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Fig. 73. Funerary slab with a soldier, Hellenistic, second half of 3rd century B.C. from the Soldiers' Tomb, Ibrahimieh necropolis, Alexandria, excavated 1884. Painted inscription: "[B]itos, son of Lostoiex, a Galatian". Limestone.

220 Fig. 74. Funerary slab with a soldier and two girls, Hellenistic, second half of 3rd century BC; from the Soldiers' Tomb, Ibrahimieh necropolis, Alexandria, excavated 1884. Remains of a painted inscription: "Isidoros, a Galatian" Limestone.

The 3rd century BC is considered to be the heyday of Hellenistic Alexandria. The Ptolemaic empire reached its climax, while Alexandria became the greatest metropolis of the Mediterranean by any definition: commerce, science, arts, literature and culture. During this period, Greek Alexandrians pursued their Greek origin and identity, while at the same time experiencing a cosmopolitan way of life. Such trends and pursuits are manifested in the Mustapha Kamel funerary complex76, maybe the most sophisticated group of tombs dating to the Hellenistic period (Figs. 75-81).

76

Breccia, 1934; Venit, 2002.

Final study of CulMe-WeOnCT project  
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