__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

Sailing Magazine June 2017

For Sailors, by Sailors


S a i l N o r t h 1996 w eFarr s t39 C/R

June Offerings - New & Brokerage - Sail & Power

1996 Farr 39 Tachyon The perfect blend of speed and comfort. Carbon rig, swept back spreaders, non-overlapping jib, cockpit seats, wheel steering, asymmetrical chutes, full interior complete with enclosed head, salon drop leaf table and complete galley. Tachyon is in top shape and ready to cruise or race today. 2003 J Boat J/145 Primadonna The ultimate performance cruiser the J/145 is the answer for sailors seeking great performance, but not at the cost of unprotected cockpits, sparse interiors or complex overpowered rigs. She is the answer for those who seek grace and elegance in their cruising comforts... but not at the cost of performance. 2000 Wellcraft 330 VMG Her twin Caterpillar 3116 diesel engines will get you where you’re going quickly and efficiently all while comfortably enclosed in her elevated bridge deck. Truly a versatile boat the Wellcraft 330 is a wide stable fishing, diving or cruising platform and a well found PNW sport cruiser.

Sail & Power - New & Brokerage BOATS ARE SELLING, WE NEED LISTINGS! POWER LISTINGS 33’ 2000 Wellcraft .............................................. $85,000 RECENT BROKERAGE SALES 44’ 1980 Nauticat......................................SOLD $130,000.00 SAIL LISTINGS ORIGINALLY OFFERED AT

Li New st in g

Li New st in g

38’ 1995 Tartan 3800................................SOLD $130,000.00 36’ 1987 Nonsuch.....................................SOLD $79,000.00 26’ 2008 J/80.............................................SOLD $34,000.00 26’ 2000 J/80.............................................SOLD $26,000.00 26’ 1986 Ericson.......................................SOLD $16,000.00

65’ 1984 Macgregor........ PRICE REDUCED $79,900 48’ 2003 J/145................................................... $389,000 40’ 1994 J/120................................................... $119,000 39’ 1996 Farr 39 Cruiser/Racer...................... $109,900 37’ 1986 Express 37..............NEW LISTING $49,900 36’ 1988 Catalina 36......................................... $27,500 30’ 1997 Henderson......................................... $42,000 29’ 1983 J/29..........................NEW LISTING $18,900 22’ 2017 J/70 #1110......................IN STOCK $52,990 22’ 2013 Rhodes....................NEW LISTING $33,000

Li New st in g

SO LD

1986 Express 37 1983 J/29

1980 Nauticat 44 2013 Rhodes 22 2

June 2017

www.48North.com

206-286-1004 - sales@sailnorthwest.com @ Shilshole Marina Suite 140


www.48North.com

June 2017

3


June 2017 24

Fishing From Your Sailboat

26

Committing to Cruising by Sail Power

28

Lessons Learned While Cruising

30

48° North Race to Alaska Preview - Part Two

32

Galley Essentials with Amanda

34

Ask the Surveyor

35

Sailor Profiles: Rent, Share, or Own?

40

How-to: Install a Roller Furler

42

The Place of Women

44

Winds of Change for Rigging Industry

46

Artist’s View - Secrets of the Salish Sea

47

48° North Race Report

A PNW cruiser’s starter guide. By Michele Rogalin Henderson

Smart routing and a thoughtful approach mean less motoring. By Patrick Davin Dinner with Pirates: The bumpy road to cruising confidence. By Jamie and Behan Gifford Sailing with Team Global, candidate for the buyback $10K. By Joe Cline Norwegian cruising, maritime history, and cuisine. By Amanda Swan Neal Keel Bolts: Careful inspections keep your keel attached. By Tom Averna Sharing, Learning, and Experiencing Variety. By Cara Kuhlman

A tricky install, but a great asset for headsail handling. By Alex and Jack Wilken Strength and femininity on display in Zihuatanejo. By Becca Guillote Hall and Navtec closures raise questions about rod rigging. By Lisa Vizzini Pelagic Cormorant: A smaller cormorant, an expert fisherman. By Larry Eifert SYC Protection and Vashon Island, Race to the Straits, J/24 Nationals, CYC PSSR, Oregon Offshore, and more

DEPARTMENTS

Editorial 6 Letters 8 Calendar 12 Lowtide 14 In the Biz 18 Crossword 20 4

Books 21 Trivia 22 Product News 23 Classified Ads 59 Brokerage/Listings 69 Index to Advertisers 78 June 2017

www.48North.com

This month’s cover,“Water and Boats Through the Trees,” is by Joe Cartwright. See more www.paintingwithwatercolors.com


Sailing Magazine

There are many great ways to ring in the new summer sailing season, but Sloop Tavern’s Race to the Straits is one of the best attended and most fun. The idyllic weekend was particularly good to class winner, Mike Tunney, on board his Thunderbird, Cuatro Vientos! Photo courtesy of Jan Anderson.

