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Goes After School Toolkit Binder


Greetings! Thank you for taking time to review the 5210 Goes After School Toolkit. 5210 Goes After School is a program of The Kids CO-OP at The Barbara Bush Children's Hospital at Maine Medical Center aimed at increasing healthy eating and physical activity in after school programs by supporting environmental and policy change. This program is part of a bigger project called Let's Go!. To learn more about Let's Go! visit our website at www.letsgo.org. The program is based on the following easy-to-remember message:

The toolkit is based on 10 key evidence-based strategies that can be used individually or collectively in after school programs to address the policies, practices, and environment that influence healthy lifestyle behaviors. Our hope is that 5210 Goes After School will help support after school programs in raising and educating a healthier generation of children. Please share any feedback, questions, or comments you may have with your local Let’s Go! contact by visiting our website: www.letsgo.org. Sincerely,

Victoria W. Rogers, MD Director, Let’s Go! Director, The Kids CO-OP at The Barbara Bush Children’s Hospital at Maine Medical Center

Richard Fortier, CHES Program Manager, Let’s Go! The Kids CO-OP at The Barbara Bush Children’s Hospital at Maine Medical Center

Elizabeth Motyka, MPH Senior Program Manager, Let's Go! The Kids CO-OP at The Barbara Bush Children’s Hospital at Maine Medical Center


Let’s Go! is generously funded by our: Founding Partners

Platinum Sponsors

Gold Sponsors Jane’s Trust Walmart Foundation

Silver Sponsors Convergence Partnership Fund of Tides Foundation The Mattina R. Proctor Foundation

Additional Funder Fairchild Semiconductor  


What is Let’s Go!? Let’s Go!, a program of The Kids CO-OP at the Barbara Bush Children’s Hospital at Maine Medical Center, uses a multi-sector approach to reach youth and families where they live, study, work, and play to reinforce the importance of healthy eating and active living. The program is based on the premise that if families are exposed to the health promotion messages through several settings, and if those settings have policies and environments that support healthy choices, they will be more likely to adopt or maintain the behaviors in their daily lives. The Let’s Go! multi-sector model is pictured below and includes the core principles of: Environmental & Policy Change Influences Behavior Change  Interconnectivity Across Sectors is Essential  Strategies are Evidence Based & Continuously Evaluated 

The Let’s Go! program interventions center on the use of the common message of “5210”. These behaviors are supported by science and endorsed as recommendations by medical professionals:

Let’s Go! has identified strategies and created tools to support and evaluate those strategies. All of these sectors are supported by a marketing campaign that utilizes multiple methods of communication including television advertising. For more information, contact the Let’s Go! Home Office at 207.662.3734, or email us at info@letsgo.org.

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or more fruits & vegetables hours or less recreational screen time* hour or more of physical activity sugary drinks, more water & low fat milk *Keep TV/Computer out of the bedroom. No screen time under the age of 2.


Table of Contents Tab 1: Getting Started 5210 Goes After School Program Overview

Tab 3: Provide water and low fat milk; limit or eliminate sugary beverages.

10 Strategies for Success

Drink water and low fat milk; limit or eliminate sugary beverages Water is Fuel for Your Body

Let’s Go! Redy Levels

Enlightening Facts About Juice

5210 at Your Program Flow Chart

Make-Your-Own Sugar Bottle Display

Getting Started Worksheet

Sports and Energy Drinks…

Scientific Rationale for 5210

Prepping Your After School Program to Be 5210 Ready Milk Taste Test Letter to Parents Announcing a New Partnership: Have a Drink Plan Worksheet Template Drink Your Low Fat Milk Worksheet Everyone Has a Role to Play Drink Your Low Fat Milk: Answer Key

Tab 2: Provide healthy choices for snacks and celebrations: limit unhealthy choices.

5210 Every Day! Water Posters

Healthy Kids’ Snacks

Fill Up Here! Refresh! Thirst Quencher For Growing Bones… Which Milk?

Provide Healthy Choices

Fuel Learning with Milk

Sample Nutrition Guidelines: Boys & Girls Clubs of Southern Maine Healthy Celebrations Parent Letter: Template

Find the Sugar

Eat at least five fruits and vegetables a day

Go Foods, Slow Foods, Whoa Foods Healthy Shopping on a Budget Understanding Food Labels

Find the Sugar: Answer Key

Tab 4: Provide non-food rewards. Provide Non-Food Rewards Non-Food Rewards at Home

Maine Seasonal Food Guide Breakfast is Best A Meal is a Family Affair

Tab 5: Provide opportunities for children to get physical activity every day.

To have fruits and vegetables year-round, add frozen or Get one hour or more of physical activity every day. canned What’s a Healthy Portion? Limit recreational screen time to two hours or less. The Fittest Food Snackwise

®

Quick Physical Activity Breaks Physical Activity Breaks from Take-Time!

Fuel Learning with Milk, Cheese and Yogurt

StoryWalk™

ChooseMyPlate Materials (including brochure, tips, coloring sheets)

Activity Room Teenage Girls & Physical Activity WinterKids Continued on next page...


Table of Contents Tab 6: Limit recreational screen time. Understanding Food Labels Limit recreational screen time to two hours or less* *Keep TV/Computer out of the bedroom. No screen time under the age of 2

Step Away from the Screen! Ways to Shake Up Your Routine Promote Healthy Viewing Habits

Maine Seasonal Food Guide Breakfast is Best! A Meal Is a Family Affair

Unplugged!

To have fruits and vegetables year-round, add frozen or canned What’s a Healthy Portion

Active Video Games: Good for You?

The Fittest Food

Do More Watch Less (Insert)

Non-Food Rewards at Home Fuel Learning with Milk, Cheese and Yogurt

Tab 7: Participate in local, state, or national initiatives that promote healthy eating and active living. Healthy Dates to Celebrate

Choose MyPlate: 10 tips to a great plate Please Give Nutritiously Hours or Less Recreational Screen Time

March is National Nutrition Month®

Limit recreational screen time to two hours or less

National Screen-Free Week

Promote Healthy Viewing Habits

WinterKids

Unplugged! National Screen-Free Week

Tab 8: Engage community partners to help support and promote healthy eating and active living at your site. Engage Community Partners Please Give Nutritiously

Hour or More of Physical Activity Get one hour or more of physical activity every day Take It Outside! WinterKids Sugary Drinks, More Water & Low Fat Milk Drink water and low fat milk; limit or eliminate sugary

Tab 9: Partner with and educate families beverages in adopting and maintaining a Water is Fuel for Your Body lifestyle that supports healthy eating Enlightening Facts About Juice and active living. Partner with and educate families in adopting and maintaining a lifestyle that supports healthy eating and active living 5210 Every Day! Letter to Parents Announcing a New Partnership (Template) or More Fruits & Vegetables Eat at least five fruits and vegetables a day

Sports and energy drinks…

Tab 10: Implement a staff wellness program that includes healthy eating and active living After School Worksite Wellness (includes the StairWELL Initiative) Move and Improve

Healthy Kids’ Snacks Healthy Celebrations Letter to Parents: Template Go Foods, Slow Foods, Whoa Foods Healthy Shopping On A Budget

Continued on next page...


Table of Contents Tab 11: Collaborate with Food and Nutrition Programs to offer healthy food and beverage options. Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) At-Risk Afterschool MEALS in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)

Tab 12: Evaluation & Recognition Evaluating Your Program’s 5210 Interventions Recognition Program for Let’s Go! Schools, After School Programs and Child Care Programs

Tab 13: Resources Original 5210 Song - CD & Lyric Sheet (Insert) Fun Songs About Nutrition Resources for Free Promotional Materials Select Resources Healthy Eating Booklist Healthy Activity Booklist Why Involve Youth? Resources for Effective Youth Group Work Media Projects Media Project Sample: Deering High School Poster Contest Sample Language for Requesting Funds from Local Businesses Sample Letter to Businesses Cash without Calories!: Fundraising without Food Healthy Body Image Resources Is Your Sport Team “Redy” for 5210? Is Your Snack Shack “Redy” for 5210? Healthier Packaged Snack Options Healthy Favorites: A Booklet Full of Healthy Tips & Recipes (Insert)


Tab 1: Getting Started 5210 Goes After School Program Overview Scientific Rationale for 5210 10 Strategies for Success Let’s Go! Redy Levels 5210 at Your Program Flow Chart Getting Started Worksheet Prepping Your After School Program to Be 5210 Ready Letter to Parents Announcing a New Partnership: Template Everyone Has a Role to Play

TAB 1 Getting Started

In This Section


5210 Goes After School Program Overview Let's Go! is a nationally recognized childhood obesity prevention program designed to increase healthy eating and active living in children from birth to 18. Let's Go! works in six sectors (schools, early childhood, after school, healthcare, workplace and community) to reach children and families where they live, study, work, and play. Let's Go! is centered on the common message of "5210".

5210 Goes After School is a program of the Let’s Go! after school sector. Through use of the 5210 strategies listed below, after school programs can address the policies, practices, and environments that influence healthy lifestyle behaviors. In addition to a toolkit, this program provides guidance and assistance to support the after school programs in the adoption of the 10 strategies. 1. Provide healthy choices for snacks and celebrations; limit unhealthy choices. 2. Provide water and low fat milk; limit or eliminate sugary beverages. 3. Provide non-food rewards. 4. Provide opportunities for children to get physical activity every day. 5. Limit recreational screen time. 6. Participate in local, state, and national initiatives that promote healthy eating and active living. 7. Engage community partners to help support and promote healthy eating and active living at your site. 8. Partner with and educate families in adopting and maintaining a lifestyle that supports healthy eating and active living. 9. Implement a staff wellness program that includes healthy eating and active living. 10. Collaborate with Food and Nutrition Programs to offer healthy food and beverage options. Redy icon represents a priority strategy

For more information, contact the Let’s Go! Home Office at 207.662.3734, or email us at info@letsgo.org

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Scientific Rationale for 5210 or more fruits and vegetables.

A diet rich in fruits and vegetables provides vitamins and minerals, important for supporting growth and development, and for optimal immune function in children. High daily intakes of fruits and vegetables among adults are associated with lower rates of chronic diseases such as heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, diabetes, and possibly, some types of cancers. Emerging science suggests fruit and vegetable consumption may help prevent weight gain, and when total calories are controlled may be an important aid to achieving and sustaining weight loss.

hours or less recreational screen time*.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP,) the average child watches an average of 5–6 hours of television a day. Watching too much television is associated with an increased prevalence of overweight and obesity, lower reading scores, and attention problems. The AAP therefore recommends that children underage two shouldn’t watch any television. In addition, the AAP recommends no TV or computer in the room in which the child sleeps, and no more than 2 hours of screen time a day.

hour or more of physical activity.

Regular physical activity is essential for weight maintenance and prevention of chronic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, colon cancer, and osteoporosis. While most school age children are quite active, physical activity sharply declines during adolescence. Children who are raised in families with active lifestyles are more likely to stay active as adults than children raised in families with sedentary lifestyles.

sugary drinks, more water & low fat milk.

Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption has increased dramatically over the past 20 years; high intake among children is associated with overweight and obesity, displacement of milk consumption, and dental cavities. It is recommended that children 1–6 years old consume no more than 4–6ounces of juice per day and youth 7–18 years old consume no more than 8–12 ounces. Whole milk is the single largest source of saturated fat in children’s diets. Switching to low or non-fat milk products significantly reduces dietary saturated and total fat, as well as total calories. *Keep TV/computer out of the bedroom. No screen time under the age of 2. Adapted from the Maine Center for Public Health

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10 Strategies for Success Let’s Go! is a nationally recognized childhood obesity prevention program designed to increase healthy eating and active living in children from birth to age 18. Let’s Go! works in six sectors (schools, early childhood, after school, healthcare, workplace and community) to reach children and families where they live, study, work, and play. Let’s Go! Is centered on the common message of “5210”.

The 10 Let’s Go! evidence-based strategies connect to Let’s Go!’s core message and align with the CDC and the Institute of Medicine’s recommendations to prevent childhood obesity. Your work should be focused on these strategies to improve environments and policies in school, after school, and child care settings. Let’s Go! recommends creating and implementing strong policies around these strategies. Please refer to the Let’s Go! Toolkits for more ideas on how to implement each strategy. 1. Provide healthy choices for snacks and celebrations; limit unhealthy choices. For example:  Encourage parents to provide only healthy options  Have non-food celebrations 2. Provide water and low fat milk; limit or eliminate sugary beverages. For example:  Allow easy access to free water via water fountains and/or water jugs  Allow water bottles  Create sugar bottle displays  Put limits on 100% juice 3. Provide non-food rewards. For example:  Use physical activity as a reward  Have non-food birthday celebrations

4. Provide opportunities for children to get physical activity every day. Children should get one hour or more of physical activity every day. Help children achieve this goal. For example:  Use physical activity as a reward  Have non-food birthday celebrations Redy icon represents a priority strategy

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5. Limit recreational screen time. Children should limit recreational screen time to two hours or less a day. Keep TVs and computers out of the bedroom. For children under the age of 2 there should be no screen time. Help children achieve this goal. For example:  Work with parents to reduce screen time at home  Find active alternatives to indoor recess  Promote National Screen-Free Week  Provide activity bags that can encourage screen-free evenings 6. Participate in local, state, and national initiatives that promote healthy eating and active living. For example:  Local: Local gardening programs, Buy Local initiatives  State: Take Time, WinterKids, Walk and Bike to School Day  National: National Nutrition Month, NAP SACC, Screen-Free Week, Safe Routes to School 7. Engage community partners to help support promote healthy eating and active living at your site. For example:  Doctors, dentists, dieticians, local colleges, food banks, libraries, farmers, and local community coalitions like Healthy Maine Partnerships 8. Partner with and educate families in adopting and maintaining a lifestyle that supports healthy eating and active living. For example:  Distribute Let’s Go! parent handouts  Sponsor family education events  Introduce Let’s Go! at parent/teacher conferences and kindergarten orientation 9. Implement a staff wellness program that includes healthy eating and active living. For example:  Support healthy staff celebrations  Encourage walking meetings  Allow for physical activity breaks throughout the day  Encourage staff to participate in physical activity with the children… no standing on the sidelines! 10. Collaborate with Food Nutrition Programs to offer healthy food and beverage options. For example:  Make your school nutrition director part of your Let’s Go! team  Partner with the Child and Adult Care Food Program

Redy icon represents a priority strategy

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Let’s Go! Redy Levels When your site completes a registration form (as you will do each year you want to participate), we ask that you pick your level of commitment to increasing healthy eating and active living at your site. There are two levels from which to choose:

Redy 1 This level is for sites who are interested in just getting their feet wet or sites who are returning and do not need technical assistance. They would like to use some materials, and don’t want site visits or hands on technical assistance. Redy 1’s are not eligible for competitive Let’s Go! mini grant funding.

As a Redy 1 site, you will receive: Free access to the complete online toolkit Email Communication, including news and support Invitation to Let’s Go! learning opportunities (symposia, e-presentations, etc.) Technical assistance as requested

Redy 2 This level is for sites who are ready to implement and sustain the 10 evidence-based Let’s Go! strategies and have a team and administrative support. They want hands-on technical assistance (site visits) and the opportunity to apply for competitive mini-grants. A limited number of sites can be supported at this level, on a first-come first-served basis.

As a Redy 2 site, you will receive: Free access to the complete online toolkit Email Communication, including news and support Invitation to Let’s Go! learning opportunities (symposia, e-presentations, etc.) Technical Assistance as requested Fall and Spring Check In (Please note: a check in may include one on one meetings, group meetings, emails, phone calls or presentations) Opportunity to apply for competitive mini-grant funding (if funding is available)

What we require of Redy 2 Schools: A team to implement Let’s Go! (Please note: may be an already existing wellness team; members to consider: PTO member, school nutrition director, nurse, PE teacher, principal, etc.) At least two check ins with Let’s Go! staff Completion of a spring survey

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5210 at Your After School Program Flow Chart

After School Program and Let’s Go! Connect

Establish Champion at After School Site Ongoing Administrative Support

Resources Toolkit Technical Assistance From Let’s Go! Contact

From Let’s Go!

Identify 1 or 2 of the Let’s Go! Strategies you’d like to try

Contact Action

Write strategies into guidelines/ wellness policy

Evaluation May/June

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Getting Started Worksheet This tool will help you look at your environment and highlight which strategies you are already working on, and those that will best help you in promoting physical activity and healthy eating. Using the following scale, mark in the first column what level of attention you are currently giving each strategy. Use the middle column to indicate the areas you would like to focus on this year. And finally, use the last column to mark where you would like to be by spring on your selected strategies. 1. Not even on the radar screen. 2. We are making plans to do this, but aren’t doing it yet. 3. We are doing this in a few classrooms. 4. We are doing this in more than a few classrooms. 5. We are doing this in most classrooms. 6. We are doing this program/school-wide.

We:

Currently

Would like to address this year

1. Provide healthy choices for snacks and celebrations; limit unhealthy choices.



2. Provide water and low fat milk; limit or eliminate sugary beverages.

1 2 3 4 5 6



3. Provide non-food rewards.

1 2 3 4 5 6

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1 2 3 4 5 6



1 2 3 4 5 6



1 2 3 4 5 6



1 2 3 4 5 6

4. Provide opportunities for children to get physical activity every day. 5. Limit recreational screen time. 6. Participate in local, state, and national initiatives that promote healthy eating and active living. 7. Engage community partners to help support and promote healthy eating and active living at your site.

1 2 3 4 5 6



1 2 3 4 5 6

8. Partner with and educate families in adopting and maintaining a lifestyle that supports healthy eating and active living.



9. Implement a staff wellness program that includes healthy eating and active living.

1 2 3 4 5 6



10.Collaborate with Food and Nutrition Programs to offer healthy food and beverage options.

1 2 3 4 5 6



Redy icon represents a priority strategy

By spring

Yes No



Yes No



Yes No



Yes No

1 2 3 4 5 6

1 2 3 4 5 6

1 2 3 4 5 6

1 2 3 4 5 6



Yes No



Yes No



Yes No



Yes No



Yes No



Yes No



1 2 3 4 5 6

1 2 3 4 5 6

1 2 3 4 5 6

1 2 3 4 5 6

1 2 3 4 5 6

1 2 3 4 5 6


Use these questions to plan out your action steps. Which strategies would you or your program like to focus on this year?

What are some specific ways you could address your chosen strategies?

What potential barriers do you foresee?

Next Steps:

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Prepping Your After School Program To Be 5210 Ready Hang Let's Go! posters throughout the facility. Dedicate one or more bulletin boards to promoting the Let's Go! program and wellness events or activities. Make daily or weekly announcements about the program. Create a section of your program newsletter dedicated to Let's Go!. Decorate the facility walls with age-appropriate educational posters promoting physical activity and healthy eating. Provide healthy snacks and beverages when serving food. Allow physical activity (inside or out) to be used as a reward. Encourage all program staff to role model 5210 behaviors. Provide trainings for staff to fully educate them on the Let's Go! program. Embed the 5210 message into lesson plans and the curriculum, especially in health and physical education themed lessons. Send parent handouts home to reinforce what children are learning in the program. Urge parents and caregivers to support the goals of the program by limiting the distribution of unhealthy high-fat, high-sugar foods and beverages. Ask us how and refer to your “Provide Healthy Choices” document. Develop collaborations with local community organizations, including school nutrition programs, doctors’ offices, and Healthy Maine Partnerships. These collaborations can help your program promote the messaging outside of the program day and sometimes even provide funding opportunities. Trigger program-wide excitement about the program by planning a kickoff, during the program hours, or at a special parent’s night, with activities based on nutrition and physical activity.

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Letter to Parents Announcing a New Partnership Date: Dear Parents: We are pleased to announce that has teamed up with 5210 Goes After School, a program that is part of a larger project called Let’s Go!. Let's Go! is a nationally recognized childhood obesity prevention program designed to increase healthy eating and active living in children from birth to 18. Let's Go! works in 6 sectors (schools, early childhood, after school, healthcare, workplace and community) to reach children and families where they live, study, work, and play. Let's Go! is centered on the common message of "5210".

Eating right and being physically active can be a challenge in today’s busy world. 5210 Goes After School is here to help! As a part of 5210 Goes After School, our program will be working hard to incorporate the 5210 messages into our daily activities. As part of our work, you may also receive parent-geared information, which will highlight the messages the your child is learning in this program. Visit www.letsgo.org for more information about 5210 Goes After School. Please contact at

-

or email the after school program staff at

info@letsgo.org. Sincerely,

Please Note: A modifiable version of this letter can be found in the online toolkit on our website.

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Everyone Has a Role to Play in 5210 Goes After School The Role of the Classroom:

The Role of the After School Program:

 Increase opportunities for physical

 Implement a strong wellness

activity and healthy eating during the program day using the 5210 strategies.

 Educate children of the importance of physical activity and healthy eating.

The Role of the Community:  Local doctors, dentists, parents, and other professionals share their expertise with after school programs.

 All school programs, after school programs, recreation centers, and libraries can promote and practice 5210 to support consistent messaging.

policy that supports 5210 strategies.

 Role model 5210 behaviors.  Create an environment that is supportive of 5210 strategies.

The Role of the Family:  Create a home environment that is supportive of 5210 behaviors.

 Become involved in 5210 Goes After School and other initiatives that promote physical activity and healthy eating.

 Role model 5210 behaviors.

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In This Section Tab 2: Provide healthy choices for snacks and celebrations: limit unhealthy choices. Eat at least five fruits and vegetables a day Provide Healthy Choices Sample Nutrition Guidelines: Boys & Girls Clubs of Southern Maine Healthy Celebrations Parent Letter: Template Go Foods, Slow Foods, Whoa Foods Healthy Shopping on a Budget Understanding Food Labels Maine Seasonal Food Guide Breakfast is Best A Meal is a Family Affair To have fruits and vegetables year-round, add frozen or canned What’s a Healthy Portion? The Fittest Food Snackwise® Fuel Learning with Milk, Cheese and Yogurt ChooseMyPlate Materials (including brochure, tips, coloring sheets)

TAB 2 Provide Healthy Choices for Snacks and Celebrations

Healthy Kids’ Snacks


Eat at least five fruits and vegetables a day.

t h g u o h t r o f d o Fo What is a serving? Adults ll size of a tennis ba A whole fruit the  s d fruit or veggie 1/2 cup of choppe  y greens 1 cup of raw, leaf  uits 1/4 cup of dried fr  Kids their hand Size of the palm of  seasons Choose with the on ies that are in seas ays available Buy fruits and vegg  d veggies are alw an ts ui fr en oz fr lt or fat. Don’t forget that  t any added sugars, sa ou ith w e os th se oo ce; ch and are a healthy choi

Redy’s Rules Try it! 

Try the three bite rule. Offer new fruits and veggies different ways and try at least three bites each time—it can take 7 to 10 tries before you like a new food.



Many fruits and veggies taste great with a dip or dressing. Try a low fat salad dressing with yogurt or get protein with peanut butter.



Make a fruit smoothie with low fat yogurt.

Mix it! 

Add them to foods you already make, like pasta, soups, casseroles, pizza, rice, etc.



Add fruit to your cereal, pancakes, or other breakfast foods.



Be a good role model for your family and have at least one veggie at every meal.

Slice it! 

Wash and chop veggies and fruits so they are ready to grab and eat.



Most people prefer crunchy foods over mushy ones. Enjoy them fresh or lightly steamed.

Did you know?  A diet rich in frui ts an vegetables provides d vitamins and miner als, important for supp orting growth and develo pment, and for optim al immune function.  Family mealtime:

• Do not underestim  Do not underes ate the ate the importanctim impo rtance of e of ily fam mealtilyimm e: ea takl-e time; takefam -1 10-15 5 m inu minutes to10 te s to sit do wn sit down gether. together.  Get your familytoinv • Get your famolv th meal ily edinvwiolv ed with planning d pr ep ar ati on . meal an planning.

Role Model.

a odel. le M Be a RoBe ck on fruits and veggies.

 Sna gies.  Snack on fruits and veg als.. plane me meals lp par fam nily&hepre the pla ve p Ha hel   Have the family

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Healthy Kids’ Snacks Snacks are a bigger part of kids’ diets than in the past. Snacks can make positive or negative contributions to kids’ diets — depending on the choices we offer. Next time your children say, “I’m hungry,” or if you need to get them through to the next meal, reach for one of these healthy snacks.

Vegetables Most of the snacks served to children should be fruits and vegetables, since most kids do not eat the recommended five to thirteen servings of fruits and vegetables each day. Popular vegetables that can be served raw with dip or salad dressing include: • Broccoli • Baby carrots • Celery sticks • Cucumber • Peppers • Snap peas • Snow peas • String beans • Grape or cherry tomatoes • Yellow summer squash • Zucchini slices

Low Fat Dairy Foods Dairy foods are a great source of calcium, which can help to build strong bones. However, dairy products also are the biggest sources of artery-clogging saturated fat in kids’ diets. To protect children’s bones and hearts, make sure all dairy foods are low fat or nonfat. • Yogurt • Lower fat cheese • Low fat pudding and frozen yogurt – Serve only as occasional treats because they are high in added sugars.

dressings such For dips: Try salad nd Island, ousa as nonfat ranch or Th an dips, , be store-bought light dips ch comes (whi guacamole, hummus salsa, or ), rs vo in dozens of fla peanut butter.

Fruit Fruit is naturally sweet, so most kids love it. Fruit can be served whole, sliced, cut in half, cubed, or in wedges. Canned, frozen, and dried fruits often need little preparation. • Apples • Apricots • Bananas • Blackberries • Blueberries • Cantaloupe • Cherries • Grapefruit • Grapes (red, green, or purple) • Honeydew melon • Kiwifruit • Mandarin oranges • Mangoes • Nectarines • Oranges • Peaches • Pears (continued on other side)


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Provide Healthy Choices : s n io t a r b le e C r Fo school r e ft a in ts n e and ev often, sweet, Celebrations o o t ll A . g in it exc programs are become the s d o fo y tt fa salty, and . There are s n o ti a r b le e c f centerpiece o urage healthy o c n e to o d n For example: things you ca . m a r g o r p r u at yo celebrations ent letter r a p d e id v o r ep Send home th It provides  . s n io t a r b le e c about healthy n treats that io t a r b le e c y h ideas for healt . can be sent in olve food, v in t a h t s n io For celebrat e, trail mix, s  e e h c , s r te t pla consider fruit thies. or fruit smoo

For Nonfood Celebrations: Set a healthy celebration policy or write guidelines for your program. Ask your Let’s Go! contact for sample policy language. See example: Boys & Girls Clubs of S. Maine Nutrition & Snacking guidelines. Have the birthday child be the first to do each activity and/or be the line leader for the day. Birthday Library: Each child donates a book to the program library on his/her birthday. Read the book aloud in honor of the child. Create a “Celebrate Me” book. Have teachers or peers write stories or poems and draw pictures to describe what is special about the birthday child. Create a special birthday package. The birthday child wears a sash and crown, sits in a special chair, and visits the director’s office for a special birthday surprise (pencil, sticker, birthday card, etc.).


For Snack Time

Most children enjoy a snack during their after school program. What a child has for a snack can affect their ability to concentrate and learn.

There are sever al things an after school program encourage healt can do to hy snac.ks. Send home the Healthy Kids’ Sn acks parent han dout. Send home a qu arterly newslett er with easy snac k ideas. Offer a fruit and vegetable tastin g to encourage children to try n ew foods. Set a program-w ide snack policy.

Be a role model

for children.

01/09 R07/11


Boys & Girls Clubs of Southern Maine Nutrition/Snacking Guidelines Effective March 2009 Nonfood Rewards: Nonfood rewards and incentives are preferred over food rewards. It is the intent of Boys & Girls Clubs of Southern Maine to use rewards and incentives that do not undermine the health of youth and/or reinforce unhealthful eating habits. Nonfood rewards and incentives should be used as the first choice to encourage healthy behavior.

The use of unhealthy food and beverages as a reward for positive youth performance or behavior will be discouraged. Alternatives to using food, as a reward will include: special recognition, privileges, and items such as stickers, books, etc.

M

PL E

Healthy Options at Celebrations/Events:

It is not the intent of Boys & Girls Clubs of Southern Maine to eliminate all treats for members. Rather it is our goal to cultivate an understanding of the difference between a nutritious snack and a treat. Treats will be reserved for special occasions.

When celebrations/events at a Boys & Girls Clubs of Southern Maine site include treats, healthy options will also be made available along with a nutrition educational component whenever appropriate or possible.

