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Issue 03

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Contents Vol. 01 / Issue 03 05. Contributors 08. Editor’s Letter

FIRE 73 - 86. Visionary: Geoffrey Holder

WATER 29 - 36. Jitu Weusi

EARTH 13 - 22. Father Figure | Zun Lee

MINERAL 48. Story Time | Letters To A Black Boy, Bob Teague

25 - 26. Surfer Dad: Andrew Norton 37 - 42. Lunch Box Doodles: Jonathan Palmiano 49 - 56. Illustration | Furqan’s First Flat Top 57 - 58. Journal Entry No. 03 61 - 62. Places to Go | The Beehive Atlanta 63 - 64. Education | GAS ART Gifts 65 - 66. Film | Rockers 67 - 68. Music | Mtume Umoja Ensemble: Alkebu-Lan 69 - 70. Podcast | The One In a Million Show 87 - 92. Our Fathers

Passion, Dreams, See Present & Future Flow, The Greater Good, Reconciliation Sense of Identity, Nurturing, Abundance Storytelling, Building, Communication


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“Each man has to fight for what he believes in, for what he wants, on his own terms.” - Bob Teague Former news anchor, reporter, producer and one of New York City’s first black television journalists

Vol. 01 / Issue 03 EDITORIAL Editor In Chief / Creative Director Marlon Cole Copy Editor Sydia Bell Sales Natalie Cole Assistant Aleshia Mclean

4FATHERS Photo Journal Brooklyn, New York Photo Journal: Bi-Annual info@4fathersjournal.com www.4fathersjournal.com Sponsorship / Advertising info@4fathersjournal.com © 2013-2015 4FATHERS All rights reserved. Unauthorized duplication without prior consent is prohibited.

Front Cover: Photo geoffreyandcarmen.dusablemuseum.org Back Cover: Photo by M. Anthony Hopkins


Zun Lee

“Father Figure,� is an exploration into the lives of black fathers through photography. Zun Lee has been working in New York, Chicago and Toronto. His goal is to show an everyday, ordinary love between children and fathers.


Zun Lee

Guy Miller / Bronx, NY Married to Lanik Conley-Miller. Father of Nijeyah, Nijel, Guy Jr., and Lanae.


www.wejamjar.tumblr.com


Melanie Hughes

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Jitu Weusi Words / Lej Rachell David Powell

he death of Jitu Weusi on May 22, 2013 of liver cancer represents a great loss to the community and to the scholarship on the history, culture and political activism of Black people in New York City. Jitu Weusi’s decades of self sacrifice and work deserve a more in depth look at his life. He represented not just the roots but the best of the Black Power movement here in NYC. He put into practice what Black scholars had only theorized. Weusi literally fought for educational opportunities for Blacks and Latinos that are mostly taken for granted today. Born and bred in Brooklyn, Weusi, originally named Leslie Campbell, came from a lower working class family. He’s not from the streets but he is off the block. His mother, who was involved in the local Parent Teachers Association (PTA), sent him as a kid to work at his cousin’s newsstand. In his words, this was his baptism to the world of jazz and the community. Many of the guys who hung out with his cousins at the newsstand were jazz people and it was his cousins who took him to his first jazz concert. He attended Brooklyn Tech High School, which at the time was almost all White. Despite the fact it was one of the city’s most prestigious high schools, he transferred out to Franklin Lane High School to be in a more integrated student population. A basketball scholarship got him through Long Island University, which as the rest of the colleges in NYC at the time, was as White as Brooklyn Tech. With a B.A. in history he started working as a junior high school (JHS) teacher right out of college. He also joined the Brooklyn chapter of the Congress of Racial Equality (Brooklyn CORE), a specifically interracial civil rights group that pioneered the non-violent direct action techniques that came to characterize the civil rights movement. Brooklyn CORE chairman Ollie Leeds, a former member of the Communist Party, had been a friend of his father who was also a Marxist.