www.48North.com

June 2017

5


Sailing Vicariously Last month, I bemoaned the moaning and groaning about a slowly developing spring. This month, everybody can celebrate the arrival of summer sailing season! At the time of this writing, it’s sunny, 74°F, and there’s a vernal 15 knot northerly indicative of the summer-time position of the Pacific High. Sailing season is most certainly here, and if you’re like me, you’ve been getting out on the water quite a bit. I imagine most of you are also like me in another way, in feeling that there’s never enough time to fit in all the sailing you’d like to be doing. That’s one of those funny things about the summer sailing season - the joys on the water are frequent and enthusiastically enjoyed, and yet there’s always somebody doing some kind of sailing that gives us FOMO (fear of missing out). For me, as someone who chooses to spend more time racing than cruising, the first and foremost FOMO inciters are the boats and groups setting sail for Alaska at this time of year. Day in, day out, they anchor by mountains that meet the water, getting more remote and ever-more-grand as you go further north: eat, sleep, sail, and maybe fish (page 24). I haven’t lived that version of sailing life yet, but I certainly hope to stop missing out on it sooner rather than later. Even in the racing realm, though, there are many things I’m just not doing, and this month is a great example. While I’m writing this, the J/24 Nationals (page 56) are in town boasting a 32-boat starting line and some of the region’s best pitting themselves against national and international competition in what many still consider the most competitive fleet in town. FOMO...big time, especially since each day of that regatta got sunnier, warmer, and windier! June also marks the start of Race to Alaska (page 30), Van Isle 360, and The America’s Cup in Bermuda. These three immensely different events are three of the most exciting to me. And, you guessed it, I won’t be sailing in any of them! FFFFOOOMMMOO! Race to Alaska, which starts on June 8, is in its third year and will have another great lineup with its customary variance of boats, sailors, and approaches to the race. Van Isle 360 starts out of Nanaimo on June 10, and is the consummate yacht race in the Pacific Northwest, in my opinion - inshore and offshore distance racing over two weeks in some of the world’s most picturesque waterways. And who could forget the storied and oft-controversial America’s Cup? The intrigue in this year’s AC in Bermuda is different than years past the boats are unusually similar (one-design hulls designed by Seattle’s own Paul Bieker, identical wings, with open foils and systems); foiling is still amazing, but it is not new like it was in San Francisco in 2013; and there are more viable teams with a chance to win. But, most of us won’t be in Bermuda. Even those that are undertaking one of these endeavors - cruising to Alaska, R2AK, Van Isle, or the America’s Cup - do so at the exclusion of the rest. Nevertheless, it’s 2017 and there are a lot of ways for all of us to enjoy any and all of these experiences. Many Alaska-bound cruisers maintain excellent blogs and social media accounts, and others share their stories in the pages of this and other publications. Race to Alaska and Van Isle have trackers to follow each of the competing boats, and if this year follows the trend, there will be more coverage from onboard the race boats (via social media) than ever before. And finally, though the access to good coverage has been disappointing compared to the 2013 America’s Cup, you can watch an expected 40 hours of race coverage between NBC, NBCSN, and the NBC Sports app. With all of this, be sure to keep tabs on www.48north.com as we try to stay up with all of it, and share our version of the stories with you! Ultimately, this is a reality of our modern world - we are constantly confronted with the choices we aren’t making. But that doesn’t mean that we can’t enjoy parts of those experiences by living, or sailing, vicariously through others. Going sailing is clearly the best choice of all, but when you can’t, don’t miss the fun of following other people’s sailing adventures! I’ll see you on the water! Joe Cline, Editor, 48° North 6

June 2017

www.48North.com

Volume XXXVI, Number 11, June 2017 6327 Seaview Ave. NW Seattle, WA 98107 (206) 789-7350, fax (206) 789-6392 Website: http://www.48north.com Publishers Michael Collins & Richard Hazelton Editor Joe Cline email: joe@48north.com Associate Editor/Race/Current Events: Karen Higginson email: karen@48north.com Advertising Director Michael Collins email: michael@48north.com Advertising Sales Scott Pittrof email: scott@48north.com Lisa Cole email: lisa@48north.com Classifieds/Display Advertising Savannah McKenzie email: savannah@48north.com Bookkeeper bookkeeper@48north.com Contributing Editors Culinary Cruiser: Amanda Swan Neal Photographer: Jan Anderson Published monthly by Boundless Enterprises, Inc, 6327 Seaview Ave. NW, Seattle, WA 98107, (206) 789-7350/ Fax (206) 789-6392. Printed in Seattle, WA, USA. 48° North encourages letters, photographs, manuscripts, burgees, and bribes. Emailed manuscripts and high quality digital images are best, but submissions via mail or delivered in person are still most welcome! We are not responsible for unsolicited materials. Articles express the author’s thoughts and may not reflect the opinions of the magazine. Reprinting in whole or part is expressly forbidden except by permission from the editor. Subscription Rates: U.S. one year - $25 - 3rd Class (3rd Class is not automatically forwarded) 1st Class in U.S. - $35 U.S Funds Canada Printed Matter - $35 U.S. Funds Over-Seas Foreign Air Mail - $65 U.S. Funds


www.nwyachtnet.com

The Northwest’s Premier Yacht Broker Network

Swantown Marina Office 700 Marine Dr. NE, Suite 105 Olympia, WA • 888-219-5485

Tacoma Waterfront Office 1717 Dock Street Tacoma, WA • 888-641-5901

Lake Union Waterfront Office 1500 Westlake Ave. N, Suite 102 Seattle, WA • 877-215-0559

More Information on over 80 listings at www.NWYachtnet.com 44' Irwin CC '87  SOLD

42' Hunter Passage '93  SOLD

42' Bavaria CC '99  SOLD

38' Baltic 38 DP '85  $70,000

34' X-Yacht X-342 '89  $44,700

30' Fisher PH '74  $39,900

44' Irwin CC '97........................SOLD 43' Slocum Cutter '84.......... 159,000 43' Beneteau Sense '12  $315,000 43' Slocum Cutter '84  $159,000 43' Beneteau Sense '12....... 315,000 We’re Selling 42' Wauquiez Centurion..... 137,800 Quality Listings! 42' Hunter Passage '93............SOLD Your Yacht Could 42' Catalina MkII '07................SOLD 42' Bavaria CC '99...................SOLD Be Shown Here. 42' Wauquiez Centur. '85 $137,800 42' Beneteau Sense '12....... 330,000 42' Spencer '66........................SOLD 41' CT PH ketch '76................ 29,900 40' Island Packet '99................SOLD 39' Hans Christian PH '83..... 174,900 39' C&C '73............................ 26,000 39' Hans Christian PH '83  $174,900 38' Shannon Ketch '81.......... 76,000 40' Island Packet '99  SOLD 38' Panda '86...........................SOLD 38' Baltic 38 DP '85................. 70,000 37' Bavaria Sloop '00...............SOLD 37' Endeavour '78.................. 27,900 36' Union Cutter '81.................SOLD 38' Shannon Ketch '81  $76,000 36' Catalina 36 MkII '02  SOLD 36' Catalina 36 MkII '02......... 94,500 36' Catalina '84........................SOLD 34' Tartan T34C '78................. 34,900 34' X-Yacht X-342 '89............. 44,700 33' Hans Christian 33T '85.... 109,500 Six of our Brokers are 33' Hans Christian 33T '85 $109,500 31' Cal Sloop '79.................... 18,000 Certified Professionals 30' Fisher PH '75........................SOLD 27' Catalina 270 ‘94.............. 22,995 TRAWLERS 92' Broward MY '84.............. 450,000 48' Offshore Sedan '87............SOLD 37' Fountaine Pajot Maryland '05 43' Fathom Element '16........... CALL 43' Fathom Element '11 SOLD Power Cat $239,500 43' Fathom Element '11....... 385,000 37' Fountaine Pajot '05........ 239,500

Dealers for:

New Fairway Yachts From 37' - 72' In stock 2017 Fairway 37' loaded at $399,500.

