, reconciliations, and $20 per hour. information dashboards; synthesizing data for, and responding Need Companion for our to, inquiries from varied audiences. 26-year-old daughter.

Companion

VEDA’s Operations Analyst will be a member of VEDA’s Operations team, working under the supervision of the Director of Servicing. This job has a wide variety of responsibilities and will reward the right candidate with a breadth of experience within a non-profit, mission-oriented workplace and the opportunity for career progression within VEDA. VEDA offers a competitive salary and excellent health and retirement benefits packages. Other perks include a flexible work environment, opportunities for professional development, generous tuition reimbursement and access to networking opportunities around Vermont. VEDA is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer and is interested in increasing staff diversity. We welcome job applications from all qualified candidates. Email resume/cover letter to Cheryl Houchens: chouchens@veda.org.

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2:10 PM

She is developmentally delayed. She takes full care of herself, just needs a little companionship and company. Must have driver’s license and car. No smoking. 6 to 8 hours a day for Thursdays and Fridays. Other times flexible. $20 per hour. Please call or email with questions.

Morton Bostock, morton.bostock@gmail.com 802-862-7602

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2/7/20 11:30 AM


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CDL CLASS A DRIVER/ROOFER

Transportation Maintenance Workers VTrans is actively seeking entry-level Transportation Maintenance Workers in the White River and Randolph areas. Permanent, full-time positions. Great benefits package including medical, dental, and life insurances; pension and retirement plans; paid vacations and earned time off; and a winter snow season bonus.

To learn more, follow the corresponding links below:

White River Application deadline is June 16 Journeyman: bit.ly/WRJjourneyMW Apprentice: bit.ly/WRJapprentMW

Randolph Application deadline is June 9

99 JUNE 9-16, 2021

• Full time year round employment

Williston, VT Craft food & beverage producer Hiring for multiple positions Looking for positive and progressive team members.

• Good benefits • EOE/M/F/VET/Disability employer • Pay negotiable with experience

PRODUCTION LEAD OR ASSISTANT 2V-ACHathorne060221.indd & WAREHOUSE MANAGER OR ASSISTANT

Apply in person: 252 Avenue C, Williston, VT 05495 802-862-6473 E.O.E.

1

5/28/21 4:16 PM

Starting at $15/hour and up:

(based on experience and prior training)

Journeyman: bit.ly/RandjournMW Apprentice: bit.ly/RandApprentMW

Contact us:

COMMUNITY BANKER

HIRING@ADROPOFJOY.COM

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS

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1 6/3/214t-ADropofJoy060921.indd 2:16 PM

6/8/21 12:09 PM

Payroll Administrator North Atlantic Baking Company is seeking an experienced Payroll Administrator to join our team in our Burlington, Vermont location! This role is responsible for processing an accurate and timely payroll for our organization. This position will also process accounts payable.

Place Place is seeking is anseeking account an account manager. manager.

www.placevt.com resumes and links to: www.placevt.com jobs@placevt.com resumes and links to:

The successful candidate will have experiencing processing payroll and accounts payable, as well as having a high attention to detail, superior accuracy, and a high degree of discretion. Experience with ADP is a plus but not required. A high school diploma and 3-5 years of payroll/AP experience required. Experience in a production/manufacturing environment a plus!

Senior Plant Accountant/Financial Analyst

The North Atlantic Baking Company is seeking a highly qualified Senior Plant Accountant/Financial Analyst for jobs@placevt.com it's organization. The North Atlantic Baking Company is CHARLOTTE a commercial bakery having locations in Burlington and CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH Brattleboro Vermont, as well as DSD operations. This position 2v-PlaceCreative052621.indd 1 5/24/21 9:53 AM is responsible for supporting plant and sales management in optimizing manufacturing costs and enhancing profits. Duties include determining actual costs of manufacturing, scrutinizing associated expenses, analyzing profitability, and assisting in the preparation and monitoring of monthly plant profit and loss statements and comparison to budgets. In partnership with operational management establish best practices related to cost tracking, waste, and consumption. Charlotte Congregational Church Embrac e d by the he alin g l ove o f Jesus Chris t a n d in s pire d by Hi s t e a c h i ng s,

PA R T- T I M E

we commit to praye rful, c ompa s s i ona t e a nd

BOOKKEEPER c oura ge ous ac tion in the wor l d .

The Charlotte Congregational www.CharlotteCongregationalChurch.org Church is looking for a part802-425-3176 charlotteucc@gmavt.net time bookkeeper. 15-20 hours/ week. Pay is negotiable and commensurate with experience. For more information, go to www.CharlotteUCC.org

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The successful candidate will have a Bachelor’s degree in business, finance, accounting, or a related field. An equivalent combination of education and experience may be considered. Experience with Microsoft Navision is a plus. 3 years of experience in a manufacturing environment preferred.

Northfield Savings Bank, founded in 1867, is the largest banking institution headquartered in Vermont. We strive to serve our employees as well as our communities. We are seeking professionals to join our team as Community Bankers at several of our locations.

JOB RESPONSIBILITIES & REQUIREMENTS

• The Community Banker will be responsible for receiving and processing customers’ financial transactions, matching customers’ needs with appropriate products and services, protecting customer information and maintaining customer confidentiality. • We are looking for someone who will consistently provide outstanding customer service, has excellent communication skills, and will build rapport and develop relationships with our valued customers. • A high school diploma, general education degree (GED) or equivalent is required.

OPPORTUNITY FOR GROWTH

• NSB encourages career development and has a variety of training platforms available. • Average Years of Service at Northfield Savings Bank is above 9! If you’re looking for a career in the Banking industry, this is a great place to start!

WHAT NSB CAN OFFER YOU

• NSB offers a competitive compensation based on experience. • Benefits package including medical, dental, vision, combined time off, 10 paid holidays, a wellness program and more! • Profit sharing opportunity and an outstanding employer-matching 401(K) retirement program. • NSB offers professional development opportunities, and a positive work environment supported by a team culture. • Hours of operation are Monday – Friday, generally 8:00am to 5:00pm. We understand the importance of having evenings and weekends with our friends, families, and our community. Please send an NSB Application + your resume in confidence to: Careers@ nsbvt.com, or mail to:

Send resumes to: shanker@koffeekupbakery.biz NORTH ATLANTIC BAKING COMPANY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER WHO OFFERS A COMPETITIVE BENEFITS PACKAGE INCLUDING PAID TIME OFF, MEDICAL, DENTAL, VISION, SHORT- AND LONG-TERM DISABILITY, LIFE INSURANCE, AND 401(K) WITH MATCH.

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There is no better time to join NSB’s team!

