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This publication was produced in conjunction with the presentation of the second iteration of the International Biennial Prospect.2 New Orleans, held in New Orleans from October 22, 2011 to January 29, 2012. Conceived in the tradition of the great international biennials, such as the Venice Biennale and the Bienal de São Paulo, Prospect New Orleans showcases new artistic practices from around the world in settings that are both historic and culturally exceptional, and contributes to the cultural economy of New Orleans and the Louisiana Gulf region by spurring cultural tourism and bringing international attention to the area’s vibrant visual arts community. Prospect New Orleans is founded on the principle that art engenders social progress. It is organized by U.S. Biennial, Inc., a 501(c)(3) non-profit art organization that launched in January 2007 in order to realize Prospect.1. © 2011 U.S. Biennial, Inc. / Prospect New Orleans and the Artists ISBN: 10-0615549497

C o n c e p t a n d l ayo u t

Erik Kiesewetter | Constance e d i to r i a l c o o r d i n at i o n

Ylva Rouse e d i to r i a l ass i sta n t

Carrie Knopf printer

Printed in Canada by the Prolific Group t y p e fac e s

Plantin Std, Graphik and Minion Pro pa p e r sto c k

Domtar Lynx Opaque


Contents Foreword

Sophie Calle

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—Susan Brennan

Nick Cave

Prospect New Orleans: The Next Chapter

8

36

40 44

Jonas Dahlberg

24

Leaping into the Void: Recollections of Saint Claude —Miranda Lash

Dawn DeDeaux

52

R. Luke DuBois

56

George Dunbar

60

64

Keith Duncan

68

William Eggleston Official Venues

146

Exhibition Checklist Acknowledgements Special Thanks

156

72

Nicole Eisenman 148 154

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Bruce Davenport, Jr.

—Dan Cameron

76

Karl Haendel

80

Ragnar Kjartansson An-My Lê

84 98

Iván Navarro

Lorraine O'Grady

96

Ozawa Tsuyoshi 100

Gina Phillips

104

William Pope.L

108

Ashton Ramsey

112

Alexis Rockman Joyce J. Scott

92

116

Jennifer Steinkamp Dan Tague

120

124

Robert Tannen Grazia Toderi

128

132

Francesco Vezzoli Paweł Wojtasik

136

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Foreword Prospect New Orleans was conceived as a way to involve members of the international art community – artists, art professionals, collectors, and patrons – in the recovery of the city of New Orleans and its visual arts community, which had been hit hard by Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Local, national and international artists embraced Prospect.1 as an opportunity to participate in this heady context, and the result was an exhibition that achieved unprecedented critical acclaim. Although one of the important benefits of Prospect.1 was to provide a much needed boost to New Orleans’ ailing tourism industry, the more potent impact was that the artists embraced the biennial’s social mission, and directly engaged with the City’s unique history, culture, people, and institutions in order to produce art works that proved that the city’s proverbial heart was still beating. It is this tradition that Prospect.2 continues. For visitors from around the world, as well as those who live here, Prospect.2 is a chance to see the city through the eyes of some of today’s leading contemporary artists and visionaries. The art on view for these thirteen weeks will surely delight and inspire, inviting us all to fall in love with the city all over again. We are grateful to all of our loyal supporters, within New Orleans and beyond, as they have made the second iteration of New Orleans’ own art biennial possible. We are especially indebted to the ongoing support of our founding benefactor, Toby Devan Lewis. The Lambent Foundation Fund of the Tides Foundation; The Metabolic Studio; The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts; The Brown Foundation of Houston; The Helis Foundation; and a small group of local supporters, The Prospectors Club, have also provided major funding. Without their contributions, Prospect.2 could not have been realized. In closing, I’d like to extend my great thanks to our committed Board of Directors, the extremely talented staff and last but not least, our visionary Founding Director, Dan Cameron. It has been no small task to keep a start-up non-profit going, especially one as ambitious as ours, in the toughest economic climate for the arts on record. I continue to be inspired by their passion for the vision of Prospect, and their incredible resourcefulness and creativity. Those of us who live and work in the Crescent City are fortunate to live in a place filled with some of the most creative and talented people in the United States. Walking through the streets of New Orleans, it is easy to stumble upon great architecture, music, food, movies, and increasingly, contemporary art. For me it is a privilege and honor to be a part of this visionary project. Susan Brennan

Chairman, Board of Directors U.S. Biennial, Inc. / Prospect New Orleans

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Prospect New Orleans: The Next Chapter A Biennial is (Re) Born Saturday, October 22 was a heartbreakingly perfect autumn morning in New Orleans: dry, no clouds, temperatures in the mid-70s. There was a collective sense of anticipation in the air as several hundred visitors and natives gathered in Washington Square Park for the opening of Prospect.2. Moments after founding benefactor Toby Devan Lewis cut the ribbon and Councilmember Kristin Gisleson Palmer declared the art biennial open to the public, a nearby conductor gave a downbeat, and more than three hundred musicians began to play. The assembled crowd heard nothing; the musicians were at least five blocks away at the time, some as far as 15 blocks. All, however, were perfectly synchronized with the conductor, thanks to a broadcast click track that enabled the bandleaders from Roots of Music, Eleanor McMain High School, and O. Perry Walker High School to keep their players on beat, despite the distances. They were performing the world premiere of R. Luke DuBois’ The Marigny Parade, and because of its unique structure and its creation for this occasion, it was highly unlikely that the piece would be performed again in the foreseeable future. As the three uniformed bands played, they marched in parade formation toward the park, each with its own accumulated audience, so that as each ensemble arrived at Washington Square from five different directions in staggered sequence, the crowds swelled accordingly. By the time the piece was complete, a few minutes before noon, the atmosphere was festive and slightly surreal. The musicians all stood in one place performing, while the public milled around them, listening as the various parts of the composition wove together in the air, then dissipated.

Lorraine O'Grady, Art Is…, 1983 / 2009 Courtesy of the artist and Alexander Gray Associates, New York Band leader indicating to the marching band members following, the musical phrase to play for R. Luke Dubois’ The Marigny Parade.

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Much of the crowd slowly dispersed and began to visit the biennial, but a core of about 200 stayed behind to watch the Pinettes, New Orleans’ only all-female brass band, launch a set that began in the park and then became a second line moving through the streets of the Marigny and then into Treme (pronounced tre-MAY), winding up at the New Orleans African American Museum. Not only was there a Prospect.2 exhibition on view (Lorraine O’Grady’s legendary Art Is…, a series of photographs that document her float for the 1982 Harlem African American Celebration parade) but the equally legendary Leah Chase was there in person, serving up a hearty lunch cooked for the occasion at her nearby Dooky Chase restaurant.


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All afternoon and well into the night, the opening of Prospect.2 was an event that transformed spectators into participants. Shortly after 4 p.m., the seats at Café Istanbul at the New Orleans Healing Center were packed with fans of Joyce J. Scott, the Baltimorebased visual artist and performer. She led a quartet of local singers and instrumentalists on a whirlwind tour of her free-association world, with rehearsed songs and scripted fragments of monologue alternating regularly with improvised passages of rapid-fire shtick that brought together as many as three separate characters channeled by the artist’s bravura delivery. Scott had already wowed viewers at Newcomb Art Gallery with her extended suite of sculptures on the theme of violence against women, and many sitting there still had in their minds a visual image of her hair-raising life-size sculpture of a lynched woman hanging from a tree outside the gallery, overlooking Tulane University’s otherwise bucolic quad. By 6 pm, viewers had gone down to the Holy Cross neighborhood, where Robert Tannen had transformed a house into a real-time artwork titled Art by Committee. Dubbed the Art House on the Levee, Tannen’s creation sought to lead the public to recognize its fundamental role as co-creator. With dozens of cans of latex house paint and freshly washed brushes always at hand, each visitor could simply start painting on the canvascovered walls of the two main rooms, usually in collaboration with some previous co-participants whose work was nearby (canvases are changed weekly). The artist’s goal is to publicly present the miles-long mural painting, created in collaboration with hundreds of participants, at the end of the biennial.

Joyce J. Scott, If Life Were A Tree, 2003 Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and Artist, Baltimore, MD

On the street in front of the Art House on the Levee a crowd observed last-minute preparations for Blink, a six-mile, twelve-hour procession artwork by William Pope.L. Its components – a former ice-cream truck painted black with a cabin displaying a rear-projection slide show of city images lent by residents of the neighborhoods along the route – were fitted together with the team of 10 volunteers from St. Bernard Project, who would serve as the first group of pullers. Although scheduled to begin at sundown, the procession got off to a late start but moved surprising quickly into the gathering darkness.

Night was a clear prerequisite for anyone who wanted to inspect Dawn DeDeaux’s three-story video-installation extravaganza at the Historic New Orleans Collection’s Brulatour Mansion: The Goddess Fortuna and her Dunces in an Effort to Make Sense of It All, based loosely on John Kennedy Toole’s comic novel A Confederacy of Dunces. The piece was a melodramatic haunted-house environment, a dreamlike realm where a clutch of symbols and gestures from Toole’s masterpiece expanded and morphed into unexpected, obsessively twisted meanings. Not only do broad hints of that ‘other’ Confederacy – the one never mentioned in the novel – linger in the side galleries, but the central image of Ignatius Reilly’s bedroom, with its water bed/fountain, is ideally positioned. It conjures up images of the Goddess Fortuna in the persons of bounce stars Big Freedia and Katey Red, who gyrate and grind erotically as they underscore the novel’s obsessive attention to destiny foretold. By the time the guests trickled out of that Royal Street space, they were ready to partake in the most expansive opening night that the galleries along St. Claude Avenue have PROSPECT.2

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ever witnessed. Having successfully transformed themselves from Prospect.1 Satellite spaces in 2008 to full-fledged exhibition sites with year-round programs, the St. Claude Satellites, as they’ve dubbed themselves, are now the most visible symbol of the full transformation of the New Orleans art scene into a far more vibrant and unwieldy incarnation than anything that same community might have imagined prior to Hurricane Katrina. And in typical New Orleans fashion, the St. Claude openings continued into the wee hours of the morning.

Prospect.2 in the World In the fall of 2006, efforts began in earnest to develop Prospect New Orleans, the first major international contemporary art biennial for the city; New Orleans was still reeling from the flood, unleashed by collapsed levees, that covered four-fifths of the city in the wake of Katrina barely a year before. Because of the extreme impact of the damage on the lives of the city’s inhabitants, it was not surprising to discover that many people were unconvinced that art had any role to play in New Orleans’ recovery. The city’s needs, we organizers were told by those both within and outside of New Orleans, were far more extreme than anything contemporary art could be expected to provide or even address in a manner that would make much of a difference to people’s lives. Real-life problems like violent crime, severely damaged infrastructure, inadequate education standards, and the uniquely lethal combination of housing shortages and blight were having such a negative effect on the city’s livability that visual art seemed almost comically trivial by comparison. Besides, the national contemporary art community had shown little interest in New Orleans beyond the first flurry of post-Katrina auctions and fundraisers in late 2005, and it was hard to imagine members of that community paying attention to artistic activity so remote from the U. S. art mainstream. When Prospect.1 (November 2008 - January 2009) finally did take place, its impact far exceeded even the most optimistic expectations of its founders and supporters. By including 80 prominent artists from nearly 40 countries who developed projects for the city, the first edition of Prospect demonstrated that the city of New Orleans possessed a unique capacity for attracting and maintaining the art world’s attention. The short-term economic impact of a project that cost the city budget nothing to produce but delivered more than $25 million in benefits, was only the beginning. By linking so many venues across the full expanse of the city, Prospect demonstrated that it had the potential to transform New Orleans into the nation’s Venice, i.e., a unique cultural treasure whose inestimable value to the world contrasts with the precarious nature of its geographical location.

Dawn DeDeaux, The Goddess Fortuna and her Dunces In An Effort To Make Sense of It All, 2011, Installation view

The three years that have passed since Prospect.1 opened have brought a number of changes − local, national and global − that make its vision possibly even more compelling. The first and most overwhelming transformation has been in the world economy. In September 2008, just as Prospect.1 was ramping up its artistic production and paving the way for hordes of eager visitors – all of whom were invited to attend the biennial free of charge − the bottom fell out of the global economy. On September 15, Lehman Brothers, one of the largest investment banks in the world, declared bankruptcy and the

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world was thrown into economic turmoil. Within weeks of the Lehman announcement, businesses and individuals began to dramatically reign in their spending, canceling holiday parties and discretionary travel, and layoffs began to spiral. Stocks made a sickening plunge in the third quarter of 2008, with GDP close behind in early 2009, as the economy contracted to an extent not witnessed in more than a half-century. In retrospect, it might be possible that one of the factors that enabled Prospect New Orleans to weather the economic crisis was that it had never presumed to generate any income through admission costs, so that no anticipated revenues were lost when substantial numbers of wouldbe visitors cancelled their travel plans. Counterbalancing this somewhat serendipitous fact, however, were the substantial overages generated by Prospect.1’s production and infrastructure costs. This required an extended period of fundraising following the biennial’s close to pay off accumulated debts, bit by bit, while other funds were raised to mount Prospect.2, albeit a year later than hoped. While in the long run, the contemporary art industry turned out to be more insulated than one would have supposed from the full brunt of the financial crisis, many galleries and artists passed long months of anxious uncertainty before allowing themselves to exhale. Even so, the pain was probably felt most acutely by not-for-profits, particularly start-ups, because their survival is so closely tied to maintaining a good reputation within the art community on which they depend for support. The second of the meta-changes that altered the world in which Prospect.2 is taking place is a direct result of electoral politics. For most objective spectators, neither Ray Nagin’s City Hall nor George W. Bush’s White House ever managed to convince a skeptical public that they had a grip on events while they unfolded (or afterwards). Nagin’s chronic inability to govern the city effectively helped pave the way for a reform candidate, Mitch Landrieu, whose tenure so far – he took office in May 2010 − has already resulted in crucial reforms in the all-important area of law enforcement. Although some sectors, the cultural economy in particular, continue to suffer from lack of clarity and direction, the New Orleans public appears more inspired by its political leadership today than has been the case for a great many years. President Bush saw his legacy in south Louisiana severely damaged by the very public failures of former FEMA director Mike Brown and so-called ‘recovery czar’ Ed Bradley. Today, although Bush is still held in high regard among many conservatives, both Brown and Bradley are treated as figures of nearuniversal scorn among residents of the city, who stood by helplessly while rampant incompetence and cronyism undermined the good intentions of the American public to make New Orleans whole again. A third critical factor in re-positioning New Orleans as an artistic center through an international art biennial was the deeply traumatic impact of the BP oil spill following the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon rig in the Gulf of Mexico in April 2010. Although questions will linger for years about the impact of the spill on the Gulf environment, the incident itself seems to have triggered a reassessment by a large sector of the south Louisiana public about the long-term sustainability of the region’s heavy economic dependence on the petroleum industry. The post-Deepwater Horizon conundrum can be posed quite simply: if oil cannot drive the regional economy in perpetuity, what will?

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For many, the silver lining to the disaster has been a belated recognition that (1) Louisiana’s natural assets require responsible stewardship if they are to thrive and be relied upon in the future, and (2) the region’s quality of life, which is intrinsically tied to the remarkable richness of fish and shellfish in the gulf, lakes and waterways, cannot be left completely to the mercy of an industry that looks at safety and other regulatory goals as impediments to profit. Most Louisianans are only distantly aware that the overwhelming majority of oil industry profits bypass the region entirely. But there does seem to be a growing acknowledgment of the profound mismatch between the concerns of vast multinational corporations focused on profit margins and residents whose livelihoods are tied to the welfare of their local communities. Entangled in this argument is a growing awareness that New Orleans is one of the world’s most prized cultural destinations; the potential for the growth of cultural tourism is vast and under-recognized. In fact, it is probably not an overstatement to suggest that for most of the last century, the perpetually self-replicating nature of New Orleans’ music and food − still the bedrock of the city’s local cultural identity − seems to have engendered, somewhat counter-intuitively, a deep-seated complacency about their relative permanence. Unfortunately, the economics of culture hint at a very different and dynamic scenario. While it is probably safe to claim that most of New Orleans’ vibrant populations of musicians, writers, artists, and chefs remain residents of the city because they are frankly in love with it, there are distinct signs of change afoot. Post-Katrina, the city initially attracted a small army of architects, do-gooders and educators intent on deploying their skills to make the city a better place to live. By the time of Prospect.1 in late 2008, the demographics of that influx had shifted notably, and increasing numbers of creative artists, as well as those who work in areas indirectly connected to art-making, opted to make New Orleans their permanent home. Not only did this new wave of New Orleanians bring new skill sets, but they also brought a different level of expectations about how artists, musicians and writers could survive and prosper; in New Orleans an artistic vocation has too often meant living on substandard wages, with very little opportunity to reach a national or international audience. These new arrivals were, in effect, replacing an earlier generation of artists who, out of despair or basic frustration, had discovered that life in other U.S. cities post-Katrina did not entail the hardships and struggles that were too often accepted in New Orleans as a given. This line of discussion leads inevitably to the fourth, and possibly most important factor in the recent transformation of cultural life in New Orleans: the February 2010 victory of the New Orleans’ Saints in the Super Bowl, followed less than two months later by the premiere of David Simon’s highly-anticipated HBO series, Treme. Taken together, the Super Bowl victory and Treme’s debut were not simply instrumental in crafting a new narrative for New Orleans, but more significantly, both events truly surprised regular citizens all over the country and made the city’s name resound positively for the first time in nearly five years. Yes, New Orleans could indeed pick itself out of the mud left by the worst levee failure in modern history and go on to score the final Super Bowl touchdown with seconds to spare! It was a triumph that was savored as a balm to those whose homes had been rav-

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aged by the 2005 floods, and whose hearts were still healing. But the near-instantaneous impact of Treme suggested an even more all-encompassing development. The title of the series itself was a none-too-subtle suggestion that the oldest African-American neighborhood in the U.S. was such an integral – and important − part of New Orleans’ cultural and historical heritage that continuing to overlook it was tantamount to hiding the city’s light under a barrel. The neighborhood itself might be sorely lacking in tourist amenities − the density of restaurants, cafes, and the kind of retail stores that make the French Quarter simultaneously enchanting and bewildering − but suddenly it had a surplus of what New Orleans seems to need the most: well-informed, independent-minded, culturally-oriented tourists.

Interlude: Water, Water Everywhere Throughout Prospect.2 are examples of works by artists who see the city’s unique ecological situation as both the source of its recurring problems and its future potential. Similar to the way that numerous Prospect.1 artists took the aftermath of Katrina as their starting-point, Alexis Rockman, Grazia Toderi, and Paweł Wojtasik have all produced work for Prospect.2 that peer directly into New Orleans’ challenging relationship to the immense quantities of water that surround it on all sides. Of the three, Rockman is the only one who produced a new work on the subject, Battle Royale, an extraordinarily ambitious, large painting that depicts a kind of Armageddon of nature. Starting with more than 60 species, half of which lived in south Louisiana before the arrival of Europeans and half of which have been introduced since that time, Rockman shows us the animal kingdom at the point where territory and food have run out, resulting in inter-species aggression instead of peaceful coexistence. It seems too horrific to be true; it’s depicted as occurring far from human eyes, and his point is that we might not really know if it’s happened until it’s too late.

Paweł Wojtasik, From Below Sea Level, 2008/11.

Paweł Wojtasik began his 360-degree video, Below Sea Level, in late 2007, at a time when the city’s future seemed unclear. Without knowing much about New Orleans, he began to investigate and soon found himself documenting oil rigs, fishing, Mardi Gras Indian practice, and an assortment of other activities that are specific to the Gulf Coast. Although commissioned by MassMOCA, where it was first presented in 2009, Below Sea Level seems to have come full circle by being shown for the first time in the city that is its subject. Similarly, although Toderi had completed the video Atlante long before she was invited to participate in Prospect, it was clear that of all the works in her extensive oeuvre, this watery depiction of the fabled city of Atlantis, nestled at the bottom of the sea, was the one that New Orleans audiences would be able to relate to most directly.

Although her investigation into the lives of Vietnamese natives who moved to south Louisiana does not seem at first glance to be directly related to ecology, An-My Lê’s research uncovers an uncanny natural resemblance between the Mississippi and Mekong Deltas. In fact, her series of more than 30 photographs seems ambiguously poised between representing the cultural dimensions of Vietnamese PROSPECT.2

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life and exploring its close relation to nature. It’s difficult for the casual viewer to even know for sure where the photographs were taken. By leaving out explicit traces of her subjects’ origin, Lê brings the viewer into a more ambivalent relationship to her otherwise straightforward choice of images.

Indians, Identity, and Post-Modernity The distance between Newcomb Art Gallery and the Ogden Museum of Southern Art is but a few miles, but for the duration of Prospect.2 that road is also notable for the lesser known Backstreet Cultural Museum, which is located in the heart of Treme. Although not a venue for Prospect, Backstreet has nevertheless played an important role as one of the city’s unparalleled cultural treasures; it manages to be the city’s most consistent repository for and promoter of Mardi Gras Indian and second line culture. Not only was Backstreet the literal source for much of Victor Harris’ Big Chief suits when he participated in Prospect.1, but it is in Backstreet’s context as a cultural beacon that Prospect.2 artist Nick Cave traces his connection to that same tradition. Although he is from the Midwest and currently lives and works in Chicago, Cave’s polymorphic embrace of the world of sculptural clothing, from Tootie Montana to Leigh Bowery, is an important development in the broader cultural recognition of Mardi Gras Indian practice as a vernacular art tradition that demands museum status. Cave’s connection to Mardi Gras Indians might not always be evident in the five examples of his Soundsuits on view at Newcomb, but the richness of his materials and the opulence of the suits’ surfaces are partly conceived in homage to the steady faith and dedication that a relatively unheralded contemporary like Harris, or Montana in his time, applies to his own New Orleans-specific art.

