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Fig. 90. The central wall scene of the burial chamber. Rowe 1942, Pl. V, Fig. 1.

Fig. 91. The right niche of the burial chamber. Rowe 1942, Pl. V, Pl. VIII.

It seems clear now that the long course of Greco-Egyptian interaction in Alexandria was culminated by the emergence of the ‘Alexandrian identity’. The latter had its own hybrid cultural language and expressive means making sometimes the search for Greek or Egyptian comparanda a rather unnecessary process.

Undeniably, Alexandrian identity obtained an advanced flexibility and

polyvalence, incomparable to any other place in the Mediterranean. Alexandrian society was undoubtedly

the

most

successful

micro-prototype

of

multiculturalism

and

cross-cultural

understanding, and different cultures and peoples were able to share common values.

Fig. 92. The image of Anubis in Roman military dress. Rowe 1942, Pl. V, Pl. X, figs 1 and 2.

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Final study of CulMe-WeOnCT project  
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