New Grand Soleil Yachts From 39' - 58' 2017 Grand Soleil 39' starting at $225,000 base. www.48North.com

New North American built Fathom Element 40. Starting at $585,000. June 2017

Grand Soleil Yachts Fathom Element Fairway Yachts

7


Letters All the Power You Need

That’s Quite a Coach Roof! Hi Joe, We spotted this boat near Friday Harbor and wondered if it was a R2AK participant - do you know? And, if so, which team?

Model Shown Beta 38

Thanks for any info! Curious minds want to know...

Engineered to be Serviced Easily!

Beta Marine West (Distributor) 400 Harbor Dr, Sausalito, CA 94965 415-332-3507

Pacific Northwest Dealer Network Emerald Marine Anacortes, WA 360-293-4161 www.emeraldmarine.com

Kit Case & Roy Kauffman S/V StarGazer Heading north... Hi Kit and Roy! That is something, isn’t it? I have no idea what it is, and as far as I know it’s not currently registered for R2AK. Our publisher, Michael Collins, noted that it looks like a square rig, which would make the predictable upwind sailing on the way to Ketchikan pretty inefficient. Aside from the voluptuous cabin top, I like the lines of the boat. It is reminiscent of some of the longboat or dory designs that have been involved in Race to Alaska in the past. I like the wizard’s staff tiller and the ornate rudder head. Do any other readers have any information about this?

Oregon Marine Industries Portland, OR 503-647-0009 omi@integra.net Access Marine Seattle, WA 206-819-2439 info@betamarineengines.com www.betamarineengines.com Sea Marine Port Townsend, WA 360-385-4000 info@betamarinepnw.com www.betamarinepnw.com Deer Harbor Boatworks Deer Harbor, WA 888-792-2382 customersupport@betamarinenw.com www.betamarinenw.com 8

June 2017

Speak No, See No, Hear No... Barging? Port tack layline approaches? Oh... Evil! The crew of “Habenero” have a little fun at the J/24 Nationals. Photo courteously shared by the amazing Jan Anderson. www.48North.com


Letters

THIRD REEF 3L The world’s best-selling foul weather gear just got better.

Only at West Marine.

• 100% waterproof/breathable and windproof • Redesigned for a better fit • High-visibility hood • Internal security pocket • Non-corrosive zippers

westmarine.com Plus more than 250 stores nationwide www.48North.com

June 2017

9


Letters

Photo courtesy of Seattle Fire Department Photo by Ted Evans. What I Learned from Sailboat Living Dear 48° North, I was twenty-two when I got out of the Navy. Those lucky souls who’ve had the honor of being out to sea know that there comes a deep, gnawing nostalgia for the ocean with life on land. The desire to be back on the water hit me hard, and so I went looking for work on the docks in Ballard. To my great joy, I found what I was looking for. A small mom-and-pop company called Boat Snake hired me to detail sailboats and yachts. It was a hard job, but sailors know a thing or two about hard work. As every boating season passed, and with it the summer workers who often didn’t last more than one season, I weathered the winters and the cold, lonely docks because I had a dream. My boss and his wife had been living on their sailboat for years, and after that first sail on a brilliantly sunny day atop the Sound, I was hooked. My goal was to save enough money to buy a small sloop, and follow in my boss’s wake. It took me five years to finally get a boat. Five years of toiling aboard other people’s boats, day after day, hoping that some day that dream would be mine. My first boat, and the boat I still have to this day, is a 1975 27 foot Catalina sloop. The Boat Snake crew had regular Friday evening sails after work, and so I had a good understanding of how the mechanics of sailing worked. But when I became my own captain, and I had to learn to solo-sail, I felt like I was learning something new all over again. Embarking and docking the boat proved to be a comedy of errors for one man. Lucky for me, the hull of my boat had some scars from a previous life, so the scratches and scours weren’t as noticeable. On one occasion, the current and wind pushed me so far out of line that I had to jump off my boat and onto another to push my boat away from it and not let them collide. I saved the boats from collision… but fell in the drink in the process! A few good Samaritans, laughing hysterically from my performance, ran to help pull me out and dock my boat. They assured me, every captain has a few stories like that. After four years of living on my sailboat at Shilshole Bay Marina, of learning how to sail and how to be a captain, I moved back to land. I still have my sailboat, but there’s 10

June 2017

www.48North.com


Letters nothing quite like the experience of living aboard. What I miss the most is the simplicity of life, the sound of the swells against the hull, rain-drops on the deck overhead as I fell asleep in the v-berth, being rocked by the waves. The sunsets at Shilshole were magnificent, and I would watch them every summer night as I grilled in the cockpit, and drank ciders with old friends. I miss the docks at night, lit like runways from the dock-box lights. I miss the connection with the sea, with nature, with how close I felt with the earth. There is so much I gained from my life aboard the boat that I wrote a book of poetry as an ode to the experience. It was published recently and became a top 10 best-seller on Amazon, a sweet medal to commemorate the experience. I wrote it to share the beauty I witnessed, to sing a song of joy for the life of sailing. A line in the book perfectly sums up how I feel about it all, “The art of sailing, is an art to thrive.” I hope you get to thrive too, and experience all the joys that sailboat living has to offer.

Defender

THE BRANDS YOU WANT AND TRUST IN STOCK FOR LESS

Item 261406 Model T70161-P70S

EVO-400 Autopilot Pack

• Includes P70S Control Head, EV-1 Sensor Core, ACU-400 and Evolution Cable Kit • For mechanically steered sailboats with a displacement of 48,000 - 77,000 lbs

SAVE $5000

Thanks for letting me share my story, Lance Garland S/V Blazin’ Guns Thanks for sharing your experience, Lance! Your determination is common among the young folks who find themselves pursuing the boat life, especially living aboard. It is a labor of love, both working on your boat and working a job to support it all. Good on you for chasing the dream, well done on being published, and thanks for preaching the gospel of sail!

When You Use Code 48N50. Offer Valid 6/1/17 - 6/30/17

The Largest Wheel Pilot Dealer in the U.S. FREE Winch Handle Pocket

(Item 612531 - A $16.24 value!) with purchase of a select 10” One Touch Handle or 10” Locking Double Grip Handle (Item 606889). While Supplies Last!