SA

On Site for Vending Machines •

Boys & Girls Clubs of Southern Maine will ensure that nutritious foods are available in all on-site food and vending machines. These guidelines are guided by the (star level) of the Power Vending program.


Healthy Celebrations Letter to Parents Date: Program: Dear Parents and Families, Our program is participating in an exciting initiative called 5210 Goes After School, a program that is part of a larger project called Let’s Go!. Let’s Go! is a nationally recognized childhood obesity prevention program. Let’s Go!, a program of The Kids CO-OP at The Barbara Bush Children's Hospital at Maine Medical Center, is implemented in partnership with MaineHealth. To learn more about Let’s Go! visit www.letsgo.org. The program emphasizes the importance of:

As a part of our efforts towards health and wellness, our program is addressing the kinds of celebrations we have. Celebrations and events are exciting and important for children and staff. Birthday parties and holiday celebrations provide a unique opportunity to help make healthy eating fun and for children to practice wise food choices. As a program, we are encouraging healthy celebration treats, like: Fruit and Cheese Kabobs – Put grapes, melons, cheese cubes, and berries onto a wooden kabob stick. Make Your Own Trail Mix – Provide bags of granola, dried fruit, and nuts for students to make their own trail mix. Fruit Smoothies – Show up at snack time with a blender, frozen fruit, and yogurt! (Be sure to make arrangements with the program first!) Yogurt Parfaits – Layer granola, fruit, and yogurt in plastic cups. Send in on a tray covered with plastic wrap. Vegetable or Fruit Platters with Low Fat Dip As a program, we are also focusing on nonfood ways to celebrate our children. On your child’s birthday, we will celebrate them in nonfood ways, like having them wear a special hat, sash, or letting them lead age appropriate activities. Please help us promote a healthy environment and healthy kids! Sincerely, Please Note: A modifiable version of this letter can be found in the online toolkit on our website.

01/09 R07/11


Go Foods, Slow Foods, Whoa Foods Lots of kids want to know which foods to eat to be healthy. Here’s something kids can do to eat healthier: Learn the difference between Go, Slow, and Whoa foods.

● Go Foods ● Slow Foods ● Whoa Foods

You probably know that foods fit into different categories. The USDA puts them into these categories (visit www.ChooseMyPlate.gov for the newest data): Grains ■ Milk and dairy products ■

Vegetables ■ Meat, beans, fish, and nuts ■

Fruits ■ Oils ■

But now, foods can be classified in three new groups: Go, Slow, and Whoa. In 2005, the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (part of the National Institutes of Health) suggested kids start thinking about whether foods are Go foods, Slow foods, or Whoa foods.

Go Foods

Slow Foods

Whoa Foods

These are foods that are good to eat almost anytime. They are the healthiest ones. Example: skim & low fat milk; some fruits & veggies. See the back of this sheet for more examples.

These are sometimes foods. They aren’t offlimits, but they shouldn’t be eaten every day. At most, eat them a few times a week. Example: waffles & pancakes.

These foods should make you say exactly that— Whoa! Should I eat that? Whoa foods are the least healthy and the most likely to cause weight problems, especially if a person eats them all the time. That's why Whoa foods are once-in-a-while foods. Example: french fries.

For a chart of Go, Slow, and Whoa foods, visit http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/stay_healthy/food/go_slow_whoa.html


● Go Foods ● Slow Foods ● Whoa Foods Go Foods

Slow Foods

Whoa Foods

Baby carrots

100% fruit juice

French fries

Celery sticks

Snap peas

Fruits canned in light syrup

Fruits canned in heavy syrup

Grape tomatoes

White bread

Doughnuts

Apples

Muffins

Cherries

French toast, waffles, and pancakes

Whole milk

Fried hamburgers

Tuna canned in oil

Melon

Oranges

Chicken nuggets

Peaches

Cookies

Pears

Ice cream

Whole grain breads

Low fat and skim milk

Chicken and turkey without skin

Lower fat cheese and yogurt

Water

08/08 R07/11


Healthy Shopping On A Budget Healthy shopping on a budget takes planning! Planning helps you SAVE TIME, MONEY, and EAT HEALTHIER. Tips: 

Make a list and stick to it – this helps you avoid impulse buys that are usually unhealthy and expensive.



Shop mostly the perimeter of the store – spend most of your grocery budget on natural foods found around the outside of the store like fruits, vegetables, dairy and protein foods that are good for your body. Limit your shopping in the middle isles to staples like pasta, canned tuna, and peanut butter, avoiding other expensive manufactured, and often unhealthy, packaged foods.



Shop when you are NOT hungry or stressed – people who shop when hungry or stressed tend to not only buy MORE food but also unhealthier food.



Compare unit prices – bigger is not always better! Use the unit price to compare similar products and make sure you’re getting the best deal. The unit price is the cost per a standard unit (like ounce or pound) and is usually found on a sticker on the shelf beneath the product.



Weigh the cost of convenience – if food tends to rot in your fridge before you prepare it, then you could actually save money by purchasing fresh fruits and veggies that have been washed and chopped for you.



Try frozen and canned – canned and frozen produce keeps for a long time and may be cheaper per serving than fresh. For frozen, make sure you look for items with no added sauces or sugar. For canned, choose fruit canned in 100% juice and vegetables that are labeled either “low sodium” or “no added salt”.



Use store flyers to plan your menu – save money by planning your menu around what fruits, vegetables and other items are on sale each week and save time by already knowing what you are going to make for dinner each night.



Try store brands – store brands on average are cheaper by about 26% to 28% and their quality usually at least meets, and often surpasses, that of name brand products.



Shop in season – buying fruits and vegetables in season generally means your food not only tastes better, but is more nutritious and more affordable.



Buy in bulk when foods are on sale – frozen and canned produce, and some fresh items like apples and carrots will last a long time. If you have the storage space, stock up on the foods you eat regularly when they are on sale to save some money.

07/11 00/00


Understanding Food Labels What can I use the Nutrition Facts label for? Getting a general idea about what’s in a food (i.e. how nutritious a food is). Figuring out what counts as one serving and how many calories are in each serving. Comparing two similar products to choose the healthiest option.

S H Start by checking what counts as one TART

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serving size and how many servings there are per package.

C C :  How many calories would you eat if you HECK

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ate a whole package?

Multiply the number of “servings per container” by the “calories”.

L N  Aim to eat only small amounts of IMIT THESE

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saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium. Keep transfat to 0.

G E N  Aim to get enough fiber, vitamins and minerals. ET

NOUGH OF THESE

QUICK GUIDE TO % DAILY VALUE 5% or less is Low 20% or more is High. Use the % Daily Value to compare similar foods and choose the healthiest option.



UTRIENTS

Watch out for these common misconceptions: Assuming sugar-free or fat-free means calorie-free; it’s not true! Buying something because it says “organic”, “natural”, “multigrain” or has some other “healthy” claim. These statements do not mean a product is good for you! Assuming that because a package looks like it should only be one serving it actually is. Many beverage bottles and packages of chips, cookies and candy are actually 2 or 3 servings! Resources: www.fda.gov/food/labelingnutrition/consumerinformation/default.htm

07/11 00/00


Maine Seasonal Food Guide What are the advantages of knowing which foods are in season? Buying fruits and vegetables that are in season means getting them at their freshest and saving money. Buying from local farms also means supporting our local farmers and their ability to produce nutritious, fresh food. The chart below lists what produce is available locally depending on the time of year. January to April Apples, Dry Beans, Beets, Cabbage, Carrots, Celeriac, Leeks, Onions, Parsnip, Potatoes, Rutabaga, Sweet Potatoes, Turnip, Winter Squash, Garlic May to June Rhubarb, Asparagus, Radishes, Salad Turnips, Scallions, Peas, Fiddleheads, Chives and Parsley, Greens July to August Berries (strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, blackberries), Plums, Peaches, Earliest Apples, Melons, Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Cucumbers, Eggplant, Fennel, Green Beans, Greens, Leeks, Onions, Scallions, Shallots, Peas, Peppers, Potatoes, Radishes, Salad Turnips, Summer Squash, Zucchini, Tomatoes, Garlic – scapes and bulbs September to October Apples, Pears, Cranberries, Melons, Raspberries, Broccoli, Broccoli Raab, Brussel Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Kohlrabi, Celeriac, Celery, Sweet Corn, Cucumbers, Fennel, Greens, Leeks, Onions, Scallions, Shallots, Beets, Carrots, Parsnips, Potatoes, Rutabaga, Sweet Potato, Turnips, Radishes, Salad Turnips, Green Beans, Shell Beans, Soy Beans (edamame), Summer Squash, Zucchini, Eggplant, Peppers, Tomatillos, Tomatoes, Winter Squash, Pie Pumpkins, Garlic November to December By this time of year, most local produce is coming from cold storage although you may be able to find some fresh greenhouse-grown products at your winter farmer’s market.

Apples, Pears, Dry Beans, Beets, Brussel Sprouts, Cabbage, Carrots, Celeriac, Late season greens (like kale and spinach), Kohlrabi, Leeks, Onions, Parsnips, Potatoes, Radishes, Rutabaga, Sweet Potatoes, Turnips, Winter Squash, Garlic Maine-produced foods that are in season all year long: FRUIT: Blueberries & Apples VEGETABLES: Potatoes, Carrots, Beets and Beet Greens, Garlic, Salad & Braising Greens, Tomatoes, Winter Squash, Cabbage, Onions DAIRY: Milk & Cheese PROTEIN: Eggs, Ground Meat, Seafood, Dry Beans GRAINS: Wheat Where to find local foods through the winter: Winter Farmers Market, Winter CSA (Community Support Agriculture), Natural Food Store, Local Food Coop (visit www.mofga.org and click on “Directories” for more information) Resource: www.mofga.org

07/11 R06/12


Breakfast Is Best! Boost your energy and brain power! Why eat breakfast every day? It will give you the energy you need to start your day. It is “fuel” for the body! It can help you do better in school! It can help you feel and act your best! It can help with weight control and keep you healthy! Not hungry in the morning? Try a variety of Start small… try: healthy foods! a cup of low fat fruited yogurt Find the ones a piece of fruit such as a banana, orange or apple YOU like! a bowl of wholegrain cereal with low fat milk a slice of wholewheat toast with peanut butter and a glass of low fat milk

t keep it u b , le p im s it p Kee ay like: delicious! You m

innamon, apple oatmeal with c f low fat milk o ss la g a , e c u sa ke with light a c n a p r o le ff a aw berries syrup and blue ith a slice of w in ff u m sh li g n an E w fat cheese ham, egg and lo n muffin, glass ra b in is ra t fa a low and a banana k il m t fa w lo f o

half of a toasted English muffin with a slice of low fat cheese trail mix of raisins, nuts and cereal


A Meal is a Family Affair In such a busy world, mealtimes often revolve around our lifestyles. As a result of this, we miss meals or eat foods that are not the best for our bodies. Did you know that experts have found that kids who eat regularly with their families are more likely to eat fruits, vegetables, and whole grains? So, no matter how busy life may seem, it’s important to make family meals a priority.

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—KidsHealth 2007


To have fruits and vegetables year-round, add frozen or canned. For health: Just as good for you as fresh fruit and vegetables—nutrients are preserved in the canning and freezing process ■ Choose fruit packed in their natural juice, not in syrup ■ Choose canned vegetables that are salt free and season to taste ■

For savings: ■

Cost less than fresh fruit and vegetables

For convenience: Always in season ■ Lots of choices ■ Easily stored ■ Already washed and cut—ready for your favorite recipe ■

Eat at least five fruits and vegetables a day!

Use Frozen and Canned by Adding: Vegetables to: ■ Chili ■ Soup or stews ■ Stir fry Tomatoes for sauce Black beans & corn to spice up a Mexican dish Chick peas, kidney or garbanzo beans to any salad

Fruits to: ■ Smoothies ■ Yogurt parfaits ■ Plain yogurt ■ Fruit salad ■ Cereal ■ Stir fry (pineapple)

sa Or use ah! side dis

04/09 R03/10


What’s a Healthy Portion? Food portions are larger than ever these days—usually much more than you need. The recommended serving size is enough. But how much is that? These tips will help keep your portions, as well as your waistline, right-sized.

Here are some tips to help you keep your portions under control: Teach your children portion size by relating food to everyday items. For example, a deck of cards is equal to a serving of meat, fish, or poultry. An apple or serving of fruit is about the size of a tennis ball. Please note: For young children, use the palm of their hand as an indicator of portion size Sta

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Teach your children the concept of the divided plate. Think of a plate divided into four equal sections. Use one of the top sections for protein, and the other one for starch, preferably a whole grain; fill the bottom half with veggies (none of the foods should overlap or be piled high).

Check the label on your food to see if it meets some basic needs in your diet, like calcium or Vitamin C; if it’s not “good” for you, eat less of that food.

Check

the serving size and remember that if you eat more than one serving, you are eating more calories.

Avoid eating directly out of the package. Try putting snacks into a small bowl or snack-size baggie. ■ Eat three meals a day; this way you won’t stuff yourself if you have skipped a meal. ■

Serve food on smaller plates.

Serve meals from the stove. This tip will keep you from feeling tempted to eat more when you are not hungry. ■ Skip the “clean plate” club. Instead, encourage your children to start with smaller portions and eat until they are satisfied. ■ At restaurants, ask for a lunch-size portion or share your meal. ■ Role model the behaviors that you want your children to develop. ■


The Fittest Food Nutritious foods give your family the most vitamins, minerals and other nutrients for the fewest calories. Naturally nutritious foods make your child’s calories count: I

Brightly colored fruits

I

Vibrant-colored vegetables

Lean meat, skinless poultry, fish, eggs, beans, and nuts TIP: Choose cuts of meat that end in "loin" or "round". I Fat-free and low fat milk, cheese, and yogurt I

I

Whole, fortified, and fiber-rich grain foods

Tips to Help Your Kids Eat Healthier: Picky eaters? Remember, experts say that parents and caregivers, not children, should decide what foods to buy and serve. New foods may have to be offered many times before they are accepted. Here are some easy ways to get your child to accept unfamiliar nutritious foods: I

Combine whole grain/high-fiber cereals with your child’s favorite cereal.

I

Make your own pizza with prepared whole wheat dough, a few veggies, and part-skim mozzarella cheese.

I

Children age 2 and older: slowly step down from whole milk to low fat to fat-free milk. I

ds are o fo s u io it r t u n These venient: n o c d n a e iv s n e inexp

Clean and cut up fresh veggies in advance. Kids love dips, so serve them with salsa or hummus!

I

s (rinse well) ¢ Canned bean tables ¢ Frozen vege season ¢ Fresh fruit in s in bulk ¢ Whole grain st le-grain breakfa o h w d n ra b re ¢ Sto cereals © 2008 Nutrition Works, LLC

On-the-go options: dried fruits, nuts, hard boiled eggs, low fat cheese sticks, yogurt cups, and single-serve fruits canned in water or 100% fruit juice.


Snackwise®

WHAT IS SNACKWISE®? Developed by the Center for Healthy Weight and Nutrition at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Snackwise® is a research-based snack rating system that calculates nutrient density in snack foods. WHO CAN USE SNACKWISE®? Snackwise® is a great tool for middle and high school student groups to use to analyze a la carte items and vending machines. HOW SNACKWISE® WORKS: The Snackwise® Nutrition Rating system is easy to use! All you do is type the information from the nutrition facts label in the Snackwise® Calculator and Snackwise® determines the nutrient density and rates the snack! Snack foods are then rated as either: GREEN: BEST CHOICE

YELLOW: CHOOSE OCCASIONALLY

RED: CHOOSE RARELY

IMPLEMENTING SNACKWISE IN VENDING MACHINES:

Nationwide Children's Hospital suggests that vending machines establish a ratio for each of the categories as: 30% Green 55% Yellow 15% Red Vendors and schools can work together to identify and adjust snack selections to meet new healthier vending selection guidelines. A student group or health class can analyze the current ration of green, yellow, and red foods available as a la carte items or in the vending machines, then work with the School Nutrition Director to increase the number of smarter snack choices available. HOW TO ACCESS THE SNACKWISE SYSTEM: The Snackwise® calculator is free to use at www.snackwise.org. You can also choose to purchase a 1 year membership for $25. The membership allows you to have full access to all the Snackwise® features, save snack lists, and to have access to experts to answer your questions.


Quaker Breakfast Cookie, Chocolate Chip

Life Cereal, Single Serve Cup

Instant Quaker Oatmeal Express Cups, Cinnamon Roll, Golden Brown Sugar, Vanilla Cinnamon

Fruit Crisp Bites, Apple Crisp or Strawberry

Fig Newtons, 100% Whole Grain

Solo Low Glycemic Nutrition Bar, Chocolate Charger or Mint Mania

Pria Complete Nutrition Bar, Chocolate Peanut Butter Crisp

Oatmeal To Go, Apple Cinnamon for Kids

Stacy's Cinnamon and Sugar (1.5oz/42.5g)

Rice Krispie Treat (1.3oz/37g)

Pepperidge Farms Goldfish Vanilla Physedibles 300 ct. (0.9oz)

Nature Valley Granola Bars, Maple Brown Sugar (1.5oz/42g)

Kudos Snickers Bar (0.89oz/23.5g)

Skittles, Original (2.17oz/61.5g)

O'Keely's Bacon Cheddar (1.5oz/42.5g)

Mounds (1.75oz/49g)

Lays, Cheddar Sour Cream (1.5oz/42.5g)

Keebler Fudge Stripe Cookies 12-11.5, 3 ea. (0.3oz)

Grandma's Chocolate Chip Big Cookies (1.38oz/39g)

Frito-Lay Flamin' Hot Chee-tos, 104 ct. (1.1oz)

Generation Max Combos Ranch Pretzels (1.06oz/30.1g)

Clif Organic Z Bar Kellogg's All Bran Snack Bites, Honey Oat & Strawberry (0.99oz/28g)

Doritos, Fiery Habanero (1.75oz/49.6g)

Doritos, Reduced Fat Cooler Ranch (1oz/28.3g)

Fruits and vegetables

NutriPals Snack Bars, PediaSure, Peanut Butter Chocolate or Strawberry Yogurt

Chewy Runts (1.85oz/52.4g)

Choose Rarely:

California Raisins Snack Box (1.33oz/38g)

Choose Sometimes:

100 Grand (1.5oz/42.5g)

Best Choice:

Austin Zoo Animal Crackers (1oz/28g)

some examples:

Snackwise rates snacks based on their nutrient density and puts them into the following categories. Here are


Implementing Snackwise® in a School Setting Steps for Modifying Vending Choices

Assess Current Vending Machine Content Survey what is currently available in your vending machines. Asses the nutritional value using the Snackwise® system and assign the corresponding color code to each snack. An assessment survey is included on Page 3.

Complete a Nutrition Assessment of Vending Foods • Use the assessment survey on page 3 to total the number of snacks for each color and calculate the percentage of green, yellow, and red choices that are in the machine.

Determine Mix of Products to Offer • Adjust the snack selections in the vending machine to fit the Snackwise® guidelines for each color: Green: 30%, Yellow: 55%, Red: 15%. Work with the vendor or food supplier to identify snacks that meet Snackwise® guidelines. Example Snackwise® plannograms are included to help guide you with snack selections.

Label Your Vending Machines Many subscribers print out customized "vending lists" and post them wherever snack foods are sold. That includes vending machines, kiosks, mini-stores and cafeteria a la carte lines. As a subscriber, you can create and save as many vending lists as you like, plus you can edit the items in the list whenever your selection changes.

Communicate Your Vending Changes • Communicate to the community, parents, faculty and students what changes have been made and how Snackwise® works. Promote the selection of Green and Yellow choices for a healthy lifestyle.

Get the word out! Use the Snackwise® news release and parent letter to promote the Snackwise® Nutrition Rating System.


Implementation Suggestions

Munchies Ultimate Cheddar Mix

> Display Snackwise® posters on the a la carte line and at vending machines.

Nutrition Facts Serving Size: 1 package

> Offer samples of new smarter snack choices for customers to taste test. > Place vending machines with smarter snack choices in high traffic areas that are easily accessible to customers. >Increase the number of smarter snack choices in vending machines.

Get LESS of these

Get MORE of these

Servings Per Container: 1 Amount Per Serving Calories 230 Calories from Fat 70 % Daily Value Total Fat 8g 13% Saturated Fat 1.5 7% Trans Fat 0g Cholesterol less than 5mg 1% Sodium 410mg 17% Total Carbohydrate 34g 11% Dietary Fiber 2g 8% Sugars 5g Protein 5 g Vitamin A 8% Vitamin C 10% Calcium 4% Iron 35%

Frequently Asked Questions What nutrition parameters are used to evaluate a snack food? Snackwise® evaluates a snack foods for eleven nutrition parameters; calories, total fat, saturated & trans fat, sodium, sugar, protein, fiber, calcium, iron, vitamin A and vitamin C. Will Snackwise® help my school establish nutrition guidelines for ALL snack foods available at school? Yes. Snackwise® evaluates packaged snack foods found in vending, a la carte line, and school stores. Snack foods are rated according to whether the nutritional parameter contributes positively or negatively to a snack food’s nutrient balance as either green-best choice, yellow-choose occasionally, or red-choose rarely. Snackwise® is not designed to evaluate beverage offerings. How are fruits and vegetables rated? Fruits and vegetables are always green…best choice and do not need to be evaluated through the Snackwise® Nutrition Rating System. Fruits and vegetables are major dietary sources of many nutrients such as vitamin A, C, folate, calcium, and fiber and are packed with phytochemicals, natural substances that fight disease and promote good health. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends nine servings of fruits and vegetables per day for 2,000 calories, with higher or lower amounts depending on calorie level. Fruits and vegetables are an excellent snack choice and should be promoted through all venues at school.

2


What about Foods of Minimal Nutritional Value (FMNV)? USDA defines FMNV as artificially sweetened foods, a food which provides less than five percent of the Reference Daily Intake (RDI) for each of the eight specified nutrients per serving – protein, vitamin A, vitamin C, niacin, riboflavin, thiamine, calcium and iron. Foods of Minimal Nutritional Value Include: Soda water (carbonated beverages), water ices (popsicles), chewing gum, and candies of the following types: hard candy, including breath mints and cough drops, jellies and gums, marshmallow candies, fondant, licorice, spun candy and candy coated popcorn. ***Regardless of the SnackwiseŽ nutrition rating, FMNV cannot be sold in the food service area or any area in which meals are either served or eaten during lunch.

3


Assessment Survey CHIP MACHINE

GREEN

YELLOW

RED

Chips, low-fat ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ Chips, low-fat ________________ ________________ ________________ Pretzels ________________ ________________ Crackers ________________ Others ________________ TOTALS

Green

CANDY MACHINE

_________

Yellow

_________

Red

_________

Total # of Slots x .20 =

Total # of Slots x .65 =

Total # of Slots x .15 =

GREEN

YELLOW

RED

Candy bars ________________ ________________ ________________ Fruit Chews ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ Cookies ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ Breakfast Bars ________________ ________________ ________________ TOTALS

Green

_________ Total # of Slots x .20 =

Yellow

_________ Total # of Slots x .65 =

Red

_________ Total # of Slots x .15 =

4


Snackwise Sample Vending Plannogram: 40 Slots 12 Green (30%) 22 Yellow (55%) 6 Red (15%) Quaker® Snack Mix, Kid’s Mix (.875 oz) GREEN

Chex Morning Mix®, Fruit & Nut (1.15 oz) GREEN

Baked Cheetos® with Calcium, Falmin Hot (.8750 oz) GREEN

Stacy’s® Texarkana Hot (1 oz) GREEN

Baked Lay’s®, Sour Cream & Onion (1.125 oz)

Snyder’s of Hanover® Honey Wheat Sticks (2.25 oz)

Baked Cheetos®, Flamin’ Hot (.875 oz)

Kudos® M&M’s Bar (.830 oz)

YELLOW Famous Amos® Chocolate Chip Cookies (3 oz)

YELLOW Generation Max™ Snickers Cereal Clusters (1.1oz)

YELLOW

YELLOW

Stacy’s® Pesto & Sundried Tomato (1.5 oz)

Oreo® 100 Calorie Packs (.81 oz)

RED Cinnamon Hershey's Toast ®1g Crunch® Sugar, w/ Milk 'n Almonds Cereal Bar (1.1 oz) (1.6 oz) GREEN YELLOW

GREEN

GREEN Florida's Austin® Natural® Zoo® Au'some Animal Fruit Crackers Nuggets (2.12 oz) (1.5 oz) GREEN YELLOW

YELLOW SnackWel l® Devilsfoo d Cookies (1.1 oz)

Scooby Doo® Fruit Snacks (.9 oz)

YELLOW

YELLOW

Reeses's ® Peanut Butter® Cups (1.5 oz)

Kellogg's ® Cinnaman ia French Toast Snacks (1.76 oz)

Kit Kat, Hershey’s ™ (1.5 oz)

Teddy Grahams ®, Chocolate (1.25oz)

Kudos ® M&M ® Bar (0.83 oz)

Welch’s® Fruit Snacks, Strawberr y (2.25 oz)

RED

YELLOW

RED

GREEN

YELLOW

YELLOW

Kudos® Snickers® (.89 oz)

Butterfing er (Nestlé®) (1.76 oz)

YELLOW

RED

Skittles®, Sour (1.8 oz) YELLOW Nature Valley® Granola Bars, Maple Brown Sugar (1.5 oz) YELLOW

NutriGrain ® Cereal Bar, Strawberry (1.3 oz) GREEN

Baked Lay’s®, Original (1.125 oz)

Baked Lay’s®, KC Master BBQ (1.125 oz)

Doritos®, Reduced Fat, Cooler Ranch (1 oz)

Cheetos® Fantastix, Chili Cheese (1 oz)

YELLOW

YELLOW

YELLOW

YELLOW

NutriGrain® Yogurt Cereal Bar, Strawberry (1.3 oz) GREEN Planters® Dry Roasted Peanuts, Lightly Salted (1.75 oz) YELLOW Rice Krispies® Treat (1.3 oz) YELLOW Cocoa Puffs® Gobstop Milk 'n pers Cereal (1.770 Bar oz) (1.4 oz) YELLOW GREEN

M&M® Peanut (1.74 oz)

RED Doritos®, Nacho Cheesier (1 oz) RED

5


Snackwise Sample Vending Plannogram: 15 Slots 5 Green (30%) 8 Yellow (55%) 2 Red (15%) Baked Cheetos® w/ Calcium, Crunchy (.875 oz)

Generation Max™ Snickers Cereal Clusters (1.1oz)

Stacy’s® Texarkana Hot (1.5 oz)

Austin® Zoo® Animal Crackers (2.12 oz)

Quaker Chewy® Granola Bars, Reduced Sugar, Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip (.840 oz)

GREEN

GREEN

GREEN

YELLOW

GREEN

Baked Lay’s®, Original (1.125 oz) YELLOW Baked Cheetos® (1.5 oz) RED

Baked Doritos®, Cooler Ranch (1.375 oz) YELLOW Baked Lay's®, Sour Cream and Onion (1.125 oz) YELLOW

Reduced Fat Crunchy Cheetos® (.875 oz) YELLOW Doritos®, WOW, Nacho Cheese (1.33 oz) YELLOW

Generation Max™ Combos Ranch Pretzels (1.060 oz) YELLOW Stacy’s® Simply Naked (1oz) YELLOW

Teddy Grahams®, Chocolate (1.25oz) GREEN Doritos®, Nacho Cheesier (1 oz) RED

Snackwise Sample Vending Plannogram: 12 Slots 4 Green (30%) 6 Yellow (55%) 2 Red (15%) Rice Krispie® Treat (1.3 oz)

NutriGrain® Yogurt Cereal Bar, Strawberry (1.3 oz)

Fruit Crisp Bites, Apple Crisp (2 oz)

Austin® Zoo® Animal Crackers (2.12 oz)

YELLOW

GREEN

GREEN

YELLOW

Kashi® TLC™ Bar, Peanut Butter (1.2 oz)

Skittles®, Sour (1.8 oz)

Welch’s® Fruit Snacks, Strawberry (2.25 oz)

Oreo® 100 Calorie Packs (.81 oz)

GREEN

YELLOW

YELLOW

YELLOW

M&M® Peanut (1.74 oz)

Snyder’s of Hanover®, Honey Wheat Sticks (2.25 oz)

Snickers® (2.07 oz)

Nabisco® Teddy Graham® Cinnamon (.75 oz)

RED

YELLOW

RED

GREEN

6


yogu rt

Fuel Learning with Milk, Cheese and Yogurt Help fuel children’s learning with a variety of healthy snacks from all food groups. Let physical activity and smart snacking spell success for your child’s school year. Choose 1% or nonfat milk, reduced fat cheese and lowfat or nonfat yogurt. Try these kid-friendly recipes and snacks at home with your family or at a school party!

