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Lost By Michael Kobayashi They walked farther, and farther from our parents. Within ten minutes, my heart began to beat faster, and faster. I started to feel my worst feeling. My stomach, at the thought of being lost with my sister, and my Japanese grandma made butterflies swarm into my stomach. I chased after my Japanese grandma and my sister as they began to disappear out of sight. “Where are you guys going?” I hollered after them. They had wandered off into the maze of the hotel. I knew chasing them was a bad idea, but I chased after them anyway. I mumbled “This is a big hotel” to myself, trying to distract myself from the thought of being lost, as I continued the wandering journey. “I wonder what time it is?” I whispered to myself. At one point, I looked up into the sky, to my horror; I found out that the stars were becoming clearer which had to mean that the sky was beginning to become darker. I thought of my parents, suddenly, I felt completely hopeless. My life felt like it was at its final moments. Instantly, I became very angry with myself, “I should have never chased after them!” I thought in my head, my feet felt like they could fall off. My heart was hurting, and was beating faster every minute that I thought of my parents. I began to notice that the light around me began to get dimmer, and dimmer, as we walked through the mazed hotel. I also began to notice that we were walking for more than, I think, more than two hours. The darkness began to cover my group and me. My heart felt like it was going at the speed of a jet plane. The hotel was larger than I had thought. I felt like an explorer, instead of being in a jungle, I was in a huge dessert at night. The pavement was like sand that was beginning to disappear in the darkness.


10 minutes later… I blinked a tiring blink, “why are they so far away?” I thought, then, a spark ignited my brain. I was falling behind. My feet kept on slowing down. Finally, I gathered enough energy to speed up “hey, wait for me” I bellowed out in a cracky voice. My sister and grandma began to slow down. The distance between the others and me closed at a slow pace. When my foot stepped over a large uneven stone, I was close enough to my group, that they started walking again. My left foot slowly trudged up the cement ground, my ankles ached, and my bones cracked in pain every cool step. My heart leaped when my eyes closed and almost didn’t open. I kept on walking. I held my grandmas hand tightly. I blinked fast in fear of falling asleep again, and this time, not waking up. I continued to keep on walking, tired, I encouraged myself to keep on walking. My grandma, my sister and me walked and walked and walked. I could tell that my grandma was tired, and it think my sister was tired too (she never admits that she is tired- she only does when she’s REALLY tired). My grandma’s hand grabbed ahold of my sister’s hand and me; she pulled us along with her as she scurried along the cement pavement. The cool night air stung my skin. It felt like ice. My heart had slowed down, and the butterflies had escaped my stomach. “I wonder how long I can keep on walking.” I quietly told myself. Numb fingers wrapped around my Japanese grandma’s hand. I felt completely numb and stiff. I was choked up, feeling like I was going to cry any minute. Stepped on the grass near the concrete path. All of the light seemed to be gone. I thought there was no way of finding my parents now. “Mikie? Catie? Mikie? Catie? Where are you?” I heard the faint voice of my parents, “Mikie? Catie? Where are?” I heard my parents voice again, this time; I heard it a little more clearly. Feet in dark, my dads office shoes clacked on the marble floor in the distance. The sound of my small tennis shoes cleverly sneaked up the cement ground path. “Mikie? Catie? Where are you?” I heard my parents completely clear now. I reached the top of the hill, and saw the dim glow of an orange light glowing in the dark. I started to


run towards my parents. I saw the proof that they were looking for us, concerned looks on their faces made it certain that they had been looking for us. They turned towards me, I saw my mom, and charged towards her. I charged into a warm hug. My sister did the same too. “Where have you two been?” my dad’s lip’s moved as the words escaped. We walked back to the hotel room. I stepped into a warm, comfortable, bed. I lay down under the blankets. Thoughts buzzed through my head. “Why did I chase after them?” a thought asked, “Will this change me? “Another thought asked. “Yes, it did change me” I told myself. “How did it change me?” another annoying thought buzzed in my head. I felt like I was being interrogated. The thoughts zipped through my head, but I ignored them. I fell fast asleep soon after, knowing that I will never chase after my sister again, and I have never done it again.


About the Author   Michael has lived in Tokyo for 7 years. He is 10 and goes to the American School in Japan, and has a twin sister who also goes to ASIJ. He was in fifth grade when he wrote his memoir.


12/16/11 12:55 PM  


Lost