Northfield Savings Bank H.R. P.O. Box 7180, Barre, VT 05641-7180 Equal Opportunity Employer

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5/17/21 10:27 AM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

100

POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

JUNE 9-16, 2021

LAMOILLE RESTORATIVE CENTER SEEKS EXPERIENCED PROFESSIONALS TO JOIN OUR GROWING TEAM. LRC is a small, dynamic nonprofit organization with a mission to uphold the dignity and resilience of individuals and families through restorative justice principles and programs. LRC employs professionals who thrive in an inclusive and equitable environment.

COURT DIVERSION AND VICTIM SERVICES CASE MANAGER Are you committed to applying restorative approaches to increase accountability, promote safety, and support those impacted by crime? LRC is hiring a full-time Court Diversion and Victim Services Case Manager to coordinate restorative processes and support services for individuals and communities impacted by crime. The case manager will work in a team to create more trauma-informed and victim-centered responses and supports, and be responsible for supporting participants in a range of pre-adjudication programs. This position is ideal for someone with excellent communication, collaboration, and organizational skills, and those who possess an understanding of trauma-informed and victim centered practices in Vermont’s justice and human service systems. A bachelor’s degree or equivalent work experience is required, and preference will be given to those with experience working with justice-involved individuals and/or with victims of crime.

RESTORATIVE PRACTICES IN SCHOOLS TRAINER AND COACH Can you see yourself working with students and staff to create more inclusive and equitable learning environments?

CREDIT ANALYST

There is no better time to join NSB’s team! Northfield Savings Bank, founded in 1867, is the largest banking institution headquartered in Vermont. We strive to serve our employees as well as our communities. We are seeking a professional to join our Commercial Credit Department as a Credit Analyst in our Berlin Operations Center.

JOB RESPONSIBILITIES & REQUIREMENTS • The Credit Analyst evaluates the financial condition of commercial borrowers applying for credit with the bank. • The successful candidate will have exceptional customer service and strong communication skills. We are looking for someone who is detail oriented in a fast-paced environment. • A bachelor’s degree in business, finance or accounting, or two years credit analysis experience in a banking environment.

LRC is hiring a full-time Restorative Practices (RP) Trainer and Coach to coordinate and support the implementation of restorative practices in local schools. This position is ideal for someone with a strong understanding of restorative practices, familiarity with the whole-school approach to restorative work, training experience, strong communication skills, and an ability to work both independently and on a team. The successful candidate for this new position will become an integral part of LRC’s existing youth team and will work collaboratively with LRC’s other restorative justice trainers and practitioners.

OPPORTUNITY FOR GROWTH

SCHOOL ENGAGEMENT SPECIALISTS

WHAT NSB CAN OFFER YOU

• Average Years of Service at Northfield Savings Bank is above 9! If you’re looking to settle your career in the Banking industry, join our team!

• NSB offers a competitive compensation based on experience.

Do you have passion for supporting students' school success? Do you enjoy collaborating with others to solve problems? LRC is hiring three full-time School Engagement Specialists (SES) to expand its School Engagement Program team. Responsibilities include providing outreach and support to Lamoille Valley students ages five to 15, and their families, struggling with school attendance. The SES helps students re-engage with school by working together to identify causes of school absences and address attendance barriers. This position is ideal for someone with a strong understanding of Vermont’s education and human services systems, excellent communication and collaboration skills, and the ability to work both independently and on a team. All positions are based in Hyde Park, and come with a competitive salary and a comprehensive benefit package that includes employee health, dental, and life insurance. Other benefits include paid sick and vacation leave, 15 paid holidays, and a retirement plan. Interested individuals can apply by email – with the job title in the subject line – by sending a cover letter and resume to: info@lrcvt.org. Applications will be accepted until the positions are filled.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT LAMOILLE RESTORATIVE CENTER GO TO LRCVT.ORG.

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• NSB encourages career development and has a variety of training platforms available, including tuition reimbursement.

• Benefits package including medical, dental, vision, combined time off, 10 paid holidays, a wellness program and more! • Profit sharing opportunity and an outstanding employer-matching 401(K) retirement program. • NSB offers professional development opportunities, and a positive work environment supported by a team culture. • Hours of operation are Monday – Friday, generally 8:00am to 5:00pm. We understand the importance of having evenings and weekends with our friends, families, and our community. Please send an NSB Application + your resume in confidence to: Careers@nsbvt.com, or mail to: Northfield Savings Bank H.R. P.O. Box 7180, Barre, VT 05641-7180 Equal Opportunity Employer

6/7/21 2:39 PM 8t-NorthfieldSavingsBank060221.indd CRACK OPEN YOUR FUTURE...

1

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with our mobile-friendly job board.

YOU WILL FIND

SUCCESS

Job seekers can: • Browse hundreds of current, local positions from Vermont companies. • Search for jobs by keyword, location, category and job type. • Set up job alerts. • Apply for jobs directly through the site.

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DRIVERS PROGRAM MANAGER PROGRAM ASSISTANT/DISPATCHER

JUNE 9-16, 2021

LITTLE MULE EQUIPMENT Fabricator/Operations Coordinator

Help move your neighbors forward in their lives by joining our team! The Ready To Go van transportation program at Good News Garage is hiring multiple positions to assist in safely transporting our clients and their children. Vans and mobile phones provided to all Drivers. For full job descriptions and to apply, visit GoodNewsGarage.org/careers ASCENTRIA CARE ALLIANCE IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER. 3h-GoodNewsGarage060921.indd 1

6/8/21 10:50 AM

Looking for a Sweet Job?

Associate Housing Director VHCB is seeking an experienced and collaborative housing professional to join our team, supporting the development of affordable housing in Vermont. Work on policy and program development, new initiatives, and deliver support and funding to VHCB’s housing partners. Coordinate training and technical assistance programs; evaluate affordable housing applications, make recommendations for action, and support the overall effectiveness of VHCB housing programs. Qualifications: demonstrated commitment to affordable housing, prior experience and training in housing development, financial analysis, and project underwriting, strong communication skills, and a commitment to collaborative problem solving. Experience working with non-profit organizations, municipalities, housing development groups, and state agencies important. Experience with project management and coordination of housing programs preferred.

Start applying at jobs.sevendaysvt.com.

Little Mule Equipment is a distributor and manufacturer of innovative excavation equipment. We sell tree shears and tiltrotators, which expand the capabilities of excavators and improve safety and efficiency. We design, produce and sell accessories that provide abilities that no other equipment does. Little Mule Equipment is a small, nimble, creative, and growing company in Huntington, VT, and we pride ourselves on excellent customer service, innovation, fun, and collaboration. We have an immediate need for a hands-on Fabricator/Operations Coordinator to make, assemble, test, and ship products. This is an opportunity to help the company deliver on our promises, learn and grow, and operate state-of-the-art excavation equipment. Wage is $20-$30 per hour depending on experience, with the possibility of profit sharing. This position has the potential to become a management position as the company grows. More info: littlemuleequipment.com Apply: Nils@LittleMuleEquipment.com

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6/7/21 1:22 PM

ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR BURLINGTON

Head Start is a federally-funded, national child and family development program which provides comprehensive services for pregnant women, children from birth to age five, and their families. Services for children promote school readiness, and include early education, health, nutrition, mental health, and services for children with special needs. Services for parents promote family engagement, and include parent leadership and social service supports.