Ê

Snacks That Kids Love!

Grab and Go • 8 oz 1% or skim milk • 1–2 oz reduced fat cheddar • 8 oz flavored 1% and cheese and apple wedges skim milk • 1–2 oz reduced fat cheese, 4–6 whole grain crackers • 8 oz lowfat or nonfat and tomato slices fruit yogurt • part skim mozzarella cheese sticks

• reduced fat cottage cheese

Pretzel Wrap (Serves 1) • 1–2 slices Swiss cheese • 1 whole grain pretzel rod (whole wheat, multigrain

or rye) Wrap a slice of cheese around a pretzel! (Swiss cheese is naturally low in sodium.)

single servings

Bean & Cheese Quesadilla (Serves 1) • 1 part skim mozzarella cheese stick or 1/4 cup reduced fat cheese, shredded • 1/4 cup black beans or refried beans • 6-inch whole grain tortilla

Directions: 1. Spread beans down the center of the tortilla. 2. Top with reduced fat shredded cheese. 3. Roll it up and microwave until cheese melts. Other topping ideas: salsa, avocado, lettuce, tomatoes and lowfat plain yogurt or reduced fat sour cream

Fruit Smoothie (Serves 8) • 8 ounce bag of frozen strawberries • 1 banana • 1/2 cup 100% apple juice • 2 cups lowfat or nonfat plain yogurt Pour ingredients into a blender pitcher and blend until smooth. Change it up by using different fruits. If not using a frozen fruit add ice cubes to the mix to keep it thick and frosty.

Maine Department of Education • Maine Grocers Association University of Maine Cooperative Extension Maine Department of Agriculture • Tozier’s Family Market Maine Nutrition Network • Maine Dairy and Nutrition Council


Let's eat for the health of it

Dairy Fruits

Vegetables

Grains

Protein

ChooseMyPlate.gov

Start by choosing one or more tips to help you...

Build a healthy plate

Cut back on foods high in solid fats, added sugars, and salt

Eat the right amount of calories for you

Be physically active your way


4Build a healthy plate Before you eat, think about what goes on your plate or in your cup or bowl. Foods like vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, and lean protein foods contain the nutrients you need without too many calories. Try some of these options.

Make at least half your grains whole. • Choose 100% wholegrain cereals, breads, crackers, rice, and pasta.

Make half your plate fruits and vegetables.

• Check the ingredients list on food packages to find whole-grain foods.

• Eat red, orange, and dark-green vegetables, such as tomatoes, sweet potatoes, and broccoli, in main and side dishes.

Vary your protein food choices.

• Eat fruit, vegetables, or unsalted nuts as snacks—they are nature’s original fast foods.

• Twice a week, make seafood the protein on your plate.

Switch to skim or 1% milk. • They have the same amount of calcium and other essential nutrients as whole milk, but less fat and calories. • Try calcium-fortified soy products as an alternative to dairy foods.

• Eat beans, which are a natural source of fiber and protein. • Keep meat and poultry portions small and lean. Keep your food safe to eat—learn more at www.FoodSafety.gov.

4Cut back on foods high in solid fats, added sugars, and salt Many people eat foods with too much solid fats, added sugars, and salt (sodium). Added sugars and fats load foods with extra calories you don’t need. Too much sodium may increase your blood pressure.

Eat fewer foods that are high in solid fats. • Make major sources of saturated fats—such as cakes, cookies, ice cream, pizza, cheese, sausages, and hot dogs—occasional choices, not everyday foods.

Choose foods and drinks with little or no added sugars.

• Select lean cuts of meats or poultry and fat-free or low-fat milk, yogurt, and cheese.

• Drink water instead of sugary drinks. There are about 10 packets of sugar in a 12-ounce can of soda.

• Switch from solid fats to oils when preparing food.*

• Select fruit for dessert. Eat sugary desserts less often. • Choose 100% fruit juice instead of fruit-flavored drinks. Look out for salt (sodium) in foods you buy— � it all adds up.

• Compare sodium in foods like soup, bread, and frozen meals—and choose the foods with lower numbers. • Add spices or herbs to season food without � adding salt. �

*Examples of solid fats and oils Solid Fats

Oils

Beef, pork, and chicken fat Butter, cream, and milk fat Coconut, palm, and palm kernel oils Hydrogenated oil Partially hydrogenated oil Shortening Stick margarine

Canola oil Corn oil Cottonseed oil Olive oil Peanut oil Safflower oil Sunflower oil Tub (soft) margarine Vegetable oil


4Eat the right amount of calories for you � Everyone has a personal calorie limit. Staying within yours can help you get to or maintain a healthy weight. People who are successful at managing their weight have found ways to keep track of how much they eat in a day, even if they don’t count every calorie. Enjoy your food, but eat less. • Get your personal daily calorie limit at www.ChooseMyPlate.gov and keep that number in mind when deciding what to eat. • Think before you eat…is it worth the calories? • Avoid oversized portions. • Use a smaller plate, bowl, and glass.

Cook more often at home, where you are in control of what’s in your food. When eating out, choose lower calorie menu options. • Check posted calorie amounts. • Choose dishes that include vegetables, fruits, and/or whole grains. • Order a smaller portion or share when eating out. Write down what you eat to keep track of how much you eat. If you drink alcoholic beverages, do so sensibly—limit to 1 drink a day for women or to 2 drinks a day for men.

• Stop eating when you are satisfied, not full.

4Be physically active your way � Pick activities that you like and start by doing what you can, at least 10 minutes at a time. Every bit adds up, and the health benefits increase as you spend more time being active.

Note to parents What you eat and drink and your level of physical activity are important for your own health, and also for your children's health. You are your children’s most important role model. Your children pay attention to what you do more than what you say. You can do a lot to help your children develop healthy habits for life by providing and eating healthy meals and snacks. For example, don’t just tell your children to eat their vegetables—show them that you eat and enjoy vegetables every day.


Use food labels to help you make better choices

Most packaged foods have a Nutrition Facts label and an ingredients list. For a healthier you, use this tool to make smart food choices quickly and easily. Check for calories. Be sure to look at the serving size and how many servings you are actually consuming. If you double the servings you eat, you double the calories. Choose foods with lower calories, saturated fat, trans fat, and sodium. Check for added sugars using the ingredients list. When a sugar is close to first on the ingredients list, the food is high in added sugars. Some names for added sugars include sucrose, glucose, high fructose corn syrup, corn syrup, maple syrup, and fructose.

Dietary Guidelines for Americans Dietary Guidelines for Americans U.S. Department of Agriculture U.S. Department of Health and Human Services www.dietaryguidelines.gov

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010 are the best science-based advice on how to eat for health. The Guidelines encourage all Americans to eat a healthy diet and be physically active.

For more information, go to:

Improving what you eat and being active will help to reduce your risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, some cancers, and obesity. Taking the steps in this brochure will help you follow the Guidelines.

• www.Health.gov/paguidelines

• www.DietaryGuidelines.gov • www.ChooseMyPlate.gov

• www.HealthFinder.gov

USDA Publication number: Home and Garden Bulletin No. 232-CP HHS Publication number: HHS-ODPHP-2010-01-DGA-B June 2011 The U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services are equal opportunity providers and employers.


10 tips

choose MyPlate 10 tips to a great plate

Nutrition

Education Series

Making food choices for a healthy lifestyle can be as simple as using these 10 Tips. Use the ideas in this list to balance your calories, to choose foods to eat more often, and to cut back on foods to eat less often.

1

balance calories

Find out how many calories YOU need for a day as a first step in managing your weight. Go to www.ChooseMyPlate.gov to find your calorie level. Being physically active also helps you balance calories.

2

enjoy your food, but eat less

Take the time to fully enjoy your food as you eat it. Eating too fast or when your attention is elsewhere may lead to eating too many calories. Pay attention to hunger and fullness cues before, during, and after meals. Use them to recognize when to eat and when you’ve had enough.

3

avoid oversized portions

Use a smaller plate, bowl, and glass. Portion out foods before you eat. When eating out, choose a smaller size option, share a dish, or take home part of your meal.

4

foods to eat more often

5

They have the same amount of calcium and other essential nutrients as whole milk, but fewer calories and less saturated fat.

7

make half your plate fruits and vegetables

Choose red, orange, and dark-green vegetables like tomatoes, sweet potatoes, and broccoli, along with other vegetables for your meals. Add fruit to meals as part of main or side dishes or as dessert.

Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion

make half your grains whole grains

To eat more whole grains, substitute a whole-grain product for a refined product—such as eating wholewheat bread instead of white bread or brown rice instead of white rice.

8

foods to eat less often

Cut back on foods high in solid fats, added sugars, and salt. They include cakes, cookies, ice cream, candies, sweetened drinks, pizza, and fatty meats like ribs, sausages, bacon, and hot dogs. Use these foods as occasional treats, not everyday foods.

9

Eat more vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and fat-free or 1% milk and dairy products. These foods have the nutrients you need for health—including potassium, calcium, vitamin D, and fiber. Make them the basis for meals and snacks.

6

switch to fat-free or low-fat (1%) milk

compare sodium in foods

Use the Nutrition Facts label to choose lower sodium versions of foods like soup, bread, and frozen meals. Select canned foods labeled “low sodium,” ”reduced sodium,” or “no salt added.”

10

drink water instead of sugary drinks

Cut calories by drinking water or unsweetened beverages. Soda, energy drinks, and sports drinks are a major source of added sugar, and calories, in American diets.

DG TipSheet No. 1 June 2011

Go to www.ChooseMyPlate.gov for more information.

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.


Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion


Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion


In This Section Tab 3: Provide water and low fat milk; limit or eliminate sugary beverages. Drink water and low fat milk; limit or eliminate sugary beverages Water is Fuel for Your Body Enlightening Facts About Juice Make-Your-Own Sugar Bottle Display Sports and Energy Drinks… Milk Taste Test Have a Drink Plan Worksheet Drink Your Low Fat Milk Worksheet 5210 Every Day! Water Posters Fill Up Here!  Refresh!  Thirst Quencher For Growing Bones… Which Milk? 

Fuel Learning with Milk Find the Sugar Find the Sugar: Answer Key

TAB 3 Provide Water and Low Fat Milk

Drink Your Low Fat Milk: Answer Key


Drink water and low fat milk; limit or eliminate sugary beverages.

e c i u j n o s t i m i l t Pu

contain ” or “punch” often k, rin “d ” e, ad “ed el s” and I Juice products lab e only difference between these “juice 5% juice or less. Th ified with Vitamin C. fort soda is that they ’re ice. whole fruits over ju se oo ch to y tr s ay I Alw 0% juice. serve juice, buy 10 to se oo ch u yo If I ould be limited to: I Each day, juice sh ildren 1-6 years old • 4-6 ounces for ch ildren 7-18 years old • 8-12 ounces for ch r 6 months and unde • No juice for children

child’s juice. ding water to your ad by ly w slo s ge I Make chan stead of juice. er or low fat milk in at w of ss gla a t es I Sugg

Redy’s Rules Water Keep It Handy, Keep It Cold: I Keep bottled water or a water bottle on hand. I Add fresh lemon, lime, or orange wedges to

water for some natural flavor. I Fill a pitcher of water and keep it in the fridge. I Drink water when you’re thirsty. It’s the best choice. I Cut back slowly on sugar-sweetened drinks. I Replace soda with water, instead of other sugar-sweetened beverages,

such as juice or sports drinks.

Be a Role Model: I Grab a glass of water instead of soda. I Try mixing seltzer with a small amount of juice.

Milk

ilkshake Make a m t milk, fa using low r u o y d n a ice, rries. e b e it r favo

Encourage low fat milk instead of sugar-sweetened drinks: According to the national dairy council: I Children ages 4–8 years old should be consuming three 8-ounce glasses of milk or other dairy each day. I Children ages 9–18 years old should be consuming four and a half 8ounce glasses of milk or other dairy each day.

Did you know? Soda has no nutriti onal value and is high in sugar. Just nine ounces of soda has 110-15 0 empty calories. Many sodas als o contain caffeine, which kids do n’t need. Energy drinks are N OT sports drinks and should ne ver replace water during exercis e. Water is fuel for yo ur body: I Water is the m ost important nutrient for active people. I Between 70-80% of a child’s body is made up of water. I When you exer cise, you sweat, and when you swea t you LOSE water and minerals – it is important to replac e the water you lose when you sweat. I Water is the # 1 thirst quencher!

08/08 R03/10


Water is Fuel for Your Body Ever wonder why you need water? Like food, water acts like fuel in your body and helps your body function. To keep your body running smoothly, drink plenty of water throughout the day. Children who eat healthy, drink enough water, and sleep well at night will have energy for all their sports and activities. I Water is the most important nutrient for active people. I Between 70-80% of a child’s body is made up of water. I Water is the #1 thirst quencher!

el! fu e r o m d e e n u hen yo w r e t a w h it w y Fuel your bod LOSE water u sweat, you

nd when yo a t, a e you sweat. n sw e h u o w y , se e lo is c u r o e y water ater When you ex to replace the t n a rt d to replace w o e p e n im y is a It m . s ls te a u r n 0 min and mine ® r longer than 6 , especially whe fo e v ti c ® nd Powerade a ry e v a Kids who are like Gatorade s, k n ri d s rt o sp ng and minerals usi id. to replace d se u e b r it’s hot and hum e v e ld n ™ inks and shou r d t ® nd SuperStar , r o sp T a O Bull are N rinks, like Red es d Energy drinks y rg e n e st o M . nd can sometim e a is r c r te a e x w e se g lo in r dy to water du e causes the bo in e ff a C . E IN E ep problems. e sl d n a s, e contain CAFF h c a ach eadaches, stom h , ty ie x n s. The extra a ie se r u lo a a c c d n a r ga amounts of su H IG H in y. ta n o c and tooth deca in a g Energy drinks t h ig e w es may add to sugar and calori

“In a game, when my players get thirsty, water gets the call.” —Arnie Beyeler, Manager, Portland Sea Dogs

08/08 R03/10


Enlightening Facts About Juice ACCORDING TO THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS (AAP):  Fruit juice offers no nutritional benefits for infants younger than 6 months.  Fruit juice offers no nutritional benefits over whole fruit for infants older than 6 months and children.  Fruit “drinks” are not nutritionally equivalent to fruit “juice” (see below).  Fruit juice is NOT appropriate in treating dehydration or diarrhea.  Excessive juice consumption may be associated with malnutrition.  Excessive juice consumption may be associated with diarrhea, flatulence, abdominal distention, and tooth decay.  Calcium-fortified juices do provide calcium, but lack other nutrients present in breast milk, formula, or cow’s milk.

RECOMMENDATIONS :  If you decide to give your child juice, it is recommended that you do not introduce it until your infant is twelve months old.

 Serve juice in open cups, not bottles or “sippy” cups that allow children to consume juice easily throughout the day.  Offer and encourage children to eat whole fruit instead of juice. They will get all the great fiber of the whole fruit and feel more full than with drinking juice.

 Serve only pasteurized juices.  Choose 100% juice instead of fruit “drinks,” which, by definition, could contain between 10% and 99% juice and most likely contain added sweeteners and flavors.

 Younger children aged 1 to 6 years should have only 4-6 ounces of juice a day, if any at all.  Older children should be limited to 8-12 ounces of juice a day, if any at all. Taken from the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Nutrition

Check out how much sugar is in some popular (and marketed towards children) juice & juice drinks: *One Teaspoon equals 4.2 grams of sugar. Beverage

Sugar Grams per Serving

Teaspoons of Sugar*

Sunny D® Baja Orange Drink

43g

10 1/4

Capri Sun® Red Berry Drink

25g

6

Apple & Eve® Bert & Ernie Berry 100% Juice

13g

3

Earth’s Best® Strawberry Pear 100% Juice

11g

2 2/3

Water

0g

0

humb: Rule of T off giving better You are ildren fruit your ch uit juice. of fr instead

01/09 R04/11


Make-Your-Own Sugar Bottle Display Let’s Go! has discovered the power of our Sugar Bottle Display; making your own is a great classroom activity. This is one of the best ways to graphically show how much sugar is in some of the most consumed beverages—you’ll be surprised. This is a tool that can be used to help students and staff to make smart beverage choices. Directions to Make-Your-Own Sugar Bottle Display

Supplies:  Bottles of your favorite beverages—refer to the table on the next page for suggestions  Bag of White Sugar  Teaspoons  Funnels Directions: 1. Empty, wash and completely dry bottles—keep the labels on the bottles. Tip: Bottles take at least 24 hours to dry completely. 2. Find the Nutrition Facts box on the bottle label. 3. Take note of serving size (many bottles contain two or more servings — something to think about!)  Tip: Make sure to pay attention to the information listed Per Bottle. 4. Record how many grams of sugar are in a bottle. (Continued on page 2)


5. Figure out how many teaspoons of sugar are in each bottle by dividing the grams of sugar by 4.2 (number of grams of sugar in a teaspoon.)  Serving size: 1 bottle  Sugars=48g  Teaspoons=48 divided by 4.2≈11.  Amount of sugar to put in bottle=11 teaspoons. 6. Put funnel into mouth of bottle and put in computed amount of sugar. Replace cap. Screw on tight! 7. Make a chart like the one below corresponding to the drinks you chose. 8. Display in your school so students and staff can see how much sugar is in some of their favorite drinks. 9. Other ideas:  Take a photo of your display and use along with chart and hand-outs from the 0 binder to make a bulletin board.  Make a game out of it by having people guess how many teaspoons of sugar are in their favorite drinks and give the winners a 5210 approved prize!  Have a poster contest around sugar-sweetened beverages.

Common Drink Choices

Drink Mountain Dew® Coca-Cola® Classic Dunkin’ Donuts Strawberry Fruit Coolata® Sprite® Monster Energy® Drink Arizona® Green Tea & Honey Minute Maid® 100% Apple Juice Glaceau Vitamin Water® Gatorade™ Starbucks Bottled Frappuccino® Poland Spring® Water

Size 20 oz 20 oz

Total Calories 275 cal 250 cal

Sugar Grams 78 g 65 g

Teaspoons Sugar 18 15

16 oz 20 oz 16 oz 20 oz 10 oz 20 oz 20 oz 9.5 oz 20 oz

290 cal 250 cal 200 cal 210 cal 140 cal 125 cal 130 cal 200 cal 0 cal

65 g 65 g 54 g 51 g 32 g 32.5 g 34 g 32 g 0g

15 15 13 12 8 8 8 8 0

05/10 00/00


Sports and Energy Drinks SPORTS DRINKS

Most peopl e don’t nee d them!

 Flavored beverages that usually contain sugar, minerals and electrolytes (like sodium, potassium and calcium).

 Most people don’t need them! They are recommended only when you have been doing intense physical activity for an hour or longer (such as long distance running or biking, or high intensity sports like soccer, basketball or hockey).

 If you drink them when you have been doing just routine physical activity or just to satisfy your thirst, you actually increase your risk of excess weight gain.

 What are some examples?  Gatorade  Powerade  Accelerade  All Sport Body Quencher  Propel

TER! A W ? s k c hat ro w w o n k You

ENERGY DRINKS  Flavored beverages that typically contain stimulants like caffeine and other compounds along with sugar, added vitamins and minerals, and maybe even protein. (We don’t need these nutrients from drinks; we get them from our food!)

 These drinks are not the same thing as sports drinks and are NEVER recommended for children or adolescents.

 Could cause you to have increased heart rate, increased blood pressure, trouble sleeping, anxiety, difficulty concentrating, upset stomach, and even caffeine toxicity.

 What are some examples?  Monster  Red Bull  Power Trip  Rockstar  Full Throttle  Jolt

Did you know? Neither sports drinks or energy drinks are a good substitute for water – water is always the best thirst quencher! Water is the best choice for hydration, even before, during and after most people’s exercise routines.

Adapted from KidsHealth.org and Sports Drinks & Energy Drinks for Children & Adolescents: Are They Appropriate?. Committee on Nutrition and the Council of Sports Medicine and Fitness. Pediatrics. 2011; 1227; 1182.

07/11 00/00


Milk Taste Test Suggested Grades: K–5 SUPPLIES NEEDED I Flipchart or blackboard I Skim, 1%, 2%, and whole milk I Cups for milk samples (4 per person)

DIRECTIONS:

1. In a classroom, health fair, or group setting ask: How many different kinds of milk have you tried, i.e., skim,1%, 2%, or whole? What kind of milk is your favorite?

2. Using a show of hands, record how many children like each type of milk (no milk, skim, 1%, 2%, and whole). Using those numbers, draw a pie graph on the flipchart or blackboard for the preference % for each kind of milk.

3. Identify each type of milk on the bottom of the cups using the following code: A (skim), B (1%), C (2%), D (whole) and pour milk for each person to taste. Be sure to cover the milk jugs when pouring or pour behind a screen so that students cannot read which milk is being poured.

4. Explain that this will be a “blindfold taste test.” This means kids will be tasting milk without being able to see if it is skim, 1%, 2%, or whole.

5. Ask kids to taste each sample of milk (A, B, C, and D), and without looking at the bottom of the cup, place their “favorite” on a table.

6. Now look at the bottom of each cup to see what was preferred. At the

te: Important no rgies ck for milk alle

Che the taste before starting e kids testing. Have th sips of who can, taste and whole skim,1%, 2%, kids who milk. Have the unt prefercannot, help co k numbers ences and mar or blackon the flipchart ake sure board. Also, m to keep you have a way d fresh the milk cold an tivity. during your ac

end of the taste test, count up the total preferences for each kind of milk and determine preference % for each. Compare these results with the first preference survey. Were there any changes? Were any kids surprised at their picks?

7. Talk about all the good nutrients that milk has to offer: calcium, protein, and other nutrients your body needs.

8. Talk about the benefits of drinking lower fat milk (the same great nutrients with less fat means fewer calories and a healthier heart).

08/08 R06/10


Have a Drink Plan On average, how often do you drink sugar-sweetened beverages? Examples: soda, fruit punch, sports drinks, or other sugared drinks _____ Daily

_____ Once a week

_____ 3 times a week

_____ Only at special events

Should it be an everyday choice or an occasional treat?

What other drinks do you enjoy instead of soda?

Revisit question one in a month to see if you’ve made any changes!

08/08 R06/10


Drink Your Milk Did you know‌? Children, ages 4-8 years, should be consuming three 8-ounce glasses of milk or other dairy each day.

How many ounces of milk is that per day? __________ How many ounces of milk is that per week? __________

Children, ages 9-18 years, should be consuming four and a half, 8-ounce glasses of milk or other dairy each day.

How many ounces of milk is that per day? __________ How many ounces of milk is that per week? __________

08/08 R07/11


Drink Your Milk: Answers Did you know‌? Children, ages 4-8 years, should be consuming three 8-ounce glasses of milk or other dairy each day.

24 How many ounces of milk is that per day? __________ 168 How many ounces of milk is that per week? __________ Children, ages 9-18 years, should be consuming four and a half, 8-ounce glasses of milk or other dairy each day.

36 How many ounces of milk is that per day? __________ 252 How many ounces of milk is that per week? __________

08/08 R0/1


yogu rt

Fuel Learning with Milk, Cheese and Yogurt Help fuel children’s learning with a variety of healthy snacks from all food groups. Let physical activity and smart snacking spell success for your child’s school year. Choose 1% or nonfat milk, reduced fat cheese and lowfat or nonfat yogurt. Try these kid-friendly recipes and snacks at home with your family or at a school party!

Ê

Snacks That Kids Love!

Grab and Go • 8 oz 1% or skim milk • 1–2 oz reduced fat cheddar • 8 oz flavored 1% and cheese and apple wedges skim milk • 1–2 oz reduced fat cheese, 4–6 whole grain crackers • 8 oz lowfat or nonfat and tomato slices fruit yogurt • part skim mozzarella cheese sticks

• reduced fat cottage cheese

Pretzel Wrap (Serves 1) • 1–2 slices Swiss cheese • 1 whole grain pretzel rod (whole wheat, multigrain

or rye) Wrap a slice of cheese around a pretzel! (Swiss cheese is naturally low in sodium.)

single servings

Bean & Cheese Quesadilla (Serves 1) • 1 part skim mozzarella cheese stick or 1/4 cup reduced fat cheese, shredded • 1/4 cup black beans or refried beans • 6-inch whole grain tortilla

Directions: 1. Spread beans down the center of the tortilla. 2. Top with reduced fat shredded cheese. 3. Roll it up and microwave until cheese melts. Other topping ideas: salsa, avocado, lettuce, tomatoes and lowfat plain yogurt or reduced fat sour cream

Fruit Smoothie (Serves 8) • 8 ounce bag of frozen strawberries • 1 banana • 1/2 cup 100% apple juice • 2 cups lowfat or nonfat plain yogurt Pour ingredients into a blender pitcher and blend until smooth. Change it up by using different fruits. If not using a frozen fruit add ice cubes to the mix to keep it thick and frosty.

Maine Department of Education • Maine Grocers Association University of Maine Cooperative Extension Maine Department of Agriculture • Tozier’s Family Market Maine Nutrition Network • Maine Dairy and Nutrition Council


In This Section Tab 4: Provide non-food rewards. Provide Non-Food Rewards Non-Food Rewards at Home

TAB 4 Provide Non-Food Rewards


Provide Non-Food Rewards idin of Prov

ards: w e R d o o g Non-F

Classrooms

ealthy h s r e t s s t that provide Benefi t that fo s n e m n o n envir 5210 message a s non-food rewards e d i v t s t n r Pro e o u p  q p e nd su mo r e f r r o f are healthy eating a y t i rtun o p p o e th Allows as a classrooms! ful) d e  s e s u u f i ( y t i s v i d t r c rewa ysical a h p f i s s to fitne s d d them! A  k s  a t s rds! Ju a w e reward r d war d : o e o f R a n o s n a fer Food g n i Kids pre d i  v Pro

ences u q e s n Co

Consider:

of

health y foods r h t o l o a p e h o n t ion of u t tributes p n o m C u  s  overcon s e g a r g habits n i Encou t a e  r (often poo s o d t o s o e f t u r those o f Contrib e  c n e s prefer e s a e r c In  sweets)

Developing guidelines that discourage the use of food as a reward

Offering a monthly indoor or outdoor physical activity to celebrate students’ accomplishments in lieu of food-based rewards

Offering rewards that endorse physical activity  Extra recess, longer recess, outdoor

activities, Take Time activity

Offering rewards that endorse academics  Pens, pencils, notebooks, books, art time,

activity sheets, etc

08/08 R07/11


Non-Food Rewards at Home How can you celebrate a job well done without using food treats? Here are ways to reward your child:  Make a list of fun, non-food rewards that don’t cost much and post it where the whole family can see it.  Have a separate list of special and inexpensive rewards for those really big achievements.  Give certificates or ribbons for healthy behaviors.  Allow your child to have a few friends over after school to play sports.  Invite a few of their friends to a sleepover.  Have a family game night.  Keep a box of special toys or art supplies that can only be used on special occasions.  Go to a sports game.

Words of appre ciatio can go a long w n a Children love to y. hear “ You did a gr eat job” or “I appreciate your help.”

 Camp out in the back yard.  Encourage the use of electronics that support physical activity, like Dance Dance Revolution.  Choose toys and games that promote physical activity like jump ropes, balls, or Skip-Its.

ard: w e R a s a d o o F Using to poor health s te u ib tr n o C I of erconsumption v o s e g ra u o c n I E s unhealthy food habits to poor eating s te u ib tr n o C I nce for sweets re fe re p s se a re I Inc

id giving o v a o t e r Be su nt of o r f n i e m i extra t mputer o c r o V T the rd! as a rewa

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In This Section Tab 5: Provide opportunities for children to get physical activity every day. Get one hour or more of physical activity every day Limit recreational screen time to two hours or less Quick Physical Activity Breaks Physical Activity Breaks from Take-Time! StoryWalk™ Activity Room Teenage Girls & Physical Activity WinterKids

TAB 5 Provide Opportunities for Physical Activity


Get one hour or more of physical activity every day.

