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Heejung Son 347 491 8187 sonh864@newschool.edu

Education

Parsons The New School For Design expected 2016, New York, NY, US

Candidate for Master of Fine Arts with major in Lighting Design

Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, RI, US 2013

Attended two semesters for Master of Design with major in Interior Architecture

Chung Ang University, Seoul, South Korea 2011

Bachelor of Fine Arts with major in Textile and Ceramic Design

Experience

Oculus Light Studio, Los Angeles, US 2015 summer

Design Intern

Participated in all phases of lighting design: schematic development, drafting, site documentation, aiming and installation coordination. Hospitality, residential and retail projects.

Gracia, New York, US 2011-2012

Intern

Coordinated and managed merchandises for production.

Communicated with factory venders for production and quality control.

Built interior booths and worked as an sales person for trade show.

Freelancer interior stylist oďŹƒce, Seoul, South Korea 2009

Design Assistant

Built and decorated interior sets for interior and fashion magazines.

Assisted interior stylist in preparing materials such as props for projects.

B-project styling group, Seoul, South Korea 2008

Design Assistant

Built and decorated interior sets in various areas such as interior and fashion magazines, exhibitions and TV programs.

Assisted interior stylist in preparing materials such as props for projects.

Award

Korean Textile Design Award, KRDA, Seoul, South Korea 2010

Pattern design for apparel, interior and accessories, prized achieving top 25% of 1664 (according to KTDA)

Skills

MS OďŹƒce, Adobe suite, AutoCAD, Rhino, Sketchup, Revit, AGi32


INDEX

CONTENTS

Contents

2

Light Installation Altering the Focuse

4

Store&Office Lighting Design Taschen Bookstore

10

Light Fixture Design Gride Chandelier

22

Daylight Strategy Micro Library

26

Architecture and Daylight Alphabet City Libarary

32

Light Fixture Design ll The Jewel of Ceiling

46

Existing Builing Renovation Hiraku Community Arcade

48

LIGHT INSTALLATION ALTERING THE FOCUS

This project shows what lighting can do to transform a space: the 2nd floor elevator lobby of Parsons studio is rejuvenated by the new vibe infused by the change of lighting. STORE & OFFICE LIGHTING DESIGN TASCHEN BOOKSTORE

With different lighting layout strategies for each floor, different functions and atmospheres are created to accommodate various areas of the space. LIGHT FIXTURE DESIGN l GRID CHANDELIER

2

3 layers of intersected rods with different patterns are overlapped vertically to create this fixture that has as many light spots as possible, a piece to project dazzling lighting effect.


DAYLIGHT STRATEGY MICRO LIBRARY

Daylight strategy study using the two characteristics of daylight: direct and indirect sunlight. DAYLIGHT AND ARCHITECTURE ALPHABET CITY LIBRARY

Strategically arranged facade and light well let appropriate amount of daylight into respective parts of the space. LIGHT FIXTURE DESIGN ll THE JEWEL OF CEILING

The ceiling gets light reflection from the very thin up-facing fixture structure. As the fixture also has same color of the ceiling so that they blend together, only the lighting is highlighted. EXISTING BUILDING RENOVATION HIRAKU COMMUNITY ARCADE

Daylight strategy and electrical lighting design are developed integratedly to overcome poor existing daylight condition of the site.


ALTERING THE FOCUS LIGHT INSTALLATION


5


This project used light as a strategy to rearrange the focus hierarchy of the north elevator lobby area at Parsons SCE building on second floor. The primary function of the elevator corridor is for people to use the elevator, but some spatial factors made the elevator almost unnoticeable. First, the pushed in structure created shadows in the space. The grey matte color of the doors also reflected very little light, creating a very dull environment. In addition, the current lighting was very insufficient and the other objects made this area feel darker.

The strategy was to highlight the doors of elevator so that it became the first object people notice. The shape of the installation (white structure) continued from the existing linear lighting (brown structure) following the hallway. Not only did it cooperate with the existing structure, to blend into the space naturally, but it also boosted lighting effects in the lobby from the hallway. The installation was offset from the wall to create a line of light and enhance aesthetic value. Horizontal structure synced with ceiling vents as well.


Philips Fluorescent, T8 Standard, 32 w, 3000k, 6 Qty.

A

B

A'

B'

Installation Plan

Illuminance Level

5 fc

25 fc

14 fc

11 fc

11 fc

20 fc Before

25 fc 25 fc

14 fc

15 fc

12 fc

20 fc

8

After

Section AA’

Section BB’


Before

After

9


TASCHEN BOOKSTORE BOOKSTORE & OFFICE LIGHTING DESIGN


Taschen bookstore began as Taschen comics, publishing Benedikt’s extensive comic collection. Our grid concept is derived from the original characteristic of the store:comic book. Since, the store publishes mostly art magazines, we extracted the grid pattern from the book cover layouts of TASCHEN publication, and applied it to the site. The interior space of the site is also rectangular like book which allows the architectural structure such as columns, stairs and walls to become a grid layout and then move that language into the design of thebook stacks. This grid then devides the functions of each space. Circulation paths and lighting layout also lay down in the grid from the architecture. The 1st floor includes a store and public spaces such as gallery, cafe and conference room. 2nd floor is TASCHEN office area.