Social Media Responses to Ray McCormack’s Multihull Article from April 2017 48° North: Jorge O’Leary: There is also such a variety of differences among the multihull designs, that it makes it difficult to generalize. For the charter crowd, this information is good. Weight has a great effect on performance characteristics. A lighter more performance-type multihull, actually has less stress on the rig despite not heeling, because the boat just generates speed on the puffs, and the speed dissipates the pressures on the entire rigging. Tim Schofield: I have sailed both mono and multi offshore, both on two-year cruises. There are a few wrong assumptions in this article. First, unless you are chartering a Hobie cat, you won’t lift a hull or under any circumstance capsize a cruising cat... Cats do ok to weather, it all depends on wave height and period. They tack easily, you just need to exaggerate the turn more... My cat was fantastic dead downwind - I did 15,000 miles downwind - it all depends on how you rig her. Motion-wise, it is fantastic for cruising; my wife would cook roast dinners on passage. We would sit as a family with glasses on the table and eat dinner while sailing at 8 knots. I did sail her at up to 17 knots, but felt she was overpowered, so reduced sail. A cat just speeds up when you have too much sail - it is way less risk than a knock down on a monohull... Having sailed both in all conditions these are my counter arguments to the article.

®

10” Locking Double Grip Winch Handle Item 606889

Only $7500

10” OneTouch Power Grip Winch Handle

• Lightweight, forged construction • Easy one-handed removal, simply squeeze handle and lift Item 612573

www.48North.com

We are not required to collect sales tax on orders shipped outside CT! Most Orders Placed by 4:30 ET Ship the Same Day! June 2017

Please Call for Price!

FREE Catalog!

2017

www.defender.com 800-625-8225 11


Lowtide

June

Calendar

2-4

Classic Mariner’s Regatta in Port Townsend, http://nwmaritime.org 2-4 PNW Wauquiez Rendezvous at Point Hudson Marina in Port Townsend, email: WauquiezPNWR@gmail.com 2-4 MYCBC 25th Anniversary on Bowen Island at the Union Steamship Marina, www.mycbc.ca 2-4 BMW Lasqueti Island Regatta, www.scyc.com Seattle YC Blake Island Tri Island #3, www.seattleyachtclub.org 3 Tacoma YC Summer Vashon, www.tacomayachtclub.org 3 3 About Boating Safely on Bainbridge Island, www.biparks.org 3-4 Coho Ho Ho Field Trip to Marine Servicenter in Anacortes, www.cohohoho.com Marine First Aid at Fishermen’s Terminal, Seattle, 5 (206) 543-1225 6 Coho “Electronic Communications” by Ryan Spott, at Fisheries Supply, www.cohohoho.com 6 Duck Dodge: Duck Dodgesty Night, www.duckdodge.org Race to Alaska begins, https://r2ak.com 8 Shilshole Boatfest, www.portseattle.org 10 Gig Harbor Marina and Boatyard’s Swap Meet, 9:00am10 3:00pm, (253) 858-3535 or jenn@gigharbormarina.com Milltown Sailing Association Saratoga Sprint Race, 10 www.milltownsailing.org Everett Sail and Power Squadron Vessel Safety Checks at 10 Anchor Cove Marina, email: espsvsc@gmail.com Leukemia Cup - Retro Regatta, www.lls.org 10 American Marine Training Centers, Captain’s License Courses 10 in Sequim, www.americanmarinetc.com BremertonYC Blake Is WSSA #6, http://bremertonyachtclub.org 10 10-11 Corinthian YC Edmonds Mad Dash, www.cycedmonds.org

10-24 13 15 16

Van Isle 360, www.vanisle360.com Duck Dodge: Western Night, www.duckdodge.org Downtown Sailing Series, www.downtownsailingseries.com Puget Sound Cruising Club meeting featuring Elsie and Steve Hulsizer, www.pugetsoundcruisingclub.org 15-18 Festival of Sail Tacoma, http://festofsailtacoma.com 16-18 PNW Jeanneau Rendezvous at Cap Sante Marina, (206) 323-2405 17 Sloop Tavern YC Three Buoy Fiasco, www.STYC.org 17 Corinthian YC Tacoma Three Hour Tour #1, www.cyct.com 17-27 America’s Cup Match in Bermuda, www.americascup.com 17-18 CorinthianYC Seattle cruise to Langley Marina, www.cycseattle.org 17-18 Cowichan Bay Maritime Centre Wooden Boat Festival, www.classicboats.org 20 Duck Dodge: Hippies and Hipsters Night, www.duckdodge.org 20-21 Red Bull Youth America’s Cup Finals, www.americascup.com 22 Downtown Sailing Series, www.downtownsailingseries.com 23 Coho Ho Ho “Safety Equipment for Offshore,” at Fisheries Supply, www.cohohoho.com 23-25 San Juan 24 North Americans at Oak Harbor, https://sites.google.com/site/sj24northwest West Sound CYC Brownsville Race WSSA #7, www.wscyc.net 24 Get Out & Boat Fest on South Lake Union, 11:00am-3:00pm, 24 (206) 748-0012 or showinfo@boatsafloatshow.com 24-25 Triton YC Emerald Cup Regatta, www.tritonyachtclub.org 24-25 Bellingham YC One Design Regatta, www.byc.org 24-25 Corinthian YC Seattle P.O.D. Regatta, www.cycseattle.org 24-25 Anacortes YC Windermere Cup, www.anacortesyachtclub.org 24-25 Corinthian YC Seattle cruise to Blakely Rock, www.cycseattle.org 24-25 Anacortes YC Windermere Regatta, www.anacortesyachtclub.org 24-25 Summer Sailstice, www.summersailstice.com

It’s All Here. PORT LUDLOW MARINA IS OPEN YEAR ROUND & OFFERS: • Boat In & Golf Packages • 26 miles of walking trails • Waterfront Dining • Covered Pavilion • Fuel Dock