Redy’s Rules Day! Move An Hour Every ily

ast an hour of da r kids and adults! physical activity…fo

I Encourage at le

be Free and Fun! y it iv ct A al ic ys h P t Le I Take a walk with I Play with your

your family

pet

I Play tag

e (remember to wear your helmet) and dance I Turn on music

I Take a bike rid

Tips from Redy Make Physical Activity Easie r.

I Make gradual change

s to increase your level of physical activity.

I Jump rope I Play Frisbee I Take the stairs the end I Park the car at of the parking lot gels I Make snow an

I Incorporate physical

activity into your daily

routines.

I Try tracking the level

of your physical activity using a pedometer .

I Turn off the TV and

computer and keep them out of the bedroom .

I Limit recreational co

mputer time.

Did you know?

One hour of moderate physical activity means:

I Choose toys and gam

• Doing activities where you breathe hard like hiking or dancing

I Encourage lifelong ph

20 minutes of vigorous physical activity means:

I Keep physical activit

• Doing activities where you sweat, like running, aerobics, or basketball Physical activity… • Makes you feel good • Helps you keep a healthy weight

es that promote

physical activity.

ysical activity by incorporating physical act ivity into your routine. y fun!!

Be A Role Model. I Use a pedometer.

• Makes your heart happy

I Take a walk after din

ner.

• Makes you stronger • Makes you flexible

08/08 R03/10


Limit recreational screen time to two hours or less.*

! n u F e h t n o n r Tu

hen you join in! w n fu re o m ts lo TV. Life is stead of watching in s e ti vi ti ac se e Try th g.

 Ride a bike. re hike.  Go on a natu a puzzle.  Put together usic and dance.  Turn on the m or magazine.  Read a book tching up with  Spend time ca your family. to the park  Take your kids or beach. mes.  Play board ga

jo  Walk, run, or l.  Start a journa tball, ke  Play ball (bas

catch, soccer, etc.). rary.  Go to the lib s in your  Explore gym . community  Rollerblade. .  Play charades owshoe. sn  Sled, ski, or

Redy’s Rules Tame the TV and Computer! Set Limits – know how much TV your child is watching. 

Set some basic rules, such as no TV or computer before homework or chores are done.



Do not watch TV during mealtime.



Use a timer. When the bell rings it’s time to turn off the TV.

 Eliminate TV time during the week.

Tips from Redy in advance. Help your child plan television viewing

es in the family room. Keep books, magazines, and board gam ad of being in front of  Make a list of fun activities to do inste a screen. ate shows.  Set family guidelines for age-appropri



Did you know?  Screentime inclu des TV computer, Playstatio , n, Gameboy. All are im and portant to limit.  Watching TV is as socia more snacking and ted with increased obesity.  Too much TV ha s been to lower reading scor linked es and attention problems.  Healthy screen tim e: • No TV/computer un der the age of 2 • No TV/computer in the room the child sleeps • One hour of educat ional TV/computer time between ages 2 and 5 • After the age of 5, 2 hours or less

*Keep TV/Computer out of the bedroom. No screen time under the age of 2.

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Quick Physical Activity Breaks The following activity breaks came from Kerra Cartwright, first grade teacher, Young Elementary School, Saco, 2008 There are several ways to incorporate the ideas below into your after school program. You could: 1.) Use them during down times as a quick and easy physical activity break 2.) Put a few together for indoor play 3.) Combine them all and put on a physical activity "show".

High Knee Run/March

Run or march in place, lifting your knees in front of you as high as you can.

Hula Hoop

Around Your Waist. Do the best you can and have fun! Keep moving your hips! Hula hoop twirling builds abdominal strength. Twirling two hula hoops builds hand-eye coordination.

Tree Pose

Balance on one foot. Place your other foot on the inside of your balanced leg. Your knee should be pointing to the side and your heel pointing up your leg. It is okay to leave your toes on the ground if you need to. Bring your hands together in front of you or overhead. Change legs after a count to 30.

Wood Chopper

Stand with your feet hip distance apart. Squat down with arms extended in front of you with a ball between your hands or just bring your hands together in a fist. As you lower in a squat bring the ball towards the ground. As you rise up, bring the ball over your head. Keep your eyes looking straight ahead the entire time.

Chair Pose

Feet together. Legs together. Keeping your knees together, sit back like you were sitting in a chair. Hold that position as long as you can. Relax when you need too, and then try again.

Skate in Place

Pretend to ice skate in place as you hop side to side bringing your heel behind you as high as you can. Swing your arms side to side. You can do this without hopping by stepping side to side.

Agility Ladder

Form a line at one end of the ladder. Run through the ladder without stepping on the white bars. Pick your knees up high! Run up the ladder and then jog around to the end of your class line.

Jump the Hurdles

Form a line at the cone. The first person begins by stepping/jumping over the hurdles. When the student before you gets to the 3rd hurdle, the next person begins. Keep the line moving!

Squeeze the Ball

Place a ball between your hands, elbows pointing out to the side. Squeeze your palms in towards the ball. Feel your arms working hard!

Jump Rope

You can pretend jump rope or use a real jump rope. Keep moving! Jumping rope builds endurance. Jumping rope is an activity recommended for both children and adults, and can be done individually or in a group setting.

Hands to Knee

Extend your arms overhead. Lock your thumbs together. Lift one knee up as you pull your arms down to touch that knee. Arms go back overhead as that foot goes back down to the ground. Lift the other knee as you pull your arms down to touch the knee. Stand nice and tall to help your abdominal muscles get strong!

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Physical Activity Breaks

Designed for activities at desks or round tables where space is limited.

Have a Seat Stand up and pull your chair away from the table. Stand in front of your chair. Sit…Stand…Sit…Stand and repeat 5-6 times. Sit half way down…Stand…Sit half way down and hold for 10 seconds…Stand. Sit…Lift 2 inches up…hold 10 seconds…Stand Barely Sit (“brush” touch)…Stand….Repeat 10-12 times

Apple Picking Walk (in place) to the imaginary apple orchard, wave to the farmers as you go by. Climb the imaginary ladder on the tree. Knees up high. Reach arms to the tallest branches where the best apples are. Reach high and pick the apples. Reach low and put them in your basket. Repeat several times to get a lot of apples. Carrying the imaginary heavy basket full of apples, walk briskly back to the house. Sit down and eat an apple to help you reach your 5 A Day.

Hugging Earth Stand and reach both arms in front of you. Now, alternate pushing one and then the other. Push the imaginary doors open. Feel your shoulder blades open as you really reach and push. Now, clasp hands together and hold them far away from your chest “Bend your elbows slightly as if you are holding a beach ball. Imagine that your beach ball is planet Earth. Now touch the north pole with your nose, stretching the back of your neck. Again, open your shoulder blades.


Titanic Stand at the bow of the ship with your arms out wide to each side. Feel the wind in your hair as you look to the horizon. Place your hands on your low back squeeze your elbows towards each other. If you can, interlace hands behind you. Open your chest and stand tall. If you choose (not everyone is able)‌lift your arms upward and really stretch. Continue to stand tall as you breathe the salty sea air.

Writing Lesson Stand and push your chair in towards the table. Stand away from the table and chair. Pretend you have a pencil stuck to your waist. Using your waist, write your name with the imaginary pencil. Repeat using your arms, hips, head or other body part. Now, using one leg at a time write your name with the imaginary pencil (requires balance).

Helping Hands Turn sideways with your left hip against the table. Place your hands on the shoulders of the person in front of you. Give them a shoulder massage! Ahhhhhhh‌.. I hope you did a good job because now turn around. Switch!

Take Time! Physical Activity and Nutrition Program Contact: Amy Root, USM/Muskie School www.maine-nutrition.org


StoryWalk™ What is StoryWalk™? Combining physical activity with literacy may seem like an odd mix, but it’s an innovative way to get people of all ages out walking while reading children’s picture books. Pages of a book are transformed into signs that are then laid out on a trail inviting families, children, caregivers, teachers and others to follow the path of pages. Our StoryWalk™ pilot was developed using the picture book, Scoot! by Maine author/illustrator, Cathryn Falwell. Cathryn gave Let’s Go! permission to use her book in this way, and Don’t let winter weather get in the way of your StoryWalk™! created extra illustrations that demonstrate to children how they can move like the animals featured in the pages of Scoot!.This StoryWalk™ set contains 29 pages or signs that can be placed along any path.

Where can I use a StoryWalk™? StoryWalk™ can easily be set up on playgrounds, walking paths, hiking trails, or fields. Our signs are wind-proof and waterproof and can be placed at different heights for various age levels.

Why a StoryWalk™? Let’s Go! wanted to offer an activity rich in literacy and healthy movement. A StoryWalk™ is a great simple way to encourage physical activity and increase reading among youth and families.

1st Graders moving and grooving Scoot!-style!

Scoot! By Cathryn Falwell

For more information on how you can bring a StoryWalk™ to your site, please contact Let's Go! at info@letsgo.org or at 207.662.3734. The StoryWalk™ Project was created by Anne Ferguson of Montpelier, VT and developed in collaboration with the Vermont Bicycle & Pedestrian Coalition and the Kellogg Hubbard Library.

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Activity Room The concept of an activity room has been successfully implemented in schools around the state as a way to reward good behavior and incorporate physical activity into the school day. Follow the steps below to create your own activity room for your after school program. with your director to identify a room that can be used as the activity room. 1. Work The space can be fairly small, but should be big enough to accommodate a small group.

2. Set up physical activity stations and directions around the room. 3. Apply for external funds (maybe your Healthy Maine Partnerships www.healthymainepartnerships.org? Other grant opportunities?) to stock the room with games and activities that promote physical activity.

Consider: Twister, jump ropes, yoga balls, rowing machines, treadmills, Dance Dance Revolution, a rock climbing wall, etc.

4. Make the activity room a part of the after school environment. Allow staff to give youth a 'coupon' for 10 minutes in the activity room as a reward for good behavior.

Activity room in action:

nding School in activity room for Mast La an d ate cre y ull ssf ce suc or, ntified a room, other teachers, Robin ide PE teacher, Robin O’Conn d an n tio tra nis mi ad th wi sign up to closely system. Any teacher can ard Freeport, Maine. Working rew ide l-w oo sch a d d implemente the room to students determined the rules, an ff can offer ‘coupons’ for sta d an y ult fac d an , om ard a student. The bring their class to the ro ve the opportunity to rew ha ers mb me l oo sch All r. . Now, they give exhibiting positive behavio students on their birthdays to es ak pc cu e giv to d to give out the ent use ground keepers are able School Nutrition Departm d an ff sta l dia sto cu the room! Even ent. a coupon to the activity ool-wide unity and excitem sch s ate cre om ro e Th s. coupon

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Teenage Girls & Physical Activity Physical activity is important for everybody, including teenagers, but especially for girls who are generally less active then boys the same age. As teens deal with the transition from primary school to high school there are other pressures that come with this transition—socially, at home, and at school. Issues such as body image, the onset of menstruation, and general feelings of insecurity about their changing bodies can rise to the surface in these years. It is important to remind teenage girls about the rewards of physical activity while being mindful of the barriers they may be dealing with in their lives. Some Rewards of Physical Activity for Teenage Girls:  Increased strength, stamina and flexibility  Gain in a healthy body image and increased self-esteem.  Helps keep the blues away and is a great way to de-stress  It’s a fun way to spend time with your friends and family — come up with some group activities centered around physical activity! Some common barriers to teenage girls starting and/or continuing a physical activity routine.  Physical inactivity role modeled by parents.  Lack of energy due to lack of physical fitness.  Peer role-modeling: i.e. having friends who don’t play sports or exercise regularly  Lack of skills, coupled with fear of looking silly or clumsy and being teased.  Embarrassment around wearing work-out clothes. Some ways you can build a physical activity program that successfully includes and welcomes teenage girls:  Hold “girls only” physical activities e.g yoga hour, time on the basketball court, dance contests, etc.  Organize clubs for girls that include physical activity and/or healthy eating components e.g. hula hoops, vegetarian cooking, ethnic food, croquet, belly dancing, lawn bowling, etc..

-Adapted from Fact Sheet created by Kinect Australia

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We Make Winter Fun! WinterKids helps children develop healthy lifelong habits through fun, outdoor winter activity. WinterKids Guide to Outdoor Active Learning Teaches educators how to take the classroom outside and get students moving and learning! Contact WinterKids for a GOAL training at your school!

WinterKids Passport th

th

th

Offers all Maine 5 , 6 , and 7 graders free and discounted tickets, lessons, and rentals to downhill ski, cross country ski, snowboard, ice skate, and more.

WinterKids FunPass th

Offers all Maine children, from preschool through 4 grade, the chance to try cross country skiing and snowshoeing for free at over 20 locations!

WinterKids Welcome To Winter Educates immigrant, refugee, and economically disadvantaged communities about the joys and benefits of outdoor winter activity. Shows kids and their families how much fun winter can be!

For more information, please visit:

www.winterkids.org WinterKids P.O. Box 7566 Portland, ME 04112 (207) 871-5700


Tab 6: Limit recreational screen time. Limit recreational screen time to two hours or less* *Keep TV/Computer out of the bedroom. No screen time under the age of 2

Step Away from the Screen! Ways to Shake Up Your Routine Promote Healthy Viewing Habits Unplugged! Active Video Games: Good for You? Do More Watch Less (Insert)

TAB 6 Limit Recreational Screen Time

In This Section


Limit recreational screen time to two hours or less.*

! n u F e h t n o n r Tu

hen you join in! w n fu re o m ts lo TV. Life is stead of watching in s e ti vi ti ac se e Try th g.

 Ride a bike. re hike.  Go on a natu a puzzle.  Put together usic and dance.  Turn on the m or magazine.  Read a book tching up with  Spend time ca your family. to the park  Take your kids or beach. mes.  Play board ga

jo  Walk, run, or l.  Start a journa tball, ke  Play ball (bas

catch, soccer, etc.). rary.  Go to the lib s in your  Explore gym . community  Rollerblade. .  Play charades owshoe. sn  Sled, ski, or

Redy’s Rules Tame the TV and Computer! Set Limits – know how much TV your child is watching. 

Set some basic rules, such as no TV or computer before homework or chores are done.



Do not watch TV during mealtime.



Use a timer. When the bell rings it’s time to turn off the TV.

 Eliminate TV time during the week.

Tips from Redy in advance. Help your child plan television viewing

es in the family room. Keep books, magazines, and board gam ad of being in front of  Make a list of fun activities to do inste a screen. ate shows.  Set family guidelines for age-appropri



Did you know?  Screentime inclu des TV computer, Playstatio , n, Gameboy. All are im and portant to limit.  Watching TV is as socia more snacking and ted with increased obesity.  Too much TV ha s been to lower reading scor linked es and attention problems.  Healthy screen tim e: • No TV/computer un der the age of 2 • No TV/computer in the room the child sleeps • One hour of educat ional TV/computer time between ages 2 and 5 • After the age of 5, 2 hours or less

*Keep TV/Computer out of the bedroom. No screen time under the age of 2.

08/08 R07/11


Step Away from the Screen! Ways to Shake Up Your Routine It’s hard to cut back on screen time when you’re used to turning to the TV or computer for entertainment; we know! Here are some great ways to figure out other things and other ways you can spend your free time. Good luck! Mom! Dad! I’m bored… What parents can do when they hear this - instead of turning on the TV or computer: Role model, role model, role model. Don’t use the TV or computer excessively. Let your kids see you turn off the TV and turn to them for a fun activity! Do not put a TV or computer in your child’s bedroom. It’s too tempting! Start a list of things that you and your family can do together that doesn’t involve a screen — tack it to a bulletin board or stick it on your fridge where you can see it easily (and add to as ideas come). Make certain days or times screen-free e.g. no TV or video games on school nights, or “No TV Tuesday”. Discuss and enforce your rules around screen time. Set limits and stick to them! Talk about it in a positive way. Instead of “turn off the TV,” say “instead of watching TV right now, let’s go on a nature hike.” Offer fun options instead of just saying no. When the TV is on, sit down and watch with your kids. Talk to them about the shows they like. Schedule shows to watch that the whole family will enjoy! Remember: boredom most often leads to creativity. Stick with it and see what great things come from limiting screen time to two hours or less!

reen Time: Sc to es iv at n er lt A Some Indoor e kids DJ vorite music; let th bstacle course Set up an indoor o  n oft as long as you ca al n o lo al b a p ee K  project Create a family art  y it new game and pla a ne yo er ev h ac Te 

Dance to your fa 

reen Time: c S to s e v ti a n Alter Some Outdoor nt scavenger hu ighborhood e n a e iz n a rg O  mily lk with your fa a w a e k a T   playground st re a e n e th e to Ride your bik  mily nds and/or fa ie fr h it w h tc Play ca  do jacks you can g in p m ju y n a See how m 

Step Away from the Screen! Shake Up Your Routine! Adapted from the LIVE OUTSIDE THE BOX Toolkit from the King County Overweight Prevention Initiative

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Promote Healthy Viewing Habits Here are some tips you can use to help your child develop positive TV and computer habits.  Keep televisions, DVD players, video games, and computers out of your child’s bedroom.  Set family guidelines for age-appropriate shows.  Set limits on the amount of time your child spends in front of a screen. Less than two hours a day is recommended.  Help your child plan television-viewing and computer-playing in advance.  Make a list of fun activities to do instead of being in front of a screen.  Keep books, magazines, and board games easily available.

to school) ed lat re ot (n e us r te pu m co d an Limit TV to 2 hours or less a day. Try some of these screen-time alternatives:

• Play outside. sical instrument. • Learn to play the guitar or other mu • Go to a local school sporting event. • Write a letter. Start seedlings indoors. • Plant a flower or vegetable garden. • Play hopscotch. • Read a book.

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Unplugged! Life is a lot more fun when you join in! Try some of these "unplugged" activities instead of watching TV. Life is a lot more fun when you join in! Try these activities instead of watching TV.  Take a walk.

 Play a board game.

 Ride a bike.

 Read a book.

 Go on a nature hike.

 Play outside.

 Put together a jigsaw puzzle.

 Turn on the music and dance.

 Go camping (even if it’s just in the backyard).

 Start a journal.

 Go to a school sporting event.

Useful We b

Pages: www.turno ffyourtv.com www.screen tim www.cmch.t e.org v

INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT TV

h s spend in meaningful conversation wit ent par t tha ek we per s ute min of er • Numb their children: 38.5 1,680 the average child watches television: • Number of minutes per week that 20,000 ls seen in a year by an average child: • Number of 30-second commercia o have TVs in their bedrooms: 50% • Percentage of children ages 6-17 wh t use TV during a typical day: 70% • Percentage of childcare centers tha an youth spends in school: 900 hours eric Am e rag ave the r yea per urs Ho • rs an youth watches television: 1500 hou • Hours per year the average Americ : 66% rly watch television while eating dinner • Percentage of Americans that regula

– www.turnoffyourtv.com

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Active Video Games: Good for You? The new generation of video games has kids (and the elderly!) jumping at the chance to be a Guitar Hero— but are they really good for you? The latest wave of video games, including the ubiquitous Wii from Nintendo, has certainly struck a cord with players: High-tech, interactive games are attracting devotees of all ages, from grade schoolers to grown-up gamers to octogenarians. What sets these games apart are their motion-detecting controls, which require users to get off the couch and virtually box, bowl or play a fierce guitar solo in a simulated rock band. Guitar Hero, for example, lets users jump around “playing” the guitar to on-screen musical notes that correspond to fret buttons on the controller. It recently set a world record with sales reaching more than $1 billion. Elderly players have shared in the craze, having discovered a way to return to playing sports through simulated games like fishing and baseball, which allow them to mimic the motions of casting a line or pitching an inning (one Maryland retirement home even hosted a “Wii Home Run Derby” that got residents swinging at fastballs). And while these games have been lauded for enticing users to be more active, many parents are wondering if they really should be encouraging their children to plug in and play.

video games are w e n f o s k c a b w ra ragand d While the benefits ham is careful to point out that encou uce being studied, Bick lly those who are overweight, to redas ing children, especialaying video games may no longer be their overall time phas in the past. advantageous as it Researchers at Children’s Hospital Boston are asking the same question. “We’re working to find out what all the links are between media use and health,” says David Bickham, PhD, a researcher in Children’s Center on Media and Child Health (CMCH). Bickham and his colleagues have examined previous studies that have shown that some video games are, indeed, capable of getting kids up off the sofa for extended periods of time. For example, Dance Dance Revolution (DDR), a game where players step on a special mat in response to on-screen prompts, has been successfully used in schools, homes and after-school programs to encourage (continued on other side)


kids to exercise. “Playing DDR for 45 minutes has been found to raise heart rates to a high enough level to burn calories and speed up metabolism,” says Bickham. “For new games to be equally successful, they must require consistent and relatively strenuous movements—not just simple arm swings and wrist movements.” They’ve also got to have substance and style. “If the active games rely on the novelty of the movement instead of on good game design, then young people will quickly revert to the more fun, sedentary games.” This new generation of active games is also causing doctors to look at research done on TV watching to determine if kids who play a lot of video games are actually heavier and less healthy. “It turns ts of active fi e n e b l ia t The poten out that decreasing television viewing for young people nstrate one o m e d s e slows their weight gain, but it does not increase their video gam s shouldn’t t n e r a p physical activity,” Bickham says. This indicates that watching y h reason w to a television does not influence obesity simply by replacing o games in e id v ll a p u gro r. more active pursuits. hy behavio

unhealt category of

So what’s happening? Two theories have been put forth: effects of food advertising on nutritional choices and eating while watching television. So far, the new, active games don’t have food ads, and given their physical requirements, don’t allow for simultaneous eating and playing. So if these games stay free of advertising, then children who use them may be at less of a risk for negative health effects than if they were spending the same amount of time watching television. The potential benefits of active video games demonstrate one reason why parents shouldn't group all video games into a category of unhealthy behavior. However, Bickham points out one major drawback: Some games have players act out extremely violent acts in very realistic ways. “Research has repeatedly demonstrated that violent video game play increases young people's aggressive thoughts and behaviors,” he says. On the Wii, for example, actual stabbing and punching motions replace simple button presses in certain games. “Going through the motions of the violence may have a stronger influence on later behaviors than traditional violent video games,” Bickham says. While the benefits and drawbacks of new video games are being studied, Bickham is careful to point out that encouraging children, especially those who are overweight, to reduce their overall time playing video games may no longer be as advantageous as it has in the past. “With the advent of high quality, active video games comes the potential to include them in the treatment for obesity rather than simply blaming them for contributing to the epidemic,” he says. By Erin Graham Children’s Hospital Boston, Dream Online

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Do More Watch Less Do More-Watch Less! is a toolkit that can be used by schools, afterschool programs, and youth serving organizations to encourage children and teens to incorporate more screen-free activities into their lives while reducing the time they spend watching TV, surfing the internet, and playing video games.

To view and download this document, visit the After School Resources page at www.letsgo.org Do More Watch Less is a program of California Department of Public Health, Community and School Policy and Training Section http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/schoolhealth/Pages/default.aspx

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In This Section Tab 7: Participate in local, state, or national initiatives that promote healthy eating and active living. Healthy Dates to Celebrate National Screen-Free Week WinterKids

TAB 7 Participate in Local, State, or National Initiatives

March is National Nutrition Month速


Healthy Dates to Celebrate MONTH

SPECIAL OBSERVATIONS

September

Fruits and Veggies—More Matters www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org Family Health and Fitness Day USA www.fitnessday.com

October Week 2

Health Literacy Month www.healthliteracy.com International Walk to School Month www.iwalktoschool.org National School Lunch Week www.schoolnutrition.org

November

American Diabetes Month www.diabetes.org

December

National Handwashing Awareness Month www.henrythehand.com

January Week 2 Week 4

February March Week 2

April Week 1 Week 4

May

National Fiber Focus Month Oatmeal Month www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org National Fresh-Squeezed Juice Week www.fns.usda.gov Healthy Weight Week www.samhsa.gov National Sweet Potato Month healthymeals.nal.usda.gov American Heart Month www.heart.org National Nutrition Month www.eatright.org National School Breakfast Week www.schoolnutrition.org National Garden Month www.nationalgardenmonth.org National Public Health Week www.nphw.org National Screen-Free Week www.screenfree.org National Strawberry Month National Physical Fitness and Sports Month healthymeals.nal.usda.gov National Bike Month www.bikeleague.org

1st Wed

All Children Exercise Simultaneously (ACES) www.lensaunders.com/aces

June

National Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Month www.agfoundation.org For more special monthly observations, go to: healthymeals.nal.usda.gov Developed by the Children in Balance initiative at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy of Tufts University

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March is National Nutrition Month® Celebrate National Nutrition Month® at your site! National Nutrition Month® is a nutrition education and information campaign created annually in March by the American Dietetic Association. The campaign focuses attention on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits. Visit www.eatright.org/nnm/ for more information. This is a great month to get your kids involved in healthy shopping and cooking!  Let kids help select, wash, chop,

snap, peel, stir, measure and mash fruits and vegetables you are preparing for meals and snacks  Play games that teach about healthy eating. Check out foodchamps.org for ideas  Pick stories to read that talk about healthy eating  Try a new healthy food each week (like a fruit, vegetable, bean, whole grain, lean meat/ poultry/fish, or low fat dairy product)  Make a picture collage of all the healthy foods your family likes to eat  Take a recipe you like and experiment to see if you can make it healthier Check out www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org for some great recipe ideas!

07/11 00/00


National Screen-Free Week Screen-Free Week (formerly TV Turn-Off Week) — the annual national celebration where children, families, schools, and communities turn off TV, video games, computers, and hand-held devices and turn on life. Instead of relying on screens for entertainment, they play, read, daydream, explore nature, and enjoy spending time with family and friends. This event is presented by the Campaign for a Commercial Free Childhood, and endorsed by many organizations, including American Public Health Association, the National Head Start Association, KaBOOM!, the National Coalition for Promoting Physical Activity and the US Play Coalition. Get ready for national Screen-Free Week, by limiting recreational screen time to two hours or less daily and by turning on the fun!

free.org n e e r c s . w Visit ww formation and in for more resources. great , 2013 4 y a M April 28 Life is a lot more fun when you join in! Think about creative ways to appeal to your “community” and make it easier for kids to resist turning on that screen! Here are some ideas to start with:  Organize a group walk.  Hold a bike parade.  Plan a nature hike or scavenger hunt.  Invite families to participate in a field day.  Host a game night — have everyone bring their favorite game or puzzle to share.  Hold regular story times.  Organize a family dance.  Visit www.screenfree.org for more great ideas!

07/11 R02/12


Guide to Outdoor Active Learning Preschool Edition

 

 

 

 

 

 

Make learning fun and active with the  WinterKids Preschool GOAL! Our teacher‐friendly  resource book makes it easy to integrate outdoor activity  into your winter lessons.  From exploring words and  writing through the sights and sounds of winter to  making sense of measurement with mittens and boots,  the Preschool GOAL offers creative lessons that will  engage your students and move their bodies! 

 

Features: Lesson plans for a variety of subjects, including  Health, Language Arts, Science, and Math  Aligned to Maine Early Childhood Guidelines  Special Needs component for each lesson  Winter‐themed book list  Quick outdoor games and activities   

To order your copy, please visit www.winterkids.org or call us at 207-871-5700  


In This Section Tab 8: Engage community partners to help support and promote healthy eating and active living at your site. Engage Community Partners Please Give Nutritiously

TAB 8 Engage Community Partners


Engage Community Partners Engaging community partners in your after school program can add enthusiasm, expertise, and excitement to your efforts. There are many community partners that are often willing and excited to go into after school programs for short presentations. The trick is finding them! Do you want to get the greater community into your classroom? Consider contacting:

      

Local colleges Hospitals Recreation departments Culinary associations Dentists’ offices Doctors’ offices Health centers

 Local businesses (bike shops, health food stores, sports clubs)

    

Seniors’ organizations or groups Local food bank County extension office Local library Grocery stores

And feel free to contact us at Let’s Go!. We have many contacts and may know of individuals who would be interested in getting involved with your program.

ool o your sch h w n o ti a istr ctors your admin lved with 5210 Goes k s A . r o t c School Do school do to be invo a g n s li a il ellness at h w w o r ls e r a fo a t g y ic e in tr h t t a is ld e if y dvoc Each schoo a call to se ives, and b olved by a t v m ia e in it h e t in e m h o lt iv c a g e nd l he uld b doctor is a wide schoo r 5210 lessons. 5210 doctors co te l a t o s o h in c g S in l. o articipat semblies o p s a y After Scho b n , s io s the 5210 g s it n r u t ti c u e is n e d s m o a t d h r e , suc n us school boa doctors ca ol activities t o a h c th s ts in ip g r red sc rg participatin l has prepa o o h @letsgo.o c S fo r in e t ft a A s s u e Go . . Email formation ith students in w e e r g o a s m s e r m fo

05/10 R07/11


In This Section Tab 9: Partner with and educate families in adopting and maintaining a lifestyle that supports healthy eating and active living. Partner with and educate families in adopting and maintaining a lifestyle that supports healthy eating and active living 5210 Every Day! Letter to Parents Announcing a New Partnership (Template) or More Fruits & Vegetables Eat at least five fruits and vegetables a day Healthy Kids��€™ Snacks Healthy Celebrations Letter to Parents: Template Go Foods, Slow Foods, Whoa Foods Healthy Shopping On A Budget Understanding Food Labels Maine Seasonal Food Guide Breakfast is Best! A Meal Is a Family Affair What’s a Healthy Portion The Fittest Food Non-Food Rewards at Home Fuel Learning with Milk, Cheese and Yogurt Choose MyPlate: 10 tips to a great plate Please Give Nutritiously Continued on next page...