12


8

1 1

9 7

1st FL Program 1. Office 2. Copy room 3. Large conference room 4. Cafe & bar 5. Resting area 6. Reception & lounge 7. Bookstore 8. Gallery

4

2

5

A 1

A’

6

3 9

5

2

3

1

2nd FL Program 1. Kitchen & lunch room 2. Small conference room 3. Office 4. Executive office 5. Shared office 6. Open office 7. Copy room

4 3

6

6


Photoshoped AGi32 Section AA’


LIGHTING RENDERED & LAYOUT PLAN

16

1ST FLOOR

1st floor lighting layout is loose but still sticks to a grid pattern. Diagonal ceiling mounted lights guide people deeper into the space where the cafe and gallery are. The Staircase itself has a large chandelier which acts as the focal point in the space.


2ND FLOOR

The 2nd floor lighting layout is much more true to the grid due to the efficiency of workers. Ceiling lights are lined up equidistantly and cove lights are applied for the private offices so that they become indicators for the positive and negative volumes created in the open office area.


20


2ND FLOOR OFFICE AREA


GRID CHANDELEIR LIGHT FIXTURE DESIGN

This chandelier was designed for the Philips event at Parsons. It was installed right above the reception desk of the chamber in which the event was held. It’s from the design which is part of my previous project - the Taschen Bookstore. The pattern of this fixture was abstracted from book cover layouts of Taschen publication, a unique pattern that has been carried on over the years while the intersected rods also visualized and echoed the invisible grids that define the physical space of the bookstore. As a result of an integrated design process, this fixture exhibited the design concept and incorporated the overall strategy of the whole project. It was displayed at the event as nutshell for the student project showcase as well as a stand alone piece with its own aesthetic integrity.

23


1

Torchstar LED fairy light 3.6 w 2200 k 3 Qty.

2

3

6”

1

6”

3

4”

2

4”

1

4”

3

24

2”

1

2”

3

2”

2

2”

2

1


MICRO LIBRARY DAYLIGHT STRATEGY


27


This project explores the effect of a combination of direct and diffused light in a conceptual space. The given double height space is D40’ x W20’ x H20’ with a D20’ x W20’ x H12’ mezzanine, it is functioned as a reading space to accommodate different reading related activities which would require various lighting conditions: diffused light from the ceiling (ceiling louver + translucent suspension with reflector on both sides); controlled direct light from the louvers in the east wall; side louvers with different angles on the top and bottom

to cater seasonal lighting conditions: the upper louver is angled to block the hot summer sun while the lower one is adjusted to let warm winter sun shine into the space. The ceiling baffles help to bounce more sunlight into the space which would then be diffused by the translucent diffuser. The reflectors beside the diffuser would further brush light into the darker 1st floor. So overall the day light condition is well dispersed for reading. The design of the electrical lighting serves the same purpose: cove, spot, all soft and cozy.

1ST FLOOR

MEZZANINE FLOOR

28


EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC

Ceiling louver reflects daylight and distributes light equally to the space

Translucent diffuser diffuses daylight from ceiling to the whole space

Reflectors reflect daylight and provide light to the darker area

Angled side louvers control direct sunlight depending on the season

29


CEILING LOUVER SYSTEM

Louver

Ceiling Diffuser

ReямВector

SIDE LOUVER SYSTEM

E

W

June

30

December


31


32


ALPHABET CITY LIBRARY DAYLIGHT AND ARCHITECTURE

STUDY AREA

ATRIUM

LOUNGE INFORMAL READING CEILING ENTRANCE

Alphabet City is a neighborhood located within the East Village in the New York City borough of Manhattan. Alphabet City is home to a mix of Puerto Rican and African American families living alongside struggling artists and musicians (who were mostly young and white). Attracted by the Nuyorican movement, low rents, and creative atmosphere, Alphabet City attracted a growing Bohemian population. At one time it was home to many of the first graffiti writers, b-boys, rappers, and DJs. The area also have high levels of illegal drug activity and violent crime. The site is located on 10th street and

STUDY AREA

ATRIUM WORKING SURFACE

LOUNGE

Avenue D. The main facade is south facing which means the building gets ton of natural light during the day. However, too much direct sunlight would be visually uncomfortable for people spending more time in the space, so a solution is needed to control the amount of daylight in the space. Also different sections of the space would have various needs for daylight depending on their respective functions and characteristic. The outcome is a facade composed of metal strips that form an intentional rhythm, and a roofto-basement light well that compensates natural light into the less shined north.

33


4th floor Study area

2nd floor Study area

4th floor Sitting stairs

High density of facade strips

The strips of the facade are strategically arranged based on how much light each section needs. For example, strips of the 2nd floor study area are denser so as to soften direct sunlight and reduce glare, making it more comfortable for reading.