Senior Housing Analyst The Senior Housing Analyst works with a collaborative team to address the housing needs of Vermonters. Evaluate affordable housing applications to the Board, make recommendations for funding, and participate in the development of VHCB housing policies. Qualifications: Substantial prior experience and training in housing development, financial analysis of housing development budgets, and multi-family housing underwriting, as well as strong communication skills, attention to detail, and a commitment to the multi-goal mission of VHCB. Experience working with non-profit organizations, municipalities, housing development groups, and state agencies is important. Background in any or all of the following desirable: architecture, construction, service-supported housing, training and technical assistance, and working with federal funds.

As the Administrative Coordinator, you will provide clerical and administrative support for the CVHS Director and management staff; conduct word processing, data entry and generate reports; facilitate document production and mass mailings; coordinate special projects; communicate with staff, parents, vendors, and various agencies; and oversee office management and organization.

REQUIREMENTS: Associate’s degree (Bachelor’s degree preferred) in relevant field, as well as 3 to 5 years of relevant work experience. Also required are excellent verbal and written communication (bilingual abilities a plus!), intermediate skills in Microsoft Office; speed, proficiency and accuracy with word processing and data entry; strong, proven note-taking, writing and proofreading skills; customer service skills; exceptional organizational skills and attention to detail; a commitment to valuing diversity and contributing to an inclusive working and learning environment; a valid driver’s license, clean driving record and access to reliable transportation; physical ability to carry out required tasks; and a can-do, extra-mile attitude.

40 hours/week, full year. Health plan and excellent benefits. Please submit cover letter, resume, and three work references to: CVHSAdminCoord@cvoeo.org. No phone calls, please. CVOEO / Head Start is interested in candidates who can contribute to our diversity and excellence. Applicants are encouraged to include in their cover letter information about how they will further this goal.

Read the full job descriptions at vhcb.org/about-us/jobs TO APPLY: Reply with letter of interest and résumé to: Laurie Graves, VHCB, 58 E. State Street, Montpelier, Vt. 05602 or by email to jobs@vhcb.org. Positions open until filled. Full-time positions with competitive salary and comprehensive benefits package. EOE.

THIS INSTITUTION IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.

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102

POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

JUNE 9-16, 2021

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Northeast Kingdom Human Services, Inc. (NKHS) is seeking an energetic and dynamic Executive Director to provide leadership for the organization by overseeing the development and execution of the strategic plan, mission and vision, fundraising and operational priorities. NKHS is a 501(c)(3) private not-for-profit organization operating with the purpose of promoting high quality, comprehensive community mental health programs in Vermont’s beautiful Northeast Kingdom. Our mission is to empower individuals, families, and communities by promoting hope, healing, and support. NKHS is a Designated Agency contracted with the State of Vermont to provide the highest quality of service in the areas of adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities, children and youth with serious emotional disabilities, and adults with mental health and substance use challenges. We serve the populations of Caledonia, Essex, and Orleans counties through a wide variety of targeted programs for individuals of all ages. NKHS has over 450 employees providing case management, community and home supports, residential care, psychiatry, medication management, therapy, vocational supports, school based counseling, emergency care, and respite services. These services are provided annually to nearly 4,000 of our local community members, helping them overcome challenges and achieve health in mind, body, and spirit.

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS

BOARD

As the senior executive for NKHS, the Executive Director will provide leadership for the design and implementation of programs aligned with the organization’s strategic plan, mission and vision. This position requires a dynamic, innovative, high-level critical thinker, effective and motivating spokesperson, effective fundraiser, and collaborative developer of talent.

• Develops & executes the Board-approved strategic plan and annual goals, while providing updates on performance and critical metrics to the Board of Directors. • Provides assistance to Board committees as requested or needed, and ensures that NKHS directors are appropriately and fully leveraging committees of the board. • Responds to Board requests in a timely fashion. • Actively pursues fundraising and assists Board members in these activities.

The Executive Director represents the organization broadly to the Board of Directors, private donors, town, county and state governments, local hospitals, law enforcement, and other community partners. Through advocacy and fundraising efforts, the Executive Director ensures that sufficient resources are available to accomplish the organization’s objectives. The director will also build and direct the leadership team and provide managerial oversight for all administration, ensuring adherence to requirements of state and federal funders and NKHS’ policies and procedures. The Executive Director provides a caring, supportive, safe environment for all staff members and clients. They will serve as a role model of the highest levels of professional attitude, conduct, and excellence while insisting on the same from the staff. Executive Director candidates should possess effective facilitation skills and the ability to adapt to changing circumstances. The Executive Director will ensure that clients’ experience, from beginning to end, are filled with compassion and competence.

RESPONSIBILITIES & SCOPE MANAGEMENT • Broad management and leadership responsibility for all NKHS programs and activities. • Models & communicates a compelling vision consistent with NKHS’ core values. • Maintains the confidentiality required by the organization. • Coordinates a marketing, communications, and outreach plan to enhance and elevate NKHS’ value across multiple channels and platforms. • Maintains productive relationships with the Board of Directors, staff, funding, referral and regulatory agencies. • In conjunction with the CFO and the NKHS Board’s Finance Committee, maintains oversight and integrity of the organization’s financial condition and funding portfolio.

STAFF • Interviews, hires, supervises, coaches, trains & retains high quality, productive management staff through the effective use of supervision and feedback. • Engages the staff and Board to identify potential solutions to complex and less-defined issues. • Promotes a culture of collaboration with accountability, respect and inclusion at its foundation. • Supports the leadership team in the creation of standardized practices for clinicians and staff at NKHS. • Creates development plans for all leadership team members, including identifying potential successors for the Executive Director role, and fosters in-house succession for other key roles at NKHS. 15t-NKHS060921.indd 1

GENERAL • Willingness to travel to represent the organization. • Maintains up-to-date knowledge of legislative actions, on the state and federal level, relative to NKHS. • Ensures the maintenance of the agency’s facilities including compliance with state and local licensing, fire and sanitation standards. • Ensures compliance with all rules and regulations applicable to NKHS. • Works with community and other business partners to negotiate agreements.