Ashton T. Ramsey with his Gambler Suit, Mardi Gras Day February 16, 2010

Meanwhile, the Ogden Museum is playing host to the suits of Ashton Ramsey, an elder statesman of the downtown cultural circuit that centers on Mardi Gras Indians, second line parades, and social aid and pleasure clubs. While growing up, Ramsey used to help his older brother sew Indian suits, but as an adult he opted instead for a form of self-expression that required less detail, less expense and less time-intensive labor. By the early 1990s, Ramsey was making regular appearances on Mardi Gras morning dressed in men’s suits that had been customized with images and words taken directly from the headline news. One year he appeared as the world’s first cell phone, in a large and ungainly box, while another year he was the Gambler, bedecked in a red suit that was covered in discarded lottery scratch-off cards. The five suits proudly displayed at the Ogden represent the first-ever survey of Ramsey’s art, but they also function as a kind of summing-up of a practice sustained over time, in which the moment of the suits’ first appearance fades, but their impact increases with memory.

Although the highly detailed drawings of Bruce Davenport, Jr are not illustrative of Mardi Gras Indian culture, they do pay homage to a tradition that is at least as important to indigenous New Orleans: high school marching bands. For decades, the incomparable reputations of New Orleans’ marching bands has been a source of

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local pride, not least of all within the schools, which compete with each other. These schools regularly host scouts from southern colleges and universities who recruit young musicians from New Orleans’ schools for their own marching bands, often providing significant scholarships to support the students’ higher education. In Davenport’s drawings, we always see the bands and musicians in uniform, in formation and often in mid-parade as well. What seems to be at the heart of his work is the principle that New Orleans’ distinction as a town of incomparable brass musicians owes everything to its high school bands. They inspire discipline, competition and pride in the young people who make the cut, while providing them with a trade that might last their whole lives; the large number of professional brass bands that work all year round in New Orleans’ clubs and concert halls, as well as at official ceremonies, weddings, funerals, and second line parades are evidence of this pipeline.

Art Tourism 101: Bring It On! Contemporary art is a multi-billion dollar business, and art tourism is one of the fastest-growing sectors of the travel industry. During only five days in December, the Art Basel Miami Beach art fair, now the largest in the world, generates an estimated five hundred million dollars in art sales, and tens of thousands of hotel rooms are booked solid for the art fair and its satellites. When the 54th Venice Biennale closed in November after a six-month run, it had generated an average of 14,000 ticket sales each week. Since the U. S. economy has not improved much since Prospect.1 opened in late 2008, such figures are doubly impressive; they indicate an area of the world economy that is actually growing. That is why the organization of a project on the scale of Prospect New Orleans also means asking the citizens and elected officials of New Orleans to fully use their imaginations to consider the magnitude of the opportunity in their hands. The long-term vision of Prospect New Orleans hinges on a marriage of two principles: people already enjoy coming to New Orleans to indulge their hedonistic, musical and culinary tastes, and the art world, justly famed for its sophisticated tastes and impressive flow of discretionary capital, might bring these tendencies to bear profitably upon the city. The roots of this particular revelation are embedded in the immediate post-Katrina months, when one cultural industry after another developed inventive and heartfelt ways to support New Orleans’ struggle back into viability. A major exception to the more arm’s-length charity-auction model that many people felt was the most appropriate way to respond to New Orleans’ near-destruction was Paul Chan’s unforgettable 2007 production of Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, staged on empty lots in the devastated Lower 9th Ward, where a vibrant community had thrived little more than two years before. Chan’s total immersion into the byways of New Orleans’ culture, which among other things resulted in an unprecedented merger of art classes at the University of New Orleans and Xavier University, was a dramatic alternative to remote cultural efforts. New Orleans’ artists, unsurprisingly, had a locally grown plan in mind. The idea of Prospect was born at an impromptu meeting of members of the visual arts community at Arthur Roger Gallery, during which I blurted out the hypothetical possibility of a biennial as a way of thinking creatively. It was painfully clear that day to anybody who was

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listening that the visual artists’ community in New Orleans saw itself as endangered. Not only were the artists omitted from the national conversation about New Orleans’ unique cultural role, but even at home they often felt themselves to be, as one artist memorably put it, the “red-haired stepchild” of New Orleans’ culture. Lacking the ability to draw national attention to itself, New Orleans’ contemporary visual artists community was uniquely poised to benefit from a signature event along the lines of the Art Basel Miami Beach annual art fair, as was New Orleans as a whole. Imagine the cachet of having the international contemporary art world arrive on one’s doorstep, with the accompanying and considerable residual benefits for local galleries, restaurants, hotels, stores and even museums and drawing out-of-town visitors in nearly unprecedented numbers. Most urgently, the artists needed to introduce into the broader cultural dialogue the role of contemporary art in New Orleans during the post-Katrina era, and to frame that issue – and the art itself − in the collective imagination with valid and arresting possibilities. At a point in the national conversation when a loose majority of Americans seemed to have mixed feelings about what happened to New Orleans in 2005 and in the first year or so after Katrina, it seemed very much worth the effort to go big as a way of dismantling and replacing the inherited negative impressions with freshly hopeful ones. What if the city of New Orleans actually happened to also possess a world-class art scene, and what if that art scene was just lying in wait for the next Saatchi, the next Prada, the next Dakis to come along and sweep a whole generation of artists into the forefront of the world’s attention? Would it be possible for the city of New Orleans to recognize this opportunity and to embrace the possibility that contemporary art could be as important to the city’s future as food and music have been to its recent past? And just as vitally, could America embrace New Orleans in that brand-new role? Prospect.1 New Orleans needed to have an impact on the art world from the outset and make its concept extremely clear. It was a sweeping panorama of an exhibition, but one conspicuously lacking in national pavilions and prizes for the best artist(s). It appeared to be a survey exhibition without a theme, but dozens of individual works were developed with the city’s ongoing plight firmly in mind. Above all, it was hoped that the humanitarian intentions behind Prospect would be totally subsumed by the breathtaking quality of the art. It went without saying within the art world of 2008 that an open-minded visit to New Orleans constituted an act of participatory two-way healing, between those who suffered directly and those who suffered as witnesses, maximizing a point in time when like-minded souls from both inside and outside the art bubble could interact with each other in a mutually beneficial way.

Retooling the Past for the Future As one of the most prominent living French artists, Sophie Calle has developed a body of work since the early 1980s that is as equally rooted in literature as it is in visual representation. She has documented her own uneasy progress through a succession of lovers, losses, discoveries and coincidences, while managing to create a semi-fictitious self-portrait in which it is never entirely clear who is the artist and who is the creation. For her Prospect.2 project, Calle developed an intervention into the Louisiana State Museum’s historic 1850 House, in which objects and narrative details from her own

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life mingle with those of the quasi-historical personage after whom the museum has been patterned, the Baroness Micaela Almonester de Pontalba, who built the house and surrounding apartments as a real estate venture in 1850, when New Orleans was at its economic peak. The porous line between the fictitious nature of ‘historic’ museums that dress the past in forms that are meant to be palatable to the present-day imagination, and the invented scenography of Sophie Calle’s imagination, creates a wavering sense of reality that slips regularly into fiction when we are unable to recognize which is the staged history and which comes from the life of a present-day artist living and working in the same Paris on which the 1850 House is modeled. Nearby, at the U.S. Mint, two very different forms of historic investigation explore the recent past, with an unapologetic nod to the current moment. The distinguished photographer William Eggleston, who has long been celebrated for his ability to use color as a means of evoking emotional depth in even the most unpromising subjects, is represented by two separate media, photography and film. A series of nearly 30 blackand-white photographs taken of patrons in bars in Memphis during the 1970s is shown in a gallery adjacent to his film, Stranded in Canton. Both were kept out of sight for decades. While both are easily recognized as originating in historical frameworks, they also have an unexpected force. As images, they are as much about our recognition that they would be as indelible as some of Eggleston’s better-known works are to us today had they only been seen earlier. The Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson, who regularly collaborates with musicians, unexpectedly produced the last known film of the Mississippi bluesman Pinetop Perkins as part of a 2010 collaboration with the nonagenarian pianist. The artist occasionally appears at a microphone to declaim his own positions about aesthetics, while Perkins, mostly ignoring him, creates a steady swirl of blues patterns that seem to ebb and flow with the late afternoon light cresting behind him. History, or at least the form of American history taught in schools, comes in for a different sort of investigation in Dan Tague’s installation, Department of Civil Obedience, which deploys the graphic language of institutional power and resistance to express a fundamental unease with political conformity in American thought. Mixing symbols of rehabilitation (youth rebellion t-shirts fashioned into an American flag), homelessness (an abandoned car used for shelter), power (a muscle car hood) and resistance (rubbings from New Orleans lampposts describing various eras of outside ‘dominance’), Tague’s intent isn’t so much to give contemporary political protest a concrete visual form as it is to address the ways that we collaborate in the suppression of our own liberty. His art visualizes means of subversion that take place right before us, without our even being aware of it. Ragnar Kjartansson, Song, 2011, Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and Galleri i8, Reykjavik

Also visible at the CAC is a selection of six decades’ worth of abstract paintings by Slidell artist George Dunbar, who began experimenting with gestural abstraction in the 1950s; a time when the gold standard for such an approach was developed by artists such as Franz Kline and Sam Francis. In recent years, Dunbar’s contribution to abstract painting in the South has generally been centered on an easily recognizable vocabulary of labyrinthine geometric compositions created on clay relief surfaces and highlighted with gold and silver leaf. However,

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Dunbar has kept his gestural proclivities active throughout this time, and the present combination of collages from 50 years ago, assemblages from the 1970s, and a new clutch of smaller works convey the youthful vitality of a painter half Dunbar’s age. History is clearly at the heart of Karl Haendel’s monumentally scaled drawings of medieval knights in armor. In the distant past, these suits were experienced as symbols of invulnerability and power; today they are merely anachronistic. The idea that a man could venture onto the battlefield sheathed in a metal casing that all but prevented the free use of his limbs seems like utter folly today, but that is perhaps because we have come to know warfare as an automated activity, in which fingers press buttons to launch bombs that destroy the lives of unseen individuals hundreds and even thousands of miles away. To the artist, this choice of subject is a backhanded reference to the act of drawing itself; he employs it to the exclusion of all other media so that the works can address their own potentially archaic condition as a way to get the viewer to experience representation anew.

New Orleans Plays Itself By far, the most frequently encountered subject in Prospect.2 is New Orleans itself – not as an urban experience, but rather as a set of prevailing conditions that have the ability to determine a particular reality. The projects by Keith Duncan, Gina Phillips, Robert Tannen, and Ozawa Tsuyoshi all evince a desire to capture something of the city’s essence and to transform it into a meaningful visual form. Keith Duncan, a native son who lived in New York City before returning to New Orleans, presents a suite of recent paintings, first shown at the Cue Art Foundation in New York, in which images of hope intermingle freely with those of despair. A young man’s funeral and the pollution of the coastline, hardly minor topics, are shown alongside images that portray the continuity of daily life. In Gina Phillips’ fabric paintings at the CAC, a distinct air of nostalgia hangs Keith J. Duncan, Requiem for a “Nigga”, 2010 over the evocative images chosen to trace an unbroken line between life and death. Her source for much of the imagery is New Orleans’ Holt Cemetery, a working class graveyard that contains innumerable artifacts from the lives of the dead; the grave markers are often handmade, and blankets or carpets are used to cover more recent burials. By installing her images in an upwardly spiraling swirl, Phillips engages the architecture of the CAC to play an active role in transforming dozens of separate images into a single dynamic shape. Robert Tannen, who has long represented the conceptual possibilities of new art in New Orleans, always deploys art to examine larger issues that he feels need to be explored more thoroughly. His original proposal for Prospect entailed transforming the derelict World Trade Center into a stylized lighthouse, but after months of securing agreements from various city agencies, the WTC organization refused him permission to use the building. Tannen proceeded to make his own comment about the ethics and aesthetics of group behavior in a collaborative painting called Art by Committee, which I’ve described earlier in these pages. Ozawa Tsuyoshi, a first-time visitor to the city, has performed a similar operation

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wherever he has exhibited his work internationally; he invites a local female participant to create dinner by shopping for the necessary groceries, and then he documents the process. The signature image in this procedure is the ‘vegetable weapon.’ He creates a portrait of the woman who will be doing the cooking brandishing the groceries as a soldier would her weapons. In New Orleans, the emphasis on local cuisine did not alter the process significantly. The actual cooking process became a bit more communal, but the resulting documentation gives a new spin to the familiar singularity of gumbo prepared and consumed by people who have lived with it their whole lives. In Ozawa’s case, being an eternal tourist also dovetails with his desire to explore what being an outsider really means. Although Nicole Eisenman’s paintings at the New Orleans Museum of Art do not appear to have a direct relationship to New Orleans, their thematic grouping as a lineup of more or less normal ‘guys’ works both as a backhanded critique of the masculine ethos that guides most American Paint brushes at the ready for Robert Tannen’s Art By Committee collaborative installation. culture, and as a particularly comic take on the stereotyped gender roles that are regularly on un-self-conscious display in all traditional societies. To us, Eisenman’s ‘protagonists’ seem, in turn, gullible, self-aggrandizing, and clueless in their self-directed confidence, and it is only their patent inability to perceive themselves as we see them − i.e., as vulnerable − that enables us to peer beyond the externals and appreciate the flimsy defenses jerry-built around the frail ego within.

The JazzFest Syndrome: A Mixed Blessing New Orleans currently possesses a model for cultural tourism that is markedly distinct from the rest of the country: JazzFest. The overwhelming success of the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival and its central place in the evolution of the local cultural tourism industry hides the years of relative obscurity endured before the festival became a universally recognized icon after its rapid expansion during the 1980s and 1990s. In fact, if one was only aware of JazzFest in its current manifestation – several hundred thousand tourists who enjoy seven days of music at a dozen stages spread across the city racetrack over two successive late spring weekends − it would be hard to recognize the seeds of the current extravaganza in the community-based celebration that was born in the early 1970s. For years organizers seemed happy to attract a mostly local following. Over time, as JazzFest grew in terms of both artistic scope and economic impact, it also spawned a surprising number of spinoff festivals, from largescale state-of-the-art spectacles like the rock- and hip-hop-oriented Voodoo Music Experience to smaller local celebrations such as Satchmo Fest, which in scale is much like JazzFest was 40 years ago. Today, there are long swaths of the calendar when each weekend features a different music or food festival, appealing to distinct but overlapping demographics – gumbo lovers, zydeco fans, blues fanatics, and even champions of the humble mirliton (a vegetable also known as chayote). The musical and culinary traditions on which JazzFest and its heirs are based are so rich and self-sustaining that it is hard at first to see how this model could be faulted. Approximately a million people each year are willing and able to buy a plane ticket to New Orleans and book a hotel room, in large part because they want to sample that particular PROSPECT.2

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pair of quintessential New Orleans experiences. However, a closer look at the presentday situation suggests that while the city’s musical heritage is such that it has no problem producing world-class musicians, a disproportionate number of its best-known musical artists – including Wynton Marsalis, Harry Connick Jr., Dr. John, and the Neville Brothers – currently reside in other U.S. cities, and those who remain often struggle to find consistent and well-paying work. At present, New Orleans does not have a recording or concert industry that even remotely corresponds to the city’s extraordinary influence on American popular music, yet it remains home to a startlingly high number of musical artists whose work is supported with passion and intensity by local fans, but whose name recognition does not extend far beyond a handful of parishes. The most significant downside to the use of such a model to promote the works of a local visual art community − or an international biennial of contemporary art − is that it does not allow for many ways in which contemporary visual art is distinct from its musical and culinary cousins. Of these differences, perhaps the most pervasive is the sweeping manner in which regional models of art-making have been displaced during the past three decades in favor of a ‘global village’ model that no longer recognizes a meaningful distinction between local or international, between outsider or avant-garde, or between the proclivities of collectors or curators in New York, Moscow, Beijing or New Orleans. Today, all art is simultaneously local and global, which is an advantage only if one is situated in a place where the two frames of reference naturally intersect, but far less so if one’s location is far off the beaten path of biennials, art fairs, major collectors, wellendowed art museums and academies, and galleries with international programs. More pointedly, by adopting the festival paradigm as its center of gravity at a time when many metropolitan centers have increasingly turned to museums and visual arts culture, New Orleans runs the risk of placing all of its eggs in a single basket. The issue at stake is not whether New Orleans is home to a critical mass of visual art activity on a par with its enviable roles in music and food – the consensus seems to be that it is − but how to promote and market New Orleans art to the outside world. Clearly, leadership on this issue will come from the ground up. As can be witnessed with the success of the St. Claude co-op gallery scene, visual artists have their own way of making an impact on the world around them. Will these artists’ example now be heeded by those who profess to understand and appreciate their significance, and who are in a position to create policy for nurturing and sustaining the newly energized art community’s contributions?

The Spatial Dilemma In the works of Jonas Dahlberg, Iván Navarro, Lorraine O’Grady, and Jennifer Steinkamp, a number of ideas converge about the articulation of space within both private and public realms. Dahlberg’s video work, which was created from an architectural model of a large and spacious interior, consists of a single, extended pan of the video camera from one side of the room to the other, revealing as it travels through the space an eerie sameness that lends a dreamlike ambience to the imagery. Although it soon becomes fairly clear that the work is a simulation of an actual constructed space, the unreality suggested by the continuous movement of the camera acts to create a suspension of disbelief on the viewer’s part, so that there is a tension created by our desire to accept the work itself as a kind of improved reality. Since there is no break when the

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sequence is completed − the video simply starts again − this fantasy can be sustained for as long as the viewer wishes. Navarro’s project, titled The UNO Fence, was designed in seven-foot sections, each of which radiates an intense, bright bluish light. First deployed to surround the Paul Kasmin Gallery’s booth at an art fair with an ornamental obstruction, it transformed the cubicle into a space that was simultaneously alive with visual power but also blocked by a physical barrier that prevented people from entering the booth itself. In some cases it sent them heading in the opposite direction. Reconfigured for New Orleans, The UNO Fence can also be interpreted as a work that addresses the divide between an artwork and the institution that hosts it. We enter the space freely, but Navarro’s work does not let us interact with the gallery’s outer perimeter, instead confining us to the zone closest to the entrance and office. Steinkamp, a pioneer of computer-driven abstract animation who lives and works in Los Angeles, chose the Rodin niche in the lobby of the New Orleans Museum of Art as the ideal location for an architectural animation that transforms the spot into a kind of liminal space – a threshold that appears to beckon the visitor to cross into another realm. Using her signature imagery of trees that seem to be inhabited by intelligent, highly mobile forces, the artist successfully activates the ‘empty’ space surrounding the projection. The rest of the museum’s interior wall and staircase become transformed into a framing device for a visual illusion that is utterly convincing. O’Grady’s photographic installation at the New Orleans African American Museum is both a deployment of public space for potentially subversive ends and an object lesson in recent history. A one-day performance held in September 1983 on the occasion of the Harlem African American Day parade, the work was provoked/inspired by a comment from a feminist friend that “the avant-garde doesn’t have anything to do with black people.” In the photographs, 15 young dancers and actors ride a float that carried a 9 x 15-foot antique-styled gold frame that captured everything surrounding it as art, while smaller gold picture frames were deployed by the performers to bring spectators into the action. The shouts, unheard here, of “Frame me, make me art!” and “That’s right, WE’RE the art!” have become part of the legend surrounding the work. Even by themselves, the photographs do not just record the magic of the moment, but capture a moment in Harlem’s, and in African-American, history that seems like a time capsule to us today.

Epilogue: Piazza d’Italia When it was first suggested to me that the Piazza d’Italia serve as a venue for Prospect New Orleans, I actually thought the speaker was joking. However, like so much about the city, the piazza’s back-story was far more fascinating than I had imagined. The more I looked into the city’s early history as a beacon for emigrating Italians, the more profound the decision to create this public monument seemed. The fact that it was Charles Moore’s first mature work as an architect, as well as the earliest known expression of the postmodern style in American architecture, more or less guaranteed that once it was completed it would be misunderstood, especially in a city that lacks other examples of that one-time architectural revolution.

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For Italian artist Francesco Vezzoli, the challenge of making a work of art especially for New Orleans was rooted in questions of Italian-American identity as seen from Italy. Those questions seem as much a part of the patchwork quilt that is modern-day America as they are tied to any sustained effort to interpret Italian-American contributions from the perspective of the mother country. For this reason alone, the varying fortunes of the Piazza d’Italia in modern-day New Orleans became a kind of challenge to him, since the task of anchoring the semiderelict plaza with an artwork depended less on style and execution than on the precise choice of subject. Enlisting the movie star Sophia Loren as a kind of surrogate for Italy itself, the artist depicts her holding up a 1913 version of Giorgio de Chirico’s iconic painting, Piazza d’Italia, which Moore often cited as an inspiration. In the original, de Chirico depicts the Roman goddess Ariadne standing in very much the same place where Loren presides and wearing a very similar garment. Vezzoli’s artistic preoccupations – with the inherent tension between contemporary art’s celebrity-styled marketing of young artists and its contradictory aspiration to produce works that will be cherished by posterity – are in full force with his highly stylized contribution to Prospect.2. Although he did not require a special visit to New Orleans to develop his concept (he was a guest at the opening of Prospect.1) Vezzoli’s ability to employ layered readings of his subject make the finished work one of the most subtly sitespecific works of the entire biennial.