• Pump Out • Free WiFi • Marina Store • BBQ Fire Pit

PORT LUDLOW WASHINGTON

www.PortLudlowResort.com • 360.437.0513 12

June 2017

www.48North.com


Lowtide

Calendar 24-25 Puget Sound Cruising Club Raft-up and Salmon Bake at Port Madison, www.pugetsoundcruisingclub.org 27 Duck Dodge: Prom Night, www.duckdodge.org 29 Downtown Sailing Series, www.downtownsailingseries.com 29-2 Santa Cruz 27 Nationals hosted by Anacortes YC, www.anacortesyachtclub.org 30 Hobie Cat Learn to Sail at Des Moines Marina, http://hobiediv4.org 30-2 The Basil Hobbs Memorial SIN Regatta, www.nanaimoyc.ca

July 1

Hobie Cat Learn to Sail at Magnuson Park, Seattle, http://hobiediv4.org 1-2 Bellingham YC Point Roberts Race, www.byc.org 1-4 Lake Union Wooden Boat Festival, www. cwb.org 3 Transpac Race- Los Angeles to Hawaii begins, https://2017.transpacyc.com 3 Hobie Cat Learn to Sail, Lake Quinault, http://hobiediv4.org 4 Happy 4th of July! 4 No Duck Dodge, www.duckdodge.org 6 Downtown Sailing Series, www.downtownsailingseries.com 8 Corinthian YC Tacoma Three Hour Tour #2, www.cyct.com 9-14 Whidbey Island RaceWeek, www.whidbeyislandraceweek.com 11 Duck Dodge: Mardi Gras Night, www.duckdodge.org 13 Downtown Sailing Series, www.downtownsailingseries.com 17 Hobie Cat Learn to Sail at Lake Mayfield Park, http://hobiediv4.org 18 Duck Dodge: Pirate Night, www.duckdodge.org 19-22 Columbia Gorge Racing Association Melges 24 National American Championships, www.cgra.org Downtown Sailing Series, www.downtownsailingseries.com 20

21

Movies at Shilshole Bay Marina - Captain Ron, www.portofseattle.org 25 Duck Dodge: Christmas in July Night, www.duckdodge.org 27 Downtown Sailing Series, Beach Party Night, www.downtownsailingseries.com 28-30 Columbia Gorge Racing Association CGOD, www.cgra.org 29 Corinthian YC Tacoma Three Hour Tour #3, www.cyct.com

August 1 1-5 3 4-6 5 5 5-6 8

Duck Dodge: Toga Night, www.duckdodge.org Thunderbird International Regatta, www.thunderbirdsailing.org Downtown Sailing Series, www.downtownsailingseries.com Cowichan Bay Regatta, www.cowbay-regatta.ca Hood RiverYC Double Damned race, www.hoodrieryachtclub.org Bellingham Youth Regatta, www.byc.org Sloop Tavern YC Down the Sound Race, www.STYC.org Duck Dodge 48 North/Marine Servicenter/Ullman Sails/ Fremont Brewing: Tropical Night, www.duckdodge.org 10 Downtown Sailing Series, The Rutten Race, www.downtownsailingseries.com 11 NW Cruisers Party, Cap Sante Marina, Anacortes, Coho Ho Ho departures to follow - www.cohohoho.com 11 Movies at Shilshole Bay Marina - The Secret Life of Pets, www.portofseattle.org 12 San Juan Island YC Shaw Island Classic Race, www.sjiyc.com 12-13 Seattle YC McCurdy Cup Jr. Team Race, www.seattleyacht club.org 15 Duck Dodge: Pajama Night, www.duckdodge.org 22 Duck Dodge: Skipper’s Choice Night, www.duckdodge.org 25-27 Island Packet Rendezvous at Cap Sante Marina, (503) 559-5739

NEW!

Unlimited Towing from TowBoatU.S. for the Insured boat for as little as $3/mo.

SET A COURSE

AND RELAX

Start and end your best days on the water with the peace of mind that comes with insurance coverage through BoatU.S. With 24/7 dispatch, Unlimited Towing provided by TowBoatU.S. and claims service from boating experts, there’s nothing but smooth sailing ahead.

BoatUS.com/insurance or 800-283-2883

BOATU.S. – THE BEST CREW FOR PROTECTING YOU All policies and endorsements subject to limits and exclusions. TowBoatU.S. Endorsement not available in all states. Pricing varies by boat length and location. In the state of California, the BoatU.S. Marine Insurance Program is provided through Boat Owners Association Insurance Services, CA License # 0H87086. www.48North.com

June 2017

13


Lowtide

The Seattle Yacht Club lawn Seattle Yacht Club was the place to be for all the pomp and circumstance of Photo courtesy of C-Images the Opening Ceremony. The 1st Corps Army Band Brass Quintet played as Past Admirals and Admiralettes from SYC and visiting Yacht Clubs marched in to form an honor guard. SYC Commodore Lynn Wingard introduced the Opening Day Trio, Admiral Bruce Campbell, Admiralette Sandy Bell, Vice Admiral Randy Holbrook, and many others who played a valuable part in making Opening Day a success. Weather was a mixed bag of sun and rain, but definitely worth coming out for. The log boom was jammed and there were many spectators along the shoreline. The firing of a cannon signaled the start of the Opening Day Parade and the opening of the Montlake Cut Bridge. The Virginia V was the first boat in the procession of more than 165 boats to pass through the Cut. Seattle also celebrated Opening Day of boating season festivities with the

31st annual Windermere Cup crew competition at Seattle’s Montlake Cut and the UW crews broke long standing records for the Windermere Cup. Prior to the Windermere Race, Seattle’s own firemen and policemen raced shells, with the police taking honors. Many boaters took the theme, “Emerald City Aahs” to mean “aahs from Seattle” while others chose the theme from The Wizard of Oz. Decorated boats, such as Lovedrive from Queen City Yacht Club, High Life from Kingston Cove Yacht Club and 3 Boats from Washington Yacht won the “Novelty Decorated Golden Potlatch Trophy.” The “Club Sponsored Decorated boats - Past Commodore’s Trophy” included Knot Now of Gig Harbor YC, Jenn Marie from Tacoma Yacht Club, and Iolani from the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. “Best Overall Theme AwardAdmiral’s Trophy” went to Knot Now. Over 250 volunteers helped put on this specatular annual event. For the list of winners, please check www.seattleyachtclub.org