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jonathan palmisano

Lunch box Doodles A collection of napkin doodles Jonathan Palmisano has done for his son Jacob’s lunch box. Jonathan’s a father, artist and designer with an affection for tentacles, metal bands, hand-drawn typography and monsters. @lunchboxdoodles lunchboxdoodles.tumblr.com jonathanpalmisano.tumblr.com

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www.sawubonaboo.com


Founder James Bailey creative roots come from the industrial city of Chicago. Born and raised in this beautiful city James has fond memories of riding in the back seat of his grand fathers Buick Oldsmobile peering at the scenery of the city. One can only feel the historic presence from the many old industrial plants throughout the city to know that the core of Chicago is home to the blue collar worker. Each design is made with the highest precision of quality & care, along with great attention to detail. The aesthetic of The Good Union product line is committed to preserving the old American industrial way of life. With so many jobs being outsourced overseas & with the rapid decline of American made goods, The Good Union believes they embody what America was built on, both ingenuity and strong work ethic. Designs are inspired by the American blue collar worker and display the quality of American made goods but also the work ethic of the American blue collar worker. The Good Union / www.thegoodunion.com


The Supply Co. Tee, screen printed with black water based ink.

Custom Hand Letterpress HERITAGE Tee.


Jesse Black Utility Bag, selvage denim.


Issue 03

PREVIEW full copy available at

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STORY TIME

Letters to a Black Boy

Author / Bob Teague

ob Teague, brilliant journalist and a wise man who understood himself that his book, Letters to a Black Boy is really a message to all white men. Teague has performed transplant surgery in which the reader takes on the heart and mind of a black man. “TV newsman Teague (Live and Off-Color; Letters to a Black Boy) uses the device of letters to his son to express positive and provocative thoughts on the “imperatives that come with being black.” Blaming white society for all the ills in black society is, in Teague’s view, counterproductive, even self-defeating. In support of that argument, he cites the example of immigrants and refugees who become readily assimilated in the mainstream of competitive America despite a variety of handicaps. Interspersing anecdotes of his personal experience with accounts of bias and hostility he has encountered in his professional life, he underscores the verities of stable family life, describing them as essential for release from the welfare syndrome. As he addresses his son, who is on the brink of his own media career, Teague speaks also to today’s young black Americans, offering them challenges he believes they are ready to accept.” Copyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Letters to a Black Boy, LP

Publisher: New York City : Bell Records, [1968] (46 min.) analog, 33 1/3 rpm, stereo; 12 in Principally readings by the author, Bob Teague; but includes 4 of the letters set to music, and sung ; arranged and conducted by Chris Dedrick.

Tracklist To a black boy; Letter one Letter Two Letter Three Do I like being black? Give me a chance Letter Four Letter Five Letter Six Letter Seven Epilogue; There’s got to be a better way

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Robert Catalino Trujillo

Planning for the future... Right now, I’m planning to do a few things. One is to take care of my self, my son, my fiancée, and my family anyway I can. I’m trying to live creatively and pace myself in this realm because although I’ve had some successes I know I have a long road ahead of me. I’m also trying to work harder/smarter so I can be financially stable.

Joy Liu


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JOURNALENTRY 03

I used to want to see the penitentiary way after elementary / Thought it was cool to look the judge in the face when he sentenced me / Since my uncles was institutionalized / My intuition has said I was suited for family ties / My momma is stressing, my daddy tired / I need me a weapon, these niggas ride / Every minute, hour and second, ministers tried to save me / How I’m gonna listen when I don’t even hear God? / Heaven or Hell, base it all on my instincts / My hands dirty, you worried ‘bout mud in your sink / You like to mistake a street nigga for real nigga / The same nigga that killed with ya, a squeal with ya / I deal with ya like my son, stare at the sun / And you’ll be looking in my eyes, homie Stand for something, or fall for anything / And you working with two left feet at the skating rink / But anyway, this for my niggas / Uncles, 23 hours sending me pictures / I want you to know that I’m so determined to blow / That you hear the music I wrote, hope it get you off Death Row / You came home to a pocket full of stones / A Metro PC phone, then you went back in / So when I touch the pen, the pen is in my view / I’mma get it right, just so you...

