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Parkway Central High School 369 N. Woods Mill Road Chesterfield, MO 63017 314-415-7978 Volume 58, Issue 3

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CONTENTSC

DEC. 13, 2013

There were no star players in any of our eyes, there was only the team. - Johnny Naughton (12)

page 24

5 Four All-Suburban members

Old Newsboys Day 4

lead band to harmonious concert season.

10 Opinion: Actual learning in

school is replaced by the “game of school.”

6 Winter Guard 15 Seniors Zach Rogers and Riley

Brown lead boys swim to fourth place ranking at state meet.

20 Classic holiday “It’s a

Wonderful Life” still has merits in today’s holiday season.

21 Winter fashion trends combine

comfort and style.

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Contents

Dec. 13, 2013

Winter Recipes 22

Unsung Heroes 18


Soldier Boxes surpass expectations Emily Schenberg Multimedia Manager

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articipating in the Month of Giving, students and teachers created care packages for troops currently serving overseas. While donations have been collected for many years, the contributions from students and faculty exceeded organizers’ goals. “Our hope is that our troops feel appreciated,” junior and Project Help event co-chair Jorris Robinson said. “We want them to get a little piece of home being that they don’t have these resources readily available while stationed.” Project Help and Student Council teamed up to create Soldier Boxes for choir director Mr. Ben Silvermintz and his unit, currently serving in Afghanistan. “There was this air of excitement when we sat down to talk about it,” Project Help co-sponsor Ms. Laura Lukowski said. “We were all a little apprehensive because we wanted to do it so well, but there was also this sense of privilege to be able to do this for Mr. Silvermintz and for his unit. With this sense of privilege comes a special link that connects us to them, which makes this even more personal.” Select students were able to Skype with Silvermintz dur-

Junior Cati Sloman rearranges items while she refers to a checklist as she works on packing up Soldier Boxes after school on Nov. 22. “I really enjoy helping out, especially for such a great cause,” Sloman said. “It is great to see how many people step up to the plate and voulenteer at our school.”

ing class several weeks ago, where they told him what they were planning. “Mr. Silvermintz was very excited to hear we were doing this,” Lukowski said. “The last time we sent boxes to his unit we had 70 boxes, but that was split between two different units. Now we have 55 boxes going directly to Silvermintz’s unit, which is absolutely incredible.” Classes could request a box, and each student within the class could contribute an item in order to properly supply each soldier with both basics and treats as well. “Silvermintz is probably my favorite teacher,” junior Marit Sosnoff said. “We miss him so much, so the fact that we’re doing this for him just shows how much we miss and appreciate him. We always send things to the people we care about because it shows we’re thinking about them, and I Senior Jill Kealing and freshman Lyana Chen work together to prepare soldier am so happy we can send these boxes. They brought extra goods like magazines and candy to make sure each boxes to Silvermintz and the rest box was properly stuffed. Photos by Emily Schenberg. of his troop.” This is Silvermintz’s second tour in Afghanistan within This is the first year that Project Help and Student the past three years, as a member of the Army Reserve, Council not only collected the items but packaged and which has provided the community an opportunity to be shipped the boxes as well. philanthropic during the holidays. “In previous years we collected the items and then gave “I simply enjoy giving back to the community,” Robinthem to another organization who packaged and shipped son said. “Since I myself have family who fought for our the goods to the troops,” Lukowski said. “It definitely recountry, it was a bit personal for me. Our troops do so quires more organization and planning to make sure each much and this is a way to show some appreciation, espebox is properly equipped and packaged correctly.” cially during the holidays.” Members of Project Help spent the afternoon of Nov. With everything labeled, packaged and addressed, the 24 organizing, packing and filling out forms to mail the Soldier Boxes were shipped before Thanksgiving Break to boxes. While the packing took the volunteers a couple of arrive before the end of the calendar year. hours, Lukowski was thrilled with the number of boxes “Day in and day out I am just amazed at the outpourthat needed to be organized. ing of kindness I see among the Central community,” “Project Help never set a number for what we wanted Lukowski said. “There really is a family dynamic here, partly because we wanted people giving because they and I think that it is a privilege to be a part of it. I want wanted to,” Lukowski said. “However, my personal goal people to know that we are in a really amazing place with was 50 boxes and we received a total of 55. I believe that great people who want to good things and this drive is just our school did a phenomenal job; more is always better one more example of that.” when it is for such a good cause.”


$tackin’ papers

Senior Men raise money for charity Danielle Serota Staff Writer

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or two decades Senior Men has participated in Old Newsboys Day, waking up at the crack of dawn to sell newspapers on the streets for various charities throughout St. Louis. Senior Men stood at the intersections of Creve Coeur Mill Road and Olive Boulevard, Woods Mill Road and Olive and Ladue Road and Woods Mill on Nov. 21. “It’s not easy to make money,” senior Andrew Matusofsky said. “A lot of people would drive by without even looking at us.” On top of that, Woods Mill has heavily decreased traffic in the area so it makes it that much harder to collect money, according to math teacher Mr. John Theobald, co-sponsor of Senior Men. “Even with the circumstances, we still raised $1,700, which is very good,” Theobald said. Despite the low temperatures and the early morning, all Senior Men participated in the fundraiser. “Helping out the community was really nice for a change,” senior Drew Grossman said. “My favorite part was seeing people give $20 bills. It’s good to see the community come together for a cause.” Following his experience, Matusofksy admits to gaining sympathy for others selling items on the streets to raise money for charity. “Before when I would see people doing this on the street, I would have probably just ignored them,” Matusofsky said. “But now that I know how difficult it is, I would definitely give them money.” Next year’s Senior Men will carry on the school tradition. “Old Newsboys is a great experience for the men to do something good for the community while having fun at the same time,” Theobald said.

Seniors Nathan Biggs and Scott Coulson stand at the corner of Woods Mill Road and Olive Boulevard to sell papers on Old Newsboys Day to raise money for charity on Nov. 21. Photos by Dean Trail.

Senior Men co-sponsor and math teacher Mr. Tom Schaefer joins his club members in an effort to collect donations on Old Newsboys Day on Nov. 21.

Senior Sam Winter gives change to a man that donated money as part of the Old Newsboys Day tradition the week before Thanksgiving.

Seniors Nick Helmbacher and Aaron Weisman dance, yell and do a variety of activities to draw the attention of drivers to their papers on Old Newsboys Day.

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News

Dec. 13, 2013

Senior Ben Mendel advertises the newspaper as cars drive by on Olive Road to try to convince commuters to donate money for children’s charities.


Four All-Suburban members set tone for concert season Matt Frischer News Editor

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our members of the Parkway Central Concert Band earned a spot in the All-Suburban group this year, securing the right to perform in the 108 member band made up of 40 high schools. “I auditioned for the St. Louis All-Suburban Honors band for trumpet and made it,” senior trumpet player Bryan Dinman said. “I prepared the audition material every day for about six months, so when I was told by Mr. Hoover that I made it, the months of practicing seemed to pay off.” Assistant band director Mr. Matt Beazley has repeatedly watched the process of band members being selected for All-Suburban. “The participants prepare an audition that is set by the state and Suburban St. Louis,” Beazley said. “They go, audition, and are selected by a blind judge, which means the judge is only able to hear them and can not see them. They play scales, etudes, and then a piece for the judge.” Band Director Mr. Doug Hoover believes those who participate in the All-Suburban band gain a distinct advantage in their playing. “It gives them an opportunity to not only work with directors from other schools but nationally known directors and conductors as well as students from the whole suburban area,” Hoover said. “This year’s All-Suburban conductor is a guest from Oklahoma State University.” Dinman went through this process and was Junior Andrew Kirkham, saxophone, able to qualify for the All-Suburban Honors band, the “first round of the All-State Honors pauses while counting a rest in a band”, according to Beazley. concert band performance. Corral “There are four rehearsals to prepare five Archives. pieces in December and January, and then a concert,” Dinman said. “After the concert, it’s over until next year but everyone who makes it gets to try out for the All-State Honors band. The band director is a guest conductor from anywhere in the country and it changes every year.” Along with Dinman, three other Central band members qualified for the All-Suburban band. Freshmen Daniel Kim, clarinet, and Joshua Adams, made the band, with junior Andrew Kirkham earning a spot as an alternate Saxophone player. “I was confused, glad, and surprised that I got in [the band]. I’m not a bad player, but I was surprised as I practiced substantially less than I did last year when I didn’t get in,”

Kirkham said. Both Kirkham and Dinman spent many hours practicing after first receiving the music back in April. “Dinman takes private lessons and works a lot with his private teacher,” Beazley said. “Kirkham has done a lot of the work on his own, with his own personal practice.” Kirkham put off practice for a while, choosing to pick it up days before the audition. “I practiced the audition a total of five hours, one with my private lessons teacher and four before the audition. I got the music back in April of last year, so I guess it was procrastination at its finest,” Kirkham said. While Kirkham waited to prepare his performance until close to the audition, Kim chose to prepare for the audition much earlier. “I practiced all summer and beginning of school year with scales, excerpts, and my solo work,” Kim said. “I practiced patiently with metronome and my private teacher helped me a lot to improve my skills.” With the entrance of four Central students into the All-Suburban band, Hoover hopes for much improvement in the entire group. “Making All-Suburban really improves kids. If you don’t take private lessons it outlines a lesson plan for you. When they make it, it helps set a standard within our band. That boats well for the future and raises the expectation now,” Hoover said. Hoover said two freshman making it into All-Suburban band is a rarity. “They’re really hungry,” Hoover said. “You can they have set some high expectations for themselves and are on their way to try and meet them. I think that the sky’s the limit for both of them.” By making the All-Suburban band freshman year, both Kim and Adams have earned the opportunity to do “something special”, according to their directors, for the Parkway Central band. “In four years you’ll be asking me about four year Suburban All-State kids,” Hoover said. “I think several of our four have a chance to maybe squeeze into the All-State band which would be significant.” With the help that those who make All-Suburban provide to the band based on their raised Senior Brian Dinman, trumpet, plays playing, they also gain more experience in playing a different role of a larger and better band. in a concert band performance. “In this band, they get the chance to play in Corral Archives. a band where they are not the best in the band,” Hoover said. “It’s really kind of a personal challenge to them, but it truly makes them better and helps them in our band. Just because they are the best at Parkway Central, we think of this as a small pond and this makes the pond a lot larger.”