As New Orleans contemplates its future as a tourist destination, it could do far worse than to keep Vezzoli’s site-specific example in mind: New Orleans must embrace the principle that what art does, first and foremost, is take something that is hopelessly misunderstood – or that may not even Preparatory mock up for Francesco Vezzoli’s Portrait exist − and make it visible for all the world to appreciate and enjoy. New of Sophia Loren As The Muse of Antiquity (after Giorgio Orleans should also acknowledge the economic potential in attracting de Chirico), 2011 visitors who want to participate. Even when the perspective of visual revelation includes the very defects that we don’t want outsiders to see, the universal truth remains; while we cannot ever have the power to see ourselves as others see us, we are forever changed by the act of being seen. DAN CAMERON

Founding Director and Chief Curator U.S. Biennial, Inc. / Prospect New Orleans

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Leaping into the Void: Recollections of Saint Claude On a good Saturday night along Saint Claude Avenue, you can almost feel a kind of electricity floating through the air.1 Over the past five years, the second Saturdays of each month have become marked as the time for art openings along this recovering commercial thoroughfare.2 Ride down this two-mile stretch along the 1 Many thanks to the individuals who gave their time Marigny and Bywater neighborhoods, and every few blocks you will be and memories towards the construction of this essay: welcomed by the glow of an open gallery door, usually with folks chatting Andy Antippas, Brad Benischek, Kyle Bravo, Anthony outside, drinking beer and smoking cigarettes. During most of the year, Campbell, Hannah Chalew, Dawn DeDeaux, Courtney Egan, Bill Fagaly, Susan Gisleson, Lindsay Glatz, openings along this street are shirt-soaking hot and crowded. The humidStephen Kwok, Shawn Hall, Delaney Martin, Christoity, however, does not dampen the spirits of the artists proudly exhibiting pher Saucedo, and Elizabeth Shannon. their work in spaces often built by their own or other artists’ hands. To an outsider accustomed to a more formal version of the art world, the 2 This tradition was launched by Andy Antippas (who galleries on Saint Claude might appeal for their welcoming attitude and relocated Barrister’s Gallery from Oretha Castle Haley to Saint Claude in 2007), Jeffery Holmes (who relohand-scrubbed charm. Though there might be barbeque roasting outside cated L’Art Noir from Mazant Avenue to Saint Claude and keg beer served in plastic cups, there is something serious going on. in 2006) and Adam Farrington, who established FarA once-fledgling art scene is asserting itself and growing every month. rington Smith gallery on Saint Claude in 2006. The What began mostly as artists visiting other artists’ shows, has now become three synchronized their openings on the second Saturday of the month, so as to not interfere with the part of a social, largely youth-driven phenomenon that is contributing to openings on Julia Street on first Saturdays. the evolution of a city hard-hit by disaster not so long ago. The Saint Claude art scene was an entity born out of necessity. Its roots trace back (depending on who you ask) to artists moving into the Marigny and Bywater around the late 1970s and 80s in search of cheap studio and living space. Others credit Andy Antippas with having a pivotal role in galvanizing the area as an “arts district.” Antippas moved his Barrister’s Gallery from Oretha Castle Haley Blvd. to Saint Claude in 2007, occupying the space beside the artist Richard Thomas who ran an important artist hub there in the 90's. In the decades preceding Hurricane Katrina, contemporary exhibitions in New Orleans were centered largely in the Warehouse District, in galleries along Julia Street and at the Contemporary Arts Center, which was founded in 1976. In City Park, the New Orleans Museum of Art also mounted a number of contemporary shows, the most notable series being the New Orleans Triennial, which traced its legacy back to 1886 and ran through 2005.3 Galleries uptown on Magazine 3 Dan Cameron, founding director of Prospect, curated Street provided another track for commercial sales. Despite these venues, the 1995 installment of the New Orleans Triennial. many artists, particularly those of a younger generation and those making art that did not easily translate to commercial context, felt limited by the Into the Void, 2011, Generic Art Solutions, Courtesy of the artists. lack of opportunities available to exhibit their work. Sensing that they

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might never be included inside Julia Street’s doors, Saint Claude became a seedbed for those motivated to clear a space for themselves. From the beginning the Saint Claude spaces distinguished themselves from their Julia Street counterparts in several ways. First, they are largely governed and maintained directly by their participating artists (as opposed to gallerists or outside arts institutions). Secondly, because properties were affordable enough to be purchased, rented, and maintained by artists without the need for art sales, they allow artists the freedom to create exhibitions and installations that are not commercially driven.4 Armed with a DIY mentality, the artists are under no restrictions as to the content or scope of their own exhibitions other than the limitations of their own funding and the duty of returning the space to its previous condition. Thirdly, from their inception 4 The affordability of housing also contributed indithe vast majority of these artist spaces demonstrated a commitment to rectly to the launching of these galleries. As Anthony not only showing their own work, but also work by outside artists. This Campbell explains “houses in New Orleans were big cross-pollination has built networks with artists from other cities; at times enough for many artists to make art at home, which means they aren’t necessarily also having to rent a these outside partners have reciprocated in showing New Orleans artists studio. That made paying the rent on a shared gallery in their own cities. Above all, it helps ensure that the art remains relatively space more doable.” fresh, expanding the galleries’ rotation beyond solely members’ shows. Two milestones played pivotal roles in the recent development of Saint Claude’s newly designated “arts district”: first, the cataclysmic failure of the levees in 2005 following Hurricane Katrina, which submerged eighty-percent of the city underwater. The total extent of this preventable tragedy—which resulted in at least 1,300 lives lost, financial damage estimated between $125 billion and $250 billion, the untold psychological pain—is impossible to quantify. Nevertheless, out of the shadows of this disaster came new opportunities for hope. The international media lens shone on the 5 Foundations that played key roles in the revitalizacity more brightly than ever in its recent history. While horrifying news tion of the arts and arts institutions include the Getty footage poured out, support from grants-giving organizations and artist Foundation, the Andy Warhol Foundation, Transforma Projects (launched in 2005), and the Joan Mitchell residencies came in.5 Perhaps even more significant than the money, Foundation. however, was the pervading survivalist mentality that encouraged artists to rally together and think innovatively about the process of reconstruct6 My own presence in New Orleans is due to the New ing their communities. It was a chance to rebuild under a new model. A Orleans Museum of Art’s decision to create a Modern and Contemporary Art curator position in 2008, for city once famous for its almost militant insularity and protection of its the first time in its then 97-year history. heritage opened itself up to change in ways never before seen.6 The second watershed was U.S. Biennial's Prospect.1, which opened on Halloween 2008. This is not to say that there were not galleries and artistic activity taking place on Saint Claude before Prospect. It is clear, however, that the scale and ambition of the international biennial, coupled with its strategic decision to place some of its venues in the devastated lower Ninth Ward and at the Studio at Colton, fostered a significant degree of art tourism down this avenue, which was not previously known for having any tourist appeal. Some artists wanting to capitalize on the biennial’s art traffic used the event as an impetus to launch their own exhibition spaces along Saint Claude, Good Children Gallery and The Front being two notable examples. Galleries mounted shows synced to be on view during the first biennial (as many are doing again for the second). Artists expanded their ambition, eager to present their best work during this crucial window. In addition to providing Saint Claude with a boost around the time of its opening, Prospect also played a role in a general upswing of optimism permeating the area, which lead to the founding of more galleries along Saint Claude long after the after the first biennial had past. Artists and curators from around the world became interested in New Orleans, attracted by the sense of wide-open possibilities available PROSPECT.2

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in the strange post-Katrina landscape, combined with the hope for a recurring biennial that would continue to attract the art world’s gaze. The following vignettes capture some of my experiences on and around Saint Claude. They are not meant to provide a comprehensive history (which merits a much longer treatment). Rather they are meant to provide windows into the issues affecting the artists who have lived and worked in the area, and helped shape Saint Claude:

Dinner with Elizabeth Shannon One bite of Elizabeth Shannon’s gumbo z’herbe and you might feel like you’ve drifted into hearty, leafy heaven. Dining in her home and studio on Dauphine Street one January night, my husband and I felt transported to the inventory room of Louisiana’s material history. Beautiful and dusty examples of cypress wood, balls of twine, animal bones, and castings from alligators adorned this warmly lit space that feels like a postmodern reconstruction of a swampy past shot in sepia tone. Born in Morgan City, Louisiana, Shannon’s family had been in the hardware and marine business since 1872. Fortified by expertly mixed sazeracs, Shannon recounted her career’s self-guided tour through Cajun culture, along the way learning how to trap, skin and cook alligators (her gator sauce piquant is another specialty). On the wall she displays photos of Dovie Naquin, a Cajun who into his nineties tracked these scaly beasts into the swamps. We watched a TV recording of young Shannon explaining to a newsman how to get the gator meat just right.

Elizabeth Shannon, 2009 © Tina Freeman

7 Prior to Frenchmen, Shannon lived at an artist gathering place on Esplanade Avenue, known as The Last Resort, founded in 1974.

8 The 511 Marigny building opened in 1992, providing studio space to artists, including, among others, Dawn DeDeaux (its first resident) and the Ark Collective. Christopher Saucedo, who moved to New Orleans in 1992, recalls the activity surrounding Mitchell Gaudet’s Studio Inferno, which opened at 3000 Royal Street in 1991. 9

Artist Dawn DeDeaux recalls “Quintron was an early fixture, and Jay Poggi (aka MC Tracheotomy) was key with his house/ nightclub called the Pearl…puppet shows became popular, Miss Pussycat and others… BJ’s Bar was a hip joint down in the low [Marigny], and the R Bar was happening in the high.”

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Her copper-toned hair in a bun, eyes glowing behind her dark rimmed glasses, Shannon’s passion for Louisianan culture is matched by the deep roots she has cultivated in her neighborhood. She moved to the Marigny Rectangle from an artist enclave on Frenchmen Street (Frenchmen had been a gathering place for artists, mostly through the 1980s).7 She recalls arriving at Temperance Hall in the Marigny in 1980, an enormous space that allowed for both living and studio space, and was ideal for Sunday afternoon salons and art parties. Artist Clifton Webb soon moved into a floor beneath her. The area at the time had an “interdisciplinary” vibe, with a small community of musicians and writers. The high school New Orleans Center for Creative Arts (NOCCA), which had been founded in the Marigny in 1973, had been inspiring development around the area, acting as a public art venue and stimulating cafes and bookstores. In the early 1990s another wave of artists moved into the Marigny, as Shannon explains, often leaving the French Quarter for “cheaper rents.” 8 “At the time, artists had been exhibiting in their studios and living rooms,” she recalls. Throughout those early years art viewing and creative activity mostly took place in studios (the CAC took part in sponsoring open studio days), and in bars, clubs, and underground spaces.9 When the neighborhood associations organized house tours in the Marigny and Bywater, which brought visitors in from other parts of the city and beyond, Shannon recalls: “We had a patrol car circling the home tour…


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because attendees were afraid of the area—many from New Orleans had rarely crossed Esplanade Avenue.” Flash forward to 2011, and Shannon looks with dismay at the slow process of gentrification taking place in the New Marigny, Saint Roch, and Saint Claude residential neighborhoods and commercial development along Saint Claude Ave. Having now lived in the Marigny and Bywater for over thirty years, Shannon has seen artist communities flourish and later relocate for reasons of affordability. As the rents slowly increased in the French Quarter and the Marigny triangle in the 1980s and 90s, artists shifted downriver, to the Bywater (Shannon moved to the Bywater herself in 2000 for a better studio space). The Bywater began to reflect this change in the early 2000s, with galleries and increased artistic activity surfacing around the area.10 She laments, “Now the Bywater is expensive and artists are going to Holy Cross, Saint Roch, 10 Jeffery Holmes’s L’Art Noir appeared on Mazant Avetc.” She points out the vandals who attacked the new Healing Center, a enue in 2002. The Bywater Art Market also launched colorfully painted performance space, yoga studio and food co-op, which in 2002, at the time the only art market in the city. Side was opened by developer Pres Kabacoff and his wife, voodoo priestess Arm Gallery opened on Saint Roch in 2003. In 2004 artists Kyle Bravo and Jenny Le Blanc (future founders Sallie Ann Glassman, in the summer of 2011. This damage, she warns, of The Front) founded the Hot Iron Press as a print is symptomatic of a “serious divide” brewing between those desiring shop, and artist José Torres Tama launched NOLA gentrification in the neighborhood, and those who fear overdevelopment Open Studio, a day of open house studio visits. will oust those most in need of lower rents.

Food for Thought On an April evening in 2009, I arrived at Antenna Gallery on Burgundy Street with a pot of baked beans in tow. The beans were for an event titled “Out of the Same Pot,” sponsored by the New Orleans Post-Racism Group, a gathering of individuals dedicated to “encouraging understanding between all races and classes.” Having read and heard much about the legacy of slavery and segregation in this city, I was curious what kind of gathering I might find. Was the title of the Group an aspiration or a manifesto for a new way of life in this violence-ridden city? I was relieved to walk into a room full of varied skin-tones, mostly artists or arts-affiliated (some of whom were members of Antenna), all interested in showing their support for a dream the city so desperately needed.

Out of the Same Pot: Susan Gisleson, Willie Birch, and Courtney Egan, April 18, 2009. Courtesy of Antenna Gallery © Mimi Zarsky

The charge was simple and classically New Orleanian in that it began with food. Bring a dish to the potluck and be prepared to tell a story about it. Then, with the help of twine, nails, and ladders, allow the cookware to become part of a nine-day installation at the gallery. Once the dishes were laid out on beautifully lacquered wooden tables, the stories began to creep forward – tales of family recipes and traditions, personal pasts and heritages. The mood was relaxed and congenial, balanced with enough intellectual curiosity to prevent a full-on “Kumbaya” session. The colored pencils came out, and soon people were drawing phrases on the walls: “Red beans and rice: a metaphor for life” read one. The surreal assortment of culinary materials hanging from twine inspired another to write, “Dada is in the AIR.”

I had been to Antenna Gallery before to see art shows. The gallery is an outgrowth of Press Street, a non-profit literary and visual arts collective, founded during the sumPROSPECT.2

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Leaping into the Void

mer of 2005 (before Katrina). Press Street (named after a street in the Bywater) had its first show/book release in June 2006 at L’Art Noir on Saint Claude in what Susan Gisleson described as a “gutted gallery space, stapling contractor paper to the studs.” The 2006 event’s enthusiastic attendance reflected the degree to which “folks were starved for cultural activity,” demonstrating the role of these art spaces as a way of feeding the community by creating a positive response to trauma. I think back to this potluck, when debates over the racial divides on Saint Claude flare up. These debates tend to point out the obligations of the artists (mostly white) in engaging with their community (now a combination of whites, blacks, and newly arrived Latino immigrants). Race will be an issue that the galleries, no longer the newcomers on the block, will continue to face.

Living for the Moment In a darkened school auditorium, I found myself vegetating in a massage armchair, looking up at the sublime twinkling of lights overhead. The Prospect biennial just opened to the press on Thursday, October 30, 2008, and between the installation process and scurrying between the biennial’s venues, I was, frankly, exhausted. Sinking into my chair I mentally processed the past few days, while being hypnotized by Cai Guo-Qiang’s Fireworks from Heaven. Located in the hollowed out remains of Charles J. Colton Junior High School, an uncanny feeling of nostalgia crept into the marrow of the architecture. In the months leading up to Prospect.1 the school had become The Studio at Colton, an exhibition, studio, and office space, which operated for one year before being returned to the city’s Recovery School District. The previous days had brought together a series of baroque extremes, with juxtapositions perhaps only possible in New Orleans, where a champagne toast can take place outside a building rotting out from its interior. For the opening of Prospect.1 art glitterati from around the world flew into the city, curious to see how New Orleans was faring in the wake of the destruction, and what great art might look like in its context. Lavish parties were held and residents of the Lower Ninth were soon surprised to see busloads of art tourists roll past their doors. It was a heady time. For some, the opening days of Prospect.1 brought a degree of euphoria that can never be fully replicated, because its joy was wrested from having survived something terrible. “We are alive, Dammit!” seemed to be the underlying thesis of the first biennial and its satellite spaces. But at that moment no one was certain, really, what would happen after the circus was over. More recently in 2011, artist Kyle Bravo shared with me, “When we started The Front, we had no idea how long it would last.” He and his wife Jenny LeBlanc founded The Front in 2008 with the goal of creating a self-sustaining, democratically structured collaborative and exhibition space. At first it was anybody’s guess whether this utopian concept could keep going. Anthony Campbell, a member of the nearby Good Children Gallery, similarly described the founding of Good Children as a “Leaping into the Void” moment, taking a chance on building a space together, without over-thinking what the future might bring. The idea of the future still felt precarious in 2008. We had all just evacuated during the summer for Hurricane Gustav (a city-mandated precaution). The city was still eggshell fragile. One crack in the levee and it was back

T WENT Y-NINE


MIRANDA LASH

to square one. Could this damaged place sustain a burgeoning yet fragile art scene? Three years later the fact that most Saint Claude galleries are still remaining, seems to answer with a proud but cautious “yes.”

Old Good Friends I first met Christopher Saucedo when he was manning the gallery at Good Children during the summer of 2008. Gallery sitting was just one of the duties Good Children members were responsible for sharing, along with the rent, wall-spack11 Campbell, one of the founding members of Good ling, janitorial duties, voting on new members, and manning the beer Children, recalls living in an apartment above what is now the gallery space (formerly a motorcycle repair keg. Particularly during its first year, gallery sitting on weekends in the shop). When the shop closed, Campbell spoke with heat of summer was not an enviable task. It might be hours between artists Srjdan Loncar, Stephen Collier, and Dan Tague visitors, although Campbell laughs at the fact that the name of the gallery about the idea of renting the space to show work during Prospect.1. The Good Children were quickly assembled. led some neighbors to drop their kids off there.11 Saucedo, a University of New Orleans sculpture professor for many years, talked with me about the possibility of teaching at UNO, which is the alma mater for a large fraction of Good Children’s members. The gallery never set out to be an enclave for UNO alumni. Rather, Campbell remembers, it has to do more with who was available: “the UNO kids tended to stick around after graduation,” he said. This familiarity and camaraderie, however, proved essential in propelling the collective leap of faith and commitment the gallery needed to get going. Prior to the storm and Prospect.1, the primary channel for new artists to enter New Orleans was through the universities, coming in as faculty or students through the MFA programs at Tulane University and UNO, and the undergraduate programs at Loyola, Xavier, and Dillard. Many of the students and faculty who decided to settle in New Orleans long-term formed bonds that later clustered into art spaces and exhibitions. The fact that other friends were already nearby made the going a bit easier. For example, Campbell and Saucedo recall being encouraged to choose Saint Claude as a location, in part because of Barrister Gallery’s popularity. It could be said that the glue that holds the Saint Claude art scene together is the trust and collegiality of its players, spiced with a healthy sense of competition. Another way to say this is: artists felt comfortable counting on each other to pay the rent because they often were already friends, or at least knew about each other. For a struggling artist on a shoestring budget, sharing rent is a big deal, even if housing around the Bywater is (or at least used to be) relatively affordable. There has to be a substantial benefit for feeding the kitty. While it is hoped that these benefits will translate into art sales, in the meantime the focus seems to be on the opportunity to show work in an atmosphere that demands excellence before a jury of one’s peers. Thus, the Saint Claude galleries have played an important role in not only cultivating art, but curatorship as well. In between the openings, there is a lot of work to be done, emails to send, meetings to call. Explaining what makes this deliberately loose structure work, as Saucedo says, “we were all old, good friends.” That can mean a lot, especially when the rent comes in a little on the late side.

PROSPECT.2

THIRT Y


Leaping into the Void

Out of the Ashes Delaney Martin has a vision. Propelled by a seemingly bottomless sense of dedication and willingness to work, her goal is to build a magical structure on Piety Street (a few blocks off Saint Claude) called Dithyrambalina or The Music Box. The overall structure was designed by street artist Swoon (aka Callie Curry) to be inhabited by a wide variety of musical instruments, which visitors can activate through touch, or simply by moving through the house. The project is an outgrowth of New Orleans Airlift, an organization Martin founded in June 2007 with Jay Pennington (DJ Rusty Lazer), dedicated to the transference of art and ideas between New Orleans and the broader world. Airlift struck up a friendship and partnership with Swoon, initially with the goal of converting a house Pennington owned on Piety into the Music Box structure. One afternoon in November 2009 Martin invited me to Piety Street, to tell me more about the Music Box, with the idea that perhaps the New Orleans Museum of Art could be a potential partner. I remember approaching the shotgun house, one of the most ancient in the Bywater, originally built out of bargeboards used to transport goods down the Mississippi Delaney Martin, Serra Victoria Bothwell Fels, and RanRiver in previous centuries. Adorned on the façade with a large wheatjit Bhatnagar at The Music Box on Piety Street, 2011, Courtesy of New Orleans Airlift © Melissa Stryker paste print by Swoon, the old house creaked as we gingerly made our way through the structure, which retained a few snatches of wallpaper on its walls. There was a lot of work to be done, but Martin seemed optimistic as we sat down for tea in the backyard. She assured me the house was safe, and then, in a moment that seemed almost cinematic in its timing, a loud snap came from the house as one of the renovators/artists moved away a piece of board. A half-second later the entire structure (thankfully with no one inside) collapsed to the ground in a cloud of dust. Teacups still in hand, Martin and I looked at each other, and decided to shift our plans. In time for the second iteration of Prospect, Airlift has erected an interim structure (in lieu of attempting to salvage the house): a Shantytown Sound Laboratory, which is a grouping of miniature houses and shanties on the same site, exhibiting sound works by roughly two dozen artists. Made out of salvaged architecture, the sonorous village aspires to be its own community center in its own right with open access and public performances. Like a phoenix the architecture is being reborn, proving that you can’t keep a good house down.