QUALIFICATIONS • A strong passion for the mission of NKHS. • Graduate degree and 5 years’ experience in the social services and/or mental health fields. • Proven experience in leadership & management of an equivalent organization. • A thorough understanding of community mental health systems. Knowledge specific to the State of Vermont would be preferred. • Outstanding verbal and written communication skills. • Experience communicating with and presenting to diverse audiences. • Understanding of a broad range of technology, with an emphasis on electronic health records. • Experience in fundraising, including cultivation of donors and writing of grants. • Experience in evaluating and/or negotiating agreements. • Ability to challenge conventional thinking, encourage dialogue and offer genuine receptiveness to differing perspectives. • Ability to inspire trust and act with integrity. Benefits for full-time employees include: health insurance (vision and prescription coverage included), dental insurance, life insurance, short-term and long-term disability, long-term care, AFLAC supplemental insurance plans, 125 Flex Plan-medical and dependent care flexible spending accounts, 403(b) retirement plan with company match, generous paid time off (including 12 paid holidays) and an outstanding employee wellness program. The application deadline for this position is June 30, 2021. Please send resumes and direct all inquiries to Brooke Bury, Director of Human Resources, at bbury@nkhs.net. NKHS is proud to be an equal opportunity workplace dedicated to pursuing and hiring a diverse workforce. 6/7/21 10:34 AM


ai162247821360_1T-HireUp060221.pdf

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5/31/21

12:23 PM

LOOKING FOR WORK? Meet the area’s top employers at:

Hire Up!

A Live Video Q&A Session Connecting Companies With Candidates Considering a new career path? Want to get back into the field you love? These sessions will help you explore your options. During each 30-minute session recruiters will explain what jobs they have available and what they’re looking for in an applicant. You can ask questions or just listen in. Attend one session or all — for free!

WED., JUNE 16 10 a.m.

a drop of joy

11 a.m.

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1 p.m.

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Register for the free live video sessions at:

jobs.sevendaysvt.com/hire-up SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

103


SHOW YOUR DAD AND YOUR COMMUNITY YOU CARE. SHOP LOCAL THIS FATHER’S DAY.

Need some ideas?

WITH GENEROUS SUPPORT FROM:

Visit the Register for all the info on area shopkeepers who are selling their products online for local delivery or pickup. Browse by categories ranging from jewelry to electronics, outdoor gear to apparel. Whether you need something for yourself or that perfect gift for a loved one, shop savvy and keep Vermont strong. SHOP T H ER EGIS T E R .C OM

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3/22/21 7:38 PM


CALCOKU & SUDOKU (P.85) CROSSWORD (P.85)

fun stuff HARRY BLISS

JEN SORENSEN

SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

105


fun stuff RYAN RIDDLE

is

Making it is not :( Keep this newspaper free for all. Join the Seven Days Super Readers at sevendaysvt.com/super-readers or call us at 802-864-5684.

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7/14/20 3:32 PM

Have a deep, dark fear of your own? Submit it to cartoonist Fran Krause at deep-dark-fears.tumblr.com, and you may see your neurosis illustrated in these pages.


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY REAL JUNE 10-16

in accordance with current astrological potentials, I invite you to make it clear to people exactly who you are and who you aren’t.

GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20):

I’m glad you’re not on the planet Saturn right now. The winds there can blow at 1,000 miles per hour. But I would like you to feel a brisk breeze as you wander around in nature here on Earth. Why? Because according to my interpretation of the current astrological omens, winds will have a cleansing effect on you. They will clear your mind of irrelevant worries and trivial concerns. They’ll elevate your thoughts, as well as your feelings. Do you know the origin of the English word “inspire”? It’s from the Latin word inspirare, meaning “blow into, breathed upon by spirit.” Its figurative meaning is “to inspire, excite, inflame.” The related Latin word spiritus refers to “a breathing of the wind” and “breath of a god” — hence “inspiration; breath of life.”

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Aries actor Leonard Nimoy became mega-famous by playing the role of Spock, an alien from the planet Vulcan in the Star Trek franchise. He always enjoyed the role, but in 1975 he wrote an autobiography called I Am Not Spock. In it, he clarified how different he was from the character he performed. In 1995, Nimoy published a follow-up autobiography, I Am Spock, in which he described the ways in which he was similar to the fictional alien. In the spirit of Nimoy’s expansive self-definition, Aries, and

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The poet Rumi declared, “A lover has four streams inside, of water, wine, honey, and milk.” With that in mind, Taurus, I will recommend that you seek a boost in the honey department. Your passions and feelings have been flowing along fairy well, but lately they’ve lacked some sweetness. As a result, you’re not receiving as much of the sweetness you need from the world around you. So your assignment is to intensify the honey stream within you! Remember the principle, “Like attracts like.” CANCER (June 21-July 22): Cancerian author Franz Kafka put his characters into surreal dilemmas. In his novella The Metamorphosis, for example, the hero wakes up one day to find he has transformed into a giant insect. Despite his feral imagination, however, Kafka had a pragmatic relationship with consumerism. “I do not read advertisements,” he said. “I would spend all of my time wanting things.” In accordance with astrological omens, I invite you to adopt his earthy attitude for the next two weeks. Take a break from wanting things, period. Experiment with feeling free of all the yearnings that constantly demand your attention. Please note: This break in the action won’t be forever. It’s just a vacation. When you return to wanting things, your priorities will have been realigned and healed, and you’ll feel refreshed. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Author Umberto Eco declared that beauty is boring because it “must always follow certain rules.” A beautiful nose has to be just the right shape and size, he said, while an “ugly nose” can be ugly in a million different unpredictable ways. I find his definition narrow and boring and prefer that of philosopher Francis Bacon, who wrote, “There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the proportion.” Poet Charles Baudelaire agreed, saying, “That which is not slightly distorted lacks sensible appeal: from which it follows that irregularity — that is to say, the unexpected, surprise and astonishment — is an essential part and characteristic of beauty.”

Then there’s the Japanese concept of wabisabi, which reveres beauty that’s imperfect, transitory and incomplete. Beginning now, and for the rest of 2021, Leo, I encourage you to ignore Eco’s dull beauty and cultivate your relationship with the more interesting kind.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): One of the more evocative passages in J.R.R. Tolkien’s novel The Return of the King is about the warrior Éowyn. It says, “Then the heart of Éowyn changed, or else at last she understood it. And suddenly her winter passed, and the sun shone on her.” I’m predicting a comparable transformation for you in the near future, Virgo. There’ll be some fundamental shift in the way your heart comprehends life. When that happens, you will clearly fathom some secrets about your heart that have previously been vague or inaccessible. And then the sun will shine upon you with extra brilliance. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Libran actor and

author Carrie Fisher had more than the average number of inner demons. Yet she accomplished a lot and was nominated for and won many professional awards. Here’s the advice she gave: “Stay afraid, but do it anyway. What’s important is the action. You don’t have to wait to be confident.” I hope you’ll employ that strategy in the coming weeks, dear Libra. The time is favorable for you to work hard on your number one goal no matter what your emotions might be at any particular moment.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpio author Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881) had a gambling addiction for many years. At one point, he lost so much money betting on roulette that he had to take drastic measures. He wrote a novella in record time — just 16 days — to raise money to pay his debt. The story was titled The Gambler. Its hero was a not-very-successful gambler. Is there a comparable antidote in your future, Scorpio? A gambit that somehow makes use of the problem to generate the cure? I suspect there is. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In her poem “Escape,” Michelle Tudor addresses a lover: “Inside of you: a dream raging to be set free.” She implies that she would like to be a collaborator

who provides assistance and inspiration in liberating her companion’s dream. The coming weeks will be an excellent time for you to make a similar offer to an ally you care for — and to ask that ally to do the same for you. And by the way: What is the dream inside you that’s raging to be set free? And what’s the dream inside your comrade?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Author Mar-

tha Beck has helpful counsel for you to keep returning to during the coming weeks. “It isn’t necessary to know exactly how your ideal life will look,” she writes. “You only have to know what feels better and what feels worse. Begin making choices based on what makes you feel freer and happier, rather than on how you think an ideal life should look. It’s the process of feeling our way toward happiness, not the realization of the Platonic ideal, that creates our best lives.”