UN simulation attracts government students

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s members of the Government class this fall, juniors Kayla Abernathy, Kyle Riley, and Ramon Gibbs participated in Civitas’ first crisis simulation of the year to fulfill their community service hours requirement. Based in St. Louis, Civitas is non-profit organization that organizes model United Nations programs. At Civitas, there are different activities that promote world awareness for both middle and high school students. “The program was mainly about how kid’s ideas can impact the government and different things around us,” Riley said. “Part of the program was coming together with your peers to come to a conclusion about a situation.” At the first meeting, 18 students from six different schools discussed the country of Ukraine, and if it could safely protect the 500 pounds of Uranium that it owns. If put in the wrong hands, Uranium can be made into nuclear weapons. In addition to the Ukrainian problem, the students divided into two different groups, and focused on other key issues as well. “We came together as groups and were given a problem that had to do with another country,” Riley said. “It

was a simulation, so my group and I came together to come to a conclusion for a certain scenario.” Abernathy credits her government teacher for helping her get involved in Civitas. “I wanted government hours plus I was interested to see what the program had to offer,” Abernathy said. “I wish I could have gone to more meetings but I only attended one. The second model UN session was held in late November. Four topics were discussed this time, with scenarios outlined in countries that included New Zealand, Saudi Arabia, and the United Kingdom. “I participated in [Civitas] because Kyle, Kayla, and I thought it would be a great opportunity to get community service hours and have fun at the same time,” Gibbs said. The session was about 2 hours long which made a dent in the required service hours for the junior government class. Despite already being friends before the program, Civitas presented a unique opportunity for each of the students. “I do feel like it brought us closer together with all of the different topics we discussed,” Riley said. “You really have to communicate in situations like this.” Although the trio did not attend the second meeting in November, the first session provided the three with a good

Civitas honestly does affect your outlook on the world - Kayla Abernathy (11)

outlet to discuss world issues. “I really enjoyed listening and participating to hear and take in everybody’s perspective on the different topics discussed at the meeting,” Abernathy said. Now done with her government hours, Abernathy recommends the Civitas program to students in the future. “Civitas honestly does affect your outlook on the world and national crisis situations,” Abernathy said. “It gives you more awareness and puts you in real life situations to show the severity of these situations and how they’re handled in a step by step process. Anyone who enjoys US and world history would like this because it gives different perspectives on world issues.”

News

Dec. 13, 2013

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Matthew Walter Entertainment Editor

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Color guard program expands to winter Meaghan Flynn Business Manager

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he color guard has decided to expand its performance opportunities this winter by forming a Winter Guard team, bringing together old and new members. The idea to create a Winter Guard came to sophomore Jennifer Wayland after she saw teams perform at a competition at Eureka High School. After figuring out the logistics of the team, Wayland and other color guard members convinced their coach to help form the Winter Guard. “The teams at Eureka were really cool,” Wayland said. “I kept bugging the other girls about it, and they finally gave in.” While they hope to perform at basketball games, the team is not associated with the pep band. Instead, the students created a completely separate activity, holding their own tryouts and practices to form the team. Tryouts consisted of a short training camp to teach new and old members the new flag work and dance moves. “Winter Guard is more dance-oriented,” Wayland said. “We will still use flags and rifles but with different dance styles and music.” After a couple of training days, the students trying out for the team were divided into different groups to perform a routine. For the audition, they performed a short dance number and flag work. However, color guard coach Ms. Liz Bryan said that skill level was not the deciding factor during the auditions. “I’m looking for someone who simply wants to be there,” Bryan said. “If they are willing to put in the hours and to try out new things, I don’t see any reason why they shouldn’t try out.” Many of the students trying out for Winter Guard were not involved with color guard, including sophomore Joely Skinner. Be-

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Dec. 13, 2013

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Junior Jessie Sauerwein models the seven steps of performing a carve. Photos by Meaghan Flynn.

cause of marching band and cheerleading, Skinner did not participate in color guard in the fall. However, she said that she has always wanted to be a part of the guard and is excited for the new season. “I have a great feeling about this season and all of the girls,” Skinner said. “I’m looking forward to Winter Guard and spending time with some of my best friends.” One major difference between color guard and Winter Guard is the lack of competition. Because the final decision to form the team happened after August, they missed the registration deadline for competitions. However, junior Jessie Sauerwein remains optimistic for their opportunities in the following years. “This will be our practice year so we can build up our skills for competitions next year,” Sauerwein said. The main focus of the team for the first few weeks is to emphasize the basics of performing. While everyone has to work on the new dance skills, the new members must learn how to work the flags and rifles. Sauerwein said that she and the other girls will have to help teach flag movements such as drop spins, slams and carves. “During practices, we have to focus on making our routine ready for competition,” Sauerwein said. “That means we will have to focus on every aspect of our performance, like our dance moves, facials and flag work.” Although there is no official theme for their performances, Bryan said that the team will dance to “Caroline” by Noah Gunderson. The routine will take on a lot of dance and partner work. As the official sponsor for the team, Bryan said she hopes to be able to prepare the students for future competitions. “I try to take on a relaxed leadership role,” Bryan said. “I try to let them have as much fun as possible, but there’s also tons of work to do.”

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Check out PCHtv’s feature on Winter Guard


Clubs spread holiday cheer

Hanna Whitehouse Staff Writer

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he months of November and December often get hectic as people prepare for the holidays. School clubs pack their schedules with holiday activities like decorating, donating, fundraising and managing food drives. One of the clubs that celebrates the holidays is the Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA). For the holidays FCA has a party than involves giving gifts, cookies and going caroling. “As Christians, the holidays are a time for happiness and we are going to share it with others in FCA, which I think is great for the group because it helps us connect with each other,” senior Scott Coulson, a member of FCA said. In addition to parties, clubs also prepare for the holidays by giving. Senior Women volunteer at the St. Louis Food Bank to provide help for those in need. One member is senior Molly Porfidio, who has worked seven hours. “There are people out there that are a lot less fortunate than some of us and it feels good to help them,” Porfidio said. Senior Women provides help at the food bank by sorting meat and other foods into boxes. On Thanksgiving they fed a Thanksgiving Dinner to the homeless people in the shelter. They brought food and drinks while talking to them and making sure they had everything they needed. “I learned that everyone isn’t as fortunate as we are and we can’t take for granted what we have,” Porfidio said. “It made me grateful for everything I have and all the oppor-

tunities I am given.” Clubs also get involved during the holidays by making festive decorations. The decorations that are seen throughout the halls during the holiday season are put up by the National Art Honors Society (NAHS). For Thanksgiving, they decorated the colts in the history commons to look like pilgrim turkeys. For the winter holidays, they painted winter scenes on the windows. This is an annual tradition for NAHS. “I love how it really sets the cozy winter mood every year, no matter what holiday you celebrate,” senior Emily Walters said. “It’s a fun thing that we all love doing and we hope everyone enjoys the paintings.” Holiday cheer is also spread by Project Help, a club which focuses on charity work throughout the year. During November, Project Help collaborated with Student Council in a month of giving. This series of events was composed of a food drive, NAHS decorations cover the windows throughout the school with all items donated to Circle of Concern, as well with winter scenes. Photo by Hanna Whitehouse. as the Soldier Boxes that each classroom could contribute toward. For the Soldier Boxes, students teaches them to be kind and giving to others.” collect a variety of items including personal hygiene prodAs the Vice President of Project Help, Choi helps plan ucts and send them to the troops overseas. Project Help this event. It is an annual tradition done by Project Help. also holds an event called the Phase II Party. During this “What I am able to experience each year is how these gettogether special education students are invited to pick students are no different than us; having a joyful time findout toys and create crafts relating to the holidays to bring ing gifts and celebrating the holidays with the people we home to their families. love is the same for everyone,” Choi said. “The happiness “This event is beneficial for the special education stuand excitement is just as great for them and it’s a blessing dents because it allows them to be independent in making to be able to provide them this time to just be indepentheir own choices by choosing gifts and deciding who to dent and giving to others.” give them to,” senior Jeanha Choi said. “In addition, it

New Leaders ‘Step Up’ to Revive Club

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ince the beginning of the school year, many students have been wondering what happened to the step team. Multiple rumors of the group’s break up have been circulating since the step team was brought to a halt this fall, but many students share the sentiment that they can’t wait for the team to return. “I did miss the step team at the pep rally,” senior Alyssa Vu said. “They brought out more energy from the crowd than the other performances. It’s fun and interesting for people to watch.” Other students noted the team’s talent and ability to excite a crowd. “I wish they were back together,” said senior Sophia Marren. “They were so entertaining and their moves and music brought a fun atmosphere.” The primary road block causing the team to disband this year is the lack of a teacher sponsor. Sophomore Trasean Stepney, one of the team’s organizers, hopes to have that issue worked out by next year. “Mrs. [Renell] Gamble said that she would be our sponsor next year because this year is her first year here and wants to get settled,” Stepney said. “From what I was told, Senior Trasean Stepney performs during she was a sponsor for another school’s step team and loves doing it. I strongly believe last winter’s pep rally with the High that everyone including the sponsor will

Steppers. Corral Archives.

be on the same page and that the step team will be very successful once we come back together.” According to Stepney, some other reasons that the team broke up include bad leadership and a lack of communication between members. To improve these leadership issues, the team plans to elect two captains and divide the responsibilities between the old and the new members. Besides Stepney, sophomores Diane Davis and Jennifer Wade are helping organize and lead the team as two of the most experienced steppers. “I would love for the step team to look like all grade levels of both genders,” Davis said. “We need to put 110% into every practice and every performance. I would love to see more boys give it a try because boys can step too.” Davis also emphasized the importance of how the team is viewed by the community. “I would love [for the step team] to be looked at as important as the band or the cheerleaders or even the dance team,” Davis said. To prevent another break-up and prepare for next school year, the team has already begun planning. Most of the team’s routine will be composed of all new steps, but will also feature small steps from last year that the student body didn’t get to see. Another goal of the group is to get the word out to interested students. “Starting towards the end of next semester we will start recruiting down at the middle school for the upcoming freshman who are interested to join the High Steppers and do auditions at the high school for anyone else who wants to join our team,” Stepney said. With these plans in place and a stepping void that needs to be filled, Stepney is optimistic about the team’s success in the future. “If we stay on task, keep a positive attitude, communicate, and make sure the leaders don’t overlook the other members’ opinions, then we can stay together,” Stepney said. If all goes according to plan, the High Steppers will make their debut performance at next year’s fall pep rally. In the meantime, students who have supported the team in the past will have until then to anticipate their return. This year, students have felt the void left by the unique team. “Not all high schools have a step team,” Vu said. “I’d love to see them get back together.”