Together We Can Move Mountains In mid-August 2011, I received an email from Stephen Kwok, a young artist working in a studio/project space he shares with four other artists called “T-Lot.” The lot,

THIRT Y-ONE


MIRANDA LASH

Stephen Kwok and Hannah Chalew at T-Lot 12 Other examples include Trouser House, a contemporary art and urban farming initiative, which was founded in October 2009, Byrdie’s, a gallery and café opened in May 2010, N.O.L.A Open Studios re-launched in November 2010, and Staple Goods (on Saint Roch Avenue), an artist collective, opened in September 2011. 13

Inspired by the success and traffic received by other Saint Claude galleries, Lawrence Jenkens, then chair of the UNO art department, convinced Al Merlin, president of UNO alumni association, to lease the building to the department for one dollar per year. The space is now a venue for alumni and MFA thesis exhibitions, which previously had been relegated to the UNO Lakefront campus.

named for its T-shaped form, comprises of a grass and gravel yard, and a two-story cinderblock space where the artists maintain their studios. I went to see Stephen’s art and learn more about T-Lot, one of several spaces for making and viewing art that has cropped up in the wake of the first Prospect biennial.12 The impact of the biennial on this freshfaced group of artists was rather direct: Stephen came from Houston to see Prospect, was inspired by the biennial and the city and immediately began dreaming of a way to be in New Orleans when the second biennial rolled around. The dream got under way when Kwok and artist-friend Hannah Chalew searched on craigslist for a studio space, they gathered four other artists to share the rent, and by July 2010, T-Lot was born. Our first stop was the UNO gallery, where Kwok also had a few pieces on view, in a show curated by alumni Dan Tague. Run by the University of New Orleans art department, the gallery is the first university-sanctioned space on Saint Claude and launched in January 2009.13 With ambitious goals and an earnest demeanor, Stephen took me next to the nearby T-Lot, his “favorite place on earth.” Chalew was also working there that afternoon. A New Orleans native, she draws homes in the city overcome by vines, capturing the fate of abandoned buildings that fall prey to cat’s claw and neglect. Upstairs, we chatted despite the heat, Chalew and Stephen recounting to me the fervent love that the Lot has engendered in them for their spot. “It inspires us,” she said, explaining how the possibilities they see latent in the space pushes them to explore its potential. I remember the word “beautiful” kept coming up.

Looking out to the empty lot, I was fascinated, and gradually, convinced. What could be more beautiful than a group of artists successfully carving out the means to show art on their own terms? Despite the specter of gentrification, an 8,000 square foot lot is still within their reach, meaning there is still plenty of room for growth. The artists have a large-scale show planned in conjunction with the second Prospect. The email for their Kickstarter fundraiser campaign was appropriately titled “Together We can Move Mountains.” MIRANDA LASH

Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art New Orleans Museum of Art

PROSPECT.2

THIRT Y-T WO


THIRT Y-THREE


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2010

Hasselblad Center, Göteborgs Konstmuseum, Göteborg, Sweden; Rachel, Monique, Palais de Tokyo, Paris, France; Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaek, Denmark 2009

Born 1953, Paris, France — Lives and works in Paris, France

Sophie Calle

Museum of Modern Art, Salvador de Bahia, Brazil; Palais des Beaux-Arts, Brussels, Belgium 2008

Take Care of Yourself DHC/Art Foundation for Contemporary Art, Montreal, Canada; Bibliotéque Nationale de France, Paris, France 2007

Take Care of Yourself, French Pavilion, 52nd International Art Exhibition, Venice Biennale, Venice, Italy; Douleur Exquise, collaboration with Frank Gehry and Edwin Chan, Rotunda 1 de Bonnevoie, Luxembourg, Germany 2003

M'as-tu vue?, Sophie Calle – Retrospective, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, France; Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, Ireland; Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin, Germany RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2011

12th Istanbul Biennial, Istanbul, Turkey 2010

The Talent Show, P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center, New York, NY; Memories of the Future, Leeum Samsung Museum of Art, Seoul, South Korea; Human, Museum of Modern Art and Contemporary Art, Nice, France; Exposed: Voyeurism, Surveillance, and the Camera, Tate Modern, London, England; The Talent Show, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN; Haunted: Contemporary Photography/Video/ Performance, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, NY 2009

1989. End of History or Beginning of the Future?, Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna, Austria; From Private to Public: Collections at the Guggenheim, Guggenheim Museum Bilboa, Bilboa, Spain; The Lens and the Mirror: Self-Portraits from the Collection, 1957-2007, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY

2011

True Stories Installation View Courtesy the Artist and Paula Cooper Gallery, New York Prospect.2 New Orleans, 1850 House, Louisiana State Museum, New Orleans

PROSPECT.2

THIRT Y-SIX


6 He was the most intelligent man I had ever known. One day he called to invite me to lunch, and proposed we meet the following week. Somehow the idea of the pleasure I would have from listening to him was countered by a malaise: The fear of not being up to it. So, to ready myself I asked him what we would talk about. It was an exercise that I knew was as silly as it was vain, but one that would comfort me. D. chose a theme instantly: What makes you get up in the morning? I prepared myself all week, accumulating all kinds of answers. When the day came, I asked him for his opinion on the matter, and he said: "The smell of coffee.� That was it. Then we changed the subject. At the end of the meal, after the coffee was served, I stole a cup as a memory of our lunch together.

7 Tuesday, March 10th, 1992, at 11:50 a.m., he threw the following in my direction: an empty tea kettle, a butcher's block, a yellow love seat, four pillows, a biography of Bruce Nauman and a black phone. When the phone hit the wall, I understood it would be preferable to meet his request and listen. By 1:00 p.m., everything was back in order except for a hole left in the wall. I hid this last bit of evidence with our wedding picture.

THIRT Y-SEVEN


SOPHIE CALLE

12 Amelie and I were eleven years old. We had a habit of stealing from department stores on Thursday afternoons. We did this for one year. When her mother began to suspect it, in order to frighten us, she said that a policeman had spotted us and reported our activities to her. But because of our age, he was giving us a second chance. He would now follow us, and if we stopped stealing, he would forget about the past. In the following weeks, we spent most of our time wondering who the policeman hidden among all the people around us was. In our attempts to lose him, we were now too busy to steal. Our last robbery had been a pair of red shoes too big for us to wear. Amelie kept the right shoe, and I kept the left.

13 I nearly got married to a man who had been posted to China for three years. That’s a long time. Like a fiancée whose betrothed is bound for the front, I wanted to marry him on the runway at Roissy airport, just before he left. The groom would step up into the plane as I stood on the tarmac. The reception would be held without him and I would spend my wedding night alone. We set the date for October 7, 2000. Negotiations with the airport authorities, mayor’s agreement to officiate, license, guest list, dress – everything was ready. Until a letter from the state prosecutor arrived refusing permission. Weddings had to be celebrated on municipal premises, with two exceptions: hospital, in the likelihood of imminent death of one of the betrothed, or prison. So, town hall, jail, agony, these were our choices. Banal, radical or tragic. Still, on October 7, I did go to the airport to wear my dress, just once, and to grieve for our wedding. And I did go back home alone, as planned.

PROSPECT.2

THIRT Y-EIGHT


15 No matter how hard I try, I never remember the color of a man's eyes or the shape and size of his sex. But I decided a wife should know these things. So I made an effort to fight this amnesia. I now know he has green eyes.

16 When I was fourteen my grandparents suggested that I needed plastic surgery. They made an appointment with a famous cosmetic surgeon, and it was decided that my nose should be straightened, that a scar on my left leg should be covered up with a piece of skin taken from my ass and that my ears should be pulled back. I had doubts, but they reassured me, I could change my mind up until the very last moment. In the end, though, it was Doctor F. himself who put an end to my dilemma. Two days before the operation, he committed suicide.

2011

True Stories Installation View Courtesy the Artist and Paula Cooper Gallery, New York Prospect.2 New Orleans, 1850 House, Louisiana State Museum, New Orleans

THIRT Y-NINE


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2010

Lost-and-Found, Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City, MO 2009

Nick Cave: Meet Me at the Center of the Earth, travelling exhibition 2008

Born 1959, Missouri — Lives and works in Chicago, IL

Nick Cave

Second Skins, Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville, FL 2006

Nick Cave Soundsuits, Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Winter Park, FL; Soundsuits, Chicago Cultural Center, Chicago, IL 2005

Soundsuits, Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild, Pittsburgh, PA 2004

Soundsuits, Holter Museum of Art, Helena, MT 2001

Amalgamations, Allentown Art Museum, Allentown, PA RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2011

Go Figure, Smart Museum, University of Chicago, IL; Pandora’s Box: Joseph Cornell Unlocks the MCA Collection, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, IL 2010

Now What?, Norton Museum, Miami, FL; Disidentification, Goteborgs Kunsthalle, Sweden; Dead or Alive, Museum of Art and Design, New York, NY 2009

30 Americans, Rubell Family Collection, Miami, FL, traveling exhibition; re-AdDRESSing Identities: Clothing as Sculpture, Katonah Art Museum, New York, NY 2008

Fashion Forward, Islip Art Museum, Long Island, NY; Of the Cloth, Shore Institute of Contemporary Arts, NJ; Hot House: Expanding the Field of Fiber at Cranbrook, Reading Museum, Reading, PA

2009

Soundsuit Fabric, appliquéd crochet and buttons, knitted yarn and metal armature 96 x 27 x 14 in. Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham, AL

PROSPECT.2

FO RT Y


2006

Soundsuit Cotton, twigs, mannequin, and armature 80 x 62 x 48 in. Collection of Christopher Vroom

FORT Y-ONE


NICK CAVE

2011

Installation View Prospect.2 New Orleans, Newcomb Art Gallery, Tulane University, New Orleans

2006

Soundsuit Afghan, cotton and found beaded fabric, mannequin and armature 80 x 30 x 22 in. Private Collection, courtesy of Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

PROSPECT.2

FORT Y-T WO


FORT Y-THREE


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2010

Galerie Nordenhake, Berlin, Germany 2009

Juana de Aizpuru Madrid, Spain 2007

Galeria Foksal, Warsaw, Poland 2006

Born 1970, Borås, Sweden — Lives and works in Stockholm, Sweden

Jonas Dahlberg

FRAC Bourgogne, Dijon, France 2005

Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Sweden; Bonner Kunstverein, Bonn, Germany (solo with Jan Mančuška) 2004

26th Bienal de Sao Paulo, Brazil (national representative) RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2011

Architecture De film, Centre Pompidou, Paris, France 2010

Still/Moving, The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Israel; The Moderna Exhibition, Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Sweden 2009

Three. The triptych in Modern Art, Kunstmuseum, Stuttgart, Germany; Anabasis. Rituals of Homecoming, Ludwik Grohman Villa, Lodz, Poland 2008

Western Motel - Edward Hopper and Contemporary Art, Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna, Austria 2006

Taipei Biennal, Taiwan; Dark Places, Santa Monica Museum of Art, Santa Monica, CA 2005

Contradicting Architecture, Marian Goodman Gallery, Paris, France 2004

Somewhere, Elsewhere, Nowhere, Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee, Scotland 2003

Dreams and Conflicts, 50th Venice Biennale, Italy 2002

Manifesta 4, The European Biennial of Contemporary Art, Frankfurt, Germany

PROSPECT.2

FORT Y-FOUR

2008

Three Rooms Installation View 3 channel video 46 inch monitors Duration 26:58 min. Courtesy of the Artist and Galerie Nordenhake, Stockholm/ Berlin and Galeria Juana de Aizpuru, Madrid


2008

Three Rooms: Location studies Bedroom, Dining room, Living room Framed lambda prints mounted on aluminum, 49 x 73 ½ in. ea. Courtesy of the Artist and Galerie Nordenhake, Stockholm/ Berlin and Galeria Juana de Aizpuru, Madrid

FORT Y-FIVE


JONAS DAHLBERG

PROSPECT.2

FORT Y-SIX


2011

2011

Macbeth

Macbeth

One channel video Still images from video Duration: 11:24 min.

Installation View

Courtesy the Artist and Galerie Nordenhake, Stockholm

Prospect.2 New Orleans, Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans Courtesy the Artist and Galerie Nordenhake, Stockholm

FORT Y-SEVEN


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2011

All I Need Is 1 Pen – John Hope Franklin Center, Duke University, Durham, NC 2010

This Some Bad Shit, As If Gallery, New York, NY

Born 1972, New Orleans, LA — Lives and works in New Orleans, LA

Bruce Davenport Jr.

RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2011

Double Crescent, C24 Gallery, New York, NY; The World According to New Orleans, Ballroom Marfa, Marfa, TX 2010

The Angola Project, Mahalia Jackson Center, New Orleans, LA; Off the Wall, Coup d’oeil Consortium, New Orleans, LA; Frenchmen, Desire, Good Children, Lambent Foundation, New York, NY 2008

City Stage, Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, LA

2011

The Harder The Crawl, The Brighter The Crown (6th series) Archival marker on handmade paper 40 x 60 in. Benetton Collection, Treviso, Italy. Courtesy of Diego Cortez Arte Ltd., NYC

PROSPECT.2

FORT Y-EIGHT


FORT Y-NINE


BRUCE DAVENPORT JR.

PROSPECT.2

FIFT Y


2011

I Do What I Do But I Don’t Like Doing It Alone!!! (6th series) Archival marker on handmade paper 40 x 60 in. Benetton Collection, Treviso, Italy. Courtesy of Diego Cortez Arte Ltd., NYC

FIFT Y-ONE


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2009

Elements of Nature, Pepperdine University Museum, Malibu, CA 2008

Swan Songs for A Falling House and Glass Floor, KK Projects, New Orleans, LA; Dawn DeDeaux: New Media, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL; Pattern: The Order of Chaos, McKinney Avenue Contemporary, Dallas, TX 2006

Hess in Dallas: Lebensraum and Other Spaces, Texas A&M University, Visualization Laboratory, College Station, TX 2004

Domestic Disturbance, Salina Art Center, Salina, KS 1996—97

The Face of God, Nexus Contemporary Art Center, Atlanta; Huntington Museum of Art, Austin, TX RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2011

The World According to New Orleans, Ballroom Marfa, Marfa, TX; Then and Now, Contemporary Art Center, New Orleans 2010

Water, Sun Valley Center for the Arts, Sun Valley, ID; Shoot’n Southern: Women Photographers, Mobile Museum of Art, Mobile, AL; Frenchmen, Desire, Good Children, Lambent Foundation, New York, NY 2008

In Katrina’s Wake, installation Hurricane Suite in 9 Movements, Blanton Museum of Art, Austin, TX; Photo and Phantasy, Carnegie Museum, Oxnard, CA 2007

Katrina: Catastrophe and Catharsis, Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, Colorado Springs, CO; The Eclectic Eye, Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, LA 1998

New Orleans Triennial, New Orleans Museum of Art, New Orleans, LA 1994—95

Black Male: Representations of Masculinity in Contemporary American Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY; Armand Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, CA

PROSPECT.2

FIFT Y-T WO

Born 1952, New Orleans, LA — Lives and works in New Orleans, LA

Dawn DeDeaux


2009

Soundsuit Mixed Media Image courtesy of James Prinz Photography

T WENT Y-NINE


DAWN DeDEAUX

2011

The Goddess Fortuna and her Dunces In An Effort To Make Sense of It All Installation Views Prospect.2 New Orleans, Brulatour Mansion and Courtyard, The Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans

PROSPECT.2

FIFT Y-FOUR


FIFT Y-FIVE


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2008—2010

Hindsight Is Always 20/20, traveling exhibition, Ulrich Museum of Art, Wichita, KS; Chrysler Museum, Norfolk, Virginia; Scottsdale Public Art Program, Scottsdale, AZ; Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN

Born 1975, United States — Lives and works in New York, NY

R. Luke DuBois

2009

Hard Data, commissioned by Turbulence, Net Art 2008

Dialog:City, Democratic National Convention, City of Denver Public Commission, displayed at Denver Center of Performing Arts, Denver, CO RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2011

Transmediale, Berlin, Germany (with Fair Use Trio); iLmage: The Uncommon Portrait, Portsmouth Museum of Art, Portsmouth, NH 2010

Data Mining, A + D Gallery, Columbia College, Chicago, IL; Common Sense: Art and the Quotidian, Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN; Mapping Language, Carlsten Gallery, University of Wisconsin Stevens Point, Stevens Point, WS 2009

Superlight: Selections from the 2nd Biennial 01SJ Global Festival of Art on the Edge, Museum Of Contemporary Art, Cleveland, OH; Three Decades of Contemporary Art, California Center for the Arts, Escondido, CA; Made in USA: Recent American Video, Łaźnia Center for Contemporary Art, Gdańsk, Poland 2008

01SJ Biennial a Global Festival of Art on the Edge, San Jose Museum of Art, San Jose, CA; DigitalART.LA, Los Angeles Center for Digital Art, Los Angeles, CA 2007

Speed 3, IVAM, Valencia, Spain 2006

Cybernetic Sensibility, Daelim Museum, Seoul, South Korea

2011

The Marigny Parade Views of the performance on October 22, 2011 by the Roots of Music Marching Crusaders, the Eleanor McMain Marching Mustangs and O. Perry Walker Charger Marching Band Courtesy of the artist and bitforms gallery, nyc

PROSPECT.2

FIFT Y-SIX


FIFT Y-SEVEN


R. LUKE DuBOIS


THIRT Y-ONE


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2008

Shaw Center for the Arts, Baton Rouge, LA 2007

George Dunbar, Southern Masters Series, Ogden Museum of Southern Art, New Orleans, LA

Born 1927, New Orleans, LA — Lives and works in Slidell, LA

George Dunbar

2002

University of the South, Sewanee, TN 1997

Mining the Surface, New Orleans Museum of Art, New Orleans, LA 1994

Retrospective, Cultural Arts Center, Slidell, LA 1964

Delgado Museum (New Orleans Museum of Art), New Orleans, LA RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

University of New Orleans, Fine Arts Gallery, New Orleans, LA Rose Museum, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA Temple University, Philadelphia, PA Denver Museum, Denver, CO Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham, AL

2011

Action Painting No. 1 Purple and taupe acrylic on paper 20 ½ x 17 in. Courtesy of the artist and Heriard-Cimino Gallery, New Orleans

PROSPECT.2

SIXT Y


2011

Action Painting No. 8 Red and white acrylic on paper 15 他 x 18 他 in. Courtesy of the artist and Heriard-Cimino Gallery, New Orleans

2011

Action Painting No. 12 Black and blue acrylic on paper 14 x 16 in. Courtesy of the artist and Heriard-Cimino Gallery, New Orleans

SIXT Y-ONE


GEORGE DUNBAR

2011

Action Painting No. 7 Taupe and white acrylic on paper 37 x 43 in. Courtesy of the artist and Heriard-Cimino Gallery, New Orleans

PROSPECT.2

SIXT Y-T WO


2011

Action Painting No. 14 Black and tan acrylic on paper 22 x 28 in. Courtesy of the artist and Heriard-Cimino Gallery, New Orleans

SIXT Y-THREE


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2011

Born 1971, New Orleans, LA — Lives and works in New Orleans, LA

Canary Arts Collective, New Orleans, LA 2010

Keith Duncan

Cue Arts Foundation, New York, NY 2009

Message to the Press Surreal Paintings by Keith J. Duncan, GSL Artprojects, New Orleans, LA 2008

Three Years in the Making: PostKatrina Images, GSL Artprojects, New Orleans, LA RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2011

Nasa|Art: 50 Years of Exploration, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, Washington, D.C., traveling exhibition 2009

Heaven and Hell, Williamsburg Music Center, Brooklyn, NY; The Big Apple Meets the Big Easy, GSL Artprojects, New Orleans, LA; Eclectic Urbanism, Space, Time, and Rhythm, Intercultural Museum Art Gallery, Baltimore, MD 2006

Urban Individualists, Tustin Center, Philadelphia, PA 2001

Black Romantics, Studio Museum, Harlem, NY; Documenta USA, Museum of Contemporary Art, Detroit, MI 2000

The Word as Art: Contemporary Renderings, American Bible Society, New York, NY 1996

A Social History IV, Bronx River Art Center and Gallery, Bronx, NY 1994

Actaeon's Hart: A show of Self-Revelation, PS122 Gallery, New York, NY

2010

I got my “Mo’jo” Back Acrylic on fabric on canvas 6 x 8 ½ ft. Courtesy of the artist

PROSPECT.2

SIXT Y-FOUR


SIXT Y-FIVE


KEITH DUNCAN

PROSPECT.2

SIXT Y-SIX


2010

Upon This Land Acrylic on fabric on canvas 6 x 10 ½ ft. Courtesy of the artist

SIXT Y-SEVEN


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2011

Anointing the Overlooked, Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Nashville, TN 2010

Paris-Kyoto, Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo, Japan 2009

William Eggleston: Paris, Foundation Cartier pour l’art contemporain, Paris, France, traveling exhibition 2008

William Eggleston: Democratic Camera, Photographs and Videos 19612008, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY, traveling exhibition 2007

Portfolios, Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich 2003—05

William Eggleston: Los Alamos, Museum Ludwig, Cologne, Germany, traveling exhibition; Cadillac Portfolio, Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, IL 2002