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Aquarian au-

thor James Dickey celebrated “the holy secret of flowing.” But he added, “You must be made for it.” In other words, he implied that the secret of flowing is a luxury only some of us have access to. And because we “must be made for it,” he seemed to suggest that being in possession of the secret of flowing is due to luck or genetics or privilege. But I reject that theory. I think anyone can tap into the secret of flowing if they have the desire and intention to do so. Like you! Right now! You’re primed to cultivate a robust relationship with the holy flow.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Why do humans enjoy much longer life spans than other higher primates? Here’s one reason: grandmothers. Anthropologists propose that early in our evolution, families with elder females especially thrived. The grandmothers helped care for children, ensuring greater health for everyone, as well as a higher rate of reproduction than grandmother-less broods. Their longevity genes got passed on, creating more grandmothers. Lucky! Having older women around while growing up has been key to the success of many of us. In accordance with astrological omens, I invite you to celebrate and honor the role your own grandmothers and female elders have played in your life. And if you’re a grandmother, celebrate and honor yourself!

CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES & DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES: REALASTROLOGY.COM OR 1-877-873-4888

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TYPE A ADVENTURER FOR LIFE Enjoy outdoor activities: gardening, photography, reading. Strong supporter of learning, growing knowledge of the arts, books on the universe (e.g., The Holographic Universe [Talbot], crime fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, thrillers [favorites authors: Preston and Child]). Like Bruce Springsteen’s Western Stars album. Looking for companion to tour Vermont mountains, reservoirs, lakes. Please, no narcissists. Thank you for reading this. Carol, 73, seeking: M, l VACCINATED, AFFECTIONATE SEEKS FORT-BUILDING TEAMMATE Curvy BBW seeks good company — a fun, chill, down-to-earth, very affectionate man to build living room forts with. Music, laughter, cuddling, witty repartee, adventure and outdoor sojourns are on the itinerary. Come enjoy the journey. The fully vaccinated and those equipped with a kind, accountable heart, a sense of humor, and an orientation toward facts and health, please inquire. middeg, 49, seeking: M, l READY TO EXPLORE I am ready for a new adventure. I am interested in exploring a relationship with a women or couple. I enjoy being in the woods, camping and just sitting in a brook or at a waterfall. I also like to get a bit of wind in my hair. I have a good sense of humor and am attractive and fun. Newadventures2021, 47, seeking: W, Cp IRREVERENCE WELCOMED My passions are travel, food, art, music and more. I like to spend as little time being serious as possible. I’m curious about a lot of things. Do you share these passions and have others of your own? Do you like family time, being in nature or people-watching as you sit at an outdoor table on Church Street? summerplease, 64, seeking: M, l SO INCREDIBLY AWKWARD Hmmm. I do kind of cool social work-y things. I have an awesome toddler and a terrible sense of humor (I love to laugh at my own jokes). I love to start projects but not finish them. I think trees are underrated and am sort of snarky to people I really like (sorry in advance). Please keep me out of direct sunlight. Am normal looking? Lol. Randomdorkyname, 35, seeking: M, l MERGING HEARTS AND MINDS Looking to add a new best friend and partner to my beautiful tribe to share those intimate moments and maybe grow old with. I believe in great love but know those roots are in the platonic. I like to move, sit, keep it fresh. I love music and silence. Looking for a brave, messy, youthful, mature human with emotional intelligence. Overhere, 56, seeking: M, l OUTDOORSY, HONEST, HEALTHY, MUSIC LOVER Vibrant, mature, independent, welltraveled person who is interested in nature, music, culture, arts, travel and enjoying life. Looking for a gent who is positive, kind, honest and enjoys the same. Bella2020, 63, seeking: M, l

MILLENNIALS INQUIRE WITHIN. YEEHAW. Looking for a hot, nerdy dude who has an adventurous, sensitive, techie soul. Good with his hands. Must love cuddles. I don’t mind if you prioritize your alone time as long as you don’t mind that I can be an endearing space case. Be warned: I will ask for your natal chart and when your most recent STI test was. starsaligned, 26, seeking: M CUCKOO ABOUT ADVENTURES I’m just looking for a new friend. I’m somewhat new to the area and would like to find someone who likes to talk, hike, or do anything that doesn’t involve going to the bar or lots of drinking! NDrootsNYbuds, 38, seeking: M, l INTERESTED Still standing after all these years! I’m interested in getting to know you as a person first, not in any great rush. Honesty, patience and acceptance = trust in my book. My favorite hobby is my new kayak. I can sometimes have a very ironic sense of humor! Just turned 68! Yikes! WayToGo, 68, seeking: M FULL MOON ADVENTURES If I told you everything about myself here, what would we have to talk about later? If you are funny, interesting, open-hearted, enjoying life and looking for some company, me too. Who knows where a little spark may lead? Firefly57, 64, seeking: M, l

EXPERIENCED IMPACT PLAYER SEEKS SPANKEE If you know, you know. If you are intrigued, please reach out. I seek a partner who can balance intellectual connection with erotic physical exploration. Be a good girl and do as you are told, and you will be rewarded. Be a bad girl, and you will be punished. Both situations will be intense and sexy. I promise. kinderedspirit, 52, seeking: W, l WORK AND PLAY, TRAVEL OFTEN I’m a hardworking, real-deal, manygeneration Vermonter with strong Caribbean connections. My goal is to work for eight-ish months and travel often to warm destinations January through March. Hope to find a partner who appreciates living life and is not about retirement but living to the fullest, staying active and staying fit. I’m a man who always has projects and plans. Fungardener, 61, seeking: W, l BREAKING OUT OF LOCKDOWN Somewhat of a homebody, though I do like an outside adventure. Ready to break out of lockdown and go traveling, or rummage through a few thrift stores in Lebanon or Estrie Aide in Sherbrooke. This follows my complete Moderna vaccination schedule. The COVID scare has kept me isolated beyond belief and devoid of a relationship. greytail2020, 65, seeking: W, Cp, Gp, l FREE SPIRIT WHO ENJOYS LIFE I enjoy skydiving, hiking, biking, photography, printing, cooking and much more. Looking for someone to share some of this life in a positive manner — friendship or more. Just turned 50 years young. jayspring, 50, seeking: W, l

MEN seeking...

