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DESIGN


1 Absence to love is what wind is to fire. It extinguishes the small; it inflames the great. (Roger de Bussy-Rabutin, French writer)

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1 Every man is a poet when he is in love. (Plato ancient Creek philosopher) Contact email : fio711@yahoo.com.tw


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Later that day, when the Princess was sitting at the table, something was heard coming up the marble stairs. Splish, splosh, splish splosh! The sound came nearer and nearer, and a voice cried, "Let me in, youngest daughter of the King."

The Princess jumped up to see who had called her. Now when she caught sight of the frog, she turned very pale. "What does a frog want with you?" demanded the King, looking rather surprised.


1 The Princess hung her head. "When I was sitting by the fountain my golden ball fell into the water. This frog fetched it back for me, because I cried so much." The Princess started to cry again. "I promised to love him and let him eat from my golden plate, drink from my golden cup, and sleep on my golden bed."

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The Princess knew she must obey, so she let the frog to come inside. The frog hopped in after her and jumped up into her chair and straight onto the table. "Now push your golden plate near me." said the frog, "so that we may eat together." As she did so, the frog leapt onto her plate and ate up all her dinner, which was just as well, because the Princess didn't feel much like eating.


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Next, the frog drank from her little golden cup until it was quite empt

didn't feel at all thirsty either! After the frog had finished, he took one the Princess's knee. "Go away you ugly, cold frog!" she screamed. "I will lovely, clean bed!"


ty. Somehow the Princess

e great leap and landed on never let you sleep on my

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That made the King very angry. "This frog helped you when you needed it. Now you must keep your promise to him." Very unwillingly the Princess picked up the frog and carried him upstairs to her room. When the frog hopped into the middle of her golden bed, it was just too much for the Princess. She pushed the frog hard and it fell onto the floor. As he fell he was changed into a handsome Prince. A spell had been cast on him by an evil witch and only the Princess had the power to break it. The Princess was speechless. She felt very sorry indeed that she had been so unkind to the frog. After a while, the handsome Prince and the Princess were married, and lived happily ever after.

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It was not long before someone knocked at the house-door and called: 'Open the door, dear children; your mother is here, and has brought something back with her for each of you.' But the little kids knew that it was the wolf, by the rough voice. 'We will not open the door,' cried they, 'you are not our mother. She has a soft, pleasant voice, but your voice is rough; you are the wolf!' Then the wolf went away to a shopkeeper and bought himself a great lump of chalk, ate this and made his voice soft with it. Then he came back, knocked at the door of the house, and called: 'Open the door, dear children, your mother is here and has brought something back with her for each of you.


1 But the wolf had laid his black paws against the window, and the children saw them and cried: 'We will not open the door, our mother has not black feet like you: you are the wolf!' Then the wolf ran to a baker and said: 'I have hurt my feet, rub some dough over them for me.' And when the baker had rubbed his feet over, he ran to the miller and said: 'Strew some white meal over my feet for me.' The miller thought to himself: 'The wolf wants to deceive someone,' and refused; but the wolf said: 'If you will not do it, I will devour you.' Then the miller was afraid, and made his paws white for him. Truly, this is the way of mankind.

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S o now the wretch went for the third time to the house-door, knocked at it and said: 'Open the door for me, children, your dear little mother has come home, and has brought every one of you something back from the forest with her.' The little kids cried: 'First show us your paws that we may know if you are our dear little mother.' Then he put his paws in through the window and when the kids saw that they were white, they believed that all he said was true, wolf!

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and opened the door. But who should come in but the

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They were terrified and wanted to hide themselves. One sprang under th the stove, the fourth into the kitchen, the fifth into the cupboard, the sixt the clock-case. But the wolf found them all, and used no great ceremony his throat. The youngest, who was in the clock-case, was the only one h appetite he took himself off, laid himself down under a tree in the green m

The wolf lifted the latch, the door sprang open, and without saying a word he went straight to the grandmother's bed, and devoured her. Then he put on her clothes, dressed himself in her cap laid himself in bed and drew the curtains.