Photo courtesy of C-Images

Photo courtesy of Josie Weiss

14

Opening Day

June 2017

www.48North.com

Photo courtesy of Josie Weiss


Lowtide Shilshole Boatfest June 10 Shilshole Bay Marina celebrates the first-ever Shilshole Boatfest. The fun begins at 11:00am and lasts until 4:00pm. Visitors can try out boating in many forms – all for free. “For anyone thinking about getting into boating, that doesn’t know how to start or what kind of boating they’d most enjoy, this is a great way to test the waters,” said Tracy McKendry, Director of Recreational Boating at the Port of Seattle. This event will allow attendees to get out on a boat, introduce them to people who can help them navigate how to get into boating, and how to boat safely. After enjoying time on the water in the boats of their choice, the shoreside festival offers more fun for all with activities including two seathemed bounce houses, lawn games for kids and adults, live music, food trucks, a beer and wine garden and many vender booths. For a complete schedule of activities visit www.portseattle.org

Old Sail Donation/Recycling June 6-10 The Resail Project keeps old sails out of landfills by providing sails for developing countries in the South Pacific and for shelter for homeless people here and in Mexico. If you’re getting new sails and would like to see your old sails help people in need, please consider donating them to the ReSail Project. Donate your old sails at Dockside Solutions during business hours June 6-10, call (206) 434-8241 or check: www.dockside-solutions.com. The sails will be presented to the Resail Project at Shilshole Boatfest on June 10.

Get Out & Boat Fest June 24 Enjoy FREE 45-minute power and sailboat rides, learn new skills at handson clinics, gain nautical knowledge at boating seminars and demo kayaks and paddleboards at the Get Out & Boat Fest on South Lake Union, from 11:00am – 3:00pm. This lively, all-ages and FREE event will also feature a fun kids' zone with toy boat building and knot-tying activities, live music and food vendors. So what are you waiting for? Seas the Day – Get Out & Boat. Contact: (206) 748-0012 or www.showinfo@boatsafloatshow.com

NW Boater Training

Gig Harbor Marina and Boatyard Swap Meet June 10

Learn to boat on a boat from local experts with the the United States Power Squadron. Classes are offered at a location near you, go to www.nwboatertraining.com

The Gig Harbor Marina and Boatyard’s 3rd annual Swap Meet is on June 10 from 9:00am-3:00pm. Call (253) 858-3535 or email: Jenn@gigharbormarina.com

SUPERHALO CELLULAR BOOSTER SALE 15% Off through June, 2017

by

5-BAND CELLULAR BOOSTER The Super HALO is a marine grade 2G, 3G and 4G voice and data cellular reception solution. Its 5-band compatibility makes it compatible with AT&T, T-Mobile and Verizon networks. The Super HALO is optimized to boost cellular reception for your boat, car, recreational vehicle, home or AnyWhere else, with support of 10+ users simultaneously and an indoor antenna to direct the signal where you really need it.

To see our complete Shakespeare offering go to fisheriessupply.com/shakespeare

Call us 800.426.6930

FisheriesSupply.com www.48North.com

1900 N. Northlake Way, Seattle

June 2017

15


Lowtide Port Townsend The Coho Ho Rigging met us Ho cruising rally, and took us down from Seattle to to a lucky winner’s San Francisco, has boat, for a free rig presented a series inspection. In the of seminars on afternoon we got a Bluewater related tour of their shop topics, two raft-ups and a couple of and two field trips. splicing lessons. This past month June 3 is we took a field trip our second field to Port Townsend. trip to Marine We had five boats Servicenter in make the journey Coho Ho Ho Anacortes, for a and quite a few Cruising Rally diesel mechanic others came by car. Saturday featured Ace Spragg from workshop.This is open to the public Northwest Maritime Center. We played and a great opportunity to ask around with radar and navigation in questions of some of the industry Puget Sound and San Francisco via experts on diesel engines refrigeration their virtual boating simulator. That generators. evening we spread around town, Coho Ho Ho is pulling out all shopped, ate, and congregated at the the stops; 10:00 am workshop, and waterfront watering hole, The Pour potluck submarine barbecue at 1:00 pm and live music from Ebb, Slack House. Sunday morning we reconvened and Flood. The Anacortes Waterfront in the Boat Haven Yard at the Blue Festival will also be taking place this Moose Café, where Lisa and Dan from weekend. Go to www.cohohoho.com

Bui Emphasis Patrols State and local law enforcement agencies will join forces to conduct boating under the influence emphasis patrols on waterways from Memorial Day weekend through August 19. The Washington State Parks’ Boating Program, Washington Department Fish and Wildlife, police, and city and county marine patrol units are working together to remind boaters of the risks of boating while impaired by drugs or alcohol. Emphasis patrols take place: June 30 through July 2, statewide, for the national Operation Dry Water. July 4, at Lake Tapps in Pierce Co. July 28-29, at Kennewick and Pasco, on the Columbia River, for the Tri-City Water Follies, Columbia Cup. August 3-6, on Lake Washington, in Seattle, for SeaFair. August 4-5, at Lake Roosevelt on the Columbia River, for the Poker Run. August 18-19, Vancouver, on the Columbia River. For more information visit: www.washingtonstateparks.us/Boating

A Summer Full of Fun! Join the Seattle Sailing Club and access not only to our 31 boats, but also enjoy the many member programs throughout the year! •

Friday Night Flotillas- May-August starting at 6pm. Head out sailing for a couple hours to fun spots around the Sound. Weeknight/Weekend RacingOur fleet is active in the local racing scene and open for anyone! Clinics and Advanced courses- Learn new skills and become better prepared for adventures on the water. Our engine clinics, crew recovery, docking classes and more are a great time!

www.seattlesailing.com 206-782-5100 16

June 2017

www.48North.com


Lowtide PNW Jeanneau Rendezvous PNW Wauquiez Rendezvous June 16-18 June 2-4

Island Packet Rendezvous August 25-27

Join Marine Servicenter & Jeanneau America for the 17th annual event! This ultra-exciting party for all Jeanneau owners will be held at Cap Sante Marina in Anacortes, WA. A welcome dock party, West Marine buy night, seminars, Jeanneau Parade of Yachts, fantastic catered dinner, door-prize extravaganza and more! Contact: (206) 323-2405 or info@marinesc.com and register for the fun!