GEEKY MAKER DAD, SUPER POSITIVE I’ve always pushed myself. Sometimes I do stop to reflect on why, and then, refreshed, I move forward some more. Built my own house. Adding to it now. But not married to it. Almost done with my master’s degree. I love travel and have been waiting out this pandemic to visit places again. Go visit places with me. Descanso, 53, seeking: W, l

HONEST, TRUSTWORTHY, AFFECTIONATE, ROMANTIC PARTNER I’m looking for my future partner in adventures though life. Someone to try new things and travel some. Willing to be in a committed relationship as we explore life together. She should have a sense of humor and be open to romantic and adventurous journeys. Equally willing to be loving, affectionate and romantic while accepting the same qualities from me. Happy2meetU, 52, seeking: W, l

WHERE ARE YOU? I like to think of myself as kind and smart, curious and adventurous, athletic and musical, and much more. A “renaissance person” is what I’ve always considered the ideal. Many years ago, I through-hiked the Appalachian Trail, and that experience, and my many adventures since, have shaped my life and my values in profound ways. somethingdifferent, 62, seeking: W, l

INTELLIGENT, COMPASSIONATE, CUDDLY, GOOD KISSER Educated SWM (50s) looking to enjoy more free time with someone special. Fully vaccinated and ready to reenter the post-COVID world. Love to walk, hike, travel, dine out, watch movies, cuddle and have good conversation, to name a few. On the more intimate side, I love naked afternoon lounging, playful teasing and some roleplaying. Tall_Guy69, 56, seeking: W, l DEADHEADS UNITE! Looking for a friend who loves music, people, laughter and fun! I’m mostly retired, and my mission now is to have as much fun as humanly possible, without hurting anybody or going to jail. Rhubarb, 69, seeking: W, l HAPPY TO BE HERE Seeking a happy, intelligent, honest woman open to possibilities. No drama queens or heavy drinkers. I like women who enjoy the outdoors, dining out on the weekends and staying in the house during the week. I like women who think a healthy sex life is important. pintoburk, 64, seeking: W, l

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TATTOOS, MUSIC, WORK I am a hardworking man who has been to hell and back and is rebuilding successfully. I would like a woman who works hard and wants to build a future with someone. No games. newlife2021, 46, seeking: W, l CHIVALRY Friendly “man” looking for my sidekick/partner/friend. Bruce2016, 54, seeking: W, l SWEET, SALTY AND SPICY I consider myself fun, charming, creative and an interestingly varied individual. BKind, 29, seeking: W, Cp, l

TRANS WOMEN seeking... LAND NARWHAL SEEKS UNICORN(S) Tall, beautiful, brilliant trans woman (just starting hormones) with long brown hair seeking trans women for friendship and fun. I’m well read, love cinema and theater. Newly single and finally fully coming out! Kind people only, please. jenesequa, 51, seeking: TW GENEROUS, OPEN, EASYGOING Active, healthy trans woman with partner seeks ecstatic connection for playtimes, connections, copulations, exploration and generally wonderful occasional times together. You should be fit, in good health and available (not down low). Ideal is another couple for a foursome. But possibilities are wide-ranging: three, four, explorations and adventure. DoubleUp, 64, seeking: M, Cp, l

TRANS MEN seeking... COUNTRY BOY SEEKS FRIENDS Not looking for a sexual relationship. I am very happily taken by a wonderful woman for over 20 years. I am just looking for people to go hunting and fishing with. Kayaking in the summer or hitting the trails. My wife has friends she does her hobbies with. Just looking for someone who shares mine! Islander68, 52, seeking: TM, TW, Q, NC, NBP

COUPLES seeking... 420-FRIENDLY COUPLE SEEKING WOMAN He’s the chocolate. I’m a vanilla dream. We need to find that special cookie to fulfill our everything in between. If you want a flavorful treat, let’s warm up the chocolate together and let him make us cookies and cream. Nawna, 39, seeking: W, l FIT COUPLE SEEKING SEXUAL CARDIO We are a fit, attractive couple (bi 41y/o female and straight 35-y/o male) in a secure relationship looking to add some fun to our sex life. Looking for an adventurous woman to help us explore our sexual fantasies. Fitcouplevt, 41, seeking: W, l INQUISITIVE, WANTING MORE I would like to meet a lady I can become friends with. You can learn more about me when we talk. Adventurewithus2, 45, seeking: W, l I WANT TO WATCH I’m looking for a guy who’s willing to let my guy go down on him while I watch. I will not be joining, just watching. Please be between 25 and 45 years of age. BJ2021, 46, seeking: W COUPLE LOOKING FOR FUN! Adventurous, silly, easygoing, freespirited. Vtcouple86, 27, seeking: Cp


i SPY

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POST-COVID KARAOKE AT JP’S You had a cool back tattoo and originated from South America. I had the dragon on my left arm and was wearing a colorful long dress. You’d never been to Costa Rica, so I showed you pics from my April vacation. Karaoke was so fun — hope to see you there again, or downtown, or wherever! When: Saturday, June 5, 2021. Where: JP’s, downtown Burlington. You: Woman. Me: Woman. #915299 ETHAN ALLEN PARK TRAILS BIKER 9:30 a.m. You were riding a bike with a bright light, helmet-free, long dark hair blowing behind you. Your smile was even brighter than your light. I was a blonde with my hair pulled back in a ponytail, walking the trail. We said good morning. Your energy is strong. I would love to meet you. When: Sunday, June 6, 2021. Where: riding the bike path that’s near Ethan Allen Park parking lot. You: Man. Me: Woman. #915298 CUTE BLONDE AT SHELBURNE BEACH You were standing down by the fence looking over the water. I was sitting up on a bench. You had lovely dark blond hair and a sweet face. I tried not to stare. I imagined you turning your head and smiling at me, but you simply went back to your car and left. Hopefully we meet again. You’re beautiful. When: Tuesday, June 1, 2021. Where: Shelburne Beach. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915297 MUSTACHE MAN Seen by riverside. Arrived by Guzzi. Sexy legs and Moz tee. Me: with dogs and Volvo. To me, you are a work of art. I would give you my heart, if I had one. Maybe next time we can make eye contact. VG? When: Monday, May 24, 2021. Where: Strangeways Sound Lounge. You: Man. Me: Gender nonconformist. #915296