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he table, the second into the bed, the third into th under the washing-bowl, and the seventh into y; one after the other he swallowed them down he did not find. When the wolf had satisfied his meadow outside, and began to sleep.

Little Red-Cap, however, had been running about picking flowers, and when she had gathered so many that she could carry no more, she remembered her grandmother, and set out on the way to her.

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She was surprised to find the cottage-door standing open, and when she went into the room, she had such a strange feeling that she said to herself: 'Oh dear! how uneasy I feel today, and at other times I like being with grandmother so much.' She called out: 'Good morning,' but received no answer; so she went to the bed and drew back the curtains. There lay her grandmother with her cap pulled far over her face, and looking very strange.

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Oh! grandmother,' she said, 'what big ears you have!' 'The better to hear you with, my child,' was the reply. 'But, grandmother, what big eyes you have!' she said. 'The better to see you with, my dear.' 'But, grandmother, what large hands you have!' 'The better to hug you with.' 'Oh! but, grandmother, what a terrible big mouth you have!' 'The better to eat you with!' And scarcely had the wolf said this, than with one bound he was out of bed and swallowed up Red-Cap. When the wolf had appeased his appetite, he lay down again in the bed, fell asleep and began to snore very loud. Contact email : fio711@yahoo.com.tw


The huntsman was just passing the house, and thought to himself: 'How the old woman is snoring! I must just see if she wants anything.' So he went into the room, and when he came to the bed, he saw that the wolf was lying in it. 'Do I find you here, you old sinner!' said he. 'I have long sought you!' Then just as he was going to fire at him, it occurred to him that the wolf might have devoured the grandmother, and that she might still be saved, so he did not fire, but took a pair of scissors, and began to cut open the stomach of the sleeping wolf.


When he had made two snips, he saw the little Red- Cap shining, and then he made two snips more, and the little girl sprang out, crying: 'Ah, how frightened I have been! How dark it was inside the wolf'; and after that the aged grandmother came out alive also, but scarcely able to breathe. Red-Cap, however, quickly fetched great stones with which they filled the wolf's belly, and when he

1 awoke, he wanted to run away, but the stones were so heavy that he collapsed at once, and fell dead.

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Time passed m

capital; stranger day, two rogue their appearance weave stuffs of patterns, the clo have the wonde everyone who w was extraordinar

"These must, in might at once fin distinguish the w he caused large begin their work So the two prete in reality they d gold thread; put at the empty loom


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merrily in the large town which was his

rs arrived every day at the court. One es, calling themselves weavers, made e. They gave out that they knew how to the most beautiful colors and elaborate othes manufactured from which should erful property of remaining invisible to was unfit for the office he held, or who rily simple in character.

deed, be splendid clothes!" thought the Emperor. "Had I such a suit, I nd out what men in my realms are unfit for their office, and also be able to wise from the foolish! This stuff must be woven for me immediately." And sums of money to be given to both the weavers in order that they might directly. ended weavers set up two looms, and affected to work very busily, though did nothing at all. They asked for the most delicate silk and the purest both into their own knapsacks; and then continued their pretended work ms until late at night. Contact email : fio711@yahoo.com.tw


So the faithful old minister we working with all their might, a meaning of this?" thought the "I cannot discover the least bit did not express his thoughts al

The poor old minister looke anything on the looms, for a ve there. "What!" thought he agai I have never thought so mysel so. Can it be, that I am unfit fo either. I will never confess tha


ent into the hall, where the knaves were at their empty looms. "What can be the old man, opening his eyes very wide. t of thread on the looms." However, he loud.

d and looked, he could not discover ery good reason, viz: there was nothing in. "Is it possible that I am a simpleton? lf; and no one must know it now if I am or my office? No, that must not be said at I could not see the stuff."

1 "Well, Sir Minister!" said one of the knaves, still pretending to work. "You do not say whether the stuff pleases you." "Oh, it is excellent!" replied the old minister, looking at the loom through his spectacles. "This pattern, and the colors, yes, I will tell the Emperor without delay, how very beautiful I think them."