William Eggleston, a selection of 25 Recent Photographs, Documenta XI, Kassel, Germany 1998

William Eggleston, Hasselblad Award Winner, Hasselblad Center, Göteborg, Sweden; Bilbao, Spain RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2011

The Spectacular of Vernacular, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN, traveling exhibition; Mannerism and Modernism: The Kasper Collection of Drawings and Photographs, The Morgan Library & Museum, New York, NY 2010

Starburst: Color Photography in America 1970-1980, Cincinnati Art Museum, Cincinatti, OH, traveling exhibition 2009

America, The Beirut Art Center, Beirut, Lebanon 2008

Vivid Vernacular: William Christenberry, William Eggleston, and Walker Evans, The Menil Collection, Houston, TX

PROSPECT.2

SIXT Y-EIGHT

Born 1939, Memphis, TN — Lives and works in Memphis, TN

William Eggleston


1973

Untitled (From the Nightclub Portraits) Gelatin silver prints From a series of 30 prints 38 x 26 ¾ in. ea. © Eggleston Artistic Trust; Courtesy of Cheim & Read, New York

SIXT Y-NINE


WILLIAM EGGLESTON


1973

Untitled (From the Nightclub Portraits) Gelatin silver prints From a series of 30 prints 38 x 26 ¾ in. ea. © Eggleston Artistic Trust; Courtesy of Cheim & Read, New York

SEVENT Y-ONE


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2009

Nicole Eisenman: The Way We Weren’t, The Tang Museum, Skidmore College, Saratoga, NY 2007

Le Plateau, Paris, France; Kunsthalle Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

Born 1965, Verdun, France — Lives and works in New York, NY

Nicole Eisenman

2005

Chunga en el callejon del Cuajo, Museo de Arte Carillo Gil, Mexico City, Mexico (with Jesusa Rodriguez) 2003

The Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Ithaca, NY 1998

Behavior, Rice University Art Gallery, Houston, TX 1995

Centraal Museum Utrecht, Utrecht, Holland; Walter/McBean Gallery, San Francisco Art Institute, San Francisco, CA RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2011

The Air We Breathe, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, CA; Invitational Exhibition of Visual Arts, American Academy of Arts and Letters, New York, NY 2010

Painting Like a Feminist, The Jewish Museum, New York, NY; At Home / Not At Home: Works from the Collection of Martin and Rebecca Eisenberg, CCS Bard Hessel Museum of Art, Annandale, NY 2009

Compass in Hand: Selections from the Judith Rothschild Foundation Contemporary Drawings Collection, Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY; Everywhere. Policies of Sexual Diversity in Art, Centro Galego de Arte Contemporánea, Santiago de Compostela, Spain; The Endless Renaissance, The Bass Museum of Art, Miami, FL 2008

Just Different, Cobra Museum of Modern Art, Amsterdam, Holland 2007

eFEMera: The Art of Feminist Activism, University Art Museum, Binghamton, NY; Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, Museo Nacional De Bella Artes, Buenos Aires, Argentina

PROSPECT.2

SEVENT Y-T WO

2011

Breakup Oil, mixed media on canvas 56 x 43 in. Collection of Bob and Bonnie Friedman, courtesy of Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects


2011

Guy Capitalist Oil, mixed media on canvas 76 x 60 in. Courtesy of Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects

SEVENT Y-THREE


NICOLE EISENMAN

2011

Guy Racer Oil, mixed media on canvas 76 x 60 in. Courtesy of the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects

PROSPECT.2

SEVENT Y-FOUR


2011

Guy Artist Oil and collage on canvas 76 x 60 in. Courtesy of the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects

SEVENT Y-FIVE


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2010

Lever House, New York, NY 2006

Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, CA RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

Born 1976, New York — Lives and works in Los Angeles, CA

Karl Haendel

2011

Drawn From Photography, The Drawing Center, New York, NY; Nothing Beside Remains, LAND, Marfa, TX 2010

Haunted, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, NY; The Last Newspaper, New Museum, New York, NY; Art Moves 2010, 3rd International Festival of Art of Billboards, Torun, Poland; Image Transfer, Henry Art Gallery, Seattle, WA 2009

Collection: MOCA’s First Thirty Years, MOCA, Los Angeles, CA; Beg, Borrow and Steal, The Rubell Family Collection, Miami, FL; Rotating Views #2 - Works from the Astrup Fearnley Collection, Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art, Oslo, Norway; Picturing the Studio, The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL; This is Killing Me, MASS MoCA, North Adams, MA 2008

2008 California Biennial, Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach, CA 2007

The New Authentics: Artists of the PostJewish Generation, Spertus Museum, Chicago, IL and Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA; Lines, Grids, Stains, Words: Minimal Art Drawings from the Collection of The Museum of Modern Art, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY, traveling exhibition; Hammer Contemporary Collection Part I, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, CA; The Price of Everything…, CUNY Graduate Center, City University of New York, New York, NY 2006

Red Eye: Los Angeles Artists from the Rubell Family Collection, Rubell Family Collection, Miami, FL; Transforming Chronologies: An Atlas of Drawings, Part Two, Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY; Particulate Matter, Mills College of Art, Oakland, CA

2011

Knight #6 Pencil on Paper 103 x 74 in. Courtesy of the Kadist Art Foundation

PROSPECT.2

SEVENT Y-SIX


2011

Knight #4 Pencil on Paper 103 x 74 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Harris Liebermann, New York

2011

Installation View Prospect.2 New Orleans, Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans

SEVENT Y-SEVEN


KARL HAENDEL


THIRT Y-ONE


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2011

Song, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, PA 2010

Me and My Mother, EX3 Center for Contemporary Art, Florence, Italy; Studion: The Night- Eroticism, Folköl, Melancholia, Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Sweden; The End, The Hafnarfjordur Centre of Culture and Fine Art, Hafnarfjordur, Iceland

Born 1976, Reykjavík, Iceland — Lives and works in Reykjavík, Iceland

Ragnar Kjartansson

2007

God, The Living Art Museum, Reykjavík, Iceland RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2010

Figura cuncta videntis (the all seeing eye) / Homage to Christoph Schlingenseif, TBA21, Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, Vienna, Austria; New Frontier, Sundance Film Festival, Park City, UT 2009

The Reach of Realism, Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, FL, Venice Biennial, Venice, Italy 2008

Iceland on the Edge, Reykjavík Art Festival, Reykjavík Art Museum, Reykjavík, Iceland 2007

Repeat Performances: Roni Horn and Ragnar Kjartansson, Center for Curatorial Studies Bard College, Annandale, NY 2004

Berlin North (collaboration with the Icelandic Love Corporation), Hamburger Bahnhoff, Berlin, Germany 2002

Grassroot, The Living Art Museum, Reykjavík, Iceland

2007

God Still image from video Duration: 30 min. Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8 Galleri, Reykjavík

PROSPECT.2

EIGHT Y


2002

Death and the Children Still images from video Duration: 4:55 min. Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8 Galleri, ReykjavĂ­k

EIGHT Y-ONE


RAGNAR KJARTANSSON

PROSPECT.2

EIGHT Y-T WO


2010

The Man Still image from video Duration: 49 min. Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8 Galleri, ReykjavĂ­k

EIGHT Y-THREE


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2008

The Photographs of An-My Lê, University of Kentucky Art Museum, Lexington, KY 2006

Trap Rock, Dia: Beacon, Beacon, NY; Small Wars, Marion Center, Santa Fe, NM, traveling exhibition

Born 1960, Saigon, Vietnam — Lives and works in New York, NY

An-My Lê

2002

Small Wars, P.S.1/MOMA Contemporary Art Center, Long Island City, NY RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2010

The Original Copy: Photography of Sculpture, 1839 to Today, Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY; Pictures by Women: A History of Modern Photography, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY; Haunted: Contemporary Photography/Video/Performance, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, NY; In the Vernacular, Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL 2009

America, Beirut Art Center, Beirut, Lebanon; Manmade: Notions of Landscape from the Lannan Collection, New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe, NM; Images Recalled - Bilder auf Aufruf 3. Fotofestival Mannheim Ludwigshafen Heidelberg; Kunsthalle Mannheim; Kunstverein Ludwigshafen; Heidelberger Kunstverein, Germany; Into the Sunset: Photography’s Image of the American West, Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY; Vague Terrain: Analogues of Place in Contemporary Photography, FLAG Art Foundation, New York, NY; Lives of the Hudson, Tang Museum, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY 2008

Soft Manipulation, or Who is Afraid of the New Now?, Casino Luxembourg, Luxembourg; The Printed Picture, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY 2007

transPOP: Korea Vietnam Remix, ARKO Art Center, Seoul, South Korea, traveling exhibition, Viet Art Centre, Hanoi; Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, CA 2006

Witness to War: Revisiting Vietnam in Contemporary Art, San Francisco State University Fine, San Francisco, CA

PROSPECT.2

EIGHT Y-FOUR

2010

Delta: Chauvin, Louisiana, United States Archival Pigment Print 38 x 27 in. Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York


EIGHT Y-FIVE


AN-MY LÊ

2011

Delta: Da Nang, Vietnam Archival Pigment Print 28 x 19 ½ in. Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York

PROSPECT.2

EIGHT Y-SIX


2011

2011

Delta: Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Delta: New Orleans, Louisiana, United States

Archival Pigment Print 28 x 19 ½ in.

Archival Pigment Print 32 x 22 ¾ in.

Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York

Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York

EIGHT Y-SEVEN


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2010

Tierra de Nadie, Caja de Burgos, Burgos, Spain 2009

Threshold, 53rd Biennale di Venezia, Chilean Pavilion, Venice, Italy 2008

Born 1972, Santiago, Chile — Lives and works in New York, NY

Iván Navarro

Homeless Lamp, The Juice Sucker, Fabric Workshop & Museum, Philadelphia, PA; No Man’s Land, Koppelman Gallery, Tufts University Art Gallery, Medford, MA 2007

¿Dónde Están?, Centro Cultural Matucana 100, Santiago, Chile; Large Wall Hole, Jersey City Museum, New Jersey, NJ 2006

Iván Navarro, Unosunove Arte Contemporanea, Rome, Italy; I Am Not From Here, I Am Not From There, Union Gallery, London, UK 2005

Shortcuts, Art Rock, Rockefeller Plaza, New York, NY RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2010

Bicentenario, Diez Miradas Latinoamericanas, Museo Mural Diego Rivera, Mexico City, Mexico; Cairo International Biennale, Cairo, Egypt; HomeLessHome, Museum on the Seam, Jerusalem, Israel; Beuys y más allá—El enseñar como arte, Museo de Artes Visuales, Santiago, Chile 2009

Trienal de Chile, Santiago, Chile 2008

A Political Exhibition, Tirana Institute for Contemporary Art, Tirana, Alabania; Informed by Function, Lehman College Art Gallery, New York, NY 2007

Refract, Reflect, Project: Light Works from The Collection, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; Petrolina, Moscow Museum of Modern Art at Petrovka, and We are your future, Art Center Winzavod. Special projects for the 2nd Moscow Biennale of Contemporary Art. Moscow, Russia

2011

The UNO Fence Installation Views Neon, aluminum, electric energy 11 sections, 61 x 89 x 12 in. Prospect.2 New Orleans, UNO St. Claude Gallery, New Orleans. Courtesy of the artist and Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York

PROSPECT.2

EIGHT Y-EIGHT


EIGHT Y-NINE


IVÁN NAVARRO


2011

The UNO Fence Neon, aluminum, electric energy Variable dimensions 11 sections, 61 x 89 x 12 in. Courtesy of the artist and Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York

THIRT Y-ONE


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2010

The Face I Had Before the World was Made, Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, CO 2008

Miscegenated Family Album, Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL

Born 1934, Boston, MA — Lives and works in New York, NY

Lorraine O’Grady

1999

Lorraine O'Grady/New Histories, Galerie Fotohof, Salzburg, Austria 1996

Lorraine O’Grady/The Secret History, The Bunting Institute of Radcilffe College, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 1995

Lorraine O’Grady/Matrix 127, Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, CT PERFOR MANCES

1989

Nefertiti/Devonia Evangeline, Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore, MD 1983

Fly By Night, Franklin Furnace, New York, NY; Art Is…, Afro-American Day Parade, New York, NY 1983

Rivers First Draft, in “Art Across the Park,” Central Park, New York, NY RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2011

Agitated Histories, Contemporary Museum, Baltimore, MD 2010

Manifesta 8, The European Biennial of Contemporary Art, Murcia, Spain; This Will Have Been Art, Love, & Politics in the 1980s, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, IL, traveling exhibition; Strange Comfort (Afforded by the Profession), Kunsthalle Basel, Zurich, Switzerland; Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY; Extended Family: Contemporary Connections, Brooklyn Museum Contemporary Galleries, Brooklyn, NY; The Original Copy: Photography of Sculpture, 1839 to Today, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY

1983 / 2009

Art Is... Digital C-print From a series of 40 prints, Ed. of 8, 1 AP ea. 16 x 20 in. ea. Courtesy of the artist and Alexander Gray Associates, New York

PROSPECT.2

NINET Y-T WO


NINET Y-THREE


LORRAINE O’GRADY

PROSPECT.2

NINET Y-FOUR


1983 / 2009

Art Is... Digital C-print From a series of 40 prints, Ed. of 8, 1 AP ea. 16 x 20 in. ea. Courtesy of the artist and Alexander Gray Associates, New York

NINET Y-FIVE


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2009

The Invisible Runner Strides On, Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art, Hiroshima, Japan 2008

Dazaifu Tenmangu Art Proguram: White Out, Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine, Fukuoka; Takahashi Collection, Shirokane, Japan; Himming 2008, Himming Art Center, Himi City, Toyama, Japan 2005

Art Taipei 2005 Artist of the Year: Ozawa Tsuyoshi, Taipei World Trade Center, Taipei, Taiwan 2004

Answer with Yes and No!, Mori Art Museum, Tokyo, Japan 1998

JIZOING and New Nasubi Gallery, Asian Fine Arts Factory, Berlin, Germany RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2011

The Group 1965 - We are boys! Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, Germany 2010

Double Infinity, (Xijing Men), Dutch Culture Centre, Shanghai, China; Tricksters Tricked, (Xijing Men), Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, Holland 2009

Fact and Fiction - Recent works from The UBS Art Collection, Guangdong Museum of Art, Guangzhou, China 2008

13th Asian Art Biennale Bangladesh, National Art Gallery, Dhaka, India; Heavy Light: Recent Photography and Video from Japan, International Center of Photography, New York, NY; Moving Horizons: The UBS Art Collection 1960s to the Present Day, National Art Museum, Beijing, China 2004

Adaptive Behavior, New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York, NY 2003

Poetic Justice, 8th Istanbul Biennial, Istanbul, Turkey; How Latitudes Become Forms, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN, traveling exhibition

PROSPECT.2

NINET Y-SIX

Born 1965, Tokyo, Japan — Lives and works in Japan

Ozawa Tsuyoshi


2008

2011

Vegetable Weapon: Katogo (Simmered vegetables with banana) / Hoima, Uganda

Vegetable Weapon: Nishime (Simmered Vegetables) / Fukushima

Type C-print 61 ½ x 44 ½ in.

Type C-print 44 ½ x 61 ½ in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

NINET Y-SEVEN


OZAWA TSUYOSHI

2011

(Melanie) Vegetable Weapon: Crawfish Etouffee / New Orleans Digital C-print 47 Âź x 57 in. Courtesy the Artist and Misa Shin Gallery, Tokyo

PROSPECT.2

NINET Y-EIGHT


2011

(Luliana) Vegetable Weapon: Creole Gumbo / New Orleans Digital C-print 47 Âź x 57 in. Courtesy the Artist and Misa Shin Gallery, Tokyo

NINET Y-NINE


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2010

The Call of the Alluvial Empire, Isaac Delgado Art Gallery, Delgado Community College, New Orleans, LA 2006

Southern Tales, Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, LA

Born in Kentucky — Lives and works in New Orleans, LA

Gina Phillips

2003

New Orleans Center for the Creative Arts, New Orleans, LA 1999

Isaac Delgado Art Gallery, Delgado Community College, New Orleans, LA 1997

In Stitches, Carroll Gallery, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 1997

Twister, Barnhart Gallery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2011

The World According to New Orleans, Marfa Ballroom, Marfa, TX 2009

Hot Up Here, Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, LA; Acadiana Center For The Arts, Lafayette, LA (2010) 2009

Christopher Deris and Gina Phillips, Carroll Gallery, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA; Portraits, Diboll Gallery, Loyola University, New Orleans, LA 2006

Surviving the Hurricane: Katrina’s Impact on New Orleans Art, Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, LA; Outside-in, Inside-Out, Mobile Museum of Art, Mobile, AL 2003

Saltline Biennial, Mobile Museum of Art, Mobile, AL 2001

Contemporary Art from the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation, Pepperdine University, Malibu, CA; 2001 New Orleans Triennial, New Orleans Museum of Art, New Orleans, LA 2000

Under the Influence: Artist Reflects on the 20th Century, Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, LA

2011

2010

Tooth Sampler

Salvage Operation

Fabric, thread, ink, paint 108 x 84 in.

Fabric thread, feathers, acrylic paint, ink, spray paint 104 x 83 in.

Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans

PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED

Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans


2011

Installation View Prospect.2 New Orleans, Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans

ONE HUNDRED ONE


GINA PHILLIPS


2011

Installation ? Mixed Media Image courtesy of James Prinz Photography

THIRT Y-ONE


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2010

landscape + object + animal, MitchellInnes + Nash, New York, NY; color isn’t matter, Samson Projects, Boston, MA 2009

Corbu Pops, Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; Yard (to harrow), Hauser + Wirth, New York, NY

Born 1955, Newark, NJ — Lives and works in Chicago, IL

William Pope.L

2008

Animal Nationalism, Grand Arts, Kansas City, MO 2007

Drawing, Dreaming, Drowning, Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL; Drawing After White People: Time, Trees, & Celluloid, Santa Monica Museum of Art, Santa Monica, CA; The Black Factory and Other Good Works, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, CA 2006

Trophy Room, Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna, Austria; Under All, Above Most, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2010

deCordova Biennial, deCordova Sculpture Park + Museum, Lincoln, MA 2009

30 Seconds Off an Inch, The Studio Museum of Harlem, New York, NY 2008

Black Is Black Aint, Renaissance Society, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL; Paul Thek: In the Context of Today’s Contemporary Art, Sammlung Falkenburg, Hamburg, Germany; 30 Americans, The Rubell Family Collection, Miami, FL PERFOR MANCE AND SCREENINGS

2010

Eating the Wall Street Journal (new Millenium version), New Museum, New York, NY 2007

In the Cabin!, House of World Cultures, Berlin, Germany 2006

The Black Factory, USA, traveling performance; Poor Piece, Center for Contemporary Art, Santa Fe, NM

PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED FOUR

2011

BLINK Live performance and multimedia installation Courtesy of the artist and Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York


MANY THANKS TO OUR PARTICIPANTS

Zainab O. Adebayo; Raven Adeneye; Michelle Agosto; Angelica Alexander; Katelyn Allemore; Libbie Allen; Avia Alonzo; Bria Amons; Nathan Anderson; Will Andrews; Art House on the Levee; Sally Asher; Audubon; D. Babatunde; Avona-Kim Baird; Charlie Barnes; Lauren Barnett; Battiste; Bean; Andy Becker; Courtni Becnel; Ashley Bellant; Rob Bellman; Muffin Bernstein; Prema Bhattacharjee; Nicholas Bijou; Renee Blair; Kara Blanken; Angela Marie Bonanno; Kayla Elizabeth Bordelon; The Bourbon Orleans Hotel; Winston Boyd; Javon Bracy; Andrew Braddock; Shirmir Branch; Glenn Braud; Brother’s Food Market; Monetiaka Brown; Jordan Bryant; Krista R. Burton; Jeanay Butler; Nikole Calhoun; Paul Callahan; Clayton Campbell; Roxella Cantu; Katie Carter; M. Carter; A. Cash; Matt Cerick; Kimberly Chandler; T. Charles; Jason Childers; Kenneth Coleman; Kristin Collins; Michel Collins; Corrosion Studios; Christon Crowley; Yolandria Dauterive; Ashley Davis; Tranelle Davis; LeaAnn Delatte; Nicole DeLoach; Kamirah Demouchet; Catherine Denial; Frank DePaula; Lydia Dorsey; Jasmine Ducre; Alison Ecker; Jessica Edwards; Kimberly Edwards; Idorenyin A. Etuk; Courtney; M. Evans; Austin Fabio; Rashida Ferdinand; First Cup Cafe; Natalie Floyd; Deondra Fox; Felice Gaddis; Jan Galligan; Hans Ganthier; Ivory Garner; Casey Garnett; Anna Gaca; Britney Gedeon; Nia Geiggar; S. Genois; Anna Giannobile; Jan Gilbert; David Giordano; Lindsay Glatz; Good Children Gallery; Breia Gordon; K. Gougishay; Teri Graham; Lana Gramlich; Gabriel Green; Nicole M. Green; Lydia Grey; David Grunfeld; A. Hall; Alexis D. Hall; K. Hall; Matt Hands; Laura Harrell; David Hassell; Megan Haynes; Richard Hebert; Sonja Hebert; Brittany Hereford; Dominique Herring; Autumn Higgins; Andrew Hill; S. Hill; Akilah Hills; Andrea Hodge; Jared Howerton; Joseph Huynh; Tuan Huynh; Linus Igbokwe; K. J.; Ed Jackson; Lawrence Jackson; Pamela Jackson; Troyell Jackson; Amanda James; J. Jhounkin; Deanna Johnson; The Joint; Jolivette; I. Jones; Mike Jones; S. Jones; Nicolas Jordan; Darel Joseph; Montrelle Joseph; Francesca