TAB 9 Partner with and Educate Families

To have fruits and vegetables year-round, add frozen or canned.


In This Section Hours or Less Recreational Screen Time *Keep TV/Computer out of the bedroom. No screen time under the age of 2.

Limit recreational screen time to two hours or less Promote Healthy Viewing Habits Unplugged! National Screen-Free Week Hour or More of Physical Activity Get one hour or more of physical activity every day Take It Outside! WinterKids Sugary Drinks, More Water & Low Fat Milk Drink water and low fat milk; limit or eliminate sugary beverages Water is Fuel for Your Body Enlightening Facts About Juice Sports and energy drinks‌


Partner with and educate families in adopting and maintaining a lifestyle that supports healthy eating and active living.

Di d you know?

a healthy lifestyle te o m o pr to s ay w fective althier habits as a One of the most ef he pt o ad to is n childre my of Pediatrics, de and behaviors for ca A an ic er m A to the children's health, ng family. According ci en flu in in le itical ro le”. “families have a cr of the family lifesty ic st ri te ac ar ch al and health is a re

Here are a few ways you can partner with and educate families: Ask parents to become a part of your

team (parents can attend conference without the need of a substitute). Send letters home to parents letting

them know about your 5210 Goes After School program, what the messages and strategies are, and how they can support your work at school. Ask parents to send only healthy snacks

and meals in with their child and share ideas with them that can make it more affordable. Utilize the skills of parents (e.g.

Parents can benefit from this relationship too!

Children who eat healthy an d have an active lifestyle are more lik ely to:

maintain a hea lthy weight have better se lf sleep better

esteem

do better acad emically avoid health is su

es such as heart disease, type 2 diab etes, bone and joint problems, etc

nutritionist, carpenter, artist, etc). Pull them into 5210 projects! Encourage fundraisers that support 5210

messages and strategies.

07/11 R02/12


Every Day! Follow the 5210 message to a healthier you.

 Try new fruits and vegetables multiple times.

 Keep TV and computer out of the bedroom.

 A meal is a family affair—have the family

 No screen time under the age of two.

help plan meals.

 Frozen and canned are just as nutritious as

fresh.

 Let physical activity be free, easy and fun!  Take a family walk.  Turn on the music and dance.  Use the stairs.

 Turn TV off during meal time.  Plan your TV viewing ahead of time.

 Drink water when you are thirsty. It’s the #1

thirst quencher!  Keep a water bottle on hand.  Put limits on 100% juice.

For more ideas visit www.letsgo.org 05/10 R07/11


Letter to Parents Announcing a New Partnership Date: Dear Parents: We are pleased to announce that has teamed up with 5210 Goes After School, a program that is part of a larger project called Let’s Go!. Let's Go! is a nationally recognized childhood obesity prevention program designed to increase healthy eating and active living in children from birth to 18. Let's Go! works in 6 sectors (schools, early childhood, after school, healthcare, workplace and community) to reach children and families where they live, study, work, and play. Let's Go! is centered on the common message of "5210".

Eating right and being physically active can be a challenge in today’s busy world. 5210 Goes After School is here to help! As a part of 5210 Goes After School, our program will be working hard to incorporate the 5210 messages into our daily activities. As part of our work, you may also receive parent-geared information, which will highlight the messages the your child is learning in this program. Visit www.letsgo.org for more information about 5210 Goes After School. Please contact at

-

or email the after school program staff at

info@letsgo.org. Sincerely,

Please Note: A modifiable version of this letter can be found in the online toolkit on our website.

03/10 R07/11


Eat at least five fruits and vegetables a day.

t h g u o h t r o f d o Fo What is a serving? Adults ll size of a tennis ba A whole fruit the  s d fruit or veggie 1/2 cup of choppe  y greens 1 cup of raw, leaf  uits 1/4 cup of dried fr  Kids their hand Size of the palm of  seasons Choose with the on ies that are in seas ays available Buy fruits and vegg  d veggies are alw an ts ui fr en oz fr lt or fat. Don’t forget that  t any added sugars, sa ou ith w e os th se oo ce; ch and are a healthy choi

Redy’s Rules Try it! 

Try the three bite rule. Offer new fruits and veggies different ways and try at least three bites each time—it can take 7 to 10 tries before you like a new food.



Many fruits and veggies taste great with a dip or dressing. Try a low fat salad dressing with yogurt or get protein with peanut butter.



Make a fruit smoothie with low fat yogurt.

Mix it! 

Add them to foods you already make, like pasta, soups, casseroles, pizza, rice, etc.



Add fruit to your cereal, pancakes, or other breakfast foods.



Be a good role model for your family and have at least one veggie at every meal.

Slice it! 

Wash and chop veggies and fruits so they are ready to grab and eat.



Most people prefer crunchy foods over mushy ones. Enjoy them fresh or lightly steamed.

Did you know?  A diet rich in frui ts an vegetables provides d vitamins and miner als, important for supp orting growth and develo pment, and for optim al immune function.  Family mealtime:

• Do not underestim  Do not underes ate the ate the importanctim impo rtance of e of ily fam mealtilyimm e: ea takl-e time; takefam -1 10-15 5 m inu minutes to10 te s to sit do wn sit down gether. together.  Get your familytoinv • Get your famolv th meal ily edinvwiolv ed with planning d pr ep ar ati on . meal an planning.

Role Model.

a odel. le M Be a RoBe ck on fruits and veggies.

 Sna gies.  Snack on fruits and veg als.. plane me meals lp par fam nily&hepre the pla ve p Ha hel   Have the family

08/08 R04/11


Healthy Kids’ Snacks Snacks are a bigger part of kids’ diets than in the past. Snacks can make positive or negative contributions to kids’ diets — depending on the choices we offer. Next time your children say, “I’m hungry,” or if you need to get them through to the next meal, reach for one of these healthy snacks.

Vegetables Most of the snacks served to children should be fruits and vegetables, since most kids do not eat the recommended five to thirteen servings of fruits and vegetables each day. Popular vegetables that can be served raw with dip or salad dressing include: • Broccoli • Baby carrots • Celery sticks • Cucumber • Peppers • Snap peas • Snow peas • String beans • Grape or cherry tomatoes • Yellow summer squash • Zucchini slices

Low Fat Dairy Foods Dairy foods are a great source of calcium, which can help to build strong bones. However, dairy products also are the biggest sources of artery-clogging saturated fat in kids’ diets. To protect children’s bones and hearts, make sure all dairy foods are low fat or nonfat. • Yogurt • Lower fat cheese • Low fat pudding and frozen yogurt – Serve only as occasional treats because they are high in added sugars.

dressings such For dips: Try salad nd Island, ousa as nonfat ranch or Th an dips, , be store-bought light dips ch comes (whi guacamole, hummus salsa, or ), rs vo in dozens of fla peanut butter.

Fruit Fruit is naturally sweet, so most kids love it. Fruit can be served whole, sliced, cut in half, cubed, or in wedges. Canned, frozen, and dried fruits often need little preparation. • Apples • Apricots • Bananas • Blackberries • Blueberries • Cantaloupe • Cherries • Grapefruit • Grapes (red, green, or purple) • Honeydew melon • Kiwifruit • Mandarin oranges • Mangoes • Nectarines • Oranges • Peaches • Pears (continued on other side)


01/09 R03/10


Healthy Celebrations Letter to Parents Date: Program: Dear Parents and Families, Our program is participating in an exciting initiative called 5210 Goes After School, a program that is part of a larger project called Let’s Go!. Let’s Go! is a nationally recognized childhood obesity prevention program. Let’s Go!, a program of The Kids CO-OP at The Barbara Bush Children's Hospital at Maine Medical Center, is implemented in partnership with MaineHealth. To learn more about Let’s Go! visit www.letsgo.org. The program emphasizes the importance of:

As a part of our efforts towards health and wellness, our program is addressing the kinds of celebrations we have. Celebrations and events are exciting and important for children and staff. Birthday parties and holiday celebrations provide a unique opportunity to help make healthy eating fun and for children to practice wise food choices. As a program, we are encouraging healthy celebration treats, like: Fruit and Cheese Kabobs – Put grapes, melons, cheese cubes, and berries onto a wooden kabob stick. Make Your Own Trail Mix – Provide bags of granola, dried fruit, and nuts for students to make their own trail mix. Fruit Smoothies – Show up at snack time with a blender, frozen fruit, and yogurt! (Be sure to make arrangements with the program first!) Yogurt Parfaits – Layer granola, fruit, and yogurt in plastic cups. Send in on a tray covered with plastic wrap. Vegetable or Fruit Platters with Low Fat Dip As a program, we are also focusing on nonfood ways to celebrate our children. On your child’s birthday, we will celebrate them in nonfood ways, like having them wear a special hat, sash, or letting them lead age appropriate activities. Please help us promote a healthy environment and healthy kids! Sincerely, Please Note: A modifiable version of this letter can be found in the online toolkit on our website.

01/09 R07/11


Go Foods, Slow Foods, Whoa Foods Lots of kids want to know which foods to eat to be healthy. Here’s something kids can do to eat healthier: Learn the difference between Go, Slow, and Whoa foods.

● Go Foods ● Slow Foods ● Whoa Foods

You probably know that foods fit into different categories. The USDA puts them into these categories (visit www.ChooseMyPlate.gov for the newest data): Grains ■ Milk and dairy products ■

Vegetables ■ Meat, beans, fish, and nuts ■

Fruits ■ Oils ■

But now, foods can be classified in three new groups: Go, Slow, and Whoa. In 2005, the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (part of the National Institutes of Health) suggested kids start thinking about whether foods are Go foods, Slow foods, or Whoa foods.

Go Foods

Slow Foods

Whoa Foods

These are foods that are good to eat almost anytime. They are the healthiest ones. Example: skim & low fat milk; some fruits & veggies. See the back of this sheet for more examples.

These are sometimes foods. They aren’t offlimits, but they shouldn’t be eaten every day. At most, eat them a few times a week. Example: waffles & pancakes.

These foods should make you say exactly that— Whoa! Should I eat that? Whoa foods are the least healthy and the most likely to cause weight problems, especially if a person eats them all the time. That's why Whoa foods are once-in-a-while foods. Example: french fries.

For a chart of Go, Slow, and Whoa foods, visit http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/stay_healthy/food/go_slow_whoa.html


● Go Foods ● Slow Foods ● Whoa Foods Go Foods

Slow Foods

Whoa Foods

Baby carrots

100% fruit juice

French fries

Celery sticks

Snap peas

Fruits canned in light syrup

Fruits canned in heavy syrup

Grape tomatoes

White bread

Doughnuts

Apples

Muffins

Cherries

French toast, waffles, and pancakes

Whole milk

Fried hamburgers

Tuna canned in oil

Melon

Oranges

Chicken nuggets

Peaches

Cookies

Pears

Ice cream

Whole grain breads

Low fat and skim milk

Chicken and turkey without skin

Lower fat cheese and yogurt

Water

08/08 R07/11


Healthy Shopping On A Budget Healthy shopping on a budget takes planning! Planning helps you SAVE TIME, MONEY, and EAT HEALTHIER. Tips: 

Make a list and stick to it – this helps you avoid impulse buys that are usually unhealthy and expensive.



Shop mostly the perimeter of the store – spend most of your grocery budget on natural foods found around the outside of the store like fruits, vegetables, dairy and protein foods that are good for your body. Limit your shopping in the middle isles to staples like pasta, canned tuna, and peanut butter, avoiding other expensive manufactured, and often unhealthy, packaged foods.



Shop when you are NOT hungry or stressed – people who shop when hungry or stressed tend to not only buy MORE food but also unhealthier food.



Compare unit prices – bigger is not always better! Use the unit price to compare similar products and make sure you’re getting the best deal. The unit price is the cost per a standard unit (like ounce or pound) and is usually found on a sticker on the shelf beneath the product.



Weigh the cost of convenience – if food tends to rot in your fridge before you prepare it, then you could actually save money by purchasing fresh fruits and veggies that have been washed and chopped for you.



Try frozen and canned – canned and frozen produce keeps for a long time and may be cheaper per serving than fresh. For frozen, make sure you look for items with no added sauces or sugar. For canned, choose fruit canned in 100% juice and vegetables that are labeled either “low sodium” or “no added salt”.



Use store flyers to plan your menu – save money by planning your menu around what fruits, vegetables and other items are on sale each week and save time by already knowing what you are going to make for dinner each night.



Try store brands – store brands on average are cheaper by about 26% to 28% and their quality usually at least meets, and often surpasses, that of name brand products.



Shop in season – buying fruits and vegetables in season generally means your food not only tastes better, but is more nutritious and more affordable.



Buy in bulk when foods are on sale – frozen and canned produce, and some fresh items like apples and carrots will last a long time. If you have the storage space, stock up on the foods you eat regularly when they are on sale to save some money.

07/11 00/00


Understanding Food Labels What can I use the Nutrition Facts label for? Getting a general idea about what’s in a food (i.e. how nutritious a food is). Figuring out what counts as one serving and how many calories are in each serving. Comparing two similar products to choose the healthiest option.

S H Start by checking what counts as one TART

ERE

serving size and how many servings there are per package.

C C :  How many calories would you eat if you HECK

ALORIES

ate a whole package?

Multiply the number of “servings per container” by the “calories”.

L N  Aim to eat only small amounts of IMIT THESE

UTRIENTS

saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium. Keep transfat to 0.

G E N  Aim to get enough fiber, vitamins and minerals. ET

NOUGH OF THESE

QUICK GUIDE TO % DAILY VALUE 5% or less is Low 20% or more is High. Use the % Daily Value to compare similar foods and choose the healthiest option.



UTRIENTS

Watch out for these common misconceptions: Assuming sugar-free or fat-free means calorie-free; it’s not true! Buying something because it says “organic”, “natural”, “multigrain” or has some other “healthy” claim. These statements do not mean a product is good for you! Assuming that because a package looks like it should only be one serving it actually is. Many beverage bottles and packages of chips, cookies and candy are actually 2 or 3 servings! Resources: www.fda.gov/food/labelingnutrition/consumerinformation/default.htm

07/11 00/00


Maine Seasonal Food Guide What are the advantages of knowing which foods are in season? Buying fruits and vegetables that are in season means getting them at their freshest and saving money. Buying from local farms also means supporting our local farmers and their ability to produce nutritious, fresh food. The chart below lists what produce is available locally depending on the time of year. January to April Apples, Dry Beans, Beets, Cabbage, Carrots, Celeriac, Leeks, Onions, Parsnip, Potatoes, Rutabaga, Sweet Potatoes, Turnip, Winter Squash, Garlic May to June Rhubarb, Asparagus, Radishes, Salad Turnips, Scallions, Peas, Fiddleheads, Chives and Parsley, Greens July to August Berries (strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, blackberries), Plums, Peaches, Earliest Apples, Melons, Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Cucumbers, Eggplant, Fennel, Green Beans, Greens, Leeks, Onions, Scallions, Shallots, Peas, Peppers, Potatoes, Radishes, Salad Turnips, Summer Squash, Zucchini, Tomatoes, Garlic – scapes and bulbs September to October Apples, Pears, Cranberries, Melons, Raspberries, Broccoli, Broccoli Raab, Brussel Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Kohlrabi, Celeriac, Celery, Sweet Corn, Cucumbers, Fennel, Greens, Leeks, Onions, Scallions, Shallots, Beets, Carrots, Parsnips, Potatoes, Rutabaga, Sweet Potato, Turnips, Radishes, Salad Turnips, Green Beans, Shell Beans, Soy Beans (edamame), Summer Squash, Zucchini, Eggplant, Peppers, Tomatillos, Tomatoes, Winter Squash, Pie Pumpkins, Garlic November to December By this time of year, most local produce is coming from cold storage although you may be able to find some fresh greenhouse-grown products at your winter farmer’s market.

Apples, Pears, Dry Beans, Beets, Brussel Sprouts, Cabbage, Carrots, Celeriac, Late season greens (like kale and spinach), Kohlrabi, Leeks, Onions, Parsnips, Potatoes, Radishes, Rutabaga, Sweet Potatoes, Turnips, Winter Squash, Garlic Maine-produced foods that are in season all year long: FRUIT: Blueberries & Apples VEGETABLES: Potatoes, Carrots, Beets and Beet Greens, Garlic, Salad & Braising Greens, Tomatoes, Winter Squash, Cabbage, Onions DAIRY: Milk & Cheese PROTEIN: Eggs, Ground Meat, Seafood, Dry Beans GRAINS: Wheat Where to find local foods through the winter: Winter Farmers Market, Winter CSA (Community Support Agriculture), Natural Food Store, Local Food Coop (visit www.mofga.org and click on “Directories” for more information) Resource: www.mofga.org

07/11 R06/12


Breakfast Is Best! Boost your energy and brain power! Why eat breakfast every day? It will give you the energy you need to start your day. It is “fuel” for the body! It can help you do better in school! It can help you feel and act your best! It can help with weight control and keep you healthy! Not hungry in the morning? Try a variety of Start small… try: healthy foods! a cup of low fat fruited yogurt Find the ones a piece of fruit such as a banana, orange or apple YOU like! a bowl of wholegrain cereal with low fat milk a slice of wholewheat toast with peanut butter and a glass of low fat milk

t keep it u b , le p im s it p Kee ay like: delicious! You m

innamon, apple oatmeal with c f low fat milk o ss la g a , e c u sa ke with light a c n a p r o le ff a aw berries syrup and blue ith a slice of w in ff u m sh li g n an E w fat cheese ham, egg and lo n muffin, glass ra b in is ra t fa a low and a banana k il m t fa w lo f o

half of a toasted English muffin with a slice of low fat cheese trail mix of raisins, nuts and cereal


A Meal is a Family Affair In such a busy world, mealtimes often revolve around our lifestyles. As a result of this, we miss meals or eat foods that are not the best for our bodies. Did you know that experts have found that kids who eat regularly with their families are more likely to eat fruits, vegetables, and whole grains? So, no matter how busy life may seem, it’s important to make family meals a priority.

as: e id e s e h t f o e try som , d e t r a t s t e g o T ast one meal

le ne can enjoy at o ry e v e n e h w Choose a time ch, or dinner. n lu , st fa k a re b ay be d and what the e rv together—it m se re a ls a e em ecide what tim d ld how much. u o d n sh a u t a o y e t, to n t a re a h p w As the an then decide c n re d il h c r u o choices are. Y off the TV. rn tu d n a l a e m e in preparing th n re d il h c r u o y Include le for a meal. b ta e th d n u ro Gather a ation positive. rs e v n o c e th g in leasant by keep p l a e m e th e k Ma e behaviors. im lt a e m d n a ers arn good mann le d il h c r u o y Help etween meals. b s k c a sn y h lt a d drinking unhe Limit eating an to develop. n re d il h c r u o y t habits you wan e th l e d o m le o R

—KidsHealth 2007


To have fruits and vegetables year-round, add frozen or canned. For health: Just as good for you as fresh fruit and vegetables—nutrients are preserved in the canning and freezing process ■ Choose fruit packed in their natural juice, not in syrup ■ Choose canned vegetables that are salt free and season to taste ■

For savings: ■

Cost less than fresh fruit and vegetables

For convenience: Always in season ■ Lots of choices ■ Easily stored ■ Already washed and cut—ready for your favorite recipe ■

Eat at least five fruits and vegetables a day!

Use Frozen and Canned by Adding: Vegetables to: ■ Chili ■ Soup or stews ■ Stir fry Tomatoes for sauce Black beans & corn to spice up a Mexican dish Chick peas, kidney or garbanzo beans to any salad

Fruits to: ■ Smoothies ■ Yogurt parfaits ■ Plain yogurt ■ Fruit salad ■ Cereal ■ Stir fry (pineapple)

sa Or use ah! side dis

04/09 R03/10


What’s a Healthy Portion? Food portions are larger than ever these days—usually much more than you need. The recommended serving size is enough. But how much is that? These tips will help keep your portions, as well as your waistline, right-sized.

Here are some tips to help you keep your portions under control: Teach your children portion size by relating food to everyday items. For example, a deck of cards is equal to a serving of meat, fish, or poultry. An apple or serving of fruit is about the size of a tennis ball. Please note: For young children, use the palm of their hand as an indicator of portion size Sta

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Teach your children the concept of the divided plate. Think of a plate divided into four equal sections. Use one of the top sections for protein, and the other one for starch, preferably a whole grain; fill the bottom half with veggies (none of the foods should overlap or be piled high).

Check the label on your food to see if it meets some basic needs in your diet, like calcium or Vitamin C; if it’s not “good” for you, eat less of that food.

Check

the serving size and remember that if you eat more than one serving, you are eating more calories.

Avoid eating directly out of the package. Try putting snacks into a small bowl or snack-size baggie. ■ Eat three meals a day; this way you won’t stuff yourself if you have skipped a meal. ■

Serve food on smaller plates.

Serve meals from the stove. This tip will keep you from feeling tempted to eat more when you are not hungry. ■ Skip the “clean plate” club. Instead, encourage your children to start with smaller portions and eat until they are satisfied. ■ At restaurants, ask for a lunch-size portion or share your meal. ■ Role model the behaviors that you want your children to develop. ■


The Fittest Food Nutritious foods give your family the most vitamins, minerals and other nutrients for the fewest calories. Naturally nutritious foods make your child’s calories count: I

Brightly colored fruits

I

Vibrant-colored vegetables

Lean meat, skinless poultry, fish, eggs, beans, and nuts TIP: Choose cuts of meat that end in "loin" or "round". I Fat-free and low fat milk, cheese, and yogurt I

I

Whole, fortified, and fiber-rich grain foods

Tips to Help Your Kids Eat Healthier: Picky eaters? Remember, experts say that parents and caregivers, not children, should decide what foods to buy and serve. New foods may have to be offered many times before they are accepted. Here are some easy ways to get your child to accept unfamiliar nutritious foods: I

Combine whole grain/high-fiber cereals with your child’s favorite cereal.

I

Make your own pizza with prepared whole wheat dough, a few veggies, and part-skim mozzarella cheese.

I

Children age 2 and older: slowly step down from whole milk to low fat to fat-free milk. I

ds are o fo s u io it r t u n These venient: n o c d n a e iv s n e inexp

Clean and cut up fresh veggies in advance. Kids love dips, so serve them with salsa or hummus!

I

s (rinse well) ¢ Canned bean tables ¢ Frozen vege season ¢ Fresh fruit in s in bulk ¢ Whole grain st le-grain breakfa o h w d n ra b re ¢ Sto cereals © 2008 Nutrition Works, LLC

On-the-go options: dried fruits, nuts, hard boiled eggs, low fat cheese sticks, yogurt cups, and single-serve fruits canned in water or 100% fruit juice.


Non-Food Rewards at Home How can you celebrate a job well done without using food treats? Here are ways to reward your child:  Make a list of fun, non-food rewards that don’t cost much and post it where the whole family can see it.  Have a separate list of special and inexpensive rewards for those really big achievements.  Give certificates or ribbons for healthy behaviors.  Allow your child to have a few friends over after school to play sports.  Invite a few of their friends to a sleepover.  Have a family game night.  Keep a box of special toys or art supplies that can only be used on special occasions.  Go to a sports game.

Words of appre ciatio can go a long w n a Children love to y. hear “ You did a gr eat job” or “I appreciate your help.”

 Camp out in the back yard.  Encourage the use of electronics that support physical activity, like Dance Dance Revolution.  Choose toys and games that promote physical activity like jump ropes, balls, or Skip-Its.

ard: w e R a s a d o o F Using to poor health s te u ib tr n o C I of erconsumption v o s e g ra u o c n I E s unhealthy food habits to poor eating s te u ib tr n o C I nce for sweets re fe re p s se a re I Inc

id giving o v a o t e r Be su nt of o r f n i e m i extra t mputer o c r o V T the rd! as a rewa

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yogu rt

Fuel Learning with Milk, Cheese and Yogurt Help fuel children’s learning with a variety of healthy snacks from all food groups. Let physical activity and smart snacking spell success for your child’s school year. Choose 1% or nonfat milk, reduced fat cheese and lowfat or nonfat yogurt. Try these kid-friendly recipes and snacks at home with your family or at a school party!

Ê

Snacks That Kids Love!

Grab and Go • 8 oz 1% or skim milk • 1–2 oz reduced fat cheddar • 8 oz flavored 1% and cheese and apple wedges skim milk • 1–2 oz reduced fat cheese, 4–6 whole grain crackers • 8 oz lowfat or nonfat and tomato slices fruit yogurt • part skim mozzarella cheese sticks

• reduced fat cottage cheese

Pretzel Wrap (Serves 1) • 1–2 slices Swiss cheese • 1 whole grain pretzel rod (whole wheat, multigrain

or rye) Wrap a slice of cheese around a pretzel! (Swiss cheese is naturally low in sodium.)

single servings

Bean & Cheese Quesadilla (Serves 1) • 1 part skim mozzarella cheese stick or 1/4 cup reduced fat cheese, shredded • 1/4 cup black beans or refried beans • 6-inch whole grain tortilla

Directions: 1. Spread beans down the center of the tortilla. 2. Top with reduced fat shredded cheese. 3. Roll it up and microwave until cheese melts. Other topping ideas: salsa, avocado, lettuce, tomatoes and lowfat plain yogurt or reduced fat sour cream

Fruit Smoothie (Serves 8) • 8 ounce bag of frozen strawberries • 1 banana • 1/2 cup 100% apple juice • 2 cups lowfat or nonfat plain yogurt Pour ingredients into a blender pitcher and blend until smooth. Change it up by using different fruits. If not using a frozen fruit add ice cubes to the mix to keep it thick and frosty.

Maine Department of Education • Maine Grocers Association University of Maine Cooperative Extension Maine Department of Agriculture • Tozier’s Family Market Maine Nutrition Network • Maine Dairy and Nutrition Council


10 tips

choose MyPlate 10 tips to a great plate

Nutrition

Education Series

Making food choices for a healthy lifestyle can be as simple as using these 10 Tips. Use the ideas in this list to balance your calories, to choose foods to eat more often, and to cut back on foods to eat less often.

1

balance calories

Find out how many calories YOU need for a day as a first step in managing your weight. Go to www.ChooseMyPlate.gov to find your calorie level. Being physically active also helps you balance calories.

2

enjoy your food, but eat less

Take the time to fully enjoy your food as you eat it. Eating too fast or when your attention is elsewhere may lead to eating too many calories. Pay attention to hunger and fullness cues before, during, and after meals. Use them to recognize when to eat and when you’ve had enough.

3

avoid oversized portions

Use a smaller plate, bowl, and glass. Portion out foods before you eat. When eating out, choose a smaller size option, share a dish, or take home part of your meal.

4

foods to eat more often

5

They have the same amount of calcium and other essential nutrients as whole milk, but fewer calories and less saturated fat.

7

make half your plate fruits and vegetables

Choose red, orange, and dark-green vegetables like tomatoes, sweet potatoes, and broccoli, along with other vegetables for your meals. Add fruit to meals as part of main or side dishes or as dessert.

Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion

make half your grains whole grains

To eat more whole grains, substitute a whole-grain product for a refined product—such as eating wholewheat bread instead of white bread or brown rice instead of white rice.

8

foods to eat less often

Cut back on foods high in solid fats, added sugars, and salt. They include cakes, cookies, ice cream, candies, sweetened drinks, pizza, and fatty meats like ribs, sausages, bacon, and hot dogs. Use these foods as occasional treats, not everyday foods.