Features

Dec. 13, 2013

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Jack Blethroad Features Editor

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Siblings span spectrum

Children called Butterflies, decided to buy a ukulele and started to play. I play it about every day, and I’ve been studying the piano for seven years.” Paul admits that he enjoys his writings more, though. He posts short stories, poetry and book reviews to his blog. “My poetry is very reflective,” Paul said. “I spend most of my time looking at the story or image and I think: How could this be applicable to a much larger or more important situation?” Paul gets inspiration not only through his siblings but also through his everyday life. Just as Madeleine gave ideas to Elise, Paul finds his older sisters influential. He did not write poetry until he saw Elise’s and thought that he would give it a shot. But when looking for ideas on stories, poems and images, Paul said he thinks that anything can be inspiring. “Basically, I live, and thus I am inspired by life in general,” Paul said. Katie Richards “Inspiration comes from watching a kid draw a really interesting picture Opinions Editor out of an extremely lame connect-the-dots game to reading a book about dragons.” ome siblings try to differentiate themselves from each others, avoidHe said his siblings’ main role, though, is encouragement and persevering comparisons at all cost. However, senior Elise Gibson and freshance. Madeleine’s ability and determination to do well helped him in the man Paul Gibson manage to have similar interests in the arts but still long run, seeing projects through. This comes from their close-knit home retain their own identities. life. Although the siblings claim their parents aren’t Elise’s main interest is fashion, which she musical or visually artistic, the siblings believe their believes came from her sister, 2012 graduate encouragements to read often and to be interested Madeleine Gibson, who was an active member in the arts pushed them in the right direction. of the National Art Honors Society. Elise says “Being home schooled was important, too,” her sister’s great fashion inspired her to dress Madeleine said. “It gave more time for creative without regards to normalcy or the opinions of activities.” others. Paul thinks that homeschooling budded his in“I had no interest in dressing up until I was terest in many things, including a love of learning. about 13,” Elise said. “One day I saw my sister “I was given the world, and I was also given a getting ready for school and she looked so quiet place where the world didn’t tell me what to pretty I thought that I could do that, too.” do,” Paul said. “I could experiment with hobbies Since this revelation, Elise’s fashion has nevthat I otherwise would have never thought was an er stayed stagnant. She says that changes in her option.” personality from middle school to high school Contrary to today’s stereotype of success behave changed her style, again for the better. ing measured in grades, college admission and “I’m more confident now than when I was ultimately a well-paying job, Paul said his parents back then, so now I can dress in crazy stuff,” were able to show him a different definition of Elise said. what it means to be successful. Elise’s other art interests include ceramics “These days people are telling everybody that and music. Her pottery interest began in high the only successful life is if you work in mathematschool, like her sister’s. Elise enjoys seeing the ics or if you’re a lawyer, a doctor or a scientist,” 3-D work because she said it seems more real Paul said. “[Defining] successful in that your bankthan Madeleine’s preferred mediums. ing balance is a seven-digit number or successful “My sister does a lot of drawing and paintin life? I don’t particularly care which you choose ing,” Elise said. “I just wanted to do something but I feel that homeschooling gave me more of an different.” option than most.” Paul’s creative outlets are writing and music. With their close adolescent life and their comElise says that Paul does things she would never mon interests, the Gibsons are not only family but thought of doing, and he’s incredibly dedicated Senior Elise Gibson models a Fourth of July good friends. outfit from her blog, A Scrambled Eg. Elise to both interests. “I enjoy watching them grow up into fascinating says her fashion has helped her become more and unique people,” Madeleine said. “I started playing the ukulele about a year ago,” Paul said. “I heard a song by Charity confident. Photo courtesy Elise Gibson.

Gibsons display their unique talents in school, on personal blogs

Check them out online Both Gibsons host blogs that demonstrate their hobbies.

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Freshman Paul Gibson’s blog, Tower of Thoughts: melodies of a literary artist

Senior Elise Gibson’s blog, A Scrambled Eg: dressing up classy and cheap.

Capture your high school memories! Buy your 2014 yearbook today! Only $55 until Jan. 1 Use order number 17225


Robotics team gears up for competition Matthew Bernstein Online Content Editor

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tarting the season early, the Nuts and Colts robotics club has completed the bottom half of a robot that is able to move due to building and programming. When FIRST, the company that holds the high school robotics competition, sends a robotics kit to the Nuts and Colts, the robotics masterminds go into action, making a robot to complete a task and help students attempt to win competition. When extra parts are needed to help the robot be successful, the aid of other teams is helpful, according to club co-sponsor Mr. Jonathan Gunasingham. “Teams will ultimately help each other,” Gunasingham said. “The goal of the FIRST competitions is to get students interested in science and to make sure all students succeed.” While in the competition, teams can be paired up together. Then the next round a team can compete against the team they just worked with. “You show gracious professionalism,” Gunasingham said. “We will rely on another team or help another whenever asked upon. I think this is an Senior Jonaexpectation regardless of the fact than Hwang that you’re competing to win.” fixes a meDuring competition, club chanical sponsors step aside and problem with let the students run the

the robot while the robotics team showed off their creation to help raise money at lunch. Photo by Kate McNeal

team to the best of their abilities. Senior captains Zach Kimberg and Jonathan Hwang have been in the robotics club for four years. Kimberg believes their experience will help, but this is the first year that the club is without its founder Alex Wei. The team also lost previous sponsor Mr. Tim Huenther, although it has benefited from co-sponsors Gunasingham and Mr. Scott Swanger. “Gunasingham and Swanger were on top of managing the club and we were able to start earlier this year,” Kimberg said. The challenges that the team will face in the competition will be different than previous years, as the goals for the competition are not released until the six weeks before the competition. This is when the team receives the kit and must build the robot. “The competition varies, even between each round, and gives all teams an opportunity to show ingenuity and creativity while competing,” freshman Kevin Aquinos said. The team works on making a robot of their own before the kit is given out. This gives team members the opportunity to work on assembling a robot and making the program to allow the robot to move around. “In the past we’ve had robots shoot frisbees or climb pyramids,” Kimberg said. “We work on specific things in practice, but you can’t know exactly what will be in the competition. For our entertainment this year, we are working on a robot that could shoot t-shirts to students at the pep rallies.” The practices teach students where to prioritize aspects of the robot and make sure the robot performs a specific task well during competition. “This will make the robot successful in competition, instead of halfway doing a bunch of little things,” Gunasingham said. The team has three different areas of focus that go into the making of the robot. This includes a marketing team to work on finding people to help fund the club and the technical expertise of programming the robot. “Our captains are knowledgeable of aspects on each part of the robot,” Aquinos said. “With them we can be successful and hopefully place above other teams in the competition.” While students in the club hope to be successful in competition, they also see other benefits of working together. “I like how we have fun along with being serious about competing,” Aquinos said. “It makes us a group and not just a team.”


CORRALC 2013-2014 Staff

Editor in Chief Jason Sobelman

Managing Editor Clare Conlisk Production Manager Lillie Wasserman Business Manager Meaghan Flynn Digital Integration Editor in Chief Nathan Kolker Online Content Editor Matthew Bernstein Online Sports Editor Sam Winter Multimedia Manager Emily Schenberg Social Media Editor Catherine Melvin News Editor Matt Frischer Features Editor Jack Blethroad Opinions Editor Katie Richards Sports Editor Dean Trail Entertainment Editor Matthew Walter Staff Writers Jeffrey Eidelman Joe Goldberg Kelsey Larimore Kate McNeal Kirk Randolph Danielle Serota Matt Stern Hanna Whitehouse Adviser Ms. Tara Stepanek The Corral is a student-written, edited and produced publication of Parkway Central High School, 369 N. Woods Mill Road, Chesterfield, MO 63017; 314-415-7978. The Corral is given away free of charge to students and faculty. Subscriptions and patronships for one year may be purchased, starting at $20. The goal of this publication is to provide accurate, informative and entertaining information in the true spirit of responsible journalism and to operate as an open forum for students, faculty, administrators and parents. The Corral is created on Hewlett-Packard computers using Adobe Creative Suite 5.5 and is published by PressJournal Printing. Unsigned editorials reflect the views of the majority of the staff. Signed columns and artwork reflect the views of that individual. The staff appreciates comments and suggestions. Letters to the editor, guest editorials and other correspondence are encouraged but must be signed. The Corral reserves the right to publish or refrain from publishing, as well as edit, all submitted material.

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CORRALC 10

Opinions

Dec. 13, 2013

‘Supplying’ a grade is discrimatory Corral Staff

I

n between spurts of drilling vocabulary flashcards, hastily filling out review packets and finally reading that chapter in your textbook, you hit the refresh button more times than you think your browser should let you, seeing if your teacher has finally locked in your grade after the final. This scenario sound familiar? It’s the fate of students with borderline grades, those who are within a fraction of a point of the letter they want and the letter they hope not to have to settle with. These concerns often start before the anxiety of finals week. To try and prevent such stress, many students jump on any extra credit opportunity their teachers will give them, from revising essays to doing an extra project. The easiest and most popular seems to be classroom donations. The idea appears strong: Students can get a few points of extra credit for items brought in during Student Council’s canned food drive or contributions to the recent Soldier Boxes campaign. It also in-

cludes, for some teachers, bringing supplies for the classroom. It is true that providing an extra credit opportunity for the donations boosts the items brought in, allowing the charity drives to be continually successful. These opportunities also help teachers stock up for the next semester on luxury items in a classroom (Kleenex, Germ-X and the like). But for students who aren’t able to afford 50 canned food items or a variety pack of dry-erase board markers, not only is the opportunity to donate not there, neither is the ability to boost a grade a few points. A few dollars for some hand sanitizer may not seem like a big deal to many people in our community, but to a family on a strict budget, there may not be extra money left over to help stock a teacher’s classroom. The logic of offering extra credit in this manner seems sound to many in our community. Commonly used supplies like tissues or dry-erase board markers always come in handy. Money for these supplies comes out of the teachers’ pockets, but

students are the ones who use the supplies. The students are motivated to help out and are rewarded for their donation. Teachers’ hearts are in the right place when they advocate for students to give back to their community. But what we are forgetting as a community is that a few dollars for a few extra credit points could be the difference between an A and a B, determined by a student’s economic status rather than his or her performance in the class. If a teacher still needs to offer extra credit for charity drives or classroom supplies, students who can’t afford to spend money in such a way should be given a different option for extra credit comparable to the points given for purchased goods. As a community, we should be more aware of how much families are asked to spend for students to be successful in both their academics and activities and the consumer culture we are fostering with these practices. Students should be giving out of the goodness of their hearts, not for the goodness of their grades.