34

Atrium

Elevator Lobby

Stairs

Low density of facade strips

Whereas the strips are sparser around the atrium and grand stairs on the 4th floor since more natural lighting is needed for those high traffic public areas. This rhythm of changing spatial functions is reflected through the faรงade pattern.


4th floor sitting stair area

35


Daylight penetrates through facade late afternoon in summer. It creates patterns of shadow on the wall while remains undisturbing to the working area.


The light well on the northern side of the building opens all the way from top floor to basement, so the basement can be compensated with diffused daylight. Plan below shows daylight penetration in the basement.

Basement 38


Skylight on the roof and atrium below the skylight provides daylight into the space. Shape of opening on each floor varies to accommodate different lighting needs of each section in the space.

1st Floor

2nd Floor

3rd Floor

4th Floor

5th Floor

Roof 39


SOUTH-NORTH RENDERED SECTION


Rendering of the basement. Thanks to the light well, working area in basement also gets natural daylight.

43


THE JEWEL OF CEILING

LIGHT FIXTURE DESIGN ll

This lighting fixture is about the tangible and intangible forms of light and its vehicle. The fixture takes the very definite and tangible form of a frame, While the light is somehow blurred in between tangible and intangible because instead of facing down the light is actually facing up. Its vague form is perceivable through reflection from the ceiling while subtlized for the same reason.

47


HIRAKU

PUBLIC HEALTH BUILDING COMMUNITY ARCADE

49


ARCHITECTURE Hiraku is a community arcade located on the intersection of 27th street and 1st avenue in New York. The neighborhood is comprised of several health care facilities including a hospital and a disease research center and has low-income-majority demographics. A new micro housing building is underway but overall the neighborhood is kind of sketchy so the goal is to “up lift” this place and integrate existing resources to increase the community value. The project is a new grocery market which will be the main program on the first floor; there are also other community programs such as cafe/restaurant,and gym.

Based on site study, we discover that the plaza acts as a transitional area between the main street and the residential area. So rather than building new structure in this transitional space, we decided to add on to the existing Public Health Building (PHB). So architecturally we would create from the existing building which is conveniently under renovation itself. We plan to open up the PHB to the neighborhood through “pushing” and “pulling” from the existing building, so the project would share core and shell with the existing building, and the new circulation will be integrated into existing occupant path.

51


We took the grids of existing building, and projected them down on the ground. And then we added perpendicular lines to the grids to form cube structures, in addition to forms created from the pulling and pushing of the existing building meshes. In this combination, the cube volumes would become shades or light wells to control natural light into the space.

52


The programs are arranged based on lighting needs. Programs that need a lot of light are placed on the east/west side of the building where lights are most abundant whereas programs that don’t need as much light are placed in the middle of the building.









53


LIGHTING Daylight strategy is to embrace natural lighting condition of the site which is characterized by mostly indirect light, thus giving people an impression of daylight: where you are always in indirect light. We applied perforated screen over the glazing on the east/west side of the building to diffuse direct sunlight into the space; light well between cubes also allows indirect light into the interior.

Electrical light also syncs with the daylight concept - indirect light. All electrical lights are integrated with the building’s form and function. On a Large scale, negative illumination accentuate the architectural form while on a smaller scale, positive illumination highlights the specific programs of each space. Conversely with the daylight strategy, electrical lighting emits to the outside, making the cubes look like glowing boxes at night.

55


Daylight condition of the site is relatively poor. The main facade of the building faces north, and the tall public health building on the south blocks most of direct daylight. Diagrams show the general daylight condition: the site only gets directs sunlight in the morning and a little bit in the late afternoon from the west. Most of the time, the side gets indirect sunlight or is completely shaded.

However, the east and west side of the building get direct sunlight at certain times of the day, these are where the restaurant, gym, library and office are located. Thus we only create shading system for these two, a shading system of only simple tiny penetration screen in grid pattern. It diffuses direct sunlight and protects privacy from passers-by.

N

Shading System

56


Lightwell through whole floor

Bringing daylight into the space

Stacked effect (air ventilation) 57


LIGHTING RENDERED PLAN

1ST FLOOR


2ND FLOOR

3RD FLOOR

4TH FLOOR

5TH FLOOR


LIGHTING CONTROL PLAN

GROCERY

EXISTING PUBLIC HEALTH BUILDING AREA

1ST FLOOR

60


CLASSROOM LIBRARY RESTAURANT & CAFE TEACHING KITCHEN

EXISTING PUBLIC HEALTH BUILDING AREA

EXISTING PUBLIC HEALTH BUILDING AREA

2ND FLOOR

3RD FLOOR

OFFICE

MEETING ROOM

GYM

EXISTING PUBLIC HEALTH BUILDING AREA

4TH FLOOR

EXISTING PUBLIC HEALTH BUILDING AREA

5TH FLOOR

61


Grocery on the first floor. As our electrical lighting concept, the most important program is highlighted - display stalls. Also as a background, cove lighting is applied on the ceiling. 63


Heejung Son Lighting Design Portfolio  

Parsons The New School For Design in Lighting Design Graduate 2016

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