9

Eat more vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and fat-free or 1% milk and dairy products. These foods have the nutrients you need for health—including potassium, calcium, vitamin D, and fiber. Make them the basis for meals and snacks.

6

switch to fat-free or low-fat (1%) milk

compare sodium in foods

Use the Nutrition Facts label to choose lower sodium versions of foods like soup, bread, and frozen meals. Select canned foods labeled “low sodium,” ”reduced sodium,” or “no salt added.”

10

drink water instead of sugary drinks

Cut calories by drinking water or unsweetened beverages. Soda, energy drinks, and sports drinks are a major source of added sugar, and calories, in American diets.

DG TipSheet No. 1 June 2011

Go to www.ChooseMyPlate.gov for more information.

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.


Limit recreational screen time to two hours or less.*

! n u F e h t n o n r Tu

hen you join in! w n fu re o m ts lo TV. Life is stead of watching in s e ti vi ti ac se e Try th g.

 Ride a bike. re hike.  Go on a natu a puzzle.  Put together usic and dance.  Turn on the m or magazine.  Read a book tching up with  Spend time ca your family. to the park  Take your kids or beach. mes.  Play board ga

jo  Walk, run, or l.  Start a journa tball, ke  Play ball (bas

catch, soccer, etc.). rary.  Go to the lib s in your  Explore gym . community  Rollerblade. .  Play charades owshoe. sn  Sled, ski, or

Redy’s Rules Tame the TV and Computer! Set Limits – know how much TV your child is watching. 

Set some basic rules, such as no TV or computer before homework or chores are done.



Do not watch TV during mealtime.



Use a timer. When the bell rings it’s time to turn off the TV.

 Eliminate TV time during the week.

Tips from Redy in advance. Help your child plan television viewing

es in the family room. Keep books, magazines, and board gam ad of being in front of  Make a list of fun activities to do inste a screen. ate shows.  Set family guidelines for age-appropri



Did you know?  Screentime inclu des TV computer, Playstatio , n, Gameboy. All are im and portant to limit.  Watching TV is as socia more snacking and ted with increased obesity.  Too much TV ha s been to lower reading scor linked es and attention problems.  Healthy screen tim e: • No TV/computer un der the age of 2 • No TV/computer in the room the child sleeps • One hour of educat ional TV/computer time between ages 2 and 5 • After the age of 5, 2 hours or less

*Keep TV/Computer out of the bedroom. No screen time under the age of 2.

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Promote Healthy Viewing Habits Here are some tips you can use to help your child develop positive TV and computer habits.  Keep televisions, DVD players, video games, and computers out of your child’s bedroom.  Set family guidelines for age-appropriate shows.  Set limits on the amount of time your child spends in front of a screen. Less than two hours a day is recommended.  Help your child plan television-viewing and computer-playing in advance.  Make a list of fun activities to do instead of being in front of a screen.  Keep books, magazines, and board games easily available.

to school) ed lat re ot (n e us r te pu m co d an Limit TV to 2 hours or less a day. Try some of these screen-time alternatives:

• Play outside. sical instrument. • Learn to play the guitar or other mu • Go to a local school sporting event. • Write a letter. Start seedlings indoors. • Plant a flower or vegetable garden. • Play hopscotch. • Read a book.

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Unplugged! Life is a lot more fun when you join in! Try some of these "unplugged" activities instead of watching TV. Life is a lot more fun when you join in! Try these activities instead of watching TV.  Take a walk.

 Play a board game.

 Ride a bike.

 Read a book.

 Go on a nature hike.

 Play outside.

 Put together a jigsaw puzzle.

 Turn on the music and dance.

 Go camping (even if it’s just in the backyard).

 Start a journal.

 Go to a school sporting event.

Useful We b

Pages: www.turno ffyourtv.com www.screen tim www.cmch.t e.org v

INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT TV

h s spend in meaningful conversation wit ent par t tha ek we per s ute min of er • Numb their children: 38.5 1,680 the average child watches television: • Number of minutes per week that 20,000 ls seen in a year by an average child: • Number of 30-second commercia o have TVs in their bedrooms: 50% • Percentage of children ages 6-17 wh t use TV during a typical day: 70% • Percentage of childcare centers tha an youth spends in school: 900 hours eric Am e rag ave the r yea per urs Ho • rs an youth watches television: 1500 hou • Hours per year the average Americ : 66% rly watch television while eating dinner • Percentage of Americans that regula

– www.turnoffyourtv.com

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National Screen-Free Week Screen-Free Week (formerly TV Turn-Off Week) — the annual national celebration where children, families, schools, and communities turn off TV, video games, computers, and hand-held devices and turn on life. Instead of relying on screens for entertainment, they play, read, daydream, explore nature, and enjoy spending time with family and friends. This event is presented by the Campaign for a Commercial Free Childhood, and endorsed by many organizations, including American Public Health Association, the National Head Start Association, KaBOOM!, the National Coalition for Promoting Physical Activity and the US Play Coalition. Get ready for national Screen-Free Week, by limiting recreational screen time to two hours or less daily and by turning on the fun!

free.org n e e r c s . w Visit ww formation and in for more resources. great , 2013 4 y a M April 28 Life is a lot more fun when you join in! Think about creative ways to appeal to your “community” and make it easier for kids to resist turning on that screen! Here are some ideas to start with:  Organize a group walk.  Hold a bike parade.  Plan a nature hike or scavenger hunt.  Invite families to participate in a field day.  Host a game night — have everyone bring their favorite game or puzzle to share.  Hold regular story times.  Organize a family dance.  Visit www.screenfree.org for more great ideas!

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Get one hour or more of physical activity every day.

Redy’s Rules Day! Move An Hour Every ily

ast an hour of da r kids and adults! physical activity…fo

I Encourage at le

be Free and Fun! y it iv ct A al ic ys h P t Le I Take a walk with I Play with your

your family

pet

I Play tag

e (remember to wear your helmet) and dance I Turn on music

I Take a bike rid

Tips from Redy Make Physical Activity Easie r.

I Make gradual change

s to increase your level of physical activity.

I Jump rope I Play Frisbee I Take the stairs the end I Park the car at of the parking lot gels I Make snow an

I Incorporate physical

activity into your daily

routines.

I Try tracking the level

of your physical activity using a pedometer .

I Turn off the TV and

computer and keep them out of the bedroom .

I Limit recreational co

mputer time.

Did you know?

One hour of moderate physical activity means:

I Choose toys and gam

• Doing activities where you breathe hard like hiking or dancing

I Encourage lifelong ph

20 minutes of vigorous physical activity means:

I Keep physical activit

• Doing activities where you sweat, like running, aerobics, or basketball Physical activity… • Makes you feel good • Helps you keep a healthy weight

es that promote

physical activity.

ysical activity by incorporating physical act ivity into your routine. y fun!!

Be A Role Model. I Use a pedometer.

• Makes your heart happy

I Take a walk after din

ner.

• Makes you stronger • Makes you flexible

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Take It Outside! With so much technology, it can be hard to pull ourselves away from indoor attractions like computers, TVs, and video games. As a result, we miss out on the exciting and beautiful world of nature that is right outside our door. Spending time in nature alone and with our families has positive outcomes for everyone. Did you know that experts have found that kids who have greater contact with nature are happier, healthier, smarter, more creative, more optimistic, more focused, and more self-confident? Families also have stronger bonds and get along better if they participate in activities outside. Getting outside can even help prevent diabetes, behavioral disorders, and depression. So, no matter how tempting staying inside may be, making time for nature is really important! Tips to get kids involved:  Make a list of nature activities that your kids want to do and then use those activities as rewards  Encourage kids to go outside with you while you do yard work  Help kids plant a garden that they can take care of  Check out books on local animals, like birds, and help your kids pick them out  Get other friends and families involved in your nature outings too – the more, the merrier! Here are some fun, family-friendly outdoor activities you can try:  Go apple or berry picking  Follow animal tracks  Go sledding  Sleep in the backyard  Go fishing  Jump in puddles  Go stargazing and pick out your favorite constellations  Plant a vegetable garden  Go for a hike or nature walk  Collect seashells on the beach Resources:  Children and Nature Network | http://www.childrenandnature.org/  Let’s Go! | http://www.letsgo.org/  Maine Bureau of Parks and Lands | http://www.parksandland.com  Healthy Maine Walks | http://www.healthymainewalks.org/

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We Make Winter Fun! WinterKids helps children develop healthy lifelong habits through fun, outdoor winter activity. WinterKids Guide to Outdoor Active Learning Teaches educators how to take the classroom outside and get students moving and learning! Contact WinterKids for a GOAL training at your school!

WinterKids Passport th

th

th

Offers all Maine 5 , 6 , and 7 graders free and discounted tickets, lessons, and rentals to downhill ski, cross country ski, snowboard, ice skate, and more.

WinterKids FunPass th

Offers all Maine children, from preschool through 4 grade, the chance to try cross country skiing and snowshoeing for free at over 20 locations!

WinterKids Welcome To Winter Educates immigrant, refugee, and economically disadvantaged communities about the joys and benefits of outdoor winter activity. Shows kids and their families how much fun winter can be!

For more information, please visit:

www.winterkids.org WinterKids P.O. Box 7566 Portland, ME 04112 (207) 871-5700


Drink water and low fat milk; limit or eliminate sugary beverages.

e c i u j n o s t i m i l t Pu

contain ” or “punch” often k, rin “d ” e, ad “ed el s” and I Juice products lab e only difference between these “juice 5% juice or less. Th ified with Vitamin C. fort soda is that they ’re ice. whole fruits over ju se oo ch to y tr s ay I Alw 0% juice. serve juice, buy 10 to se oo ch u yo If I ould be limited to: I Each day, juice sh ildren 1-6 years old • 4-6 ounces for ch ildren 7-18 years old • 8-12 ounces for ch r 6 months and unde • No juice for children

child’s juice. ding water to your ad by ly w slo s ge I Make chan stead of juice. er or low fat milk in at w of ss gla a t es I Sugg

Redy’s Rules Water Keep It Handy, Keep It Cold: I Keep bottled water or a water bottle on hand. I Add fresh lemon, lime, or orange wedges to

water for some natural flavor. I Fill a pitcher of water and keep it in the fridge. I Drink water when you’re thirsty. It’s the best choice. I Cut back slowly on sugar-sweetened drinks. I Replace soda with water, instead of other sugar-sweetened beverages,

such as juice or sports drinks.

Be a Role Model: I Grab a glass of water instead of soda. I Try mixing seltzer with a small amount of juice.

Milk

ilkshake Make a m t milk, fa using low r u o y d n a ice, rries. e b e it r favo

Encourage low fat milk instead of sugar-sweetened drinks: According to the national dairy council: I Children ages 4–8 years old should be consuming three 8-ounce glasses of milk or other dairy each day. I Children ages 9–18 years old should be consuming four and a half 8ounce glasses of milk or other dairy each day.

Did you know? Soda has no nutriti onal value and is high in sugar. Just nine ounces of soda has 110-15 0 empty calories. Many sodas als o contain caffeine, which kids do n’t need. Energy drinks are N OT sports drinks and should ne ver replace water during exercis e. Water is fuel for yo ur body: I Water is the m ost important nutrient for active people. I Between 70-80% of a child’s body is made up of water. I When you exer cise, you sweat, and when you swea t you LOSE water and minerals – it is important to replac e the water you lose when you sweat. I Water is the # 1 thirst quencher!

08/08 R03/10


Water is Fuel for Your Body Ever wonder why you need water? Like food, water acts like fuel in your body and helps your body function. To keep your body running smoothly, drink plenty of water throughout the day. Children who eat healthy, drink enough water, and sleep well at night will have energy for all their sports and activities. I Water is the most important nutrient for active people. I Between 70-80% of a child’s body is made up of water. I Water is the #1 thirst quencher!

el! fu e r o m d e e n u hen yo w r e t a w h it w y Fuel your bod LOSE water u sweat, you

nd when yo a t, a e you sweat. n sw e h u o w y , se e lo is c u r o e y water ater When you ex to replace the t n a rt d to replace w o e p e n im y is a It m . s ls te a u r n 0 min and mine ® r longer than 6 , especially whe fo e v ti c ® nd Powerade a ry e v a Kids who are like Gatorade s, k n ri d s rt o sp ng and minerals usi id. to replace d se u e b r it’s hot and hum e v e ld n ™ inks and shou r d t ® nd SuperStar , r o sp T a O Bull are N rinks, like Red es d Energy drinks y rg e n e st o M . nd can sometim e a is r c r te a e x w e se g lo in r dy to water du e causes the bo in e ff a C . E IN E ep problems. e sl d n a s, e contain CAFF h c a ach eadaches, stom h , ty ie x n s. The extra a ie se r u lo a a c c d n a r ga amounts of su H IG H in y. ta n o c and tooth deca in a g Energy drinks t h ig e w es may add to sugar and calori

“In a game, when my players get thirsty, water gets the call.” —Arnie Beyeler, Manager, Portland Sea Dogs

08/08 R03/10


Enlightening Facts About Juice ACCORDING TO THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS (AAP):  Fruit juice offers no nutritional benefits for infants younger than 6 months.  Fruit juice offers no nutritional benefits over whole fruit for infants older than 6 months and children.  Fruit “drinks” are not nutritionally equivalent to fruit “juice” (see below).  Fruit juice is NOT appropriate in treating dehydration or diarrhea.  Excessive juice consumption may be associated with malnutrition.  Excessive juice consumption may be associated with diarrhea, flatulence, abdominal distention, and tooth decay.  Calcium-fortified juices do provide calcium, but lack other nutrients present in breast milk, formula, or cow’s milk.

RECOMMENDATIONS :  If you decide to give your child juice, it is recommended that you do not introduce it until your infant is twelve months old.

 Serve juice in open cups, not bottles or “sippy” cups that allow children to consume juice easily throughout the day.  Offer and encourage children to eat whole fruit instead of juice. They will get all the great fiber of the whole fruit and feel more full than with drinking juice.

 Serve only pasteurized juices.  Choose 100% juice instead of fruit “drinks,” which, by definition, could contain between 10% and 99% juice and most likely contain added sweeteners and flavors.

 Younger children aged 1 to 6 years should have only 4-6 ounces of juice a day, if any at all.  Older children should be limited to 8-12 ounces of juice a day, if any at all. Taken from the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Nutrition

Check out how much sugar is in some popular (and marketed towards children) juice & juice drinks: *One Teaspoon equals 4.2 grams of sugar. Beverage

Sugar Grams per Serving

Teaspoons of Sugar*

Sunny D® Baja Orange Drink

43g

10 1/4

Capri Sun® Red Berry Drink

25g

6

Apple & Eve® Bert & Ernie Berry 100% Juice

13g

3

Earth’s Best® Strawberry Pear 100% Juice

11g

2 2/3

Water

0g

0

humb: Rule of T off giving better You are ildren fruit your ch uit juice. of fr instead

01/09 R04/11


Sports and Energy Drinks SPORTS DRINKS

Most peopl e don’t nee d them!

 Flavored beverages that usually contain sugar, minerals and electrolytes (like sodium, potassium and calcium).

 Most people don’t need them! They are recommended only when you have been doing intense physical activity for an hour or longer (such as long distance running or biking, or high intensity sports like soccer, basketball or hockey).

 If you drink them when you have been doing just routine physical activity or just to satisfy your thirst, you actually increase your risk of excess weight gain.

 What are some examples?  Gatorade  Powerade  Accelerade  All Sport Body Quencher  Propel

TER! A W ? s k c hat ro w w o n k You

ENERGY DRINKS  Flavored beverages that typically contain stimulants like caffeine and other compounds along with sugar, added vitamins and minerals, and maybe even protein. (We don’t need these nutrients from drinks; we get them from our food!)

 These drinks are not the same thing as sports drinks and are NEVER recommended for children or adolescents.

 Could cause you to have increased heart rate, increased blood pressure, trouble sleeping, anxiety, difficulty concentrating, upset stomach, and even caffeine toxicity.

 What are some examples?  Monster  Red Bull  Power Trip  Rockstar  Full Throttle  Jolt

Did you know? Neither sports drinks or energy drinks are a good substitute for water – water is always the best thirst quencher! Water is the best choice for hydration, even before, during and after most people’s exercise routines.

Adapted from KidsHealth.org and Sports Drinks & Energy Drinks for Children & Adolescents: Are They Appropriate?. Committee on Nutrition and the Council of Sports Medicine and Fitness. Pediatrics. 2011; 1227; 1182.

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In This Section Tab 10: Implement a staff wellness program that includes healthy eating and active living After School Worksite Wellness (includes the StairWELL Initiative) Move and Improve

TAB 10 Implement a Staff Wellness Program


School Worksite Wellness 5210 Goes After School addresses the policies, environments, and practices that influence health behaviors in the after school setting. An important aspect of the after school setting is the employees. Employees' physical and mental health are essential to the success of an after school program. The promotion of staff members' own health helps them to become positive role models for youth and increases their commitment to promoting student health. Worksite health promotion is often overlooked in many after school settings. Worksite health promotion programs for staff may not only impact the health of staff, but also have effects on the youth, their families, and community members. Healthier staff may even save programs money. Some examples of health promotion programs for staff include: health screenings, physical activity and fitness programs, nutrition education, weight management, smoking cessation, and stress management. One of the first steps of worksite health promotion is to develop a Wellness Team to help drive the project. Once wellness and health promotion programs are available, encourage staff to participate in these programs. Examples of promotion ideas include introducing wellness programs to new staff at their orientation sessions, presenting information at regular staff meetings, including flyers and brochures with paychecks, putting information into newsletter articles and e-mail messages, and offering health insurance discounts for participants.

Steps to Develop a Wellness Team 1. Involve administration/ board members in your efforts (they often control school agendas and budgets and can provide a visible leadership role for your wellness efforts.) 2. Recruit wellness team members from all areas of your school (i.e. food service, staff, teacher’s aides, and PTA/ PTO members). 3. Develop an action plan based on what’s important and achievable in your community. 4. Identify resources that can facilitate implementation of your action plan and assign responsibility. 5. Take action. 6. Celebrate and share your successes and monitor your progress.

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Worksite Wellness and 5-2-1-0 Promote healthy snacks at staff meetings. Ensure at least one fruit and vegetable are served whenever food is offered to staff. Staff Soup Club - Once a month a person volunteers to bring soup into the staff lounge. Others may volunteer to bring bread. Healthy Recipe Exchange - Share healthy recipes and perhaps compile into a recipe book. Encourage staff Wellness Team to approach vending machine company for information on their company’s healthy snack program. Don’t forget that the more time you spend sitting watching TV or surfing the internet, the less time your body is up and moving! Make your free personal or family time active time. Work with Wellness Team to promote staff participation in Screen-Free Week or similar Campaigns. Participate in a Let’s Go! StairWELL initiative (www.letsgo.org). Work with Wellness Team to promote opportunities for staff to be physically active. Make your meetings walking meetings. Implement Move and Improve! or other State physical activity promotion programs for staff (see resources at end of tab). Calculate and post average walking distances around the school. Work with Wellness Team to make sure all beverage machines in teacher lounges have water in them. Have water available at all meetings where beverages are served. Work with Wellness Team to encourage staff to model the zero message for students.

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Let’s Go! StairWELL Initiative The Let’s Go! StairWELL Initiative is based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) program, “StairWELL to Better Health.” Stairwells represent an important opportunity to increase daily physical activity because of low personal cost and convenience. Point of Decision Prompts and Motivational signs that encourage stair use are a great way to promote your initiative. Placing signs at the places where people have a choice between the stairs and the elevator is a key aspect of encouraging people to use the stairs. It will also remind employees that there are stairs for them to use! The messages contained in Let’s Go! StairWELL Initiative posters were reviewed by the StairWELL Subcommittee and deemed appropriate for use at their respective organizations. However, each organization is different and messages that motivate some may not be motivating to others. It is important to consider your audience and tailor the messages accordingly. Let’s Go! has created a StairWELL Initiative Toolkit that provides tools for Maine employers to improve employee health by implementing a StairWELL initiative within their organization. The toolkit provides options for businesses that do not have stairwells, including links to tools to help map out walking paths around worksites and additional resources to help promote physical activity in the workplace to all employees.

WELL r i a t S ! es: t’s Go The Le Toolkit includ ve Initiati )

The Let’s Go! StairWELL Initiative Toolkit contains ready to use materials that can be used to take advantage of a worksite’s built environment as a way to promote and encourage physical activity during the work day and is available FREE online at www.letsgo.org.

y t (Surve n e n o p n Com Evaluatio as ional Ide Promot e-mails t Sample n Promp rows) io is c e D r Point of eft and Right A (L Posters sters ional Po nd t a iv t o M s (Left a r e t s o P Route Walking ws) ro Right Ar es Resourc

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Worksite Wellness Resources CDC’s Healthier Worksite Initiative. Information, policies, resources, and step-by-step toolkits for workplace health promotion program planners in state and federal government. www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/hwi/index.htm The Wellness Councils of America – WELCOA Website Free Resources www.welcoa.org/freeresources The Wellness Council of Maine works to advance and promote good health among employees state-wide. They strive to assist communities throughout Maine to become healthier by consulting with companies to develop and improve their worksite wellness programs, educating companies in the Well Workplace model, and recognizing companies who achieve excellence in employee health promotion www.wellnesscouncilofmaine.org/ Health Observances: www.welcoa.org/observances Healthy People 2020 challenges individuals, communities, and professionals to take specific steps to ensure that good health, as well as long life, are enjoyed by all www.healthypeople.gov Map Walking Routes. Type in your town or city and create a walking route near your organization. www.gmap-pedometer.com Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center: www.walkinginfo.org Bicycle Coalition of Maine: www.bikemaine.org Maine in Motion is a program of the Maine Governor’s Council on Physical Activity aimed at increasing the daily level of activity for Mainers. www.maineinmotion.org

Physical Activity and People with Disabilities: The National Center on Physical Activity and Disability, Department of Disability and Human Development www.ncpad.org Disabled Sports USA www.dsusa.org National Center on Accessibility www.indiana.edu/~nca

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What if someone told you that by moving more in your day, you could promote, maintain or improve your health! Seems basic enough, but consider this, people who engage in minimal physical activity are consistently linked with increased risk of premature chronic health conditions and mortality. That is one of the reasons why the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association recommends that adults engage in at least 30-minutes of moderate physical activity on five (if not all) days of the week and children engage in 60-minutes of moderate physical activity every day. The EMHS Move and Improve program is designed to help people challenge themselves to meet these standards. Through the use of structured goals, Move and Improve gives you the opportunity to identify the goal that best fits your needs as well as tips and helpful information to keep you motivated along the way!

Program Cost.............................Free Program Length........................12-weeks (Starting early March through May each year) Program Registration..............January – March of each year Program Goals...........................Engage in physical activity at a moderate level of intensity for a minimum of eight of the 12 weeks selecting one of the goals listed below: • 30 minutes per day for 4 days per week • 30 minutes per day for 5 days per week • 45 minutes per day for 5 days per week • 60 minutes per day for 5 days per week • 60 minutes per day for 7 days per week Program Location....................Offered on-line at: www.moveandimprove.org Are you interested in learning more about the program? Visit www.moveandimprove.org and mark your calendar for the upcoming program to join the thousands of Mainers who participate in this initiative to improve their health! For more information: Contact Nicole Hammar 207-973-7245 or nhammar@emhs.org

www.moveandimprove.org


Tab 11: Collaborate with Food and Nutrition Programs to offer healthy food and beverage options. Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) At-Risk Afterschool MEALS in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)

TAB 11 Collaborate with Food and Nutrition Programs

In This Section


Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) When school is out and parents are still at work, children need a safe place to be with their friends, with structured activities, supportive adults, and good nutrition. Afterschool programs that participate in CACFP give children and teenagers the nutrition they need, and draw them into constructive activities that are safe, fun, and filled with opportunities for learning. CACFP reimburses centers at free, reduced-price, or paid rates for eligible meals and snacks served to enrolled children, targeting benefits to those children most in need. For more information, please visit http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/care/ Afterschool.htm.

Please Note: USDA provides reimbursement for meals and snacks served in afterschool programs that:  Are located at sites where at least half of the children in the school attendance area are eligible for free and reduced price school meals.  Offer educational or enrichment activities, after the regular school day ends or on week-ends and holidays, during times of the year when school is in session.  Meet licensing, health, or safety codes that are required by state or local law.  Serve nutritionally balanced meals and snacks that meet USDA’s nutrition standards, with foods like milk, meat, vegetables, fruit, and bread.

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When school is out and parents are still at work, children need a safe place to be with their friends, with structured activities, and supportive adults. Afterschool programs that serve meals or snacks draw children and teenagers into constructive activities that are safe, fun, and filled with opportunities for learning. The meals and snacks give them the nutrition they need to learn, play, and grow.

Combining Meals and Activities:

All meals and snacks served in afterschool programs in CACFP will earn reimbursement at the “free” rate. USDA rates are adjusted every July 1. Contact your State agency for the current rates.

•• Baked chicken, steamed broccoli, apple slices, whole wheat roll, fat-free or low-fat milk •• Turkey sandwich on whole wheat bread, carrot sticks, apple sauce, fat-free or low-fat milk •• Grilled cheese sandwich on whole wheat bread, oven-baked sweet potato fries, plum, fat-free or low-fat milk •• Homemade baked chicken nuggets, baked potato wedges, cornbread, fresh strawberries, fat-free or low-fat milk

June 2011 The United States Department of Agriculture is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

For a listing of State agencies, visit www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/Contacts/ StateDirectory.htm

State Agencies:

Children need good nutrition all year long. The Summer Food Service Program is ideal if you sponsor activity programs during the summer. USDA provides cash reimbursement for meals served to children after the school year ends. Your State agency can provide you with more information on summer meals.

When School Lets Out:

Contact your State agency. For more information on afterschool meals and snacks, visit our website at www.fns.usda. gov/cnd

How to Apply:

Cash Reimbursement:

Examples of Suppers Served:

Be a Champion to End Childhood Hunger in Your Community

At-Risk Afterschool MEALS in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)

United States Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service


tate Agency. Contact your State agency to apply. Meals and snacks are available in ALL States.

S

earning. Nutritious meals and snacks are important for effective learning and developing healthy eating patterns now and in the future.

L

fterschool. Organized, structured, and supervised programs after school help students make the grade!

A

veryone. At USDA, ensuring the health and well-being of children is one of our highest priorities. All children and youth attending qualified afterschool programs can have free meals and snacks.

E

eals. Cash reimbursement is available to institutions that serve nutritious meals and snacks to children in afterschool programs.

M

Arts and crafts Homework assistance Life skills Computers Remedial education Competitive sports teams are NOT eligible, but afterschool programs that include a sports activity as part of their enrichment program may be eligible.

Your State agency can assist you in determining if your program provides eligible educational or enrichment activities.

•• •• •• •• •• ••

Qualified Educational and Enrichment Activities:

Afterschool programs do not need to be licensed in order to participate UNLESS there is a State or local requirement for licensing. All programs must meet State or local health and safety standards.

•• Public or private nonprofit organizations or eligible for-profit organizations operating an afterschool program. •• Programs must be located in an attendance area of a public school where at least 50 percent of the enrolled students are certified as eligible for free or reduced-price meals. •• Programs must provide educational or enrichment activities in an organized, structured, and supervised environment after the end of the school day, on weekends, or on holidays during the school year.

•• String cheese, whole wheat crackers, and water •• Whole wheat bread, peanut butter, jam, and water •• Pita breads squares, hummus dip, water •• Pretzels and fat-free or low-fat milk

Examples of Snacks Served:

All children who are 18 and under at the start of the school year may receive a free meal, a snack, or both. There are no age limits for children with disabilities.