Are we losing sight of the meaning of school? Matt Frischer News Editor

like crazy, yet as break begins, all the knowledge that I picked up throughout the semester seems to vanish. But how can we help this? When students try to focus more on learning content in classes, their GPAs tend to start falling, as they our hours of my Sunday night were spent cramming for yet stop playing the game. If they start embracing the content and another test in an AP class, along with several other tests, whole-heartedly begin to understand it, they often have less time leading me to an extremely stressful Monday. and brain power to hold the facts they need to regurgitate come The day passed, the tests ended and little was remembered test time. But in the big scheme of things, learning content is far about any of the subjects. When my friends asked me what to more important and helpful to students in the future than a silly study, not only could I not tell them what I remembered, but I grade. couldn’t recall much at all of the subject matter. Students need to stop focusing so much on the small percentI pondered this all day: If I couldn’t remember things about a age that represents a whole semester, year or whole high school topic I had studied yesterday career full of work. How can you tell and taken a test over today, me that the tons and tons of hours of how was I learning anything? work I have put into school can be For that matter, was I learning squished down to one small number? anything at all? No, what students need to focus on With this, I started thinking is what they truly learn. Though many about what made a semester students have a good GPA, they do “successful” from an academic not truly know much about what is standpoint. My first thoughts going on in our world or even how jumped to my GPA. Had I our country works. A good GPA may kept it high enough to be conhelp a student get into college, but it sidered by the colleges at the will not help them once enrolled in top of my list? college. Truly learning is undoubtAs I was reflecting on How I “learn.” Illustration by Kelsey Larimore. edly more important than continually my semester, I never simply memorizing trivial facts. thought: What have I learned? It’s not easy to try to learn things in school in this system. It Never once did I wonder how what I’ve studied in class will help almost seem as though those who try are punished. But if we all me. The only time I thought about that is when I was dreading start trying to begin learning instead of memorizing and forgetting, studying a math concept I am convinced that I will never need in the system can eventually change. real life. No one is solely responsible for the faults of our current eduWe attend school to learn; yet, do we really remember anycational system, as the goal of teachers is not to cause students thing that we learn throughout the year? unneeded stress or to foster an environment of cramming informaThe answer in my opinion is clearly “no.” I consider myself tion. It simply seems to be the only logical, widespread way to a diligent student, and I am extremely guilty of this practice. I teach and measure success of schools everywhere. consistently memorize material only to forget it by the end of the While I’m not suggesting to completely ignore the societal stanweek. I am guilty of playing “the game of school,” getting by with dards set by the educational field, the next time you’re cramming good grades without truly learning the content for the long term. to memorize seemingly meaningless facts, remember why you’re Yes, finals provide a challenge, as concepts from the whole in school: to learn. semester are tested. Yet, my normal habits continue again. I cram

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A Lil Crazy

Dodging Z’s in the name of research Lillie Wasserman Production Manager

I

t’s sad but true - sleep deprivation is something that high school students are extremely familiar with. Either insomnia rips away sweet sleep, or projects, tests and essays have us up all night long. We all focus on what we need to get done when we push ourselves to stay awake past a healthy bedtime, but rarely do we legitimately consider the physical and mental health effects this has. So, to show how terrible things can go under these conditions, I remained awake for 36 hours. In describing these hours, the first thing I’m able to do is laugh. We’ve all been in a situation where we need to stay awake, but usually we have a reason. I had to find ways to occupy my time and stay awake. Early in the night, I had a couple friends helping to keep me awake. However, this wasn’t during the grind. I would call the grind 12:30 a.m. on, and let me tell you, I definitely had to find many interesting ways to stay awake. Here’s the part where I list all of the things I did to stay awake. Netflix, beautiful Netflix. So much to watch, so little time. This was a big factor in helping me fight sleep because it gave me something to do without any effort exerted. Reading was a great tool early in the night, but it eventually led to drooping eyelids. The tip to this one was not reading any dry material. Those two are normal activities, though. A lot of the night was consumed with eating (no pun intended...maybe). Eating is a great pasttime. Like watching Netflix, there is so much to eat and so little time. And, oh boy, do I feel American after writing that sentence.

After using it to stay awake, I can confidently say I’m pretty sick of social media. Ick. I’m not sure if Pinterest counts as social media, but it was also helpful in keeping my eyes wide open. And as usual, Pinterest leads to online shopping, which leads to adding things to your online shopping cart, which leads to realizing you don’t have a job and deleting everything in your shopping cart. But this is followed by playing mini basketball alone to forget that low point - so it’s all good. So yeah, basically the name of the game was killing time. The worst part of this experience wasn’t having to be creative in killing time; it was the physical and mental effects that ensued. I’m sure everyone has had the typical aches and pains of staying awake. However, this long stretch of time led to a terribly sore neck and back. My body felt so feeble, much like a noodle, that it was almost hard getting up and walking to my refrigerator - although it’s a refrigerator, so it wasn’t the hardest location to reach. Feeling overall worn-out and weak was not the only physical effect. Eventually the look of things became all blurry and fuzzy as my eyes (and contacts) begged me to go to sleep. Plus my mind was playing tricks on me. In the late-night hours, blankets and shadows began to look like ghosts. Yes, I’m still scared of ghosts, even though I don’t believe in them. Whoops. Also, when one is sleep deprived, every creak and moan of the house is extremely frightening. My lesson from this part was that unless you want to feel out of your mind, you should probably get a little bit of sleep. My mood was also altered by staying awake. I was way more irritable than I ever would be with a full night’s sleep. I wasn’t a raging jerk, but I definitely wasn’t as energetic as usual. It also became super hard to try and do anything productive. So you can only imagine my struggle when I had to do the reflex and cognition tests (see my results on page 14). So, staying awake for any stretch of time, especially an all-nighter plus a 12-hour day, is pretty harmful in every way. Not only do you end up setting yourself back physically, mentally and emotionally, but you also end up wasting more time getting freaked out by everyday noises than you do studying or doing homework. Lesson of this column: Study what you can before midnight and get some sleep - staying up is definitely not worth it.

Central lacks variety in practical classes

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inding classes that both satisfy the elements of ‘Will it interest me?’ and ‘Will it be beneficial to my future?’ can be very challenging. There is a variety of classes in the core subject areas, but is that what every single person’s future holds? High school should be a place to explore new opportunities for the future, but it can be difficult with the limits on class options. For those who enjoy one of the typical core subjects - science, math, social studies, or English - it is easy to find classes that are challenging and interesting. If a student is more interested in classes offered as electives, such as the visual and fine arts, there are fewer options, specifically in industrial arts classes, e.g. metal, woodworking, and other practical applications. These are classes that students might not get experience with elsewhere. That’s not to say that the new classes that have taken their place aren’t helpful. Instead of industrial arts classes, industrial technology classes are offered. They mainly revolve around the engineering field, such as Design Technology and Drafting. Technology and engineering are definitely appealing to many students, but these classes are unable to fill the void of industrial arts classes completely. Students are now unable to get a feel for what what these areas entail. For example, if you think you’d enjoy journalism, you can enroll in a publications class. For students who were not prodigies in anything early in life this is an especially helpful way to try your hand at something. However, for those who want to see if a construction-type class is right for them, the only class that still resembles old school industrial arts is Construction Technology, which combines aspects of different classes that used to be taught here (such as mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems) into a one semester’s

worth of curriculum. Now, if you already are deadset on a career in a certain field, there is the dual-credit program at South Tech. Yet this program is a big investment of time. Students only get to take four classes at Central, devoting the rest of their time to programs at South Tech. Both students who are sure and unsure of their interests lose spots in their schedules, possibly classes that are only offered in certain hours. In order to take one class they are interested in, students must, in essence, give up four classes. In addition, industrial arts are incredibly practical classes. Most students could benefit from learning a thing or two about fixing their common household and car problems, as well as some more complicated repairs to save money later in life. For those students whose relatives all have the plumber on speed dial, this could be the only place they could learn these skills in a hands-on way. Having classes dedicated to this is similar to the nature of a cooking class - you might not bake a souffle every day, but the skills necessary for making it will help you out immensely. Most teens seem to connect careers like engineer, lawyer or anything that requires years of higher education to being successful. One must realize these paths are not for everyone. It’s good that schools focus on turning students into well-rounded individuals and give them lots of practice in core subject areas, but for student who aren’t set on going to a traditional four-year college, there should be classes that aren’t so boring to them. Like a cooking class for future chefs and drama classes for future directors, certain parts of the curriculum cater to certain students - with just as viable career goals. The addition of industrial arts classes could help fix this for the teen who likes to work with her hands. “Practical arts” are not just for students who are devoted to construction careers but beneficial to those interested and who need the material these classes cover.

Freshman Anthony Braun works with a power drill in Mr. Todd Pannett’s Construction Technology class, one of the only industrial arts type classes Central provides. Photo by Katie Richards.

Opinions

Dec. 13, 2013

CORRALC HE

Katie Richards Opinions Editor

11


Snooze Lose

you

sleep less than nine* hours per night, on average

tudents know the situation all too well; it’s one that happens every semester, every month or for some, every week. After a long day of school and other activities, students tackle to piles of homework, preparing to work late Searching for shut-eye into the night. The next day, exhausFeldstein and Turkin both believe that improvetion and grogginess settle in, and the ments in school performance would occur if more cycle only repeats. for sleep was available. “I probably average around five to six “The best way for me to get more sleep was hours of sleep per night,” junior Marissa if school started later because if I Turkin said. “I do not have any school activities going on think it is sufficient and I would still have out of school I am constantly tired “My lack of sleep starting late at night so I never throughout school and all the chance to go to bed early,” of the activities I do.” causes me to make kin said. Turkin, like many stustupid mistakes on For Spanish students at dents, is involved in numerous schoolwork and tests.” he homework assignment extracurricular activities, such

more sleep there would definitely be a difference in my schoolwork,” Tursaid. “Also, when I’m tired at sports I tend to not play as well. If I had sleep, I would have more energy to play to my full potential.” For senior Seth Feldstein, the key to success is time management. “The best ways I deal with less sleep are to maximize my time so that I’m not up too far into the morning, and sticking to a routine so at least get used to the hours and respond better,” Feldstein said. “I a little bit earlier so that I can ease my way into the day. I usually the sports section of the paper so that I don’t start thinking in Like many others, Feldstein takes advantage of weekend hours and occasionally, caffeine, to keep him alert in class. spite these, Feldstein said he tends to do better with more

Lack of sleep hinders school, athletic performance Clare Conlisk Managing Editor

S

8 10

out of

*the recommended amount of sleep for adolescents is 9.25 hours,130 students surveyed

Student Survey:

least, on

don’t then, soccer have Tur-

time

Desleep.