VISIONS OF YOU Summertime and the wind is blowing outside in lower Chelsea, and I don’t know what I’m doing in this city / The sun is always in my eyes / It crashes through the windows, and I’m sleeping on the couch when I came to visit you / That’s when I knew. When: Wednesday, June 12, 2019. Where: through time and space. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915295 MIDDEG Did you mean to send me that flirt? Waited for you to get your profile online. I am interested, very interested! When: Sunday, May 30, 2021. Where: Seven Days. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915294 RYOBI GIRL Long shot, I know, and not expecting to go anywhere. We had an awesome conversation, and you’re gorgeous. We related demographically. Just wanted you to know. :) When: Sunday, May 30, 2021. Where: Williston. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915293 TO HELL AND BACK Your: 1987 Yamaha Clavinova keyboard. Me: seven feet, six inches of sunburned charm, forked tail tucked into my Carhartts, faded Led Zep tee and silver goatee. Bumped into each other twice now. You were asking about the “tobacco” products, and I couldn’t help but notice your dulcet tones. Love to show you my toolshed. 420-friendly. When: Friday, May 21, 2021. Where: Good Times in Rutland. You: Gender nonconformist. Me: Group. #915292 E. THETFORD TRAVELER5656 I spied you on Fitness Singles. You emailed me: vidadulce. Yes, life is sweet, better with someone. Fingers crossed you see this and respond. When: Tuesday, May 4, 2021. Where: Fitness Singles. You: Man. Me: Woman. #915291

Ask REVEREND Dear Phil Ashio,

DITTO We are two perfectly imperfect people! You have been my compass when I’m lost, and we must trust this process. When: Thursday, May 27, 2021. Where: in every moment. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915290 ROCK POINT HUMAN You were looking for the right spot to enjoy the sunset, so I offered you the rock I had been hogging. We were both alone, shoes off, with white shirts, and even your mood seemed to mirror mine. As I left, I kept wanting to turn back but was too shy. Just curious about you! When: Monday, May 17, 2021. Where: Rock Point cliff. You: Nonbinary person. Me: Non-binary person. #915289 MUD POND MID FAT We started a conversation about wheel size and mountain biking (at the Mud Pond entrance around noon). You were just finishing up a ride, and I was heading into the woods with an older friend. Would enjoy talking more or taking a ride together. When: Tuesday, May 25, 2021. Where: Mud Pond Conservation Area. You: Man. Me: Woman. #915288 VACCINE CHECKOUT AT THE FAIRGROUNDS You pointed me toward the exit. Not sure if you were just checking me out or also checking me out. Maybe both. Perhaps this is a second chance for us to connect, seeing as I can’t go back for a third shot? When: Monday, May 24, 2021. Where: Essex Junction. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915287 TO THE BEAUTIFUL MORETOWN WINDBREAKER You are down-to-earth, kind to all who cross your path. Girl next door with a mind as big as the whole world and a smile that makes my heart flutter. You will always be my person. When: Saturday, May 15, 2021. Where: Moretown. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915285 DELIGHTFUL START TO SUMMER Your bright smile and friendly wave as I was leaving the party lightened my heart and danced in my thoughts. Thank you for sparking some beginning of summer happiness. When: Friday, May 21, 2021. Where: Waitsfield backyard party. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915284

the

Irreverent counsel on life’s conundrums

Dear Reverend,

I don’t love getting blow jobs. It seems like every other guy I know does, but I’ve never had an orgasm from one. Intercourse and masturbation feel much better to me. Am I missing something?

Phil Ashio

(MALE, 32)

I bet anyone you ever told this to replied: “That’s because you’ve never gotten a good one.” While that could be true — because so many people don’t know what they’re doing when it comes to oral sex — assuming all men love blow jobs is like assuming all men love football and trucks: It’s just not the case. As with most things in life, what floats one person’s boat may

TANGLED UP IN YOU What are the chances it’s you? Maybe handwritten words inspired; most likely I’m just a foolish sap. Bob and Jim both wrote about the Jack of Hearts. Is it still a card you’d ever play? Your eyes always had a way of reciting profound poetry. I wonder if I will ever again gaze into that blue abyss. Float within the soulful dreamscape, always wondering, Is this reality? When: Friday, May 1, 2020. Where: photo strip on your fridge. You: Man. Me: Woman. #915283 REI PARKING LOT, MAY 17 You parked next to me, and I had to wait for you before I could leave. Didn’t mind because you were nice to look at. You said you were becoming more like your dad every day. I joked you needed a purse to keep your stuff together. Meet up so we can keep you from turning into your dad too quickly? When: Monday, May 17, 2021. Where: REI parking lot, Williston. You: Man. Me: Woman. #915282 SHORT GIRL AT JOLLEY’S, SHELBURNE ROAD You walked behind me, and I didn’t notice you. You were buying Truly, I think, but wow, you are the most stunning woman I’ve ever seen. Don’t even need a reply, since you got into a gray Tundra and you are most likely taken. Just wanna say you are beautiful. When: Sunday, May 16, 2021. Where: South Burlington Jolley’s. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915281 HEY THERE, DR. ZEUS Did you know that the German word for sweet, süß, sounds like “Zeus”? I think that’s fitting, because you’re so friggin’ sweet! ;) Let’s hang out sometime. P.S. Out of all the species, you’re my favorite. When: Sunday, May 2, 2021. Where: All Species Day. You: Man. Me: Woman. #915280 TULIP SENDS HER APOLOGIES In her frolicking, I believe she cut you with her nails. I didn’t realize this had happened until we were in the truck. I looked for you to apologize, but you were busy. You had commented that the world could use more dogs like Tulip, and she’d like to return the compliment: The world could use more humans like you. When: Friday, May 14, 2021. Where: the Intervale. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915279

take the wind right out of the sails of another. Some people really enjoy anal sex; others freak out at the mere thought of it. You like what you like, and there’s no need to feel you’re missing out on anything if you don’t partake. However, it may be hard to maintain your

MY ‘MUSE’ AND ‘RENEGADE’ I am so glad we have reunited. Here’s to the Sox, fireball, lakefront sunsets and live music, baby! When: Thursday, May 6, 2021. Where: Williston. You: Man. Me: Woman. #915278 NORTHFIELD NURSE I don’t think you read this paper, but here goes. We have known each other for years and got close for a while, then our paths separated us. I was hoping to reunite, but that hope was lost with one word from you. I wish you the best in the future, from the guy who gives the best hugs. When: Monday, September 12, 2016. Where: my place. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915277 DITTO Every moment between our meetings feels like a lifetime. A day will come when I never have to say “See you later” ever again. When: Sunday, April 11, 2021. Where: produce. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915274 BLUE TOYOTA TACOMA Oops, is that what is meant by brake lights, brake lights: “STOP, let’s meet”? LOL! Seven Days email sent in inbox or spam folder. When: Friday, April 30, 2021. Where: Route ?. You: Man. Me: Woman. #915268 WHOOKNEW I’m not certain if you’re trying to communicate with me or not? You’ve blocked me and then reached out. If the roles were reversed, how would you feel? When: Thursday, April 29, 2021. Where: here. You: Man. Me: Woman. #915267 STOWE SHAW’S CHECKOUT LINE You smiled through your mask while behind me in the grocery line. You were tall, shaven-headed (friendly?) and seemed to have a proclivity for oranges. I had shortish curly hair, greenish/colorful glasses and an issue with a rotten carrot. If you’re single, wanna make me some OJ? Or at least go for a hike. When: Thursday, April 29, 2021. Where: Stowe Shaw’s. You: Man. Me: Woman. #915266 WHITE ACURA It would be nice to meet up in person one of these days instead of passing by each other on the road. When: Tuesday, April 27, 2021. Where: on the road. You: Woman. Me: Man. #915265