Who Is Eligible:

Licensing Requirements:

Afterschool Programs that Can Participate:


In This Section Tab 12: Evaluation & Recognition Evaluating Your Program’s 5210 Interventions Recognition Program for Let’s Go! Schools, After School Programs, and TAB 12 Evaluation & Recognition

Child Care Programs


Evaluating Your After School Program’s 5210 Interventions Conducting an evaluation of your after school program’s 5210 interventions will help you understand where you have succeeded and where you may want to focus your efforts in the future. When we collect evaluation data from you, it helps us understand what changes are occurring in after school sites, and also helps us to learn about improvements we can make to the resources we offer. Every spring, we send an electronic Implementation Survey to all registered after school programs. This survey tracks which of the 5210 strategies you have implemented. It also asks which strategies are required by your program or district’s policies and enforced in your program. We use this information to determine who will be recognized as a Bronze, Silver, or Gold Let’s Go! After School program. For a preview of the Implementation Survey, please contact us at info@letsgo.org. We are here to assist you, so be sure to get in touch with us if you have any questions!

s t l u s e r r u o y e r Shar u o y e t a r b e l and ce ! s e s s e succ

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Recognition Program for Let’s Go! Schools, After School Programs and Child Care Programs We are excited to announce the Let's Go! recognition program for schools, after school programs and child care programs. This has been created as a way to acknowledge all the hard work that is happening out there! Beginning in Spring 2012, we will recognize three levels of accomplishment, described below. While we hope lots of schools and after school and child care programs will be energized by this program, we know that achieving recognition, especially at the higher levels, will take time. We are here to help! It is our goal to provide the tools and support needed to help schools and after school and child care programs sustain the great work they are doing and be recognized for it! Bronze Level Any school or program that implements all 5 Let’s Go! priority strategies. Silver Level Any school or program that: implements all 5 Let’s Go! priority strategies; requires at least 1 and up to 4 of the priority strategies in written policy; and enforces the written policy.* Gold Level Any school or program that: requires all 5 Let’s Go! priority strategies in written policy, and enforces the written policy.* We will use the surveys that we send out in the spring to determine which schools and programs have met the recognition criteria, and those sites will receive a certificate from Let’s Go! and will be recognized on the Let’s Go! web page. If you have any questions about the recognition program, please contact your local Let’s Go! partner or the Let’s Go! Home Office at 207.662.3734.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Five Priority Strategies Provide healthy choices for snacks and celebrations; limit unhealthy choices. Provide water and low fat milk; limit or eliminate sugary beverages. Provide non-food rewards. Provide opportunities for children to get physical activity every day. Limit recreational screen time. *We will ask principals or directors to sign a statement verifying that the policy is enforced.

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In This Section Tab 13: Resources Original 5210 Song - CD & Lyric Sheet (Insert) Fun Songs About Nutrition Resources for Free Promotional Materials Select Resources Healthy Eating Booklist Healthy Activity Booklist Why Involve Youth? Resources for Effective Youth Group Work Media Projects Media Project Sample: Deering High School Poster Contest Sample Letter to Businesses Cash without Calories!: Fundraising without Food Healthy Body Image Resources Is Your Sport Team “Redy” for 5210? Is Your Snack Shack “Redy” for 5210? Healthier Packaged Snack Options Healthy Favorites: A Booklet Full of Healthy Tips & Recipes (Insert)

TAB 13 Resources

Sample Language for Requesting Funds from Local Businesses


Original 5210 Song & Lyrics You can use this song and lyrics to help children become familiar with the 5210 message and to get them up and moving!

To listen to the song and view the lyrics, visit the After School Resources page at www.letsgo.org.

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Fun Songs About Nutrition Objective: This series of songs was created by Food Service Director, Sandy Lewis and Dr. Carl Winter to create a connection between students and the food service program, otherwise known as the cafeteria. This medley was performed in the school talent show by the school lunch staff. The whole medley is choreographed and the staff were dressed in fruit and vegetable costumes. This skit could also be used by a classroom. VEGGIE MEDLEY

Sung to the tune of “Who Let the Dogs Out?” by the Baha Men

I WILL SURVIVE

Sung to the tune of “I Will Survive” by Gloria Gaynor

I’d listen to the news, I’d be petrified Another foodborne illness outbreak I’d be torn up inside But then I spent so many nights Worried ‘bout what I just ate, Could I be next? Did I have poisons on my plate? But now I’m back from cyberspace Determined I won’t be another foodborne STAYING ALIVE Sung to the tune of “Staying Alive” by the Bee Gees illness case I’ve learned some simple steps (count 16 beats) To keep my food all safe for me Well you can tell by the way I choose my food And if you do the same, you’ll raise your I’m a worried guy in a cautious mood life expectancy There are pesticides, Mad Cow Disease Sure don’t put my mind at ease I’ve got a sign on my fridge door Don’t want hepatitis or gastroenteritis Saying go away bacteria—you’re not welcome I’m just staying alive, staying alive anymore Scrubbin’ off my veggies and heatin’ all my Listeria don’t scare me, nor does Nasty E-Coli burgers up to 185, 185 Hey Salmonella—did you think I’d lay down Ah ah ah ah staying alive, ah ah ah ah staying and die? alive… Oh no not I—I will survive As long as I am careful with my food I’ll stay I WANNA HOLD YOUR HAND Sung to the tune of “I Wanna Hold Your Hand” by the alive Beatles I’ve got all my safety plans, I disinfect and wash my hands Oh yeah I’ll tell you something And I’ll survive, I will survive, Hey hey... I think you’ll understand For the sake of sanitation (Continued on other side) You better wash your hands You better wash your hands You better wash your hands (start after yippee-hi-oh) Who left the meat out? WHO WHO WHO WHO WHO Who left the meat out? WHO WHO WHO WHO WHO Who left the meat out?

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BEAT IT

Sung to the tune of “Beat It” by Michael Jackson

(4 lines) Why must you be such a sickly young man Existing on granola and on powdered bran I’ll give you some advice cause you need a better plan Just eat it, just eat it Don’t want to argue, I don’t want to debate I just don’t think your food fears really carry weight What bothers me more is what’s left on your plate —so eat it Don’t tell me your scared Just eat it, just eat it… (verse)…DANCE Just eat it, eat it, just eat it Just eat it, eat it, just eat it

You’ve got a starch problem Yo, I’ll solve it Check out some rice rice baby Eat some brown rice rice baby Rice rice baby Eat some brown rice baby… ...WORD TO YOUR MOTHER…

YMCA

Sung to the tune of “YMCA” by The Village People

Young man, get your butt off that chair I said young man, go and get some fresh air I said young man, just put down that fried dough Get up, get out, this you should know Young girl, you just stop sitting there With that blank and boring long stare I said young girl, go and get your suit on You’re about to have some great fun

I’M A BELIEVER

It’s fun to swim at the YMCA It’s fun to swim at the YMCA

When I was young I stayed away from vegetables They were meant for someone, but not for me Veggies couldn’t taste good, that’s the way it seemed Whether they were stir fried, raw or steamed

JUMP AROUND

Sung to the tune of “I’m a Believer” by The Monkees

But then I had a taste, now I’m a believer Didn’t leave a trace of greens on my plate I was wrong—ooh, I’m a believer A veggie eater from now on

ICE ICE BABY

Sung to the tune of “Ice, Ice Baby” by Vanilla Ice

Alright stop It’s time to eat, so listen Rice is back here to help your digestion Ask Mom, she can cook it up nicely Extra bread, no instead use brown rice B Jam packed with some good carbohydrates Energy? Rice will set you straight

Sung to the tune of “Jump Around” by House of Pain

Jump around Jump around Jump around Jump around Jump around

WHIP IT

Sung to the tune of “Whip It” by Devo

(1 line) If you see a candy bar, you must skip it If you have some H2O, you must sip it If the cream is in the jar, you must whip it If you see a tether ball, you must tip it Now whip it… into shape Shape it up… get straight… go for it Move ahead…try to detect it It’s not too late … to whip it Whip it good

(pause...1 line)

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Resources for Free Promotional Materials Check out these websites for free materials (posters, stickers, coloring sheets, etc.) that promote health, nutrition, and physical activity while supplies last: Eat Smart. Play Hard. A USDA campaign to motivate children and their caregivers to eat healthy and be active using their character, the Power Panther. Stickers, tattoos, activity sheets, window stickers, and more are all available at no charge. www.fns.usda.gov/eatsmartplayhard

Fruits and Veggies – More Matters Produce for Better Health Foundation offers the Fruits & Veggies—More Matters™ health initiative. In simple, user-friendly ways, this health initiative offers expert cooking advice, nutrition information, and shopping tips. Refer to the “Get Kids Involved” section for downloadable coloring pages, tracking and shopping planners, and other activity pages. www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org

Leafy Greens Council Promotes consumption of leafy greens for the nutritional benefits and cancer-fighting elements of leafy greens. Offers free posters. http://www.leafy-greens.org/

PE Central Web site for health and physical education teachers, parents, and students to provide the latest information about physical education programs for children and youth. These two sites offer free posters on variety of topics (smoking, nutrition, sports, etc.), booklets, and activities: www.pecentral.org/websites/freeresources.html

The Wheat Food Council Promotes awareness of dietary grains as part of a healthy diet. They offer a variety of free posters. www.wheatfoods.org

Developed by the Children in Balance initiative at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy of Tufts University

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School Select Resources MAINE RESOURCES Bicycle Coalition of Maine: www.bikemaine.org Healthy Maine Partnerships: The Healthy Maine Partnerships is an initiative that was established to link aspects of four Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention programs. The coordination of the state and local intervention activities are funded by the tobacco settlement and assures linkages with related program activities. Visit www.healthymainepartnerships.org to find your local HMP. Healthy Maine Walks & Sites: www.healthymainewalks.org Healthy Policy Partners of Maine: www.mcd.org/HPP Let’s Go! Maine information for kids, teens, parents, childcare, healthcare providers, schools and workplaces: www.letsgo.org MaineHealth Learning Resource Centers: The MaineHealth Learning Resource Centers are health information and education resources for patients, families and communities. Each center has an extensive library of books, periodicals and videos on a wide variety of healthcare topics. www.mainehealth.org/lrc Maine Bureau of Parks and Lands: www.maine.gov/doc/parks Maine Census Data: www.state.me.us/newsletter/may2001/maine_census_data.htm Maine Center for Public Health: www.mcph.org Maine Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics: www.maineaap.org Maine Children’s Alliance: The Maine Children's Alliance is a strong, powerful voice for children, youth and families and provides leadership to create or change policy on their behalf. The Maine Children's Alliance collects the voices and data of various organizations, develops, promotes and advocates a substantive strategic plan including desired outcomes to insure positive change for children and their families. www.mainechildrensalliance.org Maine Children’s Alliance/Maine Kids Count Data Book: www.mekids.org Maine Department of Education: www.maine.gov/education Maine Governor’s Council on Physical Activity: www.maineinmotion.org Maine Prevention Research Center: http://www.une.edu/mhprc/ Maine Nutrition Network: www.maine-nutrition.org

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Maine Physical Activity & Nutrition [PAN] Program: www.maine.gov/dhhs/boh/hmp/panp Maine WIC Program: www.maine.gov/dhhs/wic WinterKids: WinterKids is a nonprofit organization committed to helping children develop lifelong habits of health, education, and physical fitness through participation in outdoor winter activities. www.winterkids.org

NATIONAL RESOURCES American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance: This professional alliance seeks to support and assist those involved in physical education, leisure, fitness, dance, health promotion, and education and all specialties related to achieving a healthy lifestyle. www.aahperd.org American Council on Exercise: This nonprofit group’s mission is to serve as an education and certification provider by setting standards and protecting the public against unqualified fitness professionals and unsafe or ineffective fitness products, programs, and trends. www.acefitness.org American Council on Fitness and Nutrition: With partner organizations, ACFN works to promote nutrition education, and physical activity programs to improve community health. www.acfn.org American Dietetic Association is the largest organization of Food and Nutrition Professionals in the United States. The ADA offers reliable, objective food and nutrition information. www.eatright.org America on the Move is a national initiative dedicated to helping individuals and communities across our nation make positive changes to improve health and quality of life. www.americaonthemove.org CDC Body Mass Index (BMI) Calculator: This simple tool calculates weight adjusted for height, which can be used to approximate whether someone is underweight, normal weight, overweight, or obese. www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/bmi Centers for Disease Control, Healthy Youth: This website offers information, resources, and strategies for encouraging physical activity in youth. www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/PhysicalActivity Center on Media and Child Health: The Center on Media and Child Health at Children’s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, and Harvard School of Public Health is dedicated to understanding and responding to the effects of media on the physical, mental, and social health of children through research, production, and education. www.cmch.tv

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The Citizenship Through Sports Alliance: This coalition of athletic organizations focuses on character in sport. CTSA promotes fair play at all levels—youth leagues to professional sport—to reinforce the value of sport as a test of character. Since 1997, CTSA has been building a sports culture that encourages respect for self, respect for others, and respect for the game. www.sportsmanship.org Food and Nutrition Information Center serves to provide “credible, accurate, and practical resources for consumers, nutrition and health professionals, educators, and government personnel.” The “Consumer Corner” contains information about popular food and nutrition topics. The Food and Nutrition Service offers free, downloadable posters and activity sheets as well as other materials. www.nal.usda.gov/fnic Healthy Hearts 4 Kids is a web-based intervention that encourages children to participate in physical activity regularly, eat nutritiously, and avoid the use of tobacco products. The web-based instructional module is designed to impact children’s knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to these risk factors associated with cardiovascular health. It encourages youngsters to read, write, and problem solve, while learning to make wise decisions that will impact them throughout their lifetimes. In addition, children are encouraged to complete daily logs of their physical activity and diet intake for which they receive immediate feedback to applaud their reports or to help them make wiser decisions the following day. Incentives are provided to encourage students to complete online tasks, take quizzes, and complete physical activity and diet logs. www.healthyhearts4kids.com Healthy People 2010: This framework is a statement of national objectives to identify and reduce threats to the health of the nation. www.healthypeople.gov HeartPower! is the American Heart Association’s curriculum-based program for teaching about the heart and how to keep it healthy for a lifetime. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Educator/ FortheClassroom/ElementaryLessonPlans/ Elementary-Lesson-Plans_UCM_001258_Article.jsp International Health, Racquet and Sportsclub Association: IHRSA’s mission is “to grow protect and promote the health and fitness industry, and to provide its members with benefits that will help them be more successful.” cms.ihrsa.org KidsHealth: KidsHealth, a partner with the Barbara Bush Children’s Hospital in Maine, is the largest and most- visited site on the Web providing doctor-approved health information about children from before birth through adolescence. It has separate sections for kids, teens, and parents. www.kidshealth.org National Association for Health & Fitness: This nonprofit organization “exists to improve the quality of life for individuals in the United States through the promotion of physical fitness, sports and healthy lifestyles and by the fostering and supporting of Governor’s and State Councils on physical fitness and sports in every state and U.S. territory.” www.physicalfitness.org

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National Center on Physical Activity and Disability: This group serves as an information center on physical activity and disability. www.ncpad.org National Institute for Fitness and Sports: NIFS is a nonprofit organization committed to enhancing human health, physical fitness, and athletic performance through research, education, and service by encouraging the adoption of appropriate healthy behaviors. www.nifs.org The President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports: This organization promotes physical activity, fitness, and sports through various partnerships and activities. The President’s Challenge is a program that awards children and adults for participating in physical activities. www.fitness.gov State Agriculture Departments: Your state agriculture department can help you find local farmers’ markets, state fairs and other resources and events that may align with your program’s mission. www.usda.gov Sustainable Table: This consumer campaign was “launched to help fill in the gaps in the sustain- able food movement, and to help direct consumers to the leading organizations who are working on the issue.” www.sustainabletable.org USDA Center for Nutrition Policy & Promotion: CNPP works to improve the health and well-being of Americans by developing and promoting dietary guidance that links scientific research to the nutrition needs of consumers. www.usda.gov/cnpp US Food and Drug Administration: The FDA is the federal agency responsible for protecting the public health by assuring the safety of our food supplies as well as various drugs, medical devices, and other products. It also serves to educate the public on nutrition and other health topics. www.fda.gov

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RESOURCES FOR PARENTS AND KIDS (Some of the websites listed below are great for computer classes or free computer time.)

Body and Mind: A CDC website that focuses on topics that kids say are important to them— such as stress and physical fitness—using kid-friendly lingo, games, quizzes, and other interactive features. www.bam.gov CDC Physical Activity: www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity Children and Nature Network: www.childrenandnature.org Choose My Plate: www.choosemyplate.gov Dole 5 A Day: Dole’s SuperKids website is designed educate and encourage elementary school children to eat 5 to 9 servings of fruits and vegetables a day to promote better health. www.dole5aday.com/ Eat Smart, Play Hard Kids: Interactive website with lots of materials, geared to elementary age students. www.fns.usda.gov/eatsmartplayhardkids Go Healthy Challenge: An Alliance for a Healthier Generations website that addresses nutrition and physical activity for children. www.igohugo.org Kidnetic.com: This interactive website offers nutrition and physical activity games, information, and resources for 9-12 year old children and their parents. www.kidnetic.com KidsHealth: www.kidshealth.org Make Your Calories Count: http://www.fda.gov/Food/LabelingNutrition/ConsumerInformation/ucm114022.htm Meals for You: www.mealsforyou.com Nutrition Explorations Kids: A Dairy Council Website designed to promote nutritious eating. www.nutritionexplorations.com/kids Overview of the VERB Campaign: www.cdc.gov/youthcampaign Screen Time: www.screentime.org Small Step Kids: Health and Human Services website designed to promote physical activity and nutrition for kids. www.smallstep.gov/kids/flash/index.html Eat Smart, Play Hard Kids: Interactive website with lots of materials, geared to elementary age students. www.fns.usda.gov/eatsmartplayhardkids Go Healthy Challenge: An Alliance for a Healthier Generations website that addresses nutrition and physical activity for children. www.igohugo.org Kidnetic.com: This interactive website offers nutrition and physical activity games, information, and resources for 9-12 year old children and their parents. www.kidnetic.com

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KidsHealth: www.kidshealth.org Make Your Calories Count:: http://www.fda.gov/Food/LabelingNutrition/ConsumerInformation/ucm114022.htm Meals for You: www.mealsforyou.com Nutrition Explorations Kids: A Dairy Council Website designed to promote nutritious eating. www.nutritionexplorations.com/kids Overview of the VERB Campaign: www.cdc.gov/youthcampaign Screen Time: www.screentime.org Small Step Kids: Health and Human Services website designed to promote physical activity and nutrition for kids. www.smallstep.gov/kids/flash/index.html

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AFTER SCHOOL RESOURCES AfterSchool Alliance: The nation's leading voice for afterschool, the Afterschool Alliance is the only organization dedicated to raising awareness of the importance of afterschool programs and advocating for more afterschool investments. www.afterschoolalliance.org CATCH Kids Club: The Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH), an NHLBI-funded study, created a school health education curriculum designed to motivate heart-healthy behavior in children in grades K-5 in after-school and summer camp settings. For more information, please visit http://wwwnhlbi.nih.gov/ health/public/heart/obesity/wecan/tools-resources/curricula-toolkits.htm (scroll down). The HEAT Club: The HEAT Club curriculum was developed as part of the Shape Up Somerville: Eat Smart. Play Hard™ project of Tufts University and revised in 2005 and 2007 for broader dissemination through the Children in Balance initiative. This health curriculum, called The HEAT (Healthy Eating and Active Time) Club, includes hands-on activities to use with elementary school children in after school programs in order to improve eating habits and increase physical activity levels. For more information, please visit http://www.childreninbalance.org. Maine Afterschool Network: The purpose of the Maine Afterschool Network is to enable every child to have access to quality, inclusive, affordable after school programming that meets the needs of the child, the family and the community. www.maineafterschool.net National AfterSchool Association: The National AfterSchool Association is the leading voice of the afterschool profession dedicated to the development, education and care of children and youth during their out-of-school hours. www.naaweb.org.

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Healthy Eating Booklist Baby Signs for Mealtime by Acredolo, Linda

Board Book

$6.99

Age 6 mo-1 yr

ISBN: 0060090731

Through baby signing that parents can teach to their children, youngsters can communicate when they want more, when something is too hot, or even to let everyone know the food is all gone!

Eat by Intrater, Roberta Grobel

Board Book $4.95 Age 9 mo-2 yr ISBN: 0439420067 A group of babies enjoys some favorite foods—along with making as big as mess on their faces as possible while they eat.

My Food/Mi Comida by Emberley, Rebecca

Hardcover $6.99 Age 9 mo-2 yr Labeled illustrations introduce various familiar foods and their names in English and Spanish.

ISBN: 0316177180

Tucking In! by Stockham, Jess

Board Book $6.99 Age 9 mo-2 yr ISBN: 1846430461 Animals and young children enjoy the same types of foods, including oats, oranges, and fish, in a book with pictures hidden beneath the flaps.

Yum-Yum, Baby!

By Harwood, Beht Board Book $5.95 Age 9 mo-2 yr ISBN: 1592238033 Rhyming text describes which meals of the day a baby is hungry for, while labeled illustrations introduce related words, such as banana, cup, and peas.

The Carrot Seed by Krauss, Ruth

Board Book $6.99 Age 1-2 ISBN: 0694004928 A young boy plants and cares for a carrot seed that everyone says will not grow, but he lovingly tends to his seed, and he eventually grows a large carrot.

Crunch Munch by London, Jonathan

Board Book $5.95 Age 1-3 ISBN: 0152166009 Shows how different animals eat, from the nibble bibble of the chipmunk to the zap! zap! zap! of the frog, and reveals the tasty morsels that each animal loves, from the yummy ants for the aardvark to the green leaves for the giraffe.

Lunch by Fleming, Denise

Board Book $7.99 Age 1-3 ISBN: 0805056963 A sturdy board-book format follows a hungry little mouse as he munches his way through a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables.

My Very First Book of Food by Carle, Eric

Board Book $5.99 Age 1-3 ISBN: 0399247475 A split-page board book provides a simple introduction to the foods animals eat as preschoolers are challenged to match up the image of the food with the animal presented.

Bread, Bread, Bread by Morris, Ann

Paperback $6.99 Age 2-4 ISBN: 0688122752 Celebrates the many different kinds of bread and how it may be enjoyed all over the world.

Spriggles: Healthy & Nutrition by Gottlieb, Jeff

Paperback $8.95 Age 3-6 ISBN:1930439016 Motivates children in the areas of nutrition, hygiene, and general well-being with animal rhymes such as “Eat a balanced meal, Seal”, “Limit the fat, Cat”, “Have a carrot, Parrot” and many more. (continued on other side)


Healthy Eating Booklist (continued) Bread Is for Eating by Gershator, David

Paperback $8.99 Age 2-4 Mamita explains how bread is created in a song sung in both English and Spanish.

ISBN: 0805057986

Give Me My Yam by Blake, Jan

Paperback $3.99 Age 2-4 ISBN: 0763608734 When Jordan loses the yam he just dug up in the river, he keeps asking to get it back, only to get something else instead, in a repetitive story set on a Caribbean island.

Growing Vegetable Soup by Ehlert, Lois

Board Book $ 6.95 A father and child grow vegetables and then make them into a soup.

Age 2-4

ISBN: 0152061762

Orange Pear Apple Bear by Gravett, Emily

Hardcover $12.99 Age 2-4 ISBN: 1416939997 Explores concepts of color, shape, and food using only five simple words, as a bear juggles and plays.

The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry, and the Big Hungry Bear by Wood, Don Board Book $6.99 Age 2-4

ISBN: 0859536599 Little Mouse worries that the big, hungry bear will take his freshly picked, ripe, red strawberry for himself.

World Snacks: A Little Bit of Soul Food by Sanger, Amy Wilson Board Book

$6.99 Age 2-4 ISBN: 1582461090 Easy-to-read rhyming text introduces a variety of soul food dishes, including grits, fried chicken, collard greens, yams, and sweet tea.

World Snacks: Chaat and Sweets by Sanger, Amy Wilson Board Book

$6.99 Age 2-4 ISBN: 1582461937 Through the author’s trademark collage art, introduces toddlers to the Indian finger foods known as chaat, including phel puri, tandoori chicken, and sweet coconut cham-cham.

World Snacks: First Book of Sushi by Sanger, Amy Wilson Board Book

$6.99 Illustrations and rhyming text introduce a variety of Japanese foods.

Age 2-4

ISBN: 1582460507

World Snacks: Hola Jalapeno by Sanger, Amy Wilson

Board Book $6.99 Age 2-4 ISBN: 1582460728 Illustrations and rhyming text, sprinkled with some Spanish words, introduce a variety of Mexican foods.

World Snacks: Let’s Nosh by Sanger, Amy Wilson

Board Book $6.99 Age 2-4 ISBN: 1582460817 Illustrations and rhyming text introduce the variety of Jewish foods, from gefilte fish to challah bread, chicken soup to matzoh.

World Snacks: Mangia! Mangia! by Sanger, Amy Wilson Board Book

$6.99 Age 2-4 ISBN: 1582461449 The sixth book in the World Snacks series pays tribute to dishes from the Italian table, from hearty minestrone and risotto to sweet, cool gelato.

World Snacks: Yum Yum Dim Sum by Sanger, Amy Wilson Board Book

$6.99 Age 2-4 ISBN: 1582461082 Easy-to-read rhyming text introduces children to the varied Chinese foods called dim sum, which means a little bit of heart.

Eating the Alphabet by Ehlert, Lois

Board Book $6.95 Age 2-5 ISBN: 015201036X An alphabetical tour of the world of fruits and vegetables, from apricot and artichoke to yam and zucchini. (continued on next page)


Healthy Eating Booklist (continued) Market Day by Ehlert, Lois

Paperback $6.95 Age 2-6 ISBN: 0152168206 On market day, a farm family experiences all the fun and excitement of going to and from the farmers’ market.

The Little Red Hen (Hen Makes a Pizza) by Sturges, Philemon Paperback

$6.99 Age 2-6 ISBN: 0142301892 In this version of the traditional tale, the duck, the dog, and the cat refuse to help the Little Red Hen make a pizza but do get to participate when the time comes to eat it.

An Island in Soup by Levert, Mireille

Paperback Need to buy used. Age 3-6 ISBN: 0888995059 Staring at the fish soup he doesn’t want to eat, Victor imagines that he is on an island of overgrown celery where he conquers a fierce pepper dragon only to be barraged by a wealth of terrifying ingredients, and soon Victor unexpectedly discovers that the dreaded fish soup is quite delicious.

Feast for 10 by Falwell, Cathryn

Paperback $6.95 Age 3-6 ISBN: 0395720818 Numbers from one to ten are used to tell how members of a family shop and work together to prepare a meal.

Grover’s Guide to Good Eating by Kleinberg, Naomi Hardcover

$6.99 Age 3-6 ISBN: 037584063X Little ones can join their host Grover and his assistant Elmo in the Good Eats Cafe where they will learn all about good nutrition and healthy eating!

Little Pea by Rosenthal, Amy Krouse

Hardcover $14.99 Age 3-6 ISBN: 081184658X Little Pea hates eating candy for dinner, but his parents will not let him have his spinach dessert until he cleans his plate, in a story that many children can relate to!

Good for Me and You by Mayer, Mercer

Paperback $3.99 Age 5-6 Little Critter learns that a healthy lifestyle includes a balanced diet and exercise.

ISBN: 0060539488

Muncha! Muncha! Muncha! by Fleming, Candace

Hardcover $17.99 Age 5-6 ISBN: 0689831528 After planting the garden he has dreamed of for years, Mr. McGreely tries to find a way to keep some persistent bunnies from eating all his vegetables.

Two Eggs, Please by Weeks, Sarah

Paperback $7.99 Age 5-7 ISBN: 141692714X A harried waitress at the local diner tries to keep up with an abundance of orders from demanding patrons—all of whom want eggs, in a lively introduction to similarities and differences.

An Orange in January by Aston, Dianna Hutts

Hardcover $16.99 Age 6-7 ISBN: 0803731469 An orange begins its life as a blossom where bees feast on the nectar, and reaches the end of its journey, bursting with the seasons inside it, in the hands of a child. (continued on other side)


Healthy Eating Booklist (continued) Blueberries for Sal by McCloskey, Robert

Paperback $7.99 Age 6-7 ISBN: 014050169X Little Bear and Sal both go berrying with their mothers, but after sitting down to rest, they each end up following the other one’s mother.

I Will Never Not Ever Eat a Tomato by Child, Lauren Paperback

$6.99 Age 6-7 ISBN: 0763621803 Fussy eater Lola makes it perfectly clear that she will not eat anything she doesn’t want until her brother shows her that carrots are really orange twiglets from Jupiter and mashed potatoes are actually Mount Fuji cloud fluff.

The Edible Pyramid by Leedy, Loreen

Paperback $6.95 Age 6-7 ISBN: 0823420752 Animal characters learn about good eating every day in a restaurant called The Edible Pyramid, where the waiter offers the foods grouped in sections of the Food Guide Pyramid and customers learn how many servings they need each day.

The Seven Silly Eaters by Hoberman, Mary Ann

Paperback Seven fussy eaters find a way to surprise their mother.