I can get up read class.”

kin more

         

Teens lose fight with sleep

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Design by Clare Conlisk

schedule leads to a struggle during first block. “I had a first block class last year, and it was really hard to motivate them to discuss things in class, because people just wanted to sit there,” Dobkin said. “The interaction leep, the refuge of the masses, a place where every human will spend one third of is much greater in my afternoon classes than the early morning classes. Even my third block class is still pretty sleepy.” their life happily snoozing away. Yet, for the majority of teenagers this becomes a While school work can demand a lot of student time, sleep remains an luxury due to school and plentiful extracurricular activities. essential key to success for student athletes. According to psychology teacher Mrs. Cathy Dobkin, “As educators and “Sleep is incredibly important from an athletic standpoint because students need balance between activities and sleep. students, we want while you are asleep that is the period of the day where your body is “Extracurricular activities and athletics can dominate our knowledge for the long truly recovering and repairing any damage you might have suffered schedules,” Dobkin said. “I think teens in general have a problem with sleep deprivation.” term and not the short during a game,” biology teacher Mr. Adam Bergeron said. “When I say damage, you have to keep in mind that muscle soreness is still damage to In addition, St. Luke’s Hospital Sleep Specialist Dr. Hasan term, so sleep is the body that needs to be repaired. If you are not sleeping and allowing Ahmed says individuals have their own sleep cycle. An insufficient extremely important.” the repair to take place, you might as well not have done the work out amount of sleep can lead to difficulty getting up in the morning and even hitting the snooze button excessive times after the alarm Biology Teacher because you are not going to benefit maximally from the workout.” According to Ahmed, televisions, cell phones and all screens can sounds. It can be difficult to concentrate, your alertness goes Adam Bergeron lead to difficulty falling asleep. The bed must be associated with sleep down, and all daytime activities are affected. He stressed there only. If homework is completed on the bed, a person’s mind no longer should be a sense of balance in your life. associates the bed specifically with sleep. Overall, Ahmed believes that sleep is crucial To provide adequate sleep for growth and healing, a teenager requires between to success. eight and 10 hours of sleep every night. Dobkin said there is research showing teenage Furthermore, sleep is a crucial factor in the learning process of teenagers. Students circadian rhythms, or human biological clocks, to be different from other individuals. trying to create a balance between sleep and school are set up for success. “When adults are beginning to feel sleepy around 9, students are just starting to feel “When you are cramming for a test the night before trying to get all of that infordrowsy around 11,” Dobkin said. “So if 11 is the bedtime, to make it to school at 7:35 mation in, you are not sleeping. Your brain does not have an opportunity to process is not giving you the sleep that you really need. There have been school districts that and learn the information,” Bergeron said. “You are just trying to store and compress have embraced what sleep researchers have found and adjusted to a later start time.” information for the short term. As educators and students, we want knowledge for the Generally, students have hours of homework in addition to extracurricular activilong term and not the short term, so sleep is extremely important.” ties. There is only so much that can be accomplished in a single day and an excessive

Jason Sobelman Editor in Chief

Experts say sleep negligence creates serious side effects

The recommended amount of sleep for adolescents is eight to nine hours per night, and a deficit of these hours can have any number of effects. Spanish teacher Mrs. Andrea Williamson said she notices these changes in her students. “There is an analogy that says sleep for humans is like the refrigerator for Jell-O,” Williamson said. “To make Jell-O you have to stick it in the refrigerator for a period of time, otherwise it doesn’t gel. Basically, your brain needs sleep in order to solidify the learning that takes place. So let’s say you spend a night cramming but then you don’t get enough sleep, you’re going to have trouble recalling that information the next day.” Williamson often encourages her students to get an adequate amount of sleep and work on their time management skills, as she understands the pressures students undergo. “Sleep is a huge problem for students who juggle AP classes, sports and jobs,” Williamson said. “The philosophy here at Central is achieve at all costs. There are only 24

Needing a nap

activities going on then, I would still have out of school soccer starting late at night so I never have the chance to go to bed early,” Turkin said. For Spanish students at least, he homework assignment on the Williamson’s board often instructs students to sleep an allotted number of hours before the next class period. “Some teachers forget all the things students have on their plates,” Williamson said. “So I assign sleep as homework because I think that no matter what’s going on they have to take care of themselves first, and sleep is like the foundation for everything else.”

Junior Marissa Turkin

Z

tired throughout school and all of the activities I do.” Turkin, like many students, is involved in numerous extracurricular activities, such as student council, soccer, Project Parkway, National Honors Society, and cheerleading. “The largest cause of me not getting enough sleep is how spread out my activities are throughout the day,” Turkin said. “For example, I would have STUCO before school, cheer from 4:30 to 6, and then soccer from 7:30 to 9. I wouldn’t be getting home until really late and there isn’t much time to do homework in between activities.”


of fall-aslep car crashes are caused by drivers 25 or younger

The average high schooler’s natural time to fall asleep is

11

minutes for caffeine to enter the bloodstream

Numbers

55%

30

Z By the

p.m.

9.25 hours of sleep recommended for adolescents

Exercise should stop

3

hours before going to bed

Facts compiled from a study published by the National Sleep Foundation.

G

Our own study

iven the findings of our research, we decided to conduct a study of our own. In our study, senior Production Manager Lillie Wasserman stayed up for 36 straight hours after nine hours of sleeps the night before. To test the effects of the lack of sleep, we conducted two tests. The results are as follows.

Out of 60 multiplication problems:

59

problems were answered correctly with a full night of sleep.

53

problems were answered correctly after staying awake for 36 hours.

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CORRALC 14

Cover Story Dec. 13, 2013

Stress impels caffeine crave Danielle Serota Staff Writer

T

he pressure to excel in academics, sports and other extracurriculars has pushed students so hard that in order to keep up with minimal hours of sleep, many have begun to rely heavily on caffeine. Whether it be coffee, tea, soda or energy drinks, many students are drinking excess amounts of caffeine without the knowledge of how it affects the body. “Any caffeine is too much caffeine,” Christian Northeast Hospital sleep medicine specialist Dr. Gary Goldstein said. “Caffeine is a stimulant drug and its consumption can lead to dependency and even addiction.” Aside from its obvious side effects including anxiety, headaches, dehydration and the jitters, caffeine largely interferes with the sleep cycle. In addition to its immediate side effects, excessive caffeine consumption can also lead to more serious consequences in the long run, including calcium deficiency, osteoporosis and heart problems. “What many don’t realize is that ingesting caffeine is introducing a new drug to your body, just like any other drug,” Goldstein said. However, many students are unaware of these negative consequences. Sophomore Tyler McDowell said she survives the pressures of multiple honors and AP classes as well as cross country with Starbucks double shot beverages. “I drink them in the morning after I’ve stayed up late studying for a test,” McDowell said. “I usually get about five to six hours of sleep, but at least twice a week I get even less.” Other students drink caffeinated drinks for the taste. Senior Jacob Maier owns a Starbucks

Students and Caffeine What is your preference? None (35%)

When trying to catch a falling ruler:

After a full night of sleep, the ruler was caught after

6.25in.

After staying awake for 36 hours, the ruler was caught after

9in.

Design by Clare Conlisk

gold card, which he received by purchasing more than 30 drinks. “I go there every week,” Maier said. “I just do it for the taste, not even for the caffeine.” The Starbucks fad has greatly increased caffeine intake. Students readily ingest excess caffeine in consequence of their Starbucks addiction. Some students choose to drink more caffeineconcentrated drinks like 5-Hour Energy. Junior Jack Karagiannis said he drinks the beverage routinely four times a week. “I take it to wake up in the mornings,” Karagiannis said. “And I take it to pump up before every football game.” In addition to coffee and 5-Hour Energy, students have admitted to drinking other energy drinks like Monster and Red Bull come finals season. Whether a student drinks the caffeine to stay up or stays up because of the caffeine, students who drink lots of caffeinated drinks face many obstacles dealing with sleep deprivation. When considering the negative effects of sleep deprivation, the dilemma of whether or not it is better to chug another coffee to stay up late cramming for a test arises. “Sleep deprivation impairs your ability to reason,” Goldstein said. “If the test is how to spell 10 words, cram. If the test is to put the words in a paragraph in various contexts, go to sleep.” According to Goldstein, high schoolers shouldn’t have to rely on caffeine to make it through the day. He believes that it all goes back to time management. “Get off Facebook and social media, put your phone down, do your work and get to sleep,” Goldstein said. “If you set your priorities you shouldn’t need caffeine.”

* Out of 130 students surveyed.

How much caffeine is in your drink? Source: University of California-Davis School of Nutrituion website

Energy Drinks (8%)

300 mg Rockstar Energy

Soda (33%)

90 mg Mountain Dew

Tea (4%)

38 mg Lipton Iced Tea

Coffee (21%)

415 mg Cup of Coffee

Drink


Rembold transitions to the pool Matthew Walter Entertainment Editor

C

oming off of a 20-8 season that included a district title, the girls basketball team lost senior Katie Rembold to the swim team. Although injured for her whole junior season, through cheering and motivating, she helped younger players on the team including junior Melanie Wasserman. “Katie was always cheering us on and helped us so much as we continued past districts,” Wasserman said. “I can’t really imagine having games without Katie this year.” Despite playing basketball since kindergarten, the injuries she sustained before her junior season were a contributing factor for the switch. Diagnosed as a problem with the talus bone in the foot, the injury developed into nagging pain in the foot and ankle. “It’s feeling good now,” Rembold said. “Swimming is great therapy to help build back lost muscles.” Despite being frustrated by the time she’s missed due to injury, swimming provides a new challenge and way to compete. “Swimming is such a different sport from basketball,” Rembold said. “Practices have been pretty tough on me mainly because I’m used to really laid back summer swim team practices and the school team is such a big change.” Unlike basketball, where plays and communication

are used, swimming practices revolve around the individual. “Swimming doesn’t give as much time to chit chat because you’re face is in the water most of practice but as far as I can tell they seem like a great group of girls,” Rembold said. “Coach Meyer and coach Paul are really nice and super welcoming.” Along with swimming, Rembold participates in numerous school activities. She is the student body president and also plays volleyball in the fall and manages the boys volleyball team in the spring. “I get pretty stressed out about everything, but my friends and family help me stay sane. It’s been hard figuring out a way to deal with homework, practices, school, StuCo events and everything like that,” Rembold said. “But so far I’m alive and still able to function so obviously I’m doing something right.” Senior Katie Rembold practices with fins on Dec. 9. She Only a couple of weeks into the season, Remswitched from basketball to swimming her senior year. Photo by bold isn’t sure what she will swim, but will look to Matthew Walter. contribute. “I think it’s great that she’s expanding her proson swimming the 50 freestyle and the 200 freestyle relay. file and showing everyone that she is capable of doing any “Katie’s got lots of spirit and she will definitely add sport,” senior Kelilah Liu said. “I feel like she will make a to the motivation on the team,” senior Allison Bain said. good addition to the team in personality and skill.” “She will also be a solid swimmer for spots when we need Girls swimming will face Parkway North, Dec. 10 for to be filled.” their first meet of the season. Rembold will start the sea-

Pair of swimmers make splash at state meet Dean Trail Sports Editor

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Senior Zach Rogers finishes the last quarter of his 500-yard freestyle on Oct. 17 at home against Clayton. Photos by Elizabeth Leath. my life with the Tigers.” While they will go their separate ways at the end of the school year, the teammates will still swim together in the off-season for the Parkway Swim Club. Swimming with other contending teens from around the area has brought out a friendly rivalry between Rogers and his club teammates. “It’s a fun time because everyone goes to different schools but were all on the same team,” Rogers said. “It has made for a special kind of rivalry when the high school season rolls around.” While they have been completing similar workouts and training for both the school and club teams, the two swimmers prepare for each meet in different ways. Rogers said he gets plenty of sleep and eats lots of protein the night before big meets. Brown said he tries to stay away from teammates, friends and family to listen to music in effort to get ready for meets. Preparing for State didn’t start the night before but in August during tryouts. Both swimmers acknowledged that they have pushed themselves the entire season. “To prepare myself through the season, I trained as hard as I could and held nothing back,” Rogers said. “Being sore for three months straight is not fun, and finally laying off toward the end of the season was one of the best feelings ever.”