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Her little hands were almost numbed with cold. Oh! a match might afford her a world of comfort, if she only dared take a single one out of the bundle, draw it against the wall, and warm her fingers by it. She drew one out. "Rischt!" how it blazed, how it burnt! It was a warm, bright flame, like a candle, as she held her hands over it: it was a wonderful light. It seemed really to the little maiden as though she were sitting before a large iron stove, with burnished brass feet and a brass ornament at top. The fire burned with such blessed influence;

it warmed so delightfully.

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The little girl had already stretched out her feet to warm them too; but--the small flame went out, the stove vanished: she had only the remains of the burntout match in her hand.

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She rubbed another against the wall: it burned brightly, and where the light fell on the wall, there the wall became transparent like a veil, so that she could see into the room. On the table was spread a snow-white tablecloth; upon it was a splendid porcelain service, and the roast goose was steaming famously with its stuffing

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1 of apple and dried plums.

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And what was still more capital to behold was, the goose hopped down from the dish, reeled about on the floor with knife and fork in its breast, till it came up to the poor little girl; when--the match went out and nothing but the thick, cold, damp wall was left behind. She lighted another match. Now there she was sitting under the most magnificent Christmas tree: it was still larger, and more decorated than the one which she had seen through the glass door in the rich merchant's house.

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Thousands of lights w and gailycolored pictur windows, looked down out her hands towards lights of the Christmas them now as stars in he trail of fire. "

Little maiden," said

you constant employme permission to see the e nightingale; for she is i So she went into the w half the court followed lowing.

"Oh," said a young cou wonderful power for su heard it before." "No, that is only a cow long way from the place


were burning on the green branches, res, such as she had seen in the shopupon her. The little maiden stretched them when-- the match went out. The s tree rose higher and higher, she saw eaven; one fell down and formed a long the lord-in-waiting, "I will obtain for

ent in the kitchen, and you shall have emperor dine, if you will lead us to the invited for this evening to the palace." wood where the nightingale sang, and her. As they went along, a cow began

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Then some frogs began to croak urtier, "now we have found her; what in the marsh. "Beautiful," said uch a small creature; I have certainly the young courtier again. "Now I hear it, tinkling like little w lowing," said the little girl; "we are a church bells." e yet."

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"No, those are frogs," said the little maiden; "but I think we shall soo nightingale began to sing.

"Hark, hark! there she is," said the girl, "and there she sits," she added, p perched on a bough. "Is it possible?" said the lord-in-waiting, "I never imagined it would be She has certainly changed color at seeing so many grand people around h

"Little nightingale," cried the girl, raising her voice, "our most graciou him." "With the greatest pleasure," said the nightingale, and began to sing most

"It sounds like tiny glass bells," said the lord-in-waiting, "and see how h


on hear her now:" and presently the

pointing to a little gray bird who was

a little, plain, simple thing like that. her."

us emperor wishes you to sing before

t delightfully.

her little throat works. It is surprising

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that we have never heard this before; she will be a great success at court." "Shall I sing once more before the emperor?" asked the nightingale,


1 who thought he was present. "My excellent little nightingale," said the courtier, "I have the great pleasure of inviting you to a court festival this evening, where you will gain imperial favor by your charming song." "My song sounds best in the green wood," said the bird; but still she came willingly

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when she heard the emperor's wish.

Her little hands were almost numbed with cold. Oh! a match might afford her a world of comfort, if she only dared take a single one out of the bundle, draw it against the wall, and warm her fingers by it. She drew one out. "Rischt!" how it blazed, how it burnt! It was a warm, bright flame, like a candle, as she held her hands over it: it was a wonderful light. It seemed really to the little maiden as though she were sitting before a large iron stove, with burnished brass feet and a brass ornament at top. The fire burned with such blessed influence; it warmed so delightfully. The little girl had already stretched out her feet to warm them too; but--the small flame went out, the stove vanished: she had only the remains of the burntout match in her hand. Contact email : fio711@yahoo.com.tw


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