$7.00

Age 6-7

ISBN: 0152024409

How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World by Priceman, Marjorie Paperback

$6.99 Age 6-8 ISBN: 0679880836 Since the market is closed, the reader is led around the world to gather the ingredients for making an apple pie.

The Sweet Tooth by Platini, Margie

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Hardcover $16.95 Age 6-8 ISBN: 0689851596 Stewart’s loud, obnoxious sweet tooth constantly gets him into trouble, until Stewart uses a healthy diet to take control of the situation.

Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs by Barrett, Judi Paperback

$6.99 Age 7-10 ISBN: 0689707495 Life is delicious in the town of Chewandswallow where it rains soup and juice, snows mashed potatoes, and blows storms of hamburgers—until the weather takes a turn for the worse.

Gregory, the Terrible Eater by Sharmat, Mitchell

Paperback $4.99 Age 7-8 ISBN: 0590433504 Mother Goat, alarmed by Gregory’s bizarre dietary preferences—he prefers toast and scrambled eggs to shoe boxes and tin cans—consults Dr. Ram, who devises an appetizing transitional diet for little Gregory.

Sun Bread by Kleven, Elisa

Paperback $6.99 Age 7-8 ISBN: 0142400734 During the dreary winter, a baker decides to bring warmth to her town by baking bread as golden and glorious as the sun itself.

Everybody Cooks Rice by Dooley, Norah

Paperback $6.95 Age 7-9 ISBN: 0876145918 A child is sent to find a younger brother at dinnertime and is introduced to a variety of cultures through encountering the many different ways rice is prepared at the different households visited.

Good Enough to Eat by Rockwell, Lizzy

Paperback $6.99 Age 7-9 ISBN: 0064451747 Describes the six categories of nutrients needed for good health, how they work in the body, and what foods provide each.

Why Do People Eat? by Needham, Kate

Paperback $4.99 Age 7-9 ISBN: 0794516238 Using simple text and illustrations, explains why people need food, where food comes from, and how the body uses it.

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Healthy Activity Booklist Row, Row, Row Your Boat by Kubler, Annie

Board Book $4.99 Age 9 mo-2 yr ISBN: 0859536580 In this traditional nursery rhyme, a group of babies and their toy animal friends row merrily down the stream.

Wiggle Waggle by London, Jonathan

Board Book $5.95 Age 9 mo-2 yr ISBN: 0152165886 Describes how various animals walk, from the wiggle waggle of a duck to the boing, boing, boing of a kangaroo to the bumble roll, bumble roll of a bear.

On the Go! by Stockham, Jess

Board Book $6.99 Age 9 mo-2 yr ISBN: 1846430496 Animals move by stretching, jumping, and climbing, and readers can flip the page to see babies doing the same action.

Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes by Kubler, Annie Board Book

$4.99 An illustrated version of the song which identifies parts of the body.

Age 9 mo-2 yr

ISBN: 0859537285

Eyes, Nose, Fingers, and Toes by Hindley, Judy

Board Book $6.99 Age 9 mo-2 yr ISBN: 0763623830 A group of toddlers demonstrate all the fun things that they can do with their eyes, ears, mouths, hands, legs, feet—and everything in between.

Bear About Town by Blackstone, Stella

Board Book $6.99 Age 1-3 ISBN: 1841483737 The big, friendly bear goes on his daily walk through his neighborhood, meeting the people who live and work nearby.

I Went Walking by Williams, Sue

Board Book $11.99 Age 1-3 During the course of a walk, a young boy identifies animals of different colors.

ISBN: 0152056262

Skippyjon Jones Shape Up by Schachner, Judy

Board Book $6.99 Age 1-3 ISBN: 0525479570 Skippyjon Jones, a Siamese cat who thinks he is a Chihuahua dog, exercises using objects of different shapes.

Jumping Day by Esbensen, Barbara Juster

Paperback $8.95 Age 2-4 ISBN: 1563978539 The pleasures of jumping, running, skipping, and hopping are celebrated as a little girl starts her day, goes to school, and comes home to play.

Doing the Animal Bop by Ormerod, Jan

Paperback $9.99 Age 2-4 ISBN: 0764178997 Various animals dance to the animal bop, including ostriches, elephants, and monkeys; includes read-along compact disc.

I'm as Quick as a Cricket by Wood, Audrey

Board Book $6.99 Age 2-4 ISBN: 0859536645 A young boy describes himself as loud as a lion, quiet as a clam, tough as a rhino, and gentle as a lamb. (continued on other side)


Healthy Activity Booklist (continued) Get Moving with Grover by Tabby, Abigail

Hardcover $6.99 Age 2-4 ISBN: 0375830464 Grover and Elmo show young readers that being fit can be fun, encouraging exercises involving jumping over, running around, and dancing around the book itself.

Duck on a Bike by Shannon, David

Hardcover $16.99 Age 2-4 ISBN: 0439050235 A duck decides to ride a bike and soon influences all the other animals on the farm to ride bikes too.

From Head to Toe by Carle, Eric

Big Paperback $24.99 Age 2-6 Encourages the reader to exercise by following the movements of various animals.

ISBN: 0061119725

Froggy Learns to Swim by London, Jonathan

Paperback $5.99 Age 3-6 ISBN: 0140553126 Froggy is afraid of the water until his mother, along with his flippers, snorkle, and mask, help him learn to swim.

Hop Jump by Walsh, Ellen Stoll

Paperback $6.99 Bored with just hopping and jumping, a frog discovers dancing.

Age 4-6

ISBN: 015201375X

Froggy Plays Soccer by London, Jonathan

Paperback $5.99 Age 5-6 ISBN: 0140568093 Although Froggy is very excited when his Dream Team plays for the city soccer championship, he makes a mistake on the field that almost costs the team the game.

Puddles by London, Jonathan

Paperback $6.99 Age 5-6 ISBN: 0140561757 When the rain stops falling and the skies clear up, it's time to put on boots and go outside to play in the puddles.

Get Up and Go! by Carlson, Nancy L.

Paperback $5.99 Age 5-6 ISBN: 0142410640 Text and illustrations encourage readers, regardless of shape or size, to turn off the television and play games, walk, dance, and engage in sports and other forms of exercise.

Animal Exercises by Ross, Mandy

Paperback $7.99 A collection of poems describes how familiar animals keep in shape.

Age 5-6

ISBN: 1846430445

I Love Yoga by Chryssicas, Mary Kaye

Hardcover Need to buy used Age 5-8 ISBN: 0756614007 Presents young readers with simple instructions for the practice of yoga, discussing how to relax, focus, and have fun through basic poses explained in step-by-step sequences.

The Busy Body Book by Rockwell, Lizzy

Paperback $6.99 Age 6-8 ISBN: 0553113747 Exploring all the many moves, twists, and turns a human body can do, this book is designed to encourage kids to move around, use their bodies, and learn the importance of staying actively fit.

Anna Banana by Cole, Joanna

Paperback $7.99 Age 6-9 ISBN: 0688088090 An illustrated collection of jump rope rhymes arranged according to the type of jumping they are meant to accompany.

Spriggles: Activity & Exercise by Gottlieb, Jeff

Paperback $8.95 Age 3-5 ISBN:1930439024 Motivates children in the areas of physical fitness and activity with animal rhymes such as “Go for a walk, Hawk”, “Play in the park, Shark”, “Ride your bike, Pike”, and many more.

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155-532-08 / 03-28-08


Why Involve Youth? Involving youth in authentic ways can take more time, energy and creativity than doing a project alone, but the rewards are big. It is essential to have a strong understanding of the value of involving youth to keep you motivated when barriers arise. Below are a list of just some of the good reasons to partner with youth as you strive to make change.

Young people have a right to be consulted about decisions that will effect their lives, and will have unique insights into the strengths & weaknesses of a project aimed at youth. Young people are fun to be with and can teach you a lot. A youth perspective is different than an adult one and in the spirit of “two heads are better than one,” multiple perspectives are helpful when trying to create change or solve a problem. Involving youth in authentic ways offers them opportunities to build skills and have leadership experiences that can influence their future choices and possibilities for work and school. Involving youth lets them know that you are “walking your talk” about their importance to you and your initiative. Youth have energy and creativity that when tapped can transform a project, community, school or any environment. Youth make great peer & community educators and can creatively get a message across—to younger students, peers, parents, and community leaders. Involving young people builds sustainability—young people who lead today build the skills and interest to lead tomorrow. Created by the

(MYAN), 2007

A program of the People’s Regional Opportunity Program (PROP) www.MYAN.org


Resources for Effective Youth Group Work Maine Youth Action Network (MYAN): An action plan can help you and your group set goals and plan the steps along the way to achieving them. MYAN provides tools and technical support to assist youth groups in creating and achieving their action plans. Some action planning tools are available, contact MYAN for more support. http://www.MYAN.org For more information on tools you can use to help you create positive change in your schools and communities, visit the MYAN online resource page: http://www.MYAN.org//?page=resources KIDS Consortium: KIDS works with teachers, administrators and students to involve students in addressing real challenges faced by their communities. It provides tools and training in service learning for educators and community organizations, as well as student Apprentice Citizenship leadership programs. Together they identify, research, and work to address local community needs. With Guidance from KIDS, teachers match those projects to school curricula, providing a powerful “hands on� learning experience that improves the community and brings academics to life. http://www.kidsconsortium.org

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Media Projects Having youth create their own health media is a great way to educate their peers and others in the community about teen health issues. You can help teens spread positive 5210 messages by working with them and community organizations to create various types of media. Teens will have great ideas for catchy media campaigns and will be excited to create ads that will appeal to their peers.

Objectives: Youth will... experience team work and collaboration. become comfortable using modern technology. explore the way media is used as a tool to spread health messages. create a product that can be shared, assessed, and utilized. Consider having youth create:   

5210 commercials or ads (post them on ‘You Tube’!) 5210 songs, raps, or poems (see if a local radio station will air them!) 5210 flyers, posters, or brochures (make it a poster contest!)

Or, send youth on a photo scavenger hunt to capture people in the ‘act’ of a healthy behavior. Who can capture the best image that represents the 5 message? The 2 message? 1? 0? Encourage creativity and thinking outside the box!

Be sure to share your students’ creations with the staff at 5210 Goes After School. You never know, the next 5210 public service announcement could come from you! Contact us at info@letsgo.org or 207.662.3734.

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Media Project Sample: Deering High School Poster Contest Students at Portland’s Deering High School, with the leadership of school nurse Kristin Johnson , participated in a 5210 poster contest. Students were encouraged to design a poster based on the 5210 message and the winning design by Senior Andrea Rogers was screen printed onto t-shirts! See a selection of the entries below:

Runner-Up: Francesco Marabito, 10th Grade

Runner-Up: Cooper Nadeau, 10th Grade

Runner-Up: Jazmin Gandia, 12th Grade

Hold a poster contest of your own! Winner: Andrea Rogers, 12th Grade

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Sample Language for Requesting Funds from Local Businesses (See sample letter on next page) General Statement: Our after school program is participating in a healthy lifestyle program called 5210 Goes After School. 5210 Goes After School promotes the following message:

Through this program, our program is working hard to create environments, policies and practices that promote and support healthy lifestyles.

Request for Support: I am writing to request your support in our efforts. While 5210 Goes After School can be implemented at no cost, additional funding allows for enhanced implementation of the program. With additional funding, we could contribute to sustainable change in our after school environment by ________________. The total cost is estimated at: $______. A donation of any amount is greatly appreciated.

Conclusion: Engaging community leaders is one of our goals as apart of the 5210 Goes After School program. Support from local businesses will enhance our community as a whole. Thank you for considering our request and please contact me at: _______________ with any questions.

Examples to fill in the blank with: …purchasing physical activity equipment that would be used as a reward for good behavior. …being able to provide fresh fruits and vegetables as a after school snack once a month.

Keys to a success ful letter:

 Be specific! Det ermine what you would like fund s for and ask for it specifically .  Consider listing a specific amount.  Consider asking for product as opposed to money . Food stores may rather donate healthy snacks instead of m oney.

…supporting a staff wellness development program to all our staff. …improving the dining environment by purchasing salad bars, new equipment, etc. …purchasing pedometers for the youth walking program.

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Sample Letter to Businesses Date: X X, 20XX

Dear Business XXX: Our program is participating in a healthy lifestyle program called 5210 Goes After School. 5210 Goes After School promotes the following message:

Through this program, we are working hard to create environments, policies, and practices that promote and support healthy lifestyles. I am writing to request your support in our efforts. While 5210 Goes After School can be implemented at no cost, additional funding allows for enhanced implementation of the program. With additional funding, we could contribute to sustainable change in the after school environment by purchasing physical activity equipment that would be used as a reward for good behavior. The total cost is estimated at $X00. A donation of any amount is greatly appreciated. Engaging community leaders is one of our goals as apart of the 5210 Goes After School program. Support from local businesses will enhance our community as a whole. Thank you for considering our request and please contact me at (207) 123-4567 with any questions. Sincerely,

Please Note: A modifiable version of this letter can be found in the online toolkit on our website.

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Cash without Calories! Fundraising without Food Things you can sell:                  

Candles Coupon books/ Discount cards Magazine subscriptions Flowers Cookbooks Grab bags School calendars Movie passes Greeting cards Pedometers Gift wrap and bags Plants Tupperware Emergency kits Jewelry Stationary Beach Towels Picture Frames

Press Your Luck! Sell raffle tickets for:    

“FUN”draising: Show Your Spirit! Sell school logo items  Talent shows  Walk/Bike/Dance/  Box seats to home Jump Rope-a-thons games  Car washes  Mugs  Dances  Scarves  Golf tournaments  Megaphones  Carnival  Stadium cushions  Craft sale  Blankets and pillows  Magic show  Umbrellas  School art show  School event tickets  Milk mustache  T-shirts and contest sweatshirts  Penny wars  License plate frame  Silent auction  Frisbees  Family dinners  Bumper stickers  Hannaford bucks  Water bottles and  Hat Day/Jean Day mugs  Gift wrapping  Calendars featuring  Horseshoe athletes competition  Fridge magnets  Bowling night  Hats  Recycle cell phones  Car magnets  Rent a “Teen Helper”

Gift certificates Gift baskets VIP parking spaces Movie theater passes

Originally developed by the MSAD #48 School Nutrition Team in Newport, Maine.


continued from other page

Need help? Some fundraising without food web resources: www.afrds.org/homeframe.html Association of Fundraising Distributors and Suppliers. Site includes a toolbox with “Fundraising Fundamentals”, a checklist for evaluating fundraising companies and a resource on product fundraising issues and trends. www.PTOtoday.com Lists fundraising activities by categories, has a “work vs. reward” equation, contains a parent sharing section on “what works, what doesn’t, and why.” www.fundraising-ideas.com Offers a free newsletter with programs, services, and press releases. Links to www.amazon.com with books on fundraising. www.american teachers.com Site links to fundraising sites and gives information on retailers who will donate a percentage of parent purchase dollars to your school. www.square1art.com Square 1 Art is committed to helping everyone recognize that there are better “family-focused” fundraising options that do not require door-to-door selling and offer LASTING QUALITY products to treasure for years.

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Healthy Body Image Resources Body Image: Loving Yourself Inside and Out:

A website of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Women's Health Information Center that promotes healthy body image among women. The website links to resources and information about healthy body image for both women and children. http://www.womenshealth.gov/bodyimage/

Maine Eating Disorder Collaborative:

Teams trained to provide coordinated health care treatment for those with eating disorders. Teams consist of at least one medical practitioner, therapist, and registered dietitian and are in Augusta, Belfast, Blue Hill, Calais, Camden, Farmington, Lewiston, South Portland, Waterville, Bowdoin College in Brunswick, and the Long Creek Youth Development Center in South Portland. The teams provide services to children, teens, and young adults with eating disorders. For specific information about a team, to join an existing team, or to establish a new team in your area, please contact Mary Orear at megirls@midcoast.com or (207) 230-0170.

National Eating Disorder Association:

The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) is the largest not-for-profit organization in the United States working to prevent eating disorders and provide treatment referrals to those suffering from anorexia, bulimia and binge eating disorder and those concerned with body image and weight issues. http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org

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Is Your Sports Team “Redy” for 5210? Let’s Go! is about giving everyone the chance to enjoy an active, healthy lifestyle.

Ev e r y D ay !

Do you want to adopt the 5210 message? If “yes” then choose your “Redy”ness level: ■

Support 5210 messages (hang posters in team meeting areas and snack shacks, provide brochures and educational handouts to parents/guardians). Encourage water instead of sports drinks.

All of the above AND ■ Only allow healthy snacks—like oranges and granola bars— during games and practice. ■ Be a role model ■ Reserve food rewards, like slushies and ice cream, for special occasions. All of the above AND ■ Develop and implement league and team policies that reinforce the above strategies.

To learn more about 5210 and team sports, please contact Dr. Rogers at 662-3734 or rogerv@mmc.org

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Is Your Snack Shack “Redy” for 5210? Let’s Go! is about giving everyone the chance to enjoy an active, healthy lifestyle.

Ev e r y D ay !

Do you want to adopt the 5210 message? If “yes” then choose your “Redy”ness level: ■

■ ■

Support 5210 messages (hang posters in the snack shacks, provide brochures and educational handouts to parents/guardians). Encourage water instead of sports drinks by prominently displaying water. Only sell single portion size candy and snacks. Have healthy food options—like fruit and granola bars.

All of the above AND ■ Remove fried foods from the snack shack. ■ Sell whole wheat pizza. ■ Sell 100 calorie snack packs. ■ Sell baked chips instead of fried. All of the above AND ■ Partner with local deli or sandwich shop to have healthy sandwiches available in the snack shack. ■ Develop and implement policies that reinforce the above strategies. Examples of policies are the following: 1. Ensure water is prominently displayed. 2. No fried food is sold in the snack shack.

To learn more about 5210 and team sports, please contact Dr. Rogers at 662-3734 or rogerv@mmc.org

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Healthier Cafeteria Snack Options Worried about what your child buys from the a la carte line, school store or vending machines? As you know, the best choices are whole or sliced fruits or veggies which are available at most schools. If your child does select a packaged snack, those from the list below, along side a balanced breakfast or lunch, are good choices. Each snack meets a strict standard for portion size, calories, fat, sodium and sugar. See full criteria on the back. Portion size is important—choose just one! These items are often found in vending machines, school stores or a la carte lines. If they are not available now, encourage your school nutrition program to carry them! Snack

Size

Snack

Size

 Baked Lay's (Sour Cream & Onion)

1 1/8 oz (31.8g) 1 3/8 oz (38.9g)

 Baked Lay's (Southwestern Ranch)

1 oz (28.3g)

 Baked Ruffles (Plain; Cheddar & Sour Cream)

1 1/8 oz (31.8g)

1.5 oz (42g)

 Doritos (Spicy Sweet Chili Reduced Fat)

1 oz (28.3g)

 Breyers YoCrunch Yogurt (Oreo Cookies n' Cream; Raspberry)

6oz (170g)

 Baked Lay's Doritos (Nacho Cheese)

3/4 oz (21.2g) 1 3/8 oz (38.9g)

 Breyers YoCrunch Yogurt (Strawberry)

7 oz (170g)

 Baked Lay's Potato Chips

1 1/8 oz (31.8g)

 Chobani Yogurt (Strawberry; Blueberry; Peach)

6 oz

 Lay's Potato Chips (Original Fat Free)

1 oz (28.3g)

 CLIF ZBAR (Chocolate Chip; Chocolate Brownie)

1.27 oz (36g)

 Rold Gold Tiny Twists Pretzels

.5 oz (14.1g) 1 oz (28.3 g)

 Minute Maid Juice Bar (Grape)

2.25 fl oz (66.54g)

 Cheerios (Bowl)

11/16 oz (19g)

 Snack Pack Fat Free Pudding (Vanilla; Chocolate)

3.5 oz (99g)

 Cheerios (Honey Nut, Bowl)

1 oz (28g)

1 oz 28.4g)

 Cinnamon Toast Crunch (Reduced Sugar)

1 oz (28g)

 Skinny Cow (Low Fat Fudge Bar)

74g

 Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cereal (Bowl)

1 oz (28g)

 Baked Cheetos

7/8 oz (24.8g)

 Cocoa Puffs Cereal

7/8 oz (24g)

 Baked Lay's (Barbecue)

7/8 oz (24.8g) 1 1/18 oz (31.8g)

 Cocoa Puffs Cereal (Reduced Sugar) (Bowl)

7/8 oz (24g)

 Annie’s Homegrown Bunny Grahams (Chocolate Chip; Honey)

1 oz (28g)

 Power Snacks Raisins

1 oz (28.35g)

 Basil's Bavarian Bakery Animal Snackers

1 oz (28g)

 Raisins

 Sunflower Seeds (Honey Roasted; Lightly Salted)

Continued on next page...


...continued from previous page Snack

Size

Snack

Size

 Fruit By The Foot (Color By the Foot Triple Fruit Punch)

.75 oz (21g)

 Hood Ice Cream Cup (Orange Ice) (86g)

 Golden Grahams Cereal (bowl)

1 oz (28g)

 Hood Ice Cream Cup (Orange Sherbet; Raspberry Sherbet)

(90g)

 Kix Berry Berry (Bowl)

7/8 oz(24g)

 Hood Ice Cream Cup (Raspberry Nonfat Frozen Yogurt)

(73g)

 Kix Cereal (Bowl)

5/8 oz (17g)

 Crisp Rice Cereal (bowl)

3/4 oz (21g)

 Nature Valley Crunchy Granola Bar 1.5 oz (42g) (Oats 'N Honey)

 Luigi's Real Italian Ice (Lemon; Strawberry)

4 fl oz (118mL)

 Nature Valley Granola Bar (Oats 'n Honey; Apple Crisp)

 Kashi Heart to Heart (Box)

1.4 oz (40g)

 Scooby-Doo! Fruit Flavored Snacks .9 oz (25.5g)

 Kashi TLC Bar (Cherry Dark Chocolate)

1.2 oz (35g)

 Team Cheerios Cereal Bar (Strawberry)

1.3 oz (37g)

 Kashi TLC Fruit & Grain (Dark Chocolate Coconut)

1.1 oz

 Total Cereal (Bowl)

13/16 oz (23g)

 Apple Jacks (Reduced Sugar)

.7 oz (20g)

 Trix (Bowl)

3/4 oz (21g)

 Austin Zoo Animal Crackers

1 oz (28g)

 Trix (Reduced Sugar) (Bowl)

3/4 oz (21g)

 Cheez-it Baked Snack Crackers (Reduced Fat)

1.5 oz (42g)

 Trix Cereal Bar

1.3 oz (37g)

 Corn Flakes (Box)

.81 oz (23g)

 Soy Crisp (Apple Cinnamon)

1.3 oz (37g)

 Froot Loops (Reduced Sugar)

.67 oz (19g)

 Hershey Mega Fudge-O Bar

4 fl oz (35g)

 Frosted Flakes (Reduced Sugar)

1 oz (28g)

 Hershey Sherbet (Raspberry)

4 fl oz (95.77g)

 Frosted Mini-Wheats

1 oz (28g)

 Hood Fudge Bar

(91g)

 Frosted Mini-Wheats (Box)

1.31 oz (37g)

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1.5 oz (42g)


...continued from previous page Snack  Frosted Mini-Wheats Little Bites (Chocolate)  Keebler Scooby-Doo! Graham Cracker Sticks (Cinnamon)

Size

Snack

Size

1 oz (28g)

 Newton's Fruit Crisp (Mixed Berry) 1 oz (28g)

1 oz (28g)

 Oreo Thin Crisps (100 calorie pack)

.81 oz (23g)

 Wheat Thins Toasted Chips Minis (100 Calorie Pack)

.77 oz (22g)

 EnviroKidz Crispy Rice (Peanut ChocoDrizzle)

1 oz (28g)

 Nutri-Grain Cereal Bar (Apple Cinnamon; Blueberry; Raspberry; Strawberry; Yogurt Strawberry)

1.3 oz (37g)

 Pop-Tarts (Frosted Strawberry)

1.76 oz (50g)

 Flintstones Push Up Sherbet Treats 2.75 fl oz (54g)

 Raisin Bran (Box)

.88 oz (25g)

 Goldfish Baked Snack Crackers (Cheddar)

1 oz (28g)

 Rice Krispies (Box)

1.52 oz (43g)

 Goldfish Giant Grahams

.9 oz (26g)

 Rice Krispies Treats

1.3 oz (37g) 1.7 oz (48g)

 Quaker Oats Breakfast Cookie (Oatmeal Raisin)

1.69 oz (48g)

 Special K (Box)

.81 oz (23g)

 Quaker Oats Cereal Bar (Apple Crisp)

1.3 oz (37g)

 Special K Bar (Honey Nut)

.77 oz (22g)

 Kemps Cream Bar (Orange)

3 fl. oz (66g)

 Quaker Oats Chewy Granola Bar (Low Fat Chocolate Chunk; Oatmeal Raisin; Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip; S-Mores)

.84oz (24g)

 Kemps Nonfat Frozen Yogurt (Chocolate)

4 fl oz (113.4g)

 Quaker Oats Instant Oatmeal (Original)

.98 oz (28g)

 Malt-O-Meal Crispy Rice (Bowl)

.63 oz (17.7g)

 Quaker Oatmeal Express (Golden Brown Sugar; Cinnamon Roll)

1.9 oz (54g)

 Malt-O-Meal Toasty O's

11/16 oz (19.5g)

 Quaker Instant Oatmeal (Cinnamon & Spice)

1.62 oz (46g)

 Quaker Instant Oatmeal (Maple & Brown Sugar)

1.51 oz (43g)

 Quakes Rice Snacks (Caramel Corn)

.91 oz (26g)

 Quaker Oats Snack Mix (Kids Mix)

7/8 oz (24.8g)

 Cheese Nips (100 Calorie Packs)

,74 oz (21g)

 Chips Ahoy Thin Crisps (100 Calorie Pack)

.81 oz (23g)

 Honey Maid Grahams (Cinnamon Sticks)

1 oz (28g)

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...continued from previous page

Snack

Snack

Size

Size

 Pirate's Booty (Aged White Cheddar)

1 oz (28g)

 Stonyfield Farm Low Fat Yogurt (Blueberry; Strawberry)

 Cascadian Farm Chewy Granola Bar (Chocolate Chip)

1.2 oz (35g)

 YoKids Squeezers Organic Low Fat 2 oz (57g) Yogurt (Strawberry)

 Snyder’s of Hanover Honey Wheat Sticks

2.25 oz (63.8g)

 Snyder’s of Hanover Mini Pretzels

1.5 oz (42.5g)

6 oz (170g)

 Fruit in a Flash Apple Slices

2 oz (57g)

 House Recipe Instant Oatmeal (Regular)

(56g)

 Creamsicle (Orange 'n Cream)

2.7 fl oz (70g)

 Upstate Farms Yogurt (Raspberry; Strawberry/Banana)

4 oz (113g)

 Stacy’s Pita Chips (Cinnamon Sugar; Parmesan Garlic & Herb; Simply Naked)

1 3/8 oz (38.9 g)

 Stacy’s Soy Thin Chips (Sweet BBQ)

1.5 oz

 Yoplait Trix Low Fat Yogurt (Strawberry Banana Bash)

4 oz (113g)

 Stauffer Whales Baked Snack Crackers

.75 oz (21g)

 Yoplait (Light Strawberry; Harvest Peach)

6 oz (170g)

Nutritional criteria for packaged snack foods: Total fat ≤ 35% of calories per serving, excludes nuts, seeds, nut butters, reduced fat cheese Trans fat ≤ 0.5 grams per serving (trans fat free) Saturated fat < 10% of calories per serving, excludes reduced fat cheese Sugar ≤ 35% by weight of total sugars, excludes fruits, vegetables, milk Sodium ≤ 480 mg per serving Calories ≤ 200 calories

The above criteria is based on the USDA's HealthierUS School Challenge competitive food criteria. This list is not reviewed or approved by USDA; products on this list are not approved or endorsed by the USDA and all products may not meet the Gold Award of Distinction criteria. For more information about the criteria, please visit http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/healthierus/index.html. For more information about Let's Go!, please visit www.letsgo.org.

09/10 R12/10


Healthy Favorites Recipe Booklet This booklet is designed to help guide you on your journey to good health. The tips, suggestions, and recipes it provides will give you the tools to get started today!

To view and download this document, visit the After School Resources page at www.letsgo.org

06/12 R00/00



After School Toolkit 2012 OP