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wo Parkway Central swimmers represented their school by placing in their respective races at the MSHSAA State Championship on Nov. 15 and 16. “Obviously I couldn’t be too mad about being first and second at a meet that size with swimmers of that caliber,” senior Zach Rogers said. “But with that being said, I wasn’t too happy. I dropped time in both events, but I was pretty far off my goals of where I wanted to be time-wise.” Although Rogers was not content with his times, he tied for first in the 200-yard freestyle with Glendale High School swimmer Will Brand and placed second in the 100-yard backstroke, losing by only one hundredth of a second to Vianney swimmer Nick Alexander. “My reaction to the turnout and how close it was in my races was mostly shock,” Rogers said. “But it was exciting, and I’m always looking for a way to make the sport more memorable and fun.” Joining Rogers by making a splash at the state tournament was fellow senior Riley Brown, who placed fourth in the 100-yard butterfly and sixth in the 100-yard backstroke. “My performance at state was something I was satisfied with,” Brown said. “I dropped time and scored a lot of points for my team, and that is what I went in to do.” Coach Jeff Spector complimented both of the athletes for their hard work throughout the year and results at the state meet. “Beyond state accomplishments, both left indelible marks on the team and have both left records in the top 10 of Parkway Central,” Spector said. The team as a whole placed fourth at the meet with a total score of 143.5 points. Rogers and Brown also contributed in the 200-yard medley relay, which placed third with a time of 1:36.93, and the 400-yard freestyle, which placed fourth with a time of 3:13.08. Both boys are continuing their swimming careers at Division I colleges, Brown at Truman State University and Rogers at the University of Missouri. “I’ve signed with Mizzou and will be Senior Riley Brown completes the last lap swimming there next year,” Rogers said. of his 200-yard freestyle race at an Oct. 8 “I’m very excited for the next chapter of home meet against Afton.

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Upperclassman key for team’s success Matt Stern Staff Writer

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ith an experienced returning cast, the boys varsity basketball team is ready to begin a new chapter, and are relying on their upperclassman to write some history. The Colts return seven seniors to the varsity squad this season. “This groups team returns quite a bit of experience and I think that’s going to be huge for the confidence of the team going in to the season,” varsity assistant coach Aaron Mueller said. “These guys have been through it, they played a lot of minutes last year and I think they have a lot of confidence in themselves and in each other because of that.” The team participated in tournaments over the summer to prepare for the season, and Mueller says that’s where he saw a lot of improvement. “Everyone had a great summer and got a lot better,” Mueller said. “Biggs improved a whole bunch over the summer, Jarrett improved a lot, and we got better as a team so I think that’s going to help us going early into the season.” Biggs, who will be starting on varsity for the third straight year, is determined that the upperclassman experience will lead the team to their goals. “Get 20 wins, win conference and win districts,” Biggs said. “Our starters and our key contributors are all upperclassman.” Cox-Bradley, who returns as the starting point guard, says he exemplifies his role to his teammates on the bench. “It’s kind of like setting the tone,” Cox-Bradley said. “I gotta know what I’m doing so people coming off the bench can know what they have to do.” Although Cox-Bradley is excited about his returning role, he will be playing his last season with teammates who he credits for his success. “It’s been great,” Cox-Bradley said. “They’ve all been there and have been very supportive of me, so I give all the credit to my senior teammates.” The varsity basketball teams will get some assurance for a good defensive unit with defensive specialist senior Nick Helmbacher coming back for his senior season. “We base our team around defense and our motto is defense wins game,” Helmbacher said.”I guard most of the best players on the other teams so I’d say my role is pretty important.” Also returning to the defensive game is senior Braendon Prude, who transferred from Vashon High School last year. Prude says the team must work well together if they want to accomplish the team goals. “I think everyone is equally important,” Prude said. “We all have to work together to accomplish our goal for a district and conference championship, and because we have so many returning seniors, this will probably be our best shot for a while.”

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Dec. 13, 2013

Returning leaders make their mark Joe Goldberg Staff Writer

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eniors Connor Kraus and Kyle Disch became key components of this year’s varsity squad. Although both played in the basketball program since freshman year, they each overcame individual struggles freshman year to reach their prominence on varsity. “Freshman basketball was a lot different than middle school,” Kraus said. “You finally got a lot of structure and the competition steps up a level. I played in the B-team games but the whole experience of having a team, and everybody being together was a cool thing.” Disch also worked to adjust to basketball on the high school level. An additional factor was everyone catching up to his height and missing his whole 8th grade season due to an eye infection. “It was tough for me to catch up Senior Kyle Disch breaks the press against Parkway South in the season with the other guys,” Disch explained. opener on Dec. 2 at Parkway North. The Colts went on to win the game 69“I didn’t really know the plays and the 54. Photo by Emily Schenberg. reason I didn’t play much freshman “You know Krausy is really a leader by example,” Kirby year is because I had so much catching said. “Here is a kid regardless of the drill at any point in the up to do both on the court and with the plays.” However, each player worked through the season and de- practice is giving you 110% and just playing real hard. When you watch him practice, you want to practice like him.” cided to come back the next year. Kraus’ decision to return Disch, a pivotal sixth man last year and starter this year, for his sophomore season was based around the team aspect filled key roles last year for the varsity team. of the game. “Last year I was the first or second guard off the bench,” “Freshman year, it was always a ‘What can I do to win Disch explained. “I just tried to come in and bring energy, games?’ mentality,” Kraus said. “I didn’t really worry about score when I needed to, and defend hard. This year I’ll eiif I was in or if it was someone else as long as we got the ther be a starter or a sixth man and I’m hoping to contribute [win]”. to a conference and district title.” Today, Coach Rick Kirby holds Kraus in high regard Times may have been tough freshman year for Disch and for his ability to do the little things in games last year that Kraus but both are glad they stuck with it. Kraus specifically helped contribute to the team. is glad to still be involved on the varsity level. “He was probably what I would consider our unsung “I always hoped I’d still be on the team winning games hero,” Kirby said. “I called him our Stat Stuffer because at when I was a senior,” Kraus explained. “Freshman year the end of the game it seemed like he had 12 points, 6 redidn’t matter nearly as much as I thought at the bounds, and a couple time. As long as you’re playing, getting better and steals. He contributed getting ready for your junior/senior year when in many different little you’re playing in games that really matter on the ways that was essential varsity level, that’s when it gets really fun.” to our 15 wins. For a Disch understand his role this season; he stretch I think he even knows he is going to be asked to step up in a vahad a couple double riety of roles, specifically as a lockdown defender doubles in a row.” and offensively. As for Disch, Kirby “I need to become a better defender,” Disch explains how he has explained. “Defensive basketball is required the ability to come into by all five guys on the court to move together the game and really and defend as a team. I’m also bringing energy help swing the momenand taking on a little bit more of a scoring and tum for the Colts. rebounding role.” “Disch ended up Overall Kirby is impressed with the results he in a stretch coming in got from Kraus and Disch last season. They filled and being what I call nicely into individual roles and were a significant instant offense,” Kirby Junior Jarrett Cox-Bradley fights for a ball in part of the team’s season. said. “He was a guy the season opener against Parkway South. “They surprised me last year with how good that got it to the basthey played,” Kirby said. “Seriously, Disch and ket, hunted and found Photo by Emily Schenberg. Krausy were big parts of our success. You got his shot and scored to be able to play 7-8 guys if you’re going to be any good. for us. He provided a scoring punch off the bench that was Although Krausy started every game and Disch came off the really critical.” bench and played in every game, he was a big catapult for Kraus is a leader by example that teammates look to as us at times with his instant offense. Both are just great kids.” a teammate always giving 100% effort throughout practice, weightlifting, and summer workouts.


Unsung Heroes Highlighting the less heralded athletes of the fall sports season

Lillie Wasserman Production Manager

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Junior Makenna Sadler spikes the ball against Pattonville on Sept. 17. Photo by Matthew Schmittdiel.

n any sport, players strive to improve and evolve their talent from year to year. This is especially true for junior Makenna Sadler, a big player for the girls varsity volleyball team. Sadler’s consistency does not come easy, as she is always adjusting to her alternating club and school teammates. “The biggest challenge every season is getting used to the setter, I play club volleyball and I’ve had the same setter for about two years now,” Sadler said, “the most important bond on the court is between the hitters and the setter.” Sadler not only contributes skill to the team, but also keeps the atmosphere relaxed with her own flare of personality. “I love making people laugh. If someone’s down or they make a little mistake you just

have to bring them up and make them smile so they can get their head back in the game,” Sadler said. Sophomore Emily McCann, Sadler’s teammate, added that Makenna’s skill and attitude are integral to the team. “She always keeps everyone’s head up even when things aren’t going well,” McCann said, “she is a great player. She is a good all around, amazing middle and blocker and has a great serve.” Coach Tom Schaefer agrees that Sadler is a unique personality on the team. “She definitely brings her energetic personality to the team and keeps things light while remaining focused,” Schaeffer said. As for her hopes for next year, Sadler hopes to even further improve, and play yet another season with a close-knit team. “Next year, I simply want to have a great group of girls that work well on the court together,” Sadler said. In any sport, stress can be high leading to a constant stream of challenges. However, these challenges were ones Sadler overcame to score the game winning point against Parkway North in the district play-offs. “My biggest accomplishment was getting the game winning point against Parkway North in the district play-offs,” Sadler said, “I played a great game. I’ve never been so proud to be a Colt.”

Alexis Hibbs Started every varsity game as a freshman Nathan Kolker Digital Integration Editor in Chief Freshman Alexis Hibbs fires the softball to second base on Sept. 24 at Westminster. Photo by Matthew Gibbs.