The Northwest Island Packet Group, “Puget Packeteers,” and the Northwest’s Island Packet dealer, Marine Servicecenter are inviting all Island Packet owners and their sailboats to their rendezvous at Cap Sante Marina. The event will include the usual social events as well as educational, informative seminars. Questions, please contact Shirley at: segart@comcast.net (503) 559-5739

Puget Sound Cruising Club Events PSCC meetings are held at North Seattle College, 7:30 pm, in the Concert Hall LB1142. Go to: www.pugetsoundcruisingclub.org June 16: Presenting - Elsie and Steve Hulsizer - The West Coast of Vancouver Island: Close-by Adventure Cruising. June 24-25: Raft-up and Salmon Bake at Port Madison.

Wauquiez sailboat owners and enthusiasts are encouraged to attend the Pacific Northwest Wauquiez Rendezvous in Port Townsend at the Point Hudson Marina. The gathering will start with a reception on Friday evening and includes sailing around the bay on Saturday followed by a dinner and presentation. For more information email WauquiezPNWR@gmail.com

Lake Union Wooden Boat Festival July 1-July 4 The Wooden Boat Festival is designed to celebrate the maritime heritage of the Northwest, putting tools in hands and getting people out on the water in historic wooden boats. Festival Hours: Saturday, July 1: 10:00am-6:00pm Sunday, July 2: 10:00am-6:00pm

www.48North.com

June 2017

Monday, July 3: 10:00am-4:00pm Tuesday, July 4: 10:00am-6:00pm, the CWB docks only are open to the public, but from 3:00pm on, Seafair has exclusive use of South Lake Union. See www.seafair.com/events For more informaton check: http://cwb.org

17


Lowtide

In The Biz

Marine First Aid June 5

MYCBC 25th Anniversary June 2-4

Washington Sea Grant and the Port of Seattle Fishermen’s Terminal are cosponsoring a Coast Guard-approved First Aid at Sea course at the Nordby Conference Room, Nordby Building, Fishermen’s Terminal, Seattle. To register or for more information, contact Sarah Fisken, (206) 543-1225, or sfisken@uw.edu

MYCBC is having a 25th anniversary party during our annual MacRendezvous on Bowen Island at the Union Steamship Marina. This celebration will mark the MYCBC’s past 25 years as a club for MacGregor yacht owners and we are reaching out to all present and past MacGregor owners to celebrate. Check: www.mycbc.ca

Everett Sail and Power Squadron Events June 10

About Boating Safely June 3

Everett Sail and Power Squadron will be conducting free to the public Vessel Safety Checks as part of their commitment to educating the public in safe boating practices at Anchor Cover Marina in Anacortes. Checks will be performed by trained United States Power Squadron members. Go to espsvsc@gmail.com

This 8-hour class, taught by members of the Coast Guard Auxiliary, teaches the fundamentals of safe boating operation and meets the mandatory boater education requirements of the State of Washington for the Boater Education Card. Class meets at Strawberry Hill Park, Bainbridge Island. Pre-register: www.biparks.org or with Jeff Ozimek, (206) 842-2306 x 118.

Yager sails & canvas Sails Built To Last

Flying Sails of Every Kind, Designed and Built in our Loft

Emily Roder is now working for the Port of Seattle, down at Pier 69 in the Department of Public Affairs as an Event Specialist. Originally from Minnesota, she moved out to Seattle about 4½ years ago and got a job with Windworks as an Administrative Coordinator, which is where she learned to sail. Emily then started working as the Office Manager for Sterling Marine Services in November of 2014 until the move last month. Her new email contact is: roder.e@portseattle.org

Friday Harbor Pirate Festival June 23 - 24 JOIN US FOR . . .

Light air sailing for the summer! We design and build classic sails, and sell light air sails designed to fly free! G-Spinns, Gennakers, Asymmetrical Spinnakers, and Drifters.

V����� ����� � ��� ����� M����, ���� � ������� B����� ��-��������� T������� ���� K��� ����� D����� ����� C������ ������� C����� �������� P������ ��������� S���� T��� F�� K��� ��� ����, ���� ����.

CALL for Furling Packages! Profurl, Hood, CDI, Seldén and Harken

www.yagersails.com www.furlingsails.com www.asymmetricalspinnakers.com 509.928.1964 www.yagersails.net 18

June 2017

Photos by Matthew Pranger

(360) 378-2688 7 days/week www.portfridayharbor.org www.48North.com


In Lowtide The Biz The Center for Wooden Boats’ navigator and true north, Founding Director, Dick Wagner, passed away at home in the presence of his family, on Thursday, April 20, 2017. ***** It was our honor at 48° North to work with Dick Wagner and The Center for Wooden Boats for many years. It was amazing to watch as this gracious and quiet man slowly built up the Center, in an area where perceived progress is rabid. His quest to “never let the new erase the old” was never ending, an undertaking in which his successes are enjoyed and appreciated by us all. In a city whose growth was born on the decks of tall ships, Dick never let us photo by Elena Losey forget the men and vessels, small and large, that constituted Northwest life Eight Bells for in and around the water. Dick Wagner, The best thing about what Dick founder of The Center for built was that it wasn’t just history in print and pictures on the wall; it was Wooden Boats history you could put your hands on. Both my kids grew up sailing the progress. He was a hero for the rest Beetlecats, Herrshoff 12, Lightnings of us. and Blanchards on Lake Union. Along When I worked at The CWB, Dick with the joy of a sunny day with an had recently transitioned from the afternoon breeze, we all learned to hands-on work of the role of a grassroots appreciate the simple, sturdy boats that non-profit founder to something represented the practical craftsmanship approximating elder statesman, a of a bygone era. transition I know was frustrating to Thank you Dick for bringing the him but in which he was incredibly past to the present, and giving real effective. He had a way of inspiring context to today’s sailing life in and people and communicating a vision around the Northwest for all. that was absolutely baffling to me. I still —Richard Hazelton can’t fully grasp his alchemy. Others former Editor of 48° North would give Powerpoint presentations ***** with polished oration and demonstrate The traditional boating world feasibility or need through well-oiled lost the shortest giant I’ve ever met; spreadsheets, Dick would sketch little CWB founder, Dick Wagner, passed boats on handwritten notes and write away in his home last month from monthly missives about the importance complications of long simmering health issues. The facts of Dick’s life are impressive: architect turned “Today Lake Union, boat enthusiast who designed, tomorrow the world!” built and grew one of the longest —Dick Wagner running and beloved institutions preserving traditional small craft and promoting access to the water for everyone. He personified and catalyzed a community of traditional boat lovers, me included, from coast to coast with his simple vision of making sure that the human scaled maritime past wasn’t swept away with www.48North.com