ONE HUNDRED FIVE


WILLIAM POPE.L

PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED SIX


THANKS CONTINUED

2011

BLINK Live performance and multimedia installation Courtesy of the artist and Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York

Koerner; B. Landrum; Tom LaPann; Amanda LaPlaca; Kellyn Lappinga; Sam Larsen-Ferree; April Leigh; Caitlin Lennon; Maria Levitsky; Ariana Fay Lewis; Jenny Louis; Ross Louis; P. Love; Micheal MacKenzie; Britney Anne Majure; Ariya Martin; Taylor Martin; Reese May; Ariel Mazariegos; Chigozie Mbamalu; Adam McCarthy; A. McGowan; Darienne McKenzie; Montague McPherson; James McVeigh; Meghan Meyer; Merideth; Michael’s on the Park; Ariana Mitchell; Afam Monetiaka; Laura Jean Montgomery; Brittany Moore; M. Moore; Christopher Morton; Lydia Mulero; Josie Nash; Natalie; Vy Nguyen; Jack Niven; Nicole Nolan; NOPD; James Nord; David Nusloch; J Olivette; Jessika Ouellette; Alex Owens; C. Pace; Josh Palmeri; A. Parker; Duane Parrish; David Patin; Hiep Pham; Sarah Phillips; Phillip Pisciotta; J. Poret; Edward John Poynter; James Pruznick; Rebecca Rae; The Radical Faeries; A. Ramsey; Cat Ratard; Nicholas Rehak; Ariel Revere; Antonio Roberts; LeJon Roberts; K. Robertson; N. Robinson; Kayla Rodney; Kali Rogers; Zach Rosenburg; Ariel Roy; Jessica Leigh Ryan; Amber Sada; Alexa Saint-Fort; Vanessa Sanborn; Julie Sando; Satsuma; Lin Schefferstein; Jasmine Scott; Mecca Scott; Marie-Clair Serou; The 700 Club; N. Sharmin; Paulina Sierra; Alex Smith; Keenon Smith; Laurabelle Smith; Nikita Soifer; Leisl Sorgel; Katherine Sparks; St. Bernard Project; Laura Steffan; R. Stewart; Dominique Taylor; Gin Taylor; Emilie Tenenbaum; Alonza Terry; A. Thomas; Cierra Thompson; Dolores Thompson; Hakan Topal; S. Turner; Shanee Turner; A. Turnipseed; Ashleagh Tyler; R. Uduko; Tiffany Unaka; Richard R. Vallon, jr.; Robin Vander; Taylor Venice-Martin; J. Vicks; Voodoo Bar & 9th Circle; Mike Vu; Leah Walbourne; M. Walker; Adia M. Wallace; Marisa Ward; Natalie Wayne; Dare Williams; G. Williams; A. Wilson; Kathryn Wilson; Jasmine Wise; Monique Woods; Juan Woolfolk; Yahti Wooten; WTUL; Jade Wyre; City of New Orleans

ONE HUNDRED SEVEN


Born 1932, New Orleans, LA — Lives and works in New Orleans, LA

Ashton T. Ramsey

2010

Ashton T. Ramsey parades his Gambler suit, Mardi Gras Day February 16, 2010

PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED EIGHT


2008

Melody Coat, shirt, pants, paper hat, tie and glasses Worn for Mardi Gras Day February 5, 2008 Courtesy of the artist ONE HUNDRED NINE


ASHTON T. RAMSEY

2007

History Coat, shirt, pants, paper hat, tie and glasses Worn for Mardi Gras Day February 20, 2007 Courtesy of the artist

1996

Freedom Coat, shirt, pants, paper hat, tie and glasses Worn for Mardi Gras Day February 20, 1996 Courtesy of the artist

PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED TEN


ONE HUNDRED ELEVEN


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2010

Born 1962, New York, NY — Lives and works in New York, NY

Alexis Rockman: A Fable for Tomorrow, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C., traveling exhibition

Alexis Rockman

2008

The Weight of Air: Works on Paper, The Rose Art Museum of Brandeis University, Waltham, MA 2007

Baroque Biology: Tony Matelli and Alexis Rockman, (Romantic Attachments) Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati, OH 2004

Manifest Destiny, Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn, NY, traveling exhibition; Wonderful World, Camden Arts Centre, London, UK 2001

Future Evolution, Henry Art Gallery, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 1999

A Recent History of the World, The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, CT RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2011

Oceanomania: Souvenirs of Mysterious Seas-from Expedition to Aquarium, Nouveau Musee National de Monaco, Monaco; The Smithson Effect, Utah Museum of Fine Art, Utah State University, Salt Lake City, UT 2008

Badlands: New Horizons in Landscape, Mass MOCA, North Adams, MA; Molecules That Matter, Tang Museum and Art Gallery, Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY; Chemical Heritage Foundation, Philadelphia, PA; The Apocalypse, Bonelli Arte Contemporanea, Canneto sull’Oglio, Italy; Future Tense: Reshaping the Landscape, Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, NY 2007

Green Horizons, Bates College Museum of Art, ME, traveling exhibition; Savage Ancient Seas, Berkshire Museum, Pittsfield, MA 2006

Into Me / Out of Me, P.S. 1 Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY, traveling exhibition

PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED T WELVE

2011

Battle Royale (Key)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

Alligator, American Alligator mississippiensis Louisiana Black Bear Ursus americanus luteolus Bald Eagle Haliaeetus leucocephalus West Indian Manatee Trichechus manatus Eastern Brown Pelican Pelecanus occidentalis Ringed Map Turtle Graptemys oculifera Smooth Soft Shelled Turtle Apalone mutica Black-Capped Vireo Vireo atricapillus American Crocodile Crocodylus Acutus Florida Panther felis concolor coryi Carolina Parakeet Conuropsis carolinensis Passenger Pigeon Ectopistes migratorius Jaguar Panthera onca Alligator Gar Lepisosteus spatula Paddlefish Polyodon spathula Ivory-billed Woodpecker Pandion haliaetus Alligator Snapping Turtle Macroclemys temmincki Osprey Pandion haliaetus


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36

Norway Rat Rattus norvegicus Mediterranean Fruit Fly Ceratitis capitata Africanized Honeybee Apis mellifera scutellata Asian Long-Horned Beetle Anoplophora glabripennis Asian Tiger Mosquito Aedes albopictus Citrus Longhorned Beetle Anoplophora chinensis Emerald Ash Borer Agrilus planipennis European Gypsy Moth Lymantria dispar Formosan Subterranean Termite Coptotermes formosanus Giant African Snail Achatina fulica Red Imported Fire Ant Solenopsis invicta Russian Wheat Aphid Diuraphis noxia Domestic Dog Canis lupus familiaris Domestic Cat Felis Domesticus Brown Tree Snake Boiga irregularis Cane Toad Bufo marinus European Starling Sturnus vulgaris Reticulated Python Python reticulates

37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54

African Clawed Frog Xenopus laevis Canada Goose Branta Canadensis Cattle Egret Bubulcus ibis Mute Swan Cygnus olor European Starling Sturnus vulgaris Shiny Cowbird Molothrus bonariensis Monk Parakeet Myiopsitta monachus House Sparrow Passer domesticus Rock Dove Columba livia Axis Deer Axis axis Domestic Goat Capra hircus Nutria Myocastor coypus Feral Hog / Wild boar Sus scrofa Eastern Red Eared Slider Chrysemys scripta Bullfrog Rana Catesbiana Northern Snakehead Channa argus Common Carp Cyprinus carpio Mozambique Tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus

ONE HUNDRED THIRTEEN


ALEXIS ROCKMAN

PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED FOURTEEN


2011

Battle Royale Oil on wood 8 x 18 ft. Collection Gian Enzo Sperone, New York

ONE HUNDRED FIFTEEN


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2010

McColl Center for Visual Art, Charlotte, NC 2009

The Mitchell Gallery at St. John's College, Annapolis, MD; Off the Beaten Path: Violence, Women and Art, UC San Diego University Art Gallery, San Diego, CA; Tijuana Cultural Center, Tijuana, Mexico

Born 1948, Baltimore, MD — Lives and works in Baltimore, MD

Joyce J. Scott

2008

Joyce J. Scott in Tampa, Scarfone/ Hartley Gallery, Tampa University, Tampa, FL 2005

This Hand Washes That Hand Too, Mesa Contemporary Arts at the Mesa Art Center, Mesa, AZ 2004

Kickin' It with Joyce J. Scott, California African American Museum, Los Angeles, CA; Joyce J. Scott, Walter Gropius Artist, Huntington Museum of Art, Huntington, WV 2003

Joyce J. Scott, Untethered, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2011

Material Girls: Contemporary Black Women Artists, Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture, Baltimore, MD; CORRIDOR, The Art Museum of the Americas, Washington, D.C. 2010

BROOCHING THE SUBJECT: ONE OF A KIND, The Ogden Museum of Southern Art, New Orleans, LA 2008

A People's Geography: The Spaces of African American Life, Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture, Baltimore, MD 2006

Legacies: Contemporary Artists Reflect on Slavery, New-York Historical Society, New York, NY; LOOT! 2006, Museum of Art and Design, New York, NY

2010

Cobalt, Yellow Circles Glass Beads, thread, wire 21 x 19 ¼ in. Courtesy of artist and Goya Contemporary, Baltimore, MD

PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED SIXTEEN


2011

Inkisi #2 Beadwork, thread, wood, wire 22 x 23 ½ x 23 ½ in. Courtesy of artist and Goya Contemporary, Baltimore, MD

ONE HUNDRED SEVENTEEN


JOYCE J. SCOTT

2011

Ancestry Dolls: 1 Beads, African sculpture (Ghana), Japanese figurines, thread, fabric 12 x 9 x 16 in. Courtesy of artist and Goya Contemporary, Baltimore, MD

2011

Lynched Tree Installation View Plastic and glass beads, blown glass, thread, wire, wooden pole, metal armature Prospect.2 New Orleans, Newcomb Art Gallery, Tulane University, New Orleans

PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED EIGHTEEN


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2011

Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego, CA 2010

North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, NC 2009

Born 1958, Denver, CO — Lives and works in Los Angeles, CA

Jennifer Steinkamp

Centro de Arte Contemporaneo de Malaga, Malaga, Spain; Fly to Mars, Nevada Museum of Art, Reno, NV 2008

Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland, OR; Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY 2007

Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City, MO 2006

University of Wyoming Art Museum, Laramie, WY; San Jose Museum of Art, San Jose, CA 2005

Swing Space, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, Canada; Ulrich Museum of Art, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS 2004

Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2010

The Artist's Museum, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, CA; Five in Istanbul, Borusan Müzik Evi, Istanbul, Turkey; Hot House: Flowers for after the Frost, Minneapolis Institute of the Arts, Minneapolis, MN; Until Now, Minneapolis Institute of the Arts, Minneapolis, MN 2009

The Passionate Pursuit, Palm Springs Art Museum, Palm Springs, CA; Variations on a Theme, San Jose Museum of Art, San Jose, CA; Confines Valencia 09, IVAM, Valencia, Spain; Abstract Cinema, Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, FL; Magnetic Landscape, Columbus Museum, Columbus, GA 2008

11th Cairo International Biennale, Cairo, Egypt; Badlands: New Horizons in Landscape, MASS MoCA, North Adams, MA; California Video, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, CA

PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED T WENT Y

2011

The Vanquished Installation view Computer Animated Light Projection 10.5 x 5 ft. (variable) Prospect.2 New Orleans, New Orleans Museum of Art, New Orleans


2003

Loom Installation view Computer Animated Light Projection 11 x 11 ft. (variable) Art Gallery of Ontario, 2005

ONE HUNDRED T WENT Y-ONE


JENNIFER STEINKAMP

PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED T WENT Y-T WO


2011

The Vanquished Installation View and Detail Computer Animated Light Projection 10.5 x 5 ft. (variable) Prospect.2 New Orleans, New Orleans Museum of Art, New Orleans

ONE HUNDRED T WENT Y-THREE


SELECTED INDIVIDUAL EXHIBITIONS

2011

The Kids Are Alright, Civilian Art Projects, Washington D.C. 2008

My War, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA

Born 1974, United States — Lives and works in New Orleans, LA

Dan Tague

RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2011

Catalyst, Space 301, Mobile, AL; The World According to New Orleans, Ballroom Marfa, Marfa, TX; Currency, ArtLab, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 2010

Frontier Preachers, The Soap Factory, Minneapolis, MN 2009

You Killed My Pretty Things, University of New Orleans, UNO St. Claude Gallery, New Orleans, LA; Frenchmen Desire Good Children, Lambent Foundation, New York, NY 2008

South X East, Contemporary Southeastern Art Biennial, Schmidt Center Gallery, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 2007

Gulf Coast Artists at La Napoule, Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, LA 2006

Homegrown, Contemporary Southeastern Art Biennial, SECCA, WinstonSalem, NC 2005

Ultimate Destination, Dumbo Art Center, Brooklyn, NY; Likeness: Atypical Portraiture, Wilson Gallery, Georgetown College, Georgetown, KY; In Harm's Way, Cities and Recovery, LMCC, New York, NY; Katrina and the Waves, Bronx River Art Center, Bronx, NY

2011

American Domination Graphite rubbings taken from the Dominator Plaques Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED T WENT Y-FOUR


2011

Installation Views Prospect.2 New Orleans, Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans

ONE HUNDRED T WENT Y-FIVE


DAN TAGUE


THIRT Y-ONE


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2008

Southern Masters: Robert Tannen, The Ogden Museum of Southern Art, New Orleans, LA 2006

Modgun, A Modular Shotgun, The Ogden Museum of Southern Art, New Orleans, LA; Surviving the Hurricane, Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, LA

Born 1937, Brooklyn, NY — Lives and works in New Orleans, LA

Robert Tannen

1990

Reprospective, Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, LA 1985

Shotgun Temple, permanent outdoor sculpture, Bayou Road, New Orleans, LA 1981

Shotgun Houses, P.S. 1, Long Island City, NY 1976

N.A.S.A. Reject, New Orleans Museum of Art, New Orleans, LA RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2011

Then and Now, Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, LA 2005

Raw Data: Conceptual Art in Louisiana, Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, LA 2001

Songs of the Mississippi, Le Festival Garonne, Toulouse, France 2000

Kinetics: Calder and Beyond, Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, LA 1995

Mississippi River Gateway Bridge, in association with Joe Lobuono for Frederick R. Harris, New Orleans, LA 1992

Santa Monica Museum of Arts, Santa Monica, CA 1984

Art Works '84, Louisiana Expo '84, New Orleans, LA 1983

World's Fair-Unfair, Artists Triennial, New Orleans Museum of Art, New Orleans, LA

2011

Art By Committee Installation View Prospect.2 New Orleans, Art House on the Levee, New Orleans

PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED T WENT Y-EIGHT


ONE HUNDRED T WENT Y-NINE


ROBERT TANNEN

P.2

THIRT Y


PROJECT STATEMENT

Upon the purchase of Louisiana by the United States, President Thomas Jefferson commissioned Benjamin H. Latrobe to design a lighthouse for the entrance to the Mississippi River on Frank's Island in 1804. Unfortunately the structure failed and was abandoned. It was replaced by a design by Winslow Lewis, another engineer. That lighthouse was in use until 1856 and survived until Frank' Island itself eroded away. A portion of the tower was still standing in 2002 until the tower fell over during a hurricane. Over time, many lighthouses of the Gulf Coast have suffered similar fates. This Lighthouse of New Orleans project is a reminder of the important role lighthouses have played with port cities and their coastal lands throughout history. Moreover, the green beacon on the top of the Lighthouse of New Orleans is a symbol for the need of coastal restoration and the greening of the city and region.

2011

Lighthouse of New Orleans Proposal drawing, statement and photographic mock up by the artist Courtesy of the artist

ONE HUNDRED THIRT Y-ONE


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2011

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 2010

Fundaçao de Serralves, Porto, Portugal 2008

Born 1963, Padua, Italy — Lives and works in Milan and Turin

Grazia Toderi

Grazia Toderi - Tobias Rehberger, Accademia Tedesca Villa Massimo, Rome, Italy 2006

Padiglione d'Arte Contemporanea, Milan, Italy; Grazia Toderi, Rendez-vous, Miami Art Museum, Miami, FL 2004

Grazia Toderi Semper Eadem, Gran Teatro La Fenice, Venice, Italy 2003

Grazia Toderi. Teatri, Fondazione Bevilacqua La Masa, Galleria di Piazza San Marco, Venice, Italy 2002

Grazia Toderi. Olympia /Homo ludens, Fundació Joan Miró, Barcelona, Spain RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2010

Cosa fa la mia anima mentre sto lavorando? Opere d’Arte Contemporanea dalla Collezione Consolandi, Museo Arte Gallarate, Milan, Italy; Pùblicos y contrapùblicos, Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporaneo, Seville, Spain; Metropolis, The New Art Gallery Walsall, Walsall, UK 2009

The difference, Centre d'Art Bastille, Grenoble, France; Spazio, Tempo, Immagine, CIAC - Centro Italiano d’Arte Contemporanea, Foligno, Italy 2008

Focus on Contemporary Italian Art, MAMbo, Bologna, Italy 2007

Gesture of Infinity, Minoriten Kultur, Graz, Austri; Space for your future, Museum of Contemporary of Art, Tokyo, Japan; Italian Mentalscapes. A journey through Italian Contemporary Art, Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Tel Aviv, Israel 2006

The Beautiful Game: Contemporary Art and Fútbol, Brooklyn Academy of Music, Brooklyn, NY, traveling exhibition

PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED THIRT Y-T WO

2010

Atlante Installation View Double video projection, sound, loop Fundaçao de Serralves, Porto, Portugal, 2010


2009

Orbite Rosse (Red Orbits) Installation View Double video projection, sound, loop The New Art Gallery, Walsall, UK, 2009

ONE HUNDRED THIRT Y-THREE


GRAZIA TODERI


THIRT Y-ONE


SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2009—2010

Dali Dali Featuring Francesco Vezzoli, Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Sweden; Marlene Redux: A True Hollywood Story!, Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna, Switzerland; the Garage Center for Contemporary Culture, Moscow, Russia 2007

Born 1971, Brescia, Italy — Lives and works in Milan, Italy

Francesco Vezzoli

Power Plant, Toronto, Canada 2006

Marlene Redux: A True Hollywood Study (Part One), Tate Modern, London, UK; Le Consortium, Dijon, France 2005

Museu Serralves, Porto, Portugal 2004

Francesco Vezzoli: Comizi di Non Amore (Non-Love Meeting), Fondazione Prada, Milan, Italy 2002

The Films of Francesco Vezzoli, New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York, NY; Castello di Rivoli Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, Turin, Italy RECENT GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2007

Venice Biennial, Italy 2006

Whitney Biennial 2006: Day for Night, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY; Short History of Performance IV, Whitechapel Art Gallery, London, UK; Satellite of Love, Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam, Netherlands; Dirty Yoga, Taipei Biennial, Taipei, Taiwan 2005

Dall’occhio elettronico, Museo D’Arte Contemporanea Castello di Rivoli, Turin, Italy; Prague Biennale 2 – Expanding Painting, Karlin Hall, Prague, Czech Republic; Africa Queen, Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, NY 2004

26th Biennial de São Paulo, Fundaão Bienal de São Paulo, Brazil 2011

2011

Portrait of Sophia Loren As The Muse of Antiquity (after Giorgio de Chirico)

Portrait of Sophia Loren As The Muse of Antiquity (after Giorgio de Chirico)

Proposal mock up by the artist

Installation Views Gilt bronze sculpture 6 ft. 3 in. x 2 ft. x 2 ft.

Courtesy of the Artist

Prospect.2 New Orleans, Piazza d’Italia, New Orleans PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED THIRT Y-SIX


2011

Portrait of Sophia Loren As The Muse of Antiquity (after Giorgio de Chirico) Proposal mockup by the artist Courtesy of the Artist

ONE HUNDRED THIRT Y-SEVEN


FRANCESCO VEZZOLI

PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED THIRT Y-EIGHT


ONE HUNDRED THIRT Y-NINE


SELECTED EXHIBITIONS AND SCREENINGS

2011

Hong Kong International Film Festival, Hong Kong, China; Berlin International Film Festival, Forum Expanded, Berlin, Germany 2010

Born 1952, Łódź, Poland — Lives and works in New York, NY

Paweł Wojtasik

Kronos Quartet performs Next Atlantis, (le) Poisson Rouge, New York, NY; Next Atlantis, Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, Philadelphia, PA; Views from the Avant-Garde, New York Film Festival; Best of The Flaherty, Hamilton College, Clinton, NY; At the Still Point, Smack Mellon, Brooklyn, NY, (solo); Next Atlantis video with music by Sebastian Currier, Carnegie Hall, New York, NY 2009

Below Sea Level, MASS MoCA, No. Adams, MA 2008

Troublemakers and Border-crossers, Oberhausen Film Festival, Oberhausen, Germany 2007

Coercive Atmospherics, Dumbo Arts Center, Brooklyn, NY; Cine y Casi Cine, The Reina Sofia Museum, Madrid, Spain; :MINUS, Aspen Art Museum, Aspen, CO, (four person show); Connecticut Contemporary, Wadsworth Atheneum Museum, Hartford, CT 2006

ANTIMATTER Underground Film Festival, Victoria, B.C., Canada 2005

Greater New York, P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center, Long Island City, NY; Terra Infirma, Proyecto Cultural de Castellon, Valencia, Spain; In the Round, Ely House, Center for Contemporary Art, New Haven, CT

2009 / 11

Below Sea Level Video stills from 360° panoramic video Courtesy of the artist and Priska C. Juschka Fine Arts, New York A Made at MASS MoCA Commission

PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED FORT Y


ONE HUNDRED FORT Y-ONE


PAWEŁ WOJTASIK


OFFICIAL VENUES

PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED FORT Y-SIX


HQ

Housed in a building at the edge of the French Quarter, the Old U.S. Mint has served a variety of official purposes, and in 1981 opened to the public as a State Museum site. Having housed both Prospect.1 and 2, it is currently under renovation to become the New Orleans Jazz Museum, which will include a state of the art recording studio and performing space.