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hile most freshman are fortunate to fill a spot on a JV roster, Alexis Hibbs made her way onto the varsity softball squad, competing against girls up to four years older than her. “I thought it was cool because I was playing girls older than me and whenever I would throw someone out at second base, I felt like Yadier Molina,” Hibbs said. Not only did Hibbs make the team, she started every game. “It was fun and nerve-racking catching all those games especially as a freshman,” Hibbs said. Hibbs added that she enjoyed her time behind the plate and looks forward to stepping back onto the diamond “Softball this year was an amazing experience and I am exited to come back for another fun season with my teammates,” Hibbs said. Hibbs gives advice for other young players in her situation: “Practice and train hard so that you can be the best that you can be going into the season,” Hibbs said.

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Trey Sheehan’s personal best dive score

Kate McNeal Staff Writer

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lthough freshman Trey Sheehan started his high school diving career with no prior diving experience, he ended up being an important addition to the boys swimming and diving team. “For my first season I thought it went pretty well,” Sheehan said. “It was really nice being able to contribute to the team.” During the 2012 boys swimming and diving season there were no divers, which had a negative effect on the team’s overall scores during meets where the opposing team had divers. “Last year there were at least two meets that we lost because there were no divers,” sophomore Adam Barr said. Sheehan was the only full-time diver but he scored first or second in almost every dual meet he dove in, which boosted the number of points the team scored. “Because Trey was diving this year, we weren’t automatically down at meets,” Barr said. “It was nice to be on an even playing field at every meet.” Along with his success at dual meets, Sheehan placed among the top eight divers at Conference also. His highest score during the season was 177 points and with the number of points needed to qualify for State being 210, Sheehan is hopeful to make State at some point during his high school diving career. “I want to dive all four years,” Sheehan said. “And this summer I want to see if I can get into a club diving team.”

Freshman Trey Sheehan plunges into the pool on Sept. 12 against Marquette. Sheehan came within 33 points of qualifying for the state meet in his first year of diving. Photo by Elizabeth Leath.

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Dec. 13, 2013

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Makenna Sadler Scores Game Winning Point in Districts

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Unsung Heroes Highlighting the less-heralded athletes of the fall sports season “I think Melinda Lai can do anything. I wouldn’t be surprised if she cures cancer or something ridiculous like that.” - junior Anna Kleydman Clare Conlisk Managing Editor

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ver the course of four years, senior Melinda Lai transformed from a freshman with very little competitive tennis experience to a key player and co-captain of girls varsity and JV team. “I joined the team my freshman year because I figured that I needed to play a sport to stay healthy and I had heard too many awful things about volleyball conditioning,” Lai said. One of her close friends and teammates is junior Anna Kleydman, who was Lai’s co-captain this season. “As captains, Anna Kleydman and I handled all of the uniform and spirit wear ordering, planned the banquet, and came up with some killer activities for our annual tennis team sleepover,” Lai said. “That’s another great memory--spending hours at Anna’s house coming up with ridiculous things for the girls to do.” According to Kleydman, Lai was a “creative” captain, so the two enjoyed “ordering everyone around together” at the team sleepover, as well as leading the team together throughout the season. “I can’t imagine the team without Melinda,” Kleydman said. “Every year that I’ve played, she’s been there. Next season is going to be something completely new, without anyone older to look up to. And having Melinda to look up to all these years has really been a privilege. I know I’m not the only one who’s going to miss her like crazy.” Lai plans to continue playing tennis in the future, “but just for funsies.” Regardless of her tennis career, her teammates have no doubts about her eminent success. “I think Melinda can do anything,” Kleydman said. “I wouldn’t be surprised if she cures cancer or something ridiculous like that.”

Senior Melinda Lai competes against Kirkwood on Sept. 30. Photo by Anna Kleydman.

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Stephen He improved his best time by :30 Kirk Randolph Staff Writer

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etting his first chance to run on varsity full time, junior Stephen He continued a trend of hard work which led to a drop in times at meets. “Running varsity full time put me in a different mindset than last year,” He said. “Going into meets [last year], I wouldn’t know which race I was running until Bergeron told me. Now that I know I’m running varsity, it makes it a lot easier to focus and prepare for my race.” The extra mental preparation that He had went a long way. At the Conference meet this year, he ran a personal best time, improving by thirty seconds from his best time last year. This happened in unfavorable circumstances for the junior runner as he slipped in the first 100 meters of his race. “Instead of letting it bring me down, I felt more determined to run as fast as I could,” He said. “Throughout the race, I pushed myself to keep up with the front pack. It was such a relief to succeed, and the effort that I had put in over the years paid off. It was amazing.” That determination to succeed that He displayed in his race might be what keeps him motivated throughout the offseason. “I run regularly in the offseason,” He said. “During the winter, I go to Banta’s winter conditioning, and over the summer I run with my cross country team.” Improvements can’t happen without hard work in He’s eyes. His work ethic is not just motivated by improving his times, however. “I plan to train hard over the off season, and hopefully inspire the younger runners to do the same,” He said. “That way, we can make huge improvements as a team.” He recognizes the importance of teamwork to win. Now, as he steps into a leadership role as a senior next year, he plans to lead by example to better both himself and his teammates.

Stephen He runs in the Parkway Central Invitational on Sept. 19. Photo by Ms. Tara Stepanek

Sarah Madsen Shaved 1:39 off of her original 5k time Jeffrey Eidelman Staff Writer

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espite running on the cross country team for the first time, sophomore Sarah Madsen found a way into the postseason. “I think that throughout the season I gained confidence in myself,” Madsen

Sophomore Sarah Madsen competes in the conference meet at University City on Oct. 12. Photo by Ms. Tara Stepanek.

said. Madsen has ran track before, for both club and school, but this is the first time that she has run long distance. “She had a rough transition at first,” sophomore runner Kara Stark said. “But she took the change really well and had a great season.” Madsen’s 5k time at the beginning of the year was 1:39 longer than it was at the end of the season. “Sarah always worked really hard, and always tried her best,” Stark said. In her first year running long distance, Madsen ran in the district meet and qualified for sectionals. She hopes to improve in certain aspects of running in the off season. “Next year I want to control my breathing during races and not freak out,” Madsen said. Throughout the year Madsen feels like she improved as a runner overall. “Running a 5k seemed really intimidating at first,” Madsen said. The cross country team was very supportive of Madsen, and helped her throughout the season. “Running with my friends pushed me to work hard during workouts and helped me become a better runner in general,” Madsen said.

For more sports updates, check out parkwaynews.net/corral


Nathan Kolker Digital Integration Editor in Chief

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he may not have shot the best round of the year, but Senior Brittany Gregory lead the team when it came to mentoring and providing positive energy. “I contributed by just staying positive and being there for the girls on the team whether it had to do with golf or school,” Gregory said. “I tried to make the freshman girls feel as welcome as possible.” Junior Elizabeth Leath, who finished tied for 11th in the state, said that the team benefited from Gregory’s encouragement. “She always has a smile on her face and is upbeat on the course,” Leath said. “She has a positive attitude. We feed off her energy. Seeing someone with a smile on their face helps you forget about the negative shots. The positive energy rubs off on you and brings you back to a cheerful state of mind.” Gregory added that she learned more as a high school golfer than just how to play the game. “I improved as the season went on by having an overall better understanding and respect for the sport in general which helped with my playing. Being a golfer taught me a lot about myself and showed me the importance of a team.”

Brittany Gregory drives the ball against Farmington at Four Seasons Country Club on Sept. 12. Photo by Tyler Deaton.

Josh Konecek jumps JV, racks up varsity playing time as sophomore

Sophomore Josh Konecek plays on Sept. 23 against University City. Photo by Molly Cagle.

Jeffrey Eidelman Staff Writer

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ophomore Josh Konecek didn’t score a goal all year, but his contribution to the team was abundant according to senior captain Ben Mendel. “He worked really hard,” Mendel said. “Coming from the freshman level he adjusted really well to the speed of the game.” Konecek credits the upperclassmen leadership with his success. “I just try to do the things they tell me to do to get better, and help out the team,” Konecek said. Konecek played the majority of the games this past season, and was rarely subbed. “Hopefully they look to me to be a leader next year,” Konecek said. “I want to help as much as possible.” Konecek was pleasantly surprised after tryouts when the coaches told him he would play varsity. Last year he played for the freshman soccer team, and was the only person this year to make the jump from freshman to varsity. “I thought it was cool that they even considered me for varsity,” Konecek said. “When they did I worked really hard to get playing time.”

Ben Fagin - Hail to the Chief Sam Winter Online Sports Editor

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hen an Indian war cry is heard from the Parkway Central student section during football games, it can only mean one thing:the oppositions premier receiver has become victim to senior Ben Fagin’s lockdown defense. “At first I was just joking around about the nickname with some of the guys, and eventually it caught on,” Fagin said. “It’s kind of cool to be known as the chief instead of being called Ben or Fagin. The war cries give me an extra incentive to play harder so I can keep hearing my cheer.” After playing on the team for three years, Fagin has asserted himself as the elite cornerback on the team. Every Friday night he is matched up against the opposing team’s top wide receiver, and expected to shut them down. “He has turned into a leader among our team this year,” Coach Mike Wright said. “We put him on the other team’s best receiver each week because we’re confident that he’s going to limit him.” Fagin ended his senior year with 45 tackles, an interception, and a trip to the Edward Jones Dome as the Colts made it to the Class 5 State Championship game against Lee Summit West. “The dome was an amazing experience that I’ll never forget,” Fagin said. “It felt like it was the big time with the lights shining on us and the crowd roaring. “ Although the team was not able to bring home the hardware they would have liked, Fagin would still consider it a successful season. “In the end, the season was just special,” Fagin said. “Every single day was exciting and being with these guys every day made it enjoyable and fun. We had such good team chemistry, and got along on and off the field. I think we can safely say we are one of the best, if not the best team in school history.”

Athletes to Watch in the Winter Sports Season Jamal Richie returns for his senior season after double digit wins his junior year. At press time, Richie has a recorded of 3 wins and 3 losses, including a tri-meet with Westminster and Webster Groves. Photo from Corral archives After leading the team in blocks last season, senior forward Connor Kraus is a force on and off the ball. Kraus is currently averaging 14 points a game thanks to a 21 point outburst against Parkway North. Photo by Emily Schenberg

Coming off of two straight years of AllConference recognition, senior captain Christie Bergesch looks to continue her success. She averaged a double-double with 14.5 points and 10.2 rebounds per game last season. Photo from Corral archives. Freshman Madison Brown has shown speed as a member of the Parkway Swim Club. Her times for backstroke are 31.57 seconds for the 50-yard back, 1:07.41 seconds for the 100-yard Back, and 2:31.15 seconds for the 200-yard back. Photo Courtesy of Madison Brown.