hummer hesitancy if you find a partner who loves giving oral. Should this situation arise and you decide to give it another whack, here are a few tips. Try not to let your mind trip up your body; just relax into the experience. Get hands-on to guide your partner and integrate the masturbation aspect that you enjoy. Try the trusty 69 position to find out whether giving while receiving is more your style. As always, if you let a partner know you’re not into something but they persist, tell them to go whistle up a rope. Good luck and God bless,

The Reverend What’s your problem?

Send it to asktherev@sevendaysvt.com. SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

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David, 73, Vermont gentleman. Growing, enjoying a healthy life mentally and physically. We are so blessed with a home like Vermont! Chemistry, spirit, health! I will listen to all you say and believe all you do! #L1510 I like to listen and learn. I’ve been lucky enough to travel a lot in business. I’d like to adventure more, maybe to Western Europe. I’d like to find someone who appreciates the little things and a best friend who is truthful and trustworthy. #L1509 58-y/o SWF seeks SM 55 to 65. I enjoy outdoor activity in all types of weather, reading, conversation and travel. NEK location. #L1507 SWM seeking SWM any age. Must love top and fem bottom. Looking for steady lover. Gay or bi, any race. Phone. #L1515 GM 60-y/o seeks sexually active 70-plus male. I love giving and receiving oral. Virgin but would love to bottom to a lover. Enjoy all activities nude. #L1514 Male widower looking for woman for FWB/LTR, maybe more. Please be 18+. Send me your name, info and phone number. I will return all calls back to you. Look forward to meeting you. #L1513 Traveling companion wanted. I would like to see the U.S. using an RV or motorhome with the possibility of relocating. #L1508

Male, 55, seeking woman to cocreate a beautiful life/ family close to the Earth on the land with plants, animals and wildlife. Together a vessel of love to manifest the dormant ancestral pulse of people living close to nature absent the turnkey life mayhem. Wolcott. Clearing the woods. #L1512 Senior male, mid-60s, seeking older males 65 to 80 for carefree and fun moments of pleasure. Must be DD-free and have completed both COVID shots. Safe and kind. Life is too short to not have moments of pleasure. It’s been a rough past year. #L1511

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SEVEN DAYS JUNE 9-16, 2021

Seeking thin guys 18 to 30 y/o. Slender. Talk first. Phone number, please. #L1506 Old woman (70s) wants to meet old or young man for only interesting conversation and coffee. Old woman is well educated and well traveled. Would like old or young man to be smart and funny. Phone number, please. #L1504 Widower man looking for woman for FWB, possible LTR and more. Send me your name and number; I’ll return your calls. Looking forward to meeting you! Please be over 18. Race is not an issue. Thank you! #L1503

Internet-Free Dating!

Reply to these messages with real, honest-to-goodness letters. DETAILS BELOW. Mid-60s, tall, strong SWF in NEK with gardening skills seeks cultivating a relationship with similar SM or platonic friend. Crafts, common sense, Carhartt, nudist Buddhist, bicycling, kayaking, woodworking, science, hammocks. Be true to who you are, perhaps not always clothed in ego. I will dress the same, alongside my faux pas. #L1502 I live in Rutland. I truly believe in honesty. Caring, understanding, independent, generous, easygoing, active, fit, fun, flexible. I’ve traveled the world extensively. Allergic to cats. I like to believe I’m a family man. Friends tell me I’m a clean-cut guy. #L1501

38-y/o SWM seeking male for LTR. Must live near the Plattsburgh, N.Y., area. I am average but cute-looking. I enjoy reading, videos and time with friends. Talking a must. Your age: 35-plus. Nonsmoker. Stability required. #L1499 GWM, mid-60s, 5’11, slim build. Blue eyes, decent looking. Like walking, hiking, swimming. Enjoy music, movies, gardening. Mindful and kind. Looking for LTR. 420-friendly. Southwest Vermont. Seeking GM, 55 to 70, tall, intelligent, humorous, energetic with integrity. Nonsmoker who enjoys nature. #L1498

I’m a man seeking new friends for adventure. I hike Mount Philo almost every day and love to cross-country ski.  #L1478

This week’s ancient as the great Madonna! Hollywood movie extra of the year. Community college art school dropout. Stop making sense. Where’s my music man? #L1497

Discreet oral bottom. 54y/o SWM, 5’8, slim, dark hair, blue eyes. Seeking any well-hung guys, 18 to 55 y/o, who are a good top and last a long time for more than one around. Phone only, but text. Champlain Valley. #L1500

GWM looking for springtime hookups or longer if all goes well. Easygoing, nice guy in Rutland County. I like to play and like everything. Respond with phone number. #L1493

Describe yourself and who you’re looking for in 40 words below:

Required confidential info:

(OR, ATTACH A SEPARATE PIECE OF PAPER.)

__________________________________________

I’m a _________________________________________________ __ ____

NAME

AGE + GENDER (OPTIONAL)

seeking a__ ___________ __________________________________________

AGE + GENDER (OPTIONAL)

_______________________________________________________

__________________________________________ ADDRESS

__________________________________________ ADDRESS (MORE)

_______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________

__________________________________________ CITY/STATE

__________________________________________ ZIP

__________________________________________ PHONE

_______________________________________________________ MAIL TO: SEVEN DAYS LOVE LETTERS • PO BOX 1164, BURLINGTON, VT 05402 OPTIONAL WEB FORM: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/LOVELETTERS HELP: 802-865-1020, EXT. 110, LOVELETTERS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

THIS FORM IS FOR LOVE LETTERS ONLY. Messages for the Personals and I-Spy sections must be submitted online at dating.sevendaysvt.com.


DREAMING OF A NEW HOME? Take the first step at the next... Wednesday, June 23, 6-8 p.m. A free online workshop for first-time home buyers. Talk with experts and ask questions from home!

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Profile for Seven Days

Seven Days, June 9, 2021  

Celebrating Vermont's Pandemic All-Stars; Burlington Readies its First-Ever Juneteenth Celebration; Classical Musicians Prepare for a Live C...

Seven Days, June 9, 2021  

Celebrating Vermont's Pandemic All-Stars; Burlington Readies its First-Ever Juneteenth Celebration; Classical Musicians Prepare for a Live C...

Profile for 7days

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