You like to mistake a street nigga for real nigga / That same nigga that kill with ya, will squeal with ya / I’d like to start it out from the bottom and build with ya / Be on my last dollar and split the bill with ya / I’m 23 with morals and plans of living cordial / Not rich, but wealthy, there’s nothing you can tell me / My killings are not remorseful / The city got my back, and for that, I give them my torso / You think about it, and don’t call me lyrical / Cause really I’m just a nigga that’s evil and spiritual / I know some rappers using big words to make their similes curve / My simplest shit be more pivotal / I penetrate the hearts of good kids and criminals / Worrisome individuals that live life critical / So won’t you bear witness while I bare feet / So you can walk in my shoes and get to know me / But anyway, this for my pops / On his lunch break, eating in the parking lot / On “Wanna Be Heard,” probably thought he worked my nerves / But really he was stressing me, getting what I deserved / Somebody said my name on the radio / He ain’t know I was ready for, the world that minute / So the next time he roll up and drop grams in it / He’ll probably be out of work, laid back, while he... Artist: Kendrick Lamar Song: Poe Man’s Dreams (His Vice) Lyrics Album: Section.80

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www.hcz.org / 24


www.academy.jazz.org 25 /


EDUCATION

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R. Gregory Christie’s GAS-ART GIFTS, The letters “G A S” stand for Gregarious Art Statements. This name reflects Mr. Christie’s vision to create a space where art appreciation and creation intersect. GAS-ART GIFTS is designed to be a space where people can come not only to appreciate art, but also to create it themselves. GAS-ART is an autographed children’s bookstore and art gallery located in Decatur, Georgia (North DeKalb Mall), with a collection of signed children’s books, prints and space available for art classes for adults and children.

SATURDAY ART Saturdays are hands-on art days at GAS-ART GIFTS. Drop in art classes in either bookmaking or monoprinting are offered from 1pm to 5pm each Saturday. Classes are only $5 bucks. ADULT CLASSES GAS-ART GIFTS offers classes in both Acrylic Painting and Illustration for adults. *All classes taught by Illustrator, R. Gregory Christie

R. Gregory Christie currently works as an illustrator. He has illustrated over fifty books for young readers, as well as collaborated with clients such as The United States Post Office, New York City’s Subway System, The New Yorker, Rolling Stone, Vibe, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Kennedy Center, Pete Seeger, Queen Latifah, and Karyn Parsons on a variety of projects. GAS-ART GIFTS 2050 Lawrenceville Hyw. #C – 25 Decatur, GA 30033 404.801.4926 www.gas-art.com

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PODCAST

THE ONE IN A MILLION SHOW Hosted by / Murphy II And Jamal Press

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The hosts, Jamal Press and Murphy are two soon-to-be dads who don’t know anything about being dads or being pregnant, but talk like they do. Listen in as they discover with each podcast what it truly means to be an expectant dad. www.theoneinamillionshow.com

EP 1 – I’M PREGNANT Those two words “I’m Pregnant” to a man can rattle him to his core. Join Murphy and Jamal Press as they share the wide range of reactions they felt when their wives first told them the news.

EP 2 – THE MICHAEL JORDAN OF BABY CATCHING Press and Murph speculate on how to count pregnancy weeks, the use of music therapy during the different stages of labor and how to catch a newborn baby without gloves.

EP 3 – HOUSE ARREST Listen as Murph and Press plot to escape house arrest, answer some tough email questions, and reveal the gender of Burrito Flash.

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Bel-Air

SERIES: Family Values

A support system is key for any family member to ascend to levels never thought one could reach. Here’s a visual representation from one of our favorite families. Poster (11x17) Available at marzkingcole.bigcartel.com


www.soulofbrooklyn.com


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CONTRIBUTE / SHARE

What we are looking for? Do you have a unique perspective as a father? If you are interested in providing your perspective as a father, we welcome submissions of photography, poetry, and articles that relates to fatherhood. Book reviews are also desired — short descriptions of particular book. How to submit material? Simply e-mail us the piece you would like published. In addition, please provide us with some background information about yourself. Submit written articles in MS Word format. Copyright Please do not resend materials published elsewhere. However, if you do have an article on a blog that you think is of particular interest to our audience, please do send us a link. Lastly keep in mind that if you do send us material and we publish it, you are granting us a non-exclusive right to maintain your piece. info@4fathersjournal.com www.4fathersjournal.com


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