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TO RIDE AND CRASH INTO DENSE BUSHES OR OBSTACLES ON THE STREET, LEAVING VEGETATION OR DEBRIS FROM THE CRASH LEFT HANGING FROM YOUR BIKE AND HELMET.


BY BOEY XIAO FENG, EDMUND


Invisible to motorists, criss crossing in the maze of heavy traffic, that is an average bicycle commute through San Francisco. The sound of a car door opening in front of you is similar to the sound of a gun being cocked. — Amy Webster


Cycling is good for our city, it is great for health, and can even serve as a solution to many of our societal, and especially environmental problems. Not to mention its contributions to the economy through the sales of full bicycles, its parts, and equipment. There are many advantages to cycling, yet cyclists are bullied on our roads everyday by motor vehicles with shear size and speed. Cyclists are invisible. With no more then a styrofoam helmet for protection, cyclists are extremely vulnerable. Sharing busy streets with motorized vehicles ranging from smaller motorbikes, to gigantic semi trucks; not enough has been done for the rights of bicycle commuters.

Motorists can’t stand it when a cyclist is too close to them, or when they take up too much of the driving lane, but the motorists need to see it from the cyclist’s point of view. No cyclist would choose to go near a car if not to dodge colliding into another one. Staying on the edge of the driving lane so close to parked vehicles, is just like a mine field of sudden swinging car doors. .


Relying only on their bicycle’s high maneuverability, cyclists are often forced to squeeze through tight bottlenecks caused by oblivious motorists, or escape being sandwiched between the curb and a taxi cab whose driver is more concerned about picking up a customer. If only motorists could see the streets through the eyes of a bicycle commuter, the roads would not be as volatile as they are today. The matter of fact is that the motorists’ view on cyclists is flawed. Not all cyclists run lights and speed down one way streets against traffic.


Rows and rows of bicycle tires, like the numerous collisions on the roads of San Francisco. With continuous efforts for the city to designate more bike lanes without much success, cyclists know the only thing they can rely on is the thread on their tires.


The roads of San Francisco are meant to be shared by both motor vehicles and bicycles. The monogram is comprised of three circles of different thicknesses. The thickest representing the city’s roads, the thinnest for bicycle wheels, and the middle being a car’s wheel. The circle also signifies equality, being a shape that's is highly symmetric, it represents equal rights for cyclists and motor vehicles. These three circles overlap one another forming a ring with different shades, symbolizing them all in harmony and in motion traveling towards the same goal. The overlapping also creates little details in the monogram, with lighter curves over darker curves, symbolic of the hilly streets of San Francisco. .


PEDALCYCLIST FATALITIES IN 2009 FLORIDA — 107 CALIFORNIA — 99 TEXAS — 48 U.S. TOTAL

— 630

Statistics from National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.



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