P.2 Visitors Center / headquarters

1036 Esplanade Avenue 1

A rt H o u s e o n t h e L e v e e

4725 Dauphine Street A classic shotgun residence of the Historic Holy Cross Neighborhood in the 9th Ward, the Art House on the Levee was created for Prospect.2 by artist Robert Tannen and wife Jeanne Nathan, as a public place for creative collaboration. 2

7

1 8 50 H o u s e

The 1850 House is one of the Pontalba Buildings, which line the St. Ann and St. Peter Street sides of Jackson Square. These were built in 1850 by the Baroness Micaela Almonester de Pontalba. To illustrate the landmark's historical significance, the State Museum has re-created with domestic goods, decorative arts and art of the period, what one of the residences would have looked like during the Antebellum era when the Baroness Pontalba first opened the doors.

900 Camp Street Located in New Orleans’ historic Arts District, and featuring over 10,000 feet of exhibition space, the Contemporary Arts Center (CAC) of New Orleans houses multidisciplinary programming spanning visual arts, dance, music and performing arts. 3

F r e n ch M a r k e t d i st r i ct, D u tch A l l e y P e r fo r m a n c e Pav i l i o n

940 Decatur Street at St. Philip The Dutch Alley gets its name from Mayor Ernest N. “Dutch” Morial, who in 1978 made significant improvements to the French Market, including the erection of the Performance Tent near St. Philip Street. It hosts a variety of concerts and activities throughout the year. 4

8

9

The Piazza d'Italia is an urban public plaza in downtown New Orleans. Designed in 1978 by renowned architect Charles Moore, the Piazza gained notoriety as a symbol of late Post-Modernism and is one of Moore’s best-known and influential works. 14

10

New Orleans Healing Center

2372 St. Claude Avenue The New Orleans Healing Center opened this year as a community center, with the aim to heal and empower surrounding neighborhoods on a civic, social, economic, environmental, and spiritual level. Among many other community services, it hosts regular exhibits of local artists.

UNO St. C l au d e Ga l l e ry

2429 St. Claude Avenue Run by the University of New Orleans’ art department, the UNO St. Claude gallery launched in 2009, providing a space for not only alumni shows, but also curated exhibitions that add to the burgeoning St. Claude Arts District. 15

The African American Museum of Art, Culture and History is located in Tremé, the oldest African-American neighborhood in the United States. The Museum, currently in expansion, is housed in the only remaining building of the original Plantation, the historic Tremé Villa, and is complemented by five other restored historical buildings.

I sa ac D e lga d o A rt Ga l l e ry

O l d U.S. M i n t

P i a z z a d' I ta l i a / Th e Am e r i ca n I ta l i a n C u lt u r a l C e n t e r

Am e r i ca n M u s e u m

615 City Park Avenue

400 Esplanade Avenue

13

N e w O r l e a n s A f r i ca n

1418 Governor Nicholls Street

D e lga d o C o mm u n i t y C o l l eg e ,

Lo u i s i a n a Stat e M u s e u m ,

The Smithsonian-affiliated Ogden Museum is dedicated to broadening the knowledge, understanding and appreciation of the visual arts and culture of the American South. Its facilities include the recently restored Patrick F. Taylor Library designed by the great American 19th century architect, Henry Hobson Richardson.

T u l a n e U n i v e rs i t y,

Housed in the Woldenberg Art Center of the former Newcomb College for Women (the first degree-granting college for women to be founded within a university in America), the Newcomb Art Gallery hosts a wide variety of exhibitions that include both treasures of craft and design work donated by the former Newcomb College along with an ambitious program of modern and contemporary art.

Mansion and Court yard

6

Og d e n M u s e u m o f So u t h e r n A rt

925 Camp Street

Woldenberg Art Center

520 Royal Street

The Isaac Delgado Fine Art Gallery is located on the City Park Campus of Delgado Community College, the oldest and largest community college in Louisiana. Run by the Arts Department, this beautiful gallery hosts monthly exhibits of New Orleans artists.

12

N e wc o mb A rt Ga l l e ry

Collection, Brulatour

5

The New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) is the city’s oldest arts institution, celebrating its centennial this year. The museum, which sits on a five-acre natural setting in City Park, features a notable collection spanning a myriad of cultures and four hundred years of art history, as well as a magnificent sculpture garden.

377 Poydras Street

Historic New Orleans

Comprising a seven-building complex of some of the oldest buildings in the French Quarter, The Historic New Orleans Collection is dedicated to preserving and researching the long and storied history of the many nations, cultures and figures that have shaped not only New Orleans, but the entire state of Louisiana from the 18th century to the present.

N e w O r l e a n s M u s e u m o f A rt

1 Collins Diboll Circle, City Park

Lo u i s i a n a Stat e M u s e u m ,

523 St. Ann Street in Jackson Square

C o n t e m p o r a ry A rts C e n t e r

11

Xav i e r U n i v e rs i t y, A rts V i l l ag e

3520 Pine Street Xavier University is the only historically Black, Catholic University in the United States. Known for its active Community Arts Program, the Arts Department at Xavier University recently moved into a new complex, the Arts Village, and will soon open a Museum that will house the Norman C. Francis Collection. 16

Aca d i a n a C e n t e r fo r t h e A rts, L a fay e t t e , LA

101 West Vermilion Street The Acadiana Center for the Arts serves as a hub in the culturally rich region of Lafayette, showcasing its visual arts, music and performance while also bringing cutting edge exhibitions to its facilities.

ONE HUNDRED FORT Y-SEVEN


Exhibition Checklist

B ru c e Dav e n p o rt J r.

Ain't Nothing But A Pen In My Hand (6 th series), 2011 Archival marker on handmade paper / 40 x 60 in. Benetton Collection, Treviso, Italy. Courtesy: Diego Cortez Arte Ltd., NYC

So p h i e Ca l l e

True Stories, 2011 Site-Specific Installation Courtesy the artist and Paula Cooper Gallery, New York Sophie Calle’s participation has been made possible, in part, by Étant donnés: The FrenchAmerican Fund for Contemporary Art

Now I Am An Artist (6 th series), 2011 Archival marker on handmade paper / 40 x 60 in. Benetton Collection, Treviso, Italy. Courtesy: Diego Cortez Arte Ltd., NYC The Harder The Crawl, The Brighter The Crown (6th series), 2011

Robert E. Lee Boots, 2011 and Jones’ Black Glove, 2011 (as interpreted by New Orleans’ master boot maker Calvin L. Dayes) Original Confederate Soldier Boots Courtesy of Confederate Memorial Hall Museum, New Orleans Constructing Goddess: Fortuna and Her Wheels of Fortune, 2011 Video Installation/Variable Dimensions Courtesy of the artist RING OF FIRE, Water and Utter Destruction, 2011 Video Installation/Variable Dimensions

Archival marker on handmade paper / 40 x 60 in.

Produced in collaboration with David Sullivan Installation by David Sullivan

Soundsuit, 2006

Benetton Collection, Treviso, Italy. Courtesy: Diego Cortez Arte Ltd., NYC

We Are Here, 2011

Afghan, cotton and found beaded fabric, mannequin and armature / 80 x 30 x 22 in.

Self Taught Artist (6 th series), 2011

Produced in collaboration with David Sullivan

Private Collection, Courtesy of Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

Archival marker on handmade paper / 40 x 60 in.

Soundsuit, 2010

Benetton Collection, Treviso, Italy. Courtesy: Diego Cortez Arte Ltd., NYC

N i c k Cav e

Mixed Media / 109 x 28 x 14 in.

Ambient Projections/Variable Dimensions

BILOXI VIEW: The Site of John Kennedy Toole’s Suicide, 2011 Video Installation/Variable Dimensions Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

Too Young Too Bury, Too Young To Marry (6 th series), 2011

Soundsuit, 2006

Archival marker on handmade paper / 40 x 60 in.

Produced with fabrication assistance by AdrinAdrina, Elliot Coon and Lorna Leedy

Cotton, twigs, mannequin, and armature / 80 x 62 x 48 in.

Benetton Collection, Treviso, Italy. Courtesy: Diego Cortez Arte Ltd., NYC

Burnt Ladders to NoWhere, 2011

Collection of Christopher Vroom Soundsuit, 2007

Making My Grandparents Proud of There Grandbaby (6 th series), 2011

Found beaded and sequined garments / 100 x 25 x 14 in.

Archival marker on handmade paper / 40 x 60 in.

Collection of Laura Lee Brown and Steve Wilson. Courtesy of 21C Museum, Louisville, KY

Benetton Collection, Treviso, Italy. Courtesy: Diego Cortez Arte Ltd., NYC

Soundsuit, 2009

I Am A Beast With A Pen & Paper U Heard Me (6 th series), 2011

Fabric, appliquéd crochet and buttons, knitted yarn and metal armature / 96 x 27 x 14 in. Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham, AL J o n as Da h l b e rg

Macbeth, 2011 One Channel Video Installation Duration: 11:24 min. Courtesy the Artist and Galerie Nordenhake, Stockholm Dahlberg’s participation has been made possible, in part, by the Barbro Osher Pro Suecia Foundation and IASPIS the Swedish Visual Arts Fund's International Programme

PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED FORT Y-EIGHT

Archival marker on handmade paper / 40 x 60 in. Benetton Collection, Treviso, Italy. Courtesy: Diego Cortez Arte Ltd., NYC Daw n D e D e aux

The Goddess Fortuna, 2011 Gown produced in collaboration with Camilla Huey, The House of Execution

Factory of Pants Revolt, 2011

Produced in collaboration with ‘Evil Twin’ Kenny Horton Golden Lucky Dog, 2011 Produced with fabrication associate Richard Valadei, Royal Artists Studios R. Lu k e D u B o i s

The Marigny Parade, 2011 Live performance for the opening of Prospect.2 New Orleans on October 22, 2011 Original score by the artist in collaboration with Christopher McIntyre. Performed by The Roots of Music Marching Crusaders, the Eleanor McMain Marching Mustang Band, and O. Perry Walker Charger Marching Band. Courtesy of the artist and bitforms gallery, nyc G eo rg e D u n ba r

The Army of Dunces, 2011 Fabricated by Kate McNee with Elizabeth Shannon, Vanessa Sanborn, Bunny Cadona and Meryt Harding

Action Painting No. 1, 2011 Purple and taupe acrylic over paper / 20 ½ x 17 in.


Courtesy of the artist

Action Painting Series No. 8, 2011

Kings of Nostalgia, 2010

Action Painting No. 11, 2011

Red and white acrylic on paper / 15 ¾ x 18 ¾ in.

Acrylic on fabric on canvas / 6 x 8 ft.

Black, purple and red acrylic on paper / 10 x 15 in. Courtesy of the artist and Heriard-Cimino Gallery, New Orleans Action Painting No. 12, 2011 Black and blue acrylic on paper / 14 x 16 in. Courtesy of the artist and Heriard-Cimino Gallery, New Orleans Action Painting No. 13, 2011 Black, white, and red acrylic on paper / 15 x 20 in.

Courtesy of the artist and Heriard-Cimino Gallery, New Orleans Action Painting Series No. 9, 2011 Black, red and white acrylic on paper (vertical paper) / 20 x 16 ¼ in. Courtesy of the artist and Heriard-Cimino Gallery, New Orleans Red M, 1959 Acrylic and Paper Collage / 50 x 47 in. Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist and Heriard-Cimino Gallery, New Orleans

Untitled, 1965

Action Painting No. 14, 2011

Courtesy of the artist

Black and tan acrylic on paper / 22 x 28 in.

Magareus 22, 2002

Courtesy of the artist and Heriard-Cimino Gallery, New Orleans Action Painting No. 15, 2011 Black, red and white acrylic on paper (BR) / 37 x 43 in.

Oil on paper mounted on Board / 48 x 60 ½ in.

Gray, red clay, mixed media / 51 x 37½ x 11½ in. Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist Upon This Land, 2010 Acrylic on fabric on canvas / 6 x 10 ½ ft. Courtesy of the artist Requiem for a “Nigga”, 2010 Acrylic on fabric on canvas / 6 x 8 ft. Courtesy of the artist Eulogy for A Nigga’, 2010 Acrylic on fabric on canvas / 6 x 8 ft. Courtesy of the artist W i l l i a m Egg l e sto n

Untitled (From the Nightclub Portraits), 1973 Gelatin silver print / 29 images, 38 x 26 ¾ in. ea. © Eggleston Artistic Trust; Courtesy of Cheim & Read, New York Stranded in Canton, 1974

Black and White Series No. 3, 2009

DVD Projection / Duration: 82 min.

Black and white acrylic on paper / 10 x 12 in.

Courtesy of Cheim & Read, New York

Courtesy of the artist and Heriard-Cimino Gallery, New Orleans

Courtesy of the artist and Heriard-Cimino Gallery, New Orleans

Action Painting No. 16, 2011

Mauve Series No. 2, 2009

Oil, mixed media on canvas / 56 x 43 in.

Acrylic and Paper Collage / 48 x 47 ¼ in.

Collection of Bob and Bonnie Friedman, courtesy of Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects

Black and white acrylic on paper / 15 x 18 in.

Nicole Eisenman

Breakup, 2011

Courtesy of the artist and Heriard-Cimino Gallery, New Orleans

Courtesy of the artist and Heriard-Cimino Gallery, New Orleans

Action Painting Series No. 19, 2011

Black Collage (Woman in Paris), 2009

Oil, mixed media on canvas / 76 x 60 in.

Paper Collage on Styrofoam /24 ¼ x 47 ½ in.

Courtesy of the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects

Blue, black and pink acrylic on paper / 15 ¼ x 10 ¼ in. Courtesy of the artist and Heriard-Cimino Gallery, New Orleans

Courtesy of the artist and Heriard-Cimino Gallery, New Orleans

Guy Capitalist, 2011

Guy Artist, 2011

Early Collage, 1961

Oil and collage on canvas / 76 x 60 in.

Action Painting Series No. 20, 2011

Blue, white and red / 12 x 14 in.

Purple, red and black acrylic on paper / 12 x 16 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects

Untitled, 1964

Guy Racer, 2011

Acrylic Collage / 23 ¼ x 24 ¼ in.

Oil, mixed media on canvas / 76 x 60 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects

Courtesy of the artist and Heriard-Cimino Gallery, New Orleans Action Painting Series No. 21, 2011 Red, white, and blue acrylic on paper / 12 x 16 ¼ in. Courtesy of the artist and Heriard-Cimino Gallery, New Orleans Action Painting No. 7, 2011 Taupe and white on paper / 37 x 43 in. Courtesy the artist and Heriard-Cimino Gallery, New Orleans

K e i t h D u n ca n

Down By the River Side, 2010 Acrylic on fabric on canvas / 6 x 9 ft. Courtesy of the artist I got my “Mo’jo” Back, 2010

Karl Haendel

Knight #4, 2011 Pencil on paper / 103 x 74 in. Courtesy of the artist and Harris Liebermann, New York

Acrylic on fabric on canvas / 6 x 8 ½ ft. Courtesy of the artist

ONE HUNDRED FORT Y-NINE


EXHIBITION CHECKLIST

Knight #5, 2011 Pencil on Paper / 103 x 74 in. Courtesy of the artist and Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects

Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York Delta: New Orleans, Louisiana, United States,

IvÁ n N ava r ro

The UNO Fence, 2011 Neon, aluminum, electric energy

Knight #6, 2011

Archival Pigment Print / 22 x 15 ½ in.

Variable dimensions / 11 sections, 61 x 89 x 12 in.

Pencil on paper / 103 x 74 in.

Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York

Courtesy of the artist and Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York

Courtesy of the Kadist Art Foundation R ag n a r Kja rta n sso n

2011

Delta: New Orleans, Louisiana, United States,

Lo r r a i n e O’G r a dy

2011

The Man, 2010

Art Is…, 1983/2009

Archival Pigment Print / 22 x 15 ½ in.

Video Installation, Ed. of 6 and 2 AP / Duration: 49 min.

Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York

Digital C-print, Ed. of 8, 1 AP / 40 prints, 16 x 20 in. ea.

Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8 Galleri, Reykjavik

Delta: Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, 2011

Death and the Children, 2002

Archival Pigment Print / 22 x 15 ½ in.

Video Installation / Duration: 4:55 min.

Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York

Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8 Galleri, Reykjavik

Delta: Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, 2011

An-My Lê

Delta: Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, 2011 Archival Pigment Print / 38 x 27 in. Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York Delta: Go Cong, Vietnam, 2011 Archival Pigment Print / 32 x 22 ¾ in. Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York Delta: New Orleans, Louisiana, United States,

Archival Pigment Print / 22 x 15 ½ in. Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York Delta: Go Cong, Vietnam, 2011 Archival Pigment Print / 22 x 15 ½ in. Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York Delta: Go Cong, Vietnam, 2011 Archival Pigment Print / 22 x 15 ½ in. Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York

Courtesy of the artist and Alexander Gray Associates, New York Oz awa Tsu yos h i

(Melanie) Vegetable Weapon: Crawfish Etouffee/New Orleans, 2011 Digital C-print / 47 ¼ x 57 in. Courtesy of the artist and Misa Shin Gallery, Tokyo (Luliana) Vegetable Weapon: Creole Gumbo/ New Orleans, 2011 Digital C-print / 47 ¼ x 57 in. Courtesy the artist and Misa Shin Gallery, Tokyo Documentation Video: Vegetable Weapon New Orleans, 2011 Courtesy the artist and Misa Shin Gallery, Tokyo Ozawa’s participation has been made possible, in part, by the Japan Foundation and The Asian Cultural Council

2011

Archival Pigment Print / 32 x 22 ¾ in.

Delta: Go Cong, Vietnam, 2011

Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York

Archival Pigment Print / 28 x 19 ½ in.

Holt Cemetery Live Oak, 2011

Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York

Fabric, thread, ink, paint / 19 ft. 2 ½ in. x 12 ft. 8 in.

Delta: New Orleans, Louisiana, United States,

Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans

Delta: Chauvin, Louisiana, United States, 2011 Archival Pigment Print / 38 x 27 in. Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York Delta: Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, 2011 Archival Pigment Print / 22 x 15 ½ in. Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York Delta: Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, 2011 Archival Pigment Print / 22 x 15 ½ in. Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York Delta: Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, 2011 Archival Pigment Print / 22 x 15 ½ in.

PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED FIFT Y

2011

G i n a Ph i l l i ps

Archival Pigment Print / 28 x 19 ½ in.

Sweaty Feet (Leakers), 2011

Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York

Fabric thread, ink, paint / 61 x 50 in.

Delta: Da Nang, Vietnam, 2011

Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans

Archival Pigment Print / 28 x 19 ½ in.

Sunset Cloud, 2011

Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York

Fabric, thread, ink, paint / 84 x 92 in.

Delta: Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, 2011

Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans

Archival Pigment Print / 28 x 19 ½ in.

Peckers, Thirsty Girl, 2011

Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy Gallery, New York

Fabric thread, ink, paint / 59 x 72 in.

An-My Lê’s participation has been made possible, in part, by The Asian Cultural Council

Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans


Floating World Cloud, 2011

Sentimental Tooth: Cornstalk, 2011

Fabric, thread, ink, paint / 68 x 75 in.

Fabric, thread, ink, paint, oil pastel / 42 x 46 in.

Haiti, 2011

Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans

Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans

Coat, shirt, pants, paper hat, tie and glasses

Rex Cloud, 2011

Sentimental Teeth: ‘73 AMX, 2011

Courtesy of the artist

Fabric, thread, ink, paint / 50 x 96 in.

Fabric, thread, ink, paint, oil pastel / 36 x 32 ½ in.

Melody, 2008

Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans Fast Girl, 7 th Ward Creole Girl (With Avatars), 2011 Fabric, thread, ink, paint / 51 in. x 84 in. Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans Baby Blanket, 2011 Fabric, thread, paint / 62 ½ x 85 ¼ in.

Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans Sentimental Tooth: Blue Ribbon Girl from Fayette County, 2011

As h to n R a m s e y

Worn for Mardi Gras Day March 8, 2011

Coat, shirt, pants, paper hat, tie and glasses Worn for Mardi Gras Day February 5, 2008 Courtesy of the artist Black & White, 2004

Fabric, thread, ink, paint, oil pastel / 38 x 39 in.

Coat, shirt, pants, paper hat, tie and glasses

Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans

Worn for Mardi Gras Day February 24, 2004

Rain Cloud, 2011

Courtesy of the artist History, 2007

Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans

Fabric, thread, ink, paint / 11 ft. 2 ½ in. x 57 ft. ½ in.

Worn for Mardi Gras Day February 20, 2007

Holt Cemetery Tooth Comforter, 2011

Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans Yesterme, Yesteryou, Yesterday, 2011

Freedom, 1996

Fabric, thread, paint / 102 ½ x 56 in.