Compiled by the Corral staff Designed by Nathan Kolker and Jeffrey Eidelman

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“She always has a smile on her face and is upbeat on the course,” Junior Elizabeth Leath said of Brittany Gregory

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Teachers committed to students beyond the classroom Kirk Randolph Staff Writer

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any teachers spend a lot of time grading tests and papers. However, those that also coach have even more on their plate but willingly accept the challenge. “I became a coach because I always loved sports, watching kids compete, and watching them get better,” said history teacher and head football coach Mr. Mark Goldenberg. “That is also why I like teaching.” Like any sport, the coach is ultimately responsible for the team’s success. Realizing this, Goldenberg spends a lot of time at practices after school to put his team in the best position to succeed. He makes sure to not let that take away from his teaching responsibilities though. “Luckily, I have experience so it makes things easier,” Goldenberg said. “I’m primarily a teacher though so I try not to let coaching get in the way of that.” Goldenberg is just one of many teachers that coach. Mrs. Jennifer Meyer, the girls cross country assistant coach and head swimming coach, has to deal with many of the same time management challenges that Goldenberg faces. “I work all the time,” Meyer said. “I work every weekend, before school and night.” Meyer works through the school day, but the work doesn’t stop there. She also works with the National Honors Society because she is the sponsor. For this commitment she meets with the officers once a month, runs the meetings, and assigns them to tutor kids.

On top of that, she works for several hours with her team. Although this is a big time commitment, Meyer willingly accepts the challenge because of her passion for coaching. “I liked participating in sports in high school and challenging myself,” Meyer said. “I loved being a part of a team. Also, I had influential coaches when I was an athlete and wanted to be like them.” Teaching and coaching can be viewed as different jobs. However, Meyer realizes that the two are not as far apart as they may seem. “Coaching enhances teaching because it helps me build relationships with my athletes that I can’t as a teacher,” Meyer said. One of those individuals that Meyer has been able to develop a strong relationship with is senior Rachel Morris. She is not only on both the girls cross country and swim team but also is currently in one of Meyer’s physics classes. “I do feel like I have a better relationship with her because she is my coach,” Morris said. “We get the chance to know each other more as just people instead of simply a teacher and a student.” Meyer does not form relationships with her students to become friends. She then uses those relationships to enable her in progressing the growth of her students and athletes. “She knows how hard I can work to achieve something,” Morris said. “Therefore, she knows how much work ethic I have when it comes to physics, too. I think this is a good thing because she would never expect any

Mrs. Meyer’s Daily Schedule 6:15 a.m.: Help students with questions 7:35 a.m.: Begin teaching classes 4 p.m.: Start away swim meet 6 p.m.: Arrive at school and wait for athletes to get picked up 6:15 p.m.: Go home 7 p.m.: Work on school work and swim team when time permits less of me than I can give her so I can reach my full potential in both sports and school.” Teachers all over the school dedicate a lot of time with their students to coach both the sports and the kids they care so much about. “I can’t pick which one I love more,” Goldenberg said. “I love them both. It just depends on the day.”

SENIORS DON’T FORGET:

Prestige/ Lifetouch Portraits was chosen as the official senior portrait photographer for the Class of 2014. To make your appointment, call Prestige Portraits at 636-438-0829. **In order for your senior picture to appear in the yearbook, schedule an appointment by Friday, Jan. 10. You are under no obligation to buy a package, and there is no charge for getting the yearbook photo taken. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to e-mail us at pchyearbook@yahoo.com.


, E R E H S I R E T N do not fear WI Patterned Mittens & Gloves

Catherine Melvin Social Media Editor

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ften times the winter months become a period of fashion mourning. In the summertime it’s easy to throw on cute sundresses, sunglasses, and sun hats. However, when snowflakes and cold air take over our city, avoiding that luxurious pair of sweatpants everyday seems a bit more difficult. The constant power struggle between looking cute and feeling comfortable is inevitable. But, this winter, cute and comfortable have collided. Don’t miss out on the cozy accessories that can make an ensemble truly glamorous. Bundle up with these detailed hats and scarves and accessorize with sparkles and cozy furs.

Animal Print Anything

Cute & Cozy

Quilted Colored Headscarf

There’s no sense in dismissing fun accessories this season! Finish off the outfit while staying warm.

Beaded Headbands Faux Fur Vest Sequins Galore

Entertainment Dec. 13, 2013

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Textured Snoods

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Recipes with a PEP in their STEP Catherine Melvin Social Media Editor

Peppermint Pattie Brownies

Peppermint Chex Mix Ingredients

-6 cups Rice Chex or Chocolate Chex cereal -1 bag white chocolate baking chips (2 cups) -1/3 cup coarsely crushed peppermint candy canes

Ingredients

-boxed brownie mix -ingredients listed on brownie mix (eggs, oil, water) -24 York Peppermint Patties -1 cup chocolate chips

Directions

1. Prepare brownie mix as directed. Pour half into greased 9x13� pan. 2. Unwrap peppermint patties and line them up over the layer of batter. 3. Pour remaining half of batter on top of peppermint patties. 4. Bake as directed on box. 5. Let cool and then refrigerate for a couple of hours so that the peppermint patties can set back up.

Directions

1. Line cookie sheet with foil or waxed paper. Place cereal in large bowl. 2. In microwavable bowl, microwave white baking chips uncovered on high about 1 minute 30 seconds, stirring every 30 seconds, until chips can be stirred smooth. Stir in half the crushed peppermint candy. 3. Pour over cereal; toss to evenly coat. Spread mixture in single layer on cookie sheet. Immediately sprinkle with remaining candy.

Peppermint Oreo Truffles Ingredients

-1 package of regular Oreos -1 (8 oz.) pkg cream cheese, softened

-1 tsp peppermint extract -16 oz. white, milk, or dark chocolate -crushed candy canes

Directions 1. Cover a cookie sheet with wax paper and set aside. 2. Finely crush Oreos. This can be done with a food processor or by placing them in a large Ziploc bag and smashing them. Pour crushed Oreos into a mixing bowl. 3. In separate bowl, blend together cream cheese and peppermint extract. 4. Add cream cheese to crushed Oreos and stir until well combined and evenly moistened. 5. Scoop mixture out into 1 inch balls, place on the cookie sheet and freeze for 10 minutes. 6. Melt desired chocolate and dip each truffle 7. Return to baking sheet, and immediately sprinkle with crushed candy. HE

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Entertainment Dec. 13, 2013


Scottrade Center iberian Trans- S ra Orchest Dec. 23

Beyonce Dec. 14

Drake Dec. 11

Jack Blethroad Features Editor

The Fox Theatre o conds T 30 SeM ars Dec. 12

Dean’s movie of the month: ‘It’s a wonderful’ holiday film Dean Trail Staff Editor

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t’s a Wonderful Life” is a classic holiday movie that is ideal to watch with the whole family by the fireplace. The movie is a heartwarming tale that follows a banker named George Bailey, who spends his life worrying about the welfare of others while saving his own interests for last. George aspires to travel the world, but gets stuck in his home town of Bedford Falls. He ends up in a bind when he loses 8,000 dollars that he owed to the richest man in town, Mr. Potter. After he had already given up on life, he wishes he was never born at all. At that point his guardian angel swoops down to show him how much he has meant to everyone in the town. This movie was slow and tiring at the beginning. I spent the first hour questioning the plot and was essentially bored to death. I sincerely wanted to turn the movie off and take a quick nap on the couch. However, I kept watching waiting for more to come. As more of the plot became clear to me and the story finally started to resolve itself, I was sucked in.

Adding to my boredom, the entire film is in black and white. It was hard to adjust to watching a movie like this but after awhile I got used to it. I understood that this movie was made 60 years ago so I cut it some slack. Because the movie was made so long ago the special effects were so poor it was even comical. Compared to special effects in todays movies, it was like “It’s a wonderful life” was filmed in the stone age. “It’s a Wonderful Life” is the definition of how everyone should feel around the holiday times. It shows the audience that during the holiday season it is more important to give than to receive. It also shows that greed and selfishness never turn out for the best in the end. Although the movie is about Christmas specifically, it has more of a general holiday moral that can be applied to other holidays. The quote, “No man is a failure who has friends” from the end of the film reminds us that as long as we are generous to the people close to us, we will never be let down.

Phoenix Dec. 13

Social Compiled by Corral Staff

Entertainment Dec. 13, 2013

Dec. 6, 2013

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STL heats up Winter with December shows and concerts

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Football season ends with loss at Dome

Senior Augie Brooks raises the second-place trophy for the Class 5 State Championship. The team lost 51-14 to Lee’s Summit West on Nov. 30 at the Edward Jones Dome. Photos by Emily Schenberg.

Kate McNeal Staff Writer

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fter a 13-1 season, varsity football fell to the Lee’s Summit West Titans in the MSHSAA Class 5 State Championship Game on Nov. 30. “Playing a tough opponent like that, our expectations weren’t high, weren’t low, just kind of in the middle,” senior Zack Lazenby said. Both the Colts and the Titans had the same record going into the Show-Me Bowl, but despite having matching records, the Titans’ team of almost 120 had nearly 80 more players than the Colts. Team members knew going into the game that it would be hard to beat the Titans. “We heard that we were the underdog a lot,” Bonner said. “To win we knew we needed to have our best game of the season.” This year’s team was the third from Central to play at a State Championship game. The Show-Me Bowl was held at the Edward Jones Dome, which provided an opportunity for players to compete on the same field as the pros. “When we were at the Dome, it took a while for everything to sink in,” Bonner said. “But after that, we all knew that it was time to go to work.” While the Colts scored 14 points throughout the course of the game, they couldn’t match the Titans’ 51 points scored. “It was pretty depressing, not just because we lost but more so because we knew it was our last game,” Bonner said. Not only was it the last game of the season, but it was also the last high school football game for 17 of the players. “This group of seniors has been playing since sixth grade, and the majority of us knew we weren’t going to put on a football helmet again,” Lazenby said. “It was really emotional for most of us.” Many of the seniors on the team played together on the Junior Colts football team in middle school, playing together for seven years. “We’ve been through so much together,” Lazenby said. “We knew that this was like a brotherhood that you can’t really replace.” Senior Augie Brooks echoed Lazenby’s sentiments about the closeness of the team. “That was the last time that I was ever going to play with my brothers,” Brooks said. The team’s close chemistry was reflected throughout the season in their teamwork on the field, and players attribute their success to working hard as a team. “There were no star players in any of our eyes, there was only the team,” senior Johnny Naughton said. Even though the team lost its final game, players believe they had a successful season. They had more wins than any other team from Central, and according to Head Coach Mark Goldenberg, it was one of the best seasons in the school’s history. HE

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Contributing reporting by Nathan Biggs and Ethan Morse

Sports

Dec. 13, 2013

Rushing the ball into oncoming defenders from Lee’s Summit West, senior Khalen Saunders looks to push the Colts forward for a first down.

Senior Augie Brooks takes the handoff from senior Zack Lazenby and runs the ball before a group of Titan defenders. Brooks rushed for 2,052 yards this season, averaging 147 yards per game for the Colts.


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