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square base, a large North-South orientated plateia (called plateia A) 29.50 m. wide (100 foot penthouses), that at the Southern end crossed an East-West orientated plateia (called plateia B) 14.59 m. wide (50 foot) , corresponding to ½ of A. The plateia B after 295 m (1000 foot) east from the junction with the plateia A, intercepts another North-South orientated plateia (called C) 12.40 m. wide (40 foot; 2/5 of A). Along plateia A, East-West orientated stenopoi are present at almost regular intervals of 35-37 m. and 3 m. wide, the ones North-South orientated are at intervals of approximately 74 m., further divided by an about 1,80 m. wide sewer. In the light of the excavations it seems conceivable that there is a 390 x 295m grid divided into 37 x 37 m blocks forming two square dwellings of about 17-18 m. Thanks to the Diodorus’ narrative we possess even the street names of Thurii: the four lengthwise plateiai were named Herakleia, Aphrodisia, Olympias and Dionysias, while the three breadthwise were Heroa, Thuria and Thurina. The colony but had no easy life: disagreements between the exiled Sybarites and the new colonists took place already before its foundation and the original Sybarite settlers were finally expelled from the city. Later Thurii fought against Tarentum for the possession of the territory of Siris. It also sought to limit the attempts of the tyrants of Syracuse to extend their domains, as well as the italic populations’ expansionist impulse. On the site of Thurii was founded the Latin colony of Copia in 194 BC. Thanks to a progressive development, the completely Romanized city became a Roman municipium in 84 BC. The prosperity of the city reached its culmination in the Augustan age. In literary sources, the city continues to be known as Thurii despite its new name appears on coins. Copia-Thurii became a quiet town of Empire, mentioned by Cicero as "secluded place with a well-tilled fields and one of the few accessible ports of the Ionian coast". Author: Alessandro Russo, Archaeologist Bibliography: E. Greco, “Turi”, in E. Greco (curated by), La città greca antica (The ancient Greek city), Rome 1999, 413-430. E. Greco- S. Luppino, “Ricerche sulla topografia e sull’urbanistica di Sibary-Thuri- Copiae” ( Research on the topography and town-planning of Sibary-Thuri-Copiae), in Annals of the Istituto Universitario Orientale of Naples, 1999. E. Greco, “Ippodamo e L’Urbanistica di Thurii” ( Hippodamus and the town planning of Thurii), in Proceedings of the 47th Conference on Magna Graecia Studies, Taranto, 2007, 281-286.

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Final study of CulMe-WeOnCT project  
Final study of CulMe-WeOnCT project  
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