Coat, shirt, pants, paper hat, tie and glasses

Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans

Worn for Mardi Gras Day February 20, 1996

Tooth Sampler, 2011

Documentation (Collages and Pictures)

Fabric, thread, ink, paint / 108 x 84 in.

Courtesy of the artist

Fabric, thread, paint / 62 ½ x 85 ¼ in. Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans Dream Girl Cloud, 2011 Fabric, thread, ink, paint / 68 x 75 in. Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans The Whisperer (Future Teeth), 2011 Fabric, thread, ink, paint / 39 x 50 in. Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans Old America Baby, 2011 Fabric, thread, ink, paint / 12 ¾ x 12 in. Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans 20th Century America Baby, 2011 Fabric, thread, ink, paint / 14 ½ x 12 ½ in. Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans Worried Baby, 2011 Fabric, thread, ink, paint / 12 ½ x 11 in. Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans Sentimental Tooth: Cornfield, 2011 Fabric, thread, ink, paint, oil pastel / 28 x 42 in. Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans

Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans Rope-a-dope, 2010 Fabric, thread, ink, paint / 70 x 42 in. Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans

Coat, shirt, pants, paper hat, tie and glasses Courtesy of the artist

Courtesy of the artist

A l e x i s Ro c k m a n

Battle Royale, 2011 Oil on wood / 8’ x 18’ Collection Gian Enzo Sperone, New York J oyc e J. Sc ot t

Flying Trapeze #1 and #2, 2010

Yemenya, 2008

fabric, thread, ink, paint / 44 x 44 in. ea.

Cast glass, beadwork

Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans

27 x 10 ¾ x 5 ¼ in.

Rex Cloud, 2011

Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD

Fabric, thread, ink, paint / 50 x 96 in.

Ancestry/ Progeny, 2008

Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans

Porcelain figures, glass beadwork

William Pope.L

Blink, 2011 Live performance & Multi-media Installation Courtesy of the artist and Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York

Beaded Head: 7 ½ x 6 x 4 ¼ in. Porcelain Woman: 12 ½ x 4 ½ x 3 ½ in. Porcelain Man: 12 ½ x 5 ½ x 2 ½ in. Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD Aunt Jemima Takes a Stand, 1990s Cast glass and beadwork 14 ½ x 12 ½ x 1 ¾ in.

ONE HUNDRED FIFT Y-ONE


EXHIBITION CHECKLIST

Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD

Published by Goya Contemporary & Goya-Girl Press

Tanzanian Flayed Albino Man’s Face, 2008

Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD

Seed beads & thread 4 ½ x 3 ¾ x 1¼ in.

Yaller Girl, 2006 Beadwork, wood and mixed media 25 X 10 X 9 in.

Womanhood 2, 2011

Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD

Monoprint

Tanzanian Flayed Albino Man’s Penis, 2008

Veil, 2011

30 x 22 in.

Seed beads & thread

Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD

Plastic beads, thread

2 ¼ x 1 ¾ x 2 in. Collection of Martha Macks-Kahn

Creepy Night, 2011

46 x 44 in. Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD

Mexican - African - American/Casta Family,

Monoprint

2006

30 x 22 in.

Wood, peyote stitched glass beads, stained glass, fabric, thread, African sculpture & Mexican mask

Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD

Father/Child: 20 ½ x 6 ½ x 7 in.

Decapitated Tanzanian Albino Boy Head,

(Work by Elizabeth Talford Scott, Mother)

2009-2011

Courtesy of the artist, Baltimore, MD

Mother: 20 x 8 x 9 in. Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD Sexecution: Pussy, 2008 Screenprint 30 x 22 in. Published by University of Tampa Print Studio Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD Sexecution II, 2008 Screenprint 30 x 22 in. Published by University of Tampa Print Studio Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD Sexecution III, 2008 Screenprint 30 x 22 in. Published by University of Tampa Print Studio Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD Unable To Be Released, 2000 Monoprint 30 x 22 in. Published by Goya Contemporary & Goya-Girl Press Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD Want a Little Action, 2000 Monoprint 30 x 22 in.

PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED FIFT Y-T WO

Blown and beaded glass, beads & thread Beaded Head: 7 ½ x 5 x 4 ¾ in. Glass Piece: 12 x 4 ½ x 5 ½ in. Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD If Life Were A Tree, 2003 Blown & kiln fired glass, beads, thread & mixed media 47 x 18 x 13 in. Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD Cobalt, Yellow Circles, 2010 Glass Beads, thread, wire 21 x 19 ¼ in. Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD Cosmos, 2010 Glass Beads, thread, wire

Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, 1992 Fabric, knots, buttons, shells, rocks, bead, thread 69 x 57 in.

Ancestry Dolls: 1, 2011 Beads, African sculpture (Ghana), Japanese figurines, thread, fabric 12 x 9 x 16 in. Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD Ancestry Doll: 2, 2011 Chosen crochet dress, Japanese figurines, beads and thread 13 x 10 x 3 in. Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD Ancestry Doll: 3, 2011 Chosen crochet jumpsuit, African (Malawi) figures, beads and thread 23 ½ x 15 ½ x 2 ½ in. Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD

28 ¼ x 22 in.

Lynched Tree, 2011

Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD

Plastic and glass beads, blown glass, thread, wire, wooden pole and metal armature

White Noise Hanging, 2010

106 x 40 x 12 in.

Glass Beads, thread, wire

Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD

25 ¼ x 29 in. Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD Cobalt Rain, 2011 Beads, thread, wire, wood

Evidence, 2011 Beads, thread / 5 ½ x 7 ¼ in. Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD

45 ½ x 11 x 8 ½ in.

Inkisi #2, 2011

Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD

Beadwork, thread, wood, wire


22 x 23 ½ x 23 ½ in.

Black Blonde & Bronze Babe, 2010

Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD

African sculpture, beads, thread

Art By Committee, 2011

12 ¼ x 7 x 4 in.

Site-Specific Installation / Variable Dimensions

From the Still Funny Series: Mammy/Penis,

Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD

Courtesy of the artist

2011

Commercial shaker, beadwork, thread and glue 3 ¾ x 2 x 2 ¼ in. Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD From the Still Funny Series: Indian in Boat, 2011

Japanese ceramic figurine and beadwork, thread 3 x 2 ¼ x 4 in. Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD From the Still Funny Series: Asian/Negro, 2011 Japanese ceramic figurine and beadwork, thread, African carving 6 x 4 x 2 ¾ in. Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD From the Still Funny Series: Couple, 2011

G r a z i a To d e r i

Black Blonde 1, 2010 African sculpture, beads, thread 6 ¼ x 1 ½ x 2 ½ in. Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD Confused, 2009 Blown glass, beadwork, thread, wire 7 ¾ x 11 x 8 ¼ in. Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD Head Shot, 2008 Seed beads, thread, glass, bullets 18 ½ x 4 ½ x 4 ½ in. Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD J e n n i f e r St e i n k a m p

Beads, African carving, thread

The Vanquished, 2011

8 ½ x 4 ½ x 4 ½ in.

Computer Animated Light Projection / 10.5 x 5 ft. (variable)

Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD From the Still Funny Series: Flutist, 2011

U.S Department of Civil Obedience, 2011 Multi-media Installation / Variable Dimensions

Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD

Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans

Black Blonde IV, 2011

American Muscle, 2011

Beads, thread, African carving, hair

Vinyl and enamel on ’69 Pontiac Firebird Hood

6 ½ x 1 ½ x 2 in.

Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans

African slingshot, beadwork, thread

Atlante, 2011 Graphite, metals, and melted tin on gator board/ 8 drawings, 39 ⅓ x 27 ½ ea. Courtesy of the artist FRAN C ESC O V EZZOLI

Portrait of Sophia Loren As The Muse of Antiquity (after Giorgio de Chirico), 2011 Gilt bronze sculpture / 6 ft. 3 in. x 2 ft. x 2 ft. Courtesy of the artist Paw e ł Woj tas i k

Below Sea Level, 2009/11 360° panoramic video Courtesy of the artist and Priska C. Juschka Fine Arts, New York A Made at MASS MoCA Commission

Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans Crisis Car – CC829, 2011

Collection of Amy Eva Raehse & David Tomasko

Repurposed 1969 Firebird Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans

African sculpture, beads, thread

Dominator Plaques, 2011

8 ½ x 4 x 3 in.

Graphite rubbings taken from the Dominator Plaques

Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD

Courtesy of the artist

Young Patriots Flag, 2011

6 ¼ x 1 ½ x 2 ½ in.

Black Blonde V, 2011

Double video projection, sound, loop

Da n Tag u e

5 ½ x 3 ¾ x 3 in.

Black Blonde II, 2010

Atlante, 2010

Courtesy of the artist

Japanese figurine, beads and thread

Courtesy of Goya Contemporary and the artist, Baltimore, MD

Ro b e rt Ta n n e n

Courtesy of the artist and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans

ONE HUNDRED FIFT Y-THREE


Acknowledgements We would like to thank the following persons, galleries and organizations for their valuable contribution and support of Prospect.2 New Orleans—

21c Museum, Louisville, KY

Luca Corbetta

Robert Herndon

Anthony Allen, Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

Rhonda Corvese, The Third of May Arts, Inc.

The House of Execution, New York

Andy Antippas, Barrister's Gallery, New Orleans

Court Square Center LLC, Memphis, TN

Priska C. Juschka Fine Arts, New York

Joe Baker, Longue Vue House and Gardens, New Orleans

Wilma Cruz, Hyatt Regency New Orleans

Pres Kabakoff and Sallie Ann Glassman, New Orleans Healing Center, New Orleans

John Barnes, Dillard University Ron Bechet, Xavier University, New Orleans Troi Bechet Kristen Becker, Luhring Augustine Gallery, New York Dante Birch, MASS MoCA, North Adams, MA Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham, AL

Jennifer Day, New Orleans Convention and Visitors Bureau Jeanette E. Delery, Public Benefit Corporations, New Orleans Dillard University, New Orleans P. Hayden Dunbar, Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York Liz Dunnebacke, NOVAC, New Orleans

Kadist Art Foundation Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York Amy Kirk, French Market Corporation, New Orleans Leo Koenig, Inc., New York Miranda Lash, The New Orleans Museum of Art

Jeffrey D. Ehrenreich

Priscilla Lawrence, The Historic New Orleans Collection

Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans

Harris Liebermann, New York

Lisa Flanagan, Xavier University, New Orleans

Little Buddy Incorporated

Bob and Bonnie Friedman

Srdjan Loncar

Detroit Brooks

Galleri i8, Reykjavik, Iceland

Laura Lee Brown and Steve Wilson

Urban Glass, Brooklyn, NY

Kathryn Lorraine Rodriguez, UNO St. Claude Gallery

Malaika “Mecca” Burke

Mitchell Gaudet, Studio Inferno, New Orleans

Patrick Burns, Louisiana State Museum, New Orleans

Kristin Glenn Photography

bitforms gallery, nyc Jessica Bizer Ralph Brennan Catering and Events, New Orleans

James Cahn Clayton Campbell, Joan Mitchell Center, New Orleans Lauren Cason, Hyatt Regency New Orleans

Kacy Godso, Louisiana State Museum, New Orleans Goya Contemporary, Baltimore, MD Alexander Gray Associates, New York

Jaime Castillo

Tamsen Greene, Jack Shainman Gallery, New York

Angela Cavis, Weber Shandwick

Lydia Grey

Martine Chaisson, Martine Chaisson Gallery, New Orleans

Glenn Gruber, Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans

Kimberly Chandler, Xavier University, New Orleans

Brian Guidry, Acadiana Center for the Arts, Lafayette, LA

Leah Chase, Dooky Chase’s Restaurant

Murray Guy Gallery, New York

Cheim & Read, New York

Katy Hall, Louisiana State Museum, New Orleans

Nicholas Christopher, Turon Travel

Brenda Hanegan, Isaac Delgado Fine Arts Gallery, Delgado Community College, New Orleans

Tony Ciaccio, Hypersoul, LLC Heriard-Cimino Gallery, New Orleans Luis Colmenares, City Art Studios, New Orleans

John E. Hankins, New Orleans African-American Museum

Cynthia M. Connick, Public Benefit Corporations, New Orleans

The Honorable Stacy Head, New Orleans City Council

PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED FIFT Y-FOUR

Ross Louis, Xavier University Charles M. Lovell, Newcomb Art Gallery, Tulane University, New Orleans Sophie T. Lvoff Martha Macks-Kahn Laurel MacMillan, The Third of May Arts, Inc. Sally Main, Newcomb Art Gallery, Tulane University, New Orleans Denise Markonish, MASS MoCA, North Adams, MA Luliana Mars Kathy Mata, Hyatt Regency New Orleans Lisa McCaffety, the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, New Orleans Amanda McFillen, The Historic New Orleans Collection Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York William Morrow, 21c Museum, Louisville, KY Jeanne Nathan New Orleans Arts District Tony T. Nguyen, VAYLA New Orleans


Galerie Nordenhake, Stockholm, Sweden Fumi Ozawa Thea Pagel Productions, New Orleans The Honorable Kristin Gisleson Palmer, New Orleans City Council Chuck Perkins, Café Istanbul, New Orleans Piety Street Studio, New Orleans Pilchuck Glass, Stanwood, WA Frank Pizzolato, French Market Corporation, New Orleans Demetra J. Prattas, Turon Travel, New York Ron Platt, Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham, AL

Bradley Sumrall, The Ogden Museum of Southern Art, New Orleans Jacqueline Tarquinio, Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects Susan Taylor, The New Orleans Museum of Art Jamel Terrace Books, New York Panacea Theriac James Tingley, Shipping Made Simple, New Orleans Aimée Toledano, Post Production, New Orleans Robin G. Vander, Xavier University, New Orleans James Vella Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects

Point Clear Construction, Point Clear, AL

Christopher Vroom

Amy Eva Raehse and Dave Tomasko

Jay Weigel, Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans

Howard Read, Cheim & Read, New York Arthur Roger Gallery, New Orleans Mark Romig, New Orleans Tourism and Marketing Corporation

Sperone Westwater Gallery, New York WHO DAT Café Jane Whitty, George Dunbar Studio

Jakob Rosenzweig Christopher Saucedo

F i n a l ly, v e ry s p ec i a l t h a n ks to —

Lonnie Schaffer, Strike it Green, New Orleans

Our Satellite artists and venues

Kelly Schulz, New Orleans Convention and Visitors Bureau

Brandon Ballengée

Jack Shainman Gallery, New York Melanie A. Sheen Misa Shin Gallery, Tokyo

Michel de Broin Don and Patricia Fels and all P2.S – St. Claude Satellites for their contribution to the Prospect.2 experience!

Dimitri Smith Leslie Smith Michael Smith Harry Solasz Gian Enzo Sperone, New York Sue Strachan, The Ogden Museum of Southern Art, New Orleans Stronghold Studio, New Orleans Sol Studio, Baltimore, MD Studio-f / University of Tampa, Tampa, FL Suleyman, Café Istanbul, New Orleans

ONE HUNDRED FIFT Y-FIVE


Our Artists' Own Special Thanks

Photographic Credits

Daw n D e D e aux

A l l c o py r i gh ts a r e t h e A rt i sts a n d t h e W r i t e rs

Anne Sullivan and John Barry; Dan Cameron; Priscilla Lawrence; Carol Cunningham; Ylva Rouse; Keith Johnson; Jay Pennington; Melvin Foley; Big Freedia; Katey Red; Camilla Huey and Kurt Thometz; Tina Freeman and Philip Woolham; Lyn and John Fischbach; Devra DeDeaux; Barbara and Wayne Amedee; Shawn Hall; Bill Darrow; Seth Tillet; Therese Wegmann; Meryt Harding; Stephanie Atkins; Kate McNee; Ali Duffey; Amanda McFillen; Scott Ratterree; John Lawrence; Beth Allen; Vanessa Sanbourn; John Humphries; Susan Brennan; Jeffrery Scherer; Judith Owen & Harry Shearer; Margaret and David Ross; Bill O’Keeffe; Yorke Lawson; Alexa Georges; Kent and Charlie Davis; Melissa and John D. Gray; Mary Edith Woosley; Nan Weir; Harvey Weir; Madame Purple Rain; Lolis Eric Elie; Catherine Tremaine; Anne and King Milling; Molly Reilly; Bruce Davenport Jr.; Wayne Troyer; Andrew Freeman; Elliott Coon; Ginger Reeder and David Workman.

All photographs © Michael Smith and

r. lu k e d u b o i s

Christopher McIntyre, Ed Baer, Dana Karwas, Gabriel Winer, Laura Blereau, and Deborah Johnson; Band Leaders Lawrence Rawlins, Wilbert Rawlins Jr. and Todrick Carmouche; the Roots of Music Marching Crusaders, the Eleanor McMain Marching Mustang Band and the O. Perry Walker Charger Marching Band; Liz Dunnebacke, Ashley Charbonnet, and all the staff at NOVAC; The Metabolic Studio; Amy Kirk and the French Market District; Bang on a Can/Cantaloupe Music; and Deborah Luster. william pope.l

Breanna Thompson; Courtney Davis; Ylva Rouse; Carrie Knopf; Curt McClain; Dan Cameron; Ron Bechet; Luke Garcia; Kent Wood; Rebecca Hardin; Nile Lang; Jameel Paulin; Cherí Landry; Mary Dawes; Von Paul Reeves; Jay Gorney; Nicole Russo; Matt Foster; Mitchell-Innes & Nash; Xavier University Art Department; Keith Johnson; Carter Lashley; Michael Pajon; Nike Desis; Loyola University Art Department and Tulane University Art Department.

PROSPECT.2

ONE HUNDRED FIFT Y-SIX

pgs. 36-39 © Sophie Calle / ADAGP pgs. 41, 43 © James Printz Photography (Cave) pgs. 44 © Stephan Wyckoff (Dahlberg) pgs. 56-59 © Scott Salzman (DuBois) pgs. 68-71 © Eggleston Artistic Trust pgs. 76-77 © Robert Woodmeyer (Haendel) pg. 104, 106, 107 © James Pruznick (Pope.L) pgs. 105 © Courtesy freshartinternational.com (Pope.L) pg. 121 © Courtesy ACME, Los Angeles and greengrassi, London (Steinkamp) pg. 128-129 © John Traviesa (Tannen) pgs. 137-139 © Todd Eberle (Vezzoli)


U.S. Biennial, Inc. / Prospect New Orleans

Funding Organizations and Donors

B oa r d o f D i r ecto rs

Prospect.2 New Orleans has been made possible with the support of Founding Benefactor Toby Devan Lewis.

Christopher J. Alfieri Susan Gore Brennan

Fo u n d i n g D i r ecto r a n d C h i e f C u r ato r

Dan Cameron

Vivian Cahn

D i r ecto r o f D e v e lo p m e n t

Leah Chase

Beth Allen

William A. Fagaly William H. Hines

D e p u t y D i r ecto r fo r Exh i b i t i o n s

Nancy Delman Portnoy

Keith Johnson

Nari Ward Michael Wilkinson ex officio

Dan Cameron A dv i so ry C o mm i t t e e

Deput y Director for Curatorial Affairs

Ylva Rouse D e v e lo p m e n t Asso c i at e

Ashley Chavis

Ron Bechet

E d u cat i o n C o o r d i n ato r

Andrew Bizer

Takema Robinson-Bradberry

Beverly Cook Lolis Eric Elie Jonathan Ferrara LaSwanda S. Green Brian Knighten

H os p i ta l i t y C o o r d i n ato r

David Nusloch / Carrie Knopf Vo lu n t e e r C o o r d i n ato r

Cherí Landry

Srdjan Loncar

C u r ato r i a l I n t e r n

Deborah Luster

Carrie Knopf

Don Marshall Charles L. Whited Justin Woods

Leadership support has been provided by the Lambent Foundation Fund of the Tides Foundation; The Metabolic Studio; The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts; The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston; The Prospectors Club; and The Helis Foundation. Additional support has been provided by Susan and Ralph Brennan; the Barbro Osher Pro Suecia Foundation; Bloomberg; Regions Bank; Whitney National Bank; Friends of the Stuart Collection, San Diego; Michael Wilkinson; Asian Cultural Council; Mr. and Mrs. Richard Cahn; Étant donnés: The French-American Fund for Contemporary Art; Adam J. Lewis Trust; Heymann Fund; The New Orleans Hash House Harriers, Inc. / Red Dress Run; Peter B. Lewis, Michele Reynoir and Kevin Clifford; the Japan Foundation; The C24 Gallery; Downtown Development District; William A. Fagaly; Sarah Harte; Sanford Heller; IASPIS the Swedish Visual Arts Fund's International Programme; JDL Foundation; Pamela Joseph and Robert Brinker; Jones Walker; Jeanne and Michael L. Klein; Arthur Roger; Martha Claire Tompkins; Margie and Sandy Villere; New Orleans Convention & Visitors Bureau; Iberiabank; Arts Council of New Orleans; the Elmore Morgan Jr. Visual Arts Endowment; New Orleans Arts District; New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation; Turon Travel, among others. Special thanks to Hyatt Regency New Orleans, Hospitality Sponsor and WWNO, Prospect.2 Media Sponsor.

E d u cat i o n I n t e r n

Tara Foster T ech n o lo gy C o n su lta n t

Hakan Topal Marketing and P u b l i c R e l at i o n s

Blue Medium, Inc. Lo g o a n d W e b D e s i g n

PURE+APPLIED Map Design

Atelier Fleufhaus T r a n s p o rt

ARN Transport and Masterpiece International I n su r a n c e

Huntington T. Block

ONE HUNDRED FIFT Y-SEVEN


Prospect.2 New Orleans  

This publication was produced in conjunction with the presentation of the second iteration of the International Biennial Prospect.2 New Orle...

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