June 2017

of rowing technique or the boatbuilding history of Lake Union. People ate it up. He’d steward the mission both in the books he wrote and in his interactions with people. He spoke softly but if you listened carefully he was never one to hold back on how he really felt. My favorite piece of DickWagner advice was to treat everyone like they were the next million dollar donation walking down the dock, because they might be and because shouldn’t they feel that way anyway… that, and I should remember to oil the oarlocks otherwise the bronze would wear and they would start to chatter and it would screw up the stroke. No, not that oil, I was doing it wrong. Dedicated to the core, even in his final years, Dick would come to work six or seven days a week. When he wasn’t around, we used to joke that the only way he would ever leave his desk was… well, if I can think of a bright side to his passing, it’s that he can finally take that day off we all talked about. CWB did a recent video of Dick talking about the history of the organization that he started. There is a link at the CWB site: https://cwb.org Dick was a rare individual who dedicated his life to this mission we all share. Count me among the many who are going to miss him. —Jake Beattie Executive Director NW Maritime Center ***** He always said, “It’s great to preserve the boats, but the people are more important.” For far too long, boating was the recreation of the elite. Dick and his wife, Colleen, wanted knowledge about boats to be available to everybody, and the way to do it was to get the people down here. —Judie Romeo Assistant to the Founding Director ***** In lieu of flowers, Wagner’s family has asked that donations be made to The Center for Wooden Boats. Donations can be made online at cwb.org, over the phone at (206) 382-2628, or in person, 1010 Valley St, Seattle, WA, 98109. 19


Lowtide The 13th edition of this bestselling book is proof of the success of Mary Blewitt’s success in explaining a particularly difficult skill, in a concise and clear way It has been the bible for many generations of ocean navigators. Since this book was first published, the huge advances in electronic navigation have

Captain Adorable (3-yearold Lucy) and her stinky BIG BROTHERS have their own ideas about what vacationing on the water is all about. Not everyone on board agrees that the CAPTAIN is the one in charge of the SEA YA! Get ready for laughs when encountering what actually happens on boating vacations through Dave Alavoine's perceptive cartoons.

Books

transported most offshore navigators to a world of push-button convenience. However, there is still a vital need for traditional skills when things go wrong: batteries can fail, aerials go overboard, and electronics have been known to get wet. A bestseller for over 65 years, Celestial Navigation for Yachtsmen is a model

of simplicity and clarity. The proven examples require only straightforward addition and subtraction, which explains why this book has truly earned its reputation for admirable conciseness and for making a tricky subject easy to understand. This edition has been thoroughly revised by Andy Du Port, the highly respected ex-editor of Reeds Almanacs. Celestial Navigation for Yachtsmen by Mary Blewitt, $17. 00.

All members of one’s boating family will be able to relate, including moms, dads, kids, and grandparents. And when young readers encounter nautical words crafted within the cartoons, the fun will be in the challenge of deciphering them! Of course, a rather light-

hearted, sassy glossary is also available, adding more chuckles to this fun read! (I mean, seriously, everyone knows that a HEAD is a boat toilet don't they?) Who’s the Captain? by Mary Laudien with cartoons by Dave Alavoine, $14. 99.

50 T

H

ANN

IVERS

AR

THE BEST TIME EVER. Update your Downwind Inventory for your Summer Cruise Phone: 206.234.3737 Seattle, WA | 2442 Westlake Ave N. Anacortes, WA | 700 28th Street SailsInfo@UllmanSailsPNW.com www.pnw.ullmansails.com.com

20

June 2017

www.48North.com

Y


Across 1 Knot that forms a large weighted ball at the end of a heaving line, 2 words 8 Not at home 10 Ability to keep one’s balance on a ship and not get sick 11 Haul with tackle 12 Turn over responsibility to another crewman and go off duty, 2 words 15 Color on many national flags 18 In a new direction 19 Lifting device 22 Get a message out 23 Not operating currently 24 Swing off course due to the force of following seas 26 Sea dogs 27 Severe weather phenomenon 29 Sun, in Mexico 31 ‘’___ the season . . .’’ 32 Observe

Nautical Crossword 1

2

3

4

5

6 8

10

3

7 9

11

12 15

13

14

16

17

18

19

21

20

22

23

24

27

25

26

28

29

31 33

30

32 34

33 ____location, mens of navigation 34 Aquatic bird

1 2

Down Call the crew on deck for rollcall Twice-a-month tide

Lowtide

20 21 25 28 30

Chemical process that can damage the shaft and the propeller 4 Cry for help signal 5 Fix permanently 6 Tugboat task 7 From ____ to stern 9 50 states 13 Trawling equipment 14 Geared bit that gives a mechanical advantage when drawing a line taut 16 Lightweight anchor wih large flukes 17 Sound signal of a ship in fog, when close to other ships 19 Occidental ___ minute, soon- 2 words He built the ark Very large sea mammal Brazilian city Above, to bards Solution on page 68

Start here, start now! FLAGSHIP MARITIME Put your experience on the water to work, with world class training for the professional mariner.

USCG Captain’s License Training OUPV / 6-Pack ● Upgrade OUPV to Master 100 Tons Commercial Assistance Towing ● Auxiliary Sail Endorsement FCC Marine Radio Operator Permit ● License Renewals Maritime Licensing, Consulting, and Legal Services Located at Foss Harbor Marina, 821 Dock Street in Tacoma

(253) 905-5972 www.flagshipmaritimellc.com www.48North.com

June 2017

21


Lowtide Humphead wrasses, coral reef fish, can grow to seven feet long. Humpback whales make violin-like sounds. The color pattern on a humpback whale’s tail is used to identify individuals because, like fingerprints, each one is unique. Proportionately, the humpback whale’s pectoral fins are the largest of any cetacean—they can be more than 18 feet long on a 65-foot whale. Some whales have more than 100 teeth. The biggest whale teeth belong to the sperm whale and can weigh up to two pounds. The sperm whale’s teeth can reach 10 inches long. Sperm whales dive deeper than any other whale.

Maritime Trivia by

B ryan H enry

The sperm whale’s skin, up to 14 inches, is the thickest of any animal. In proportion to its body, the sperm whale has the largest tail of any animal. The sperm whale’s head accounts for a third of its body length. Sperm whales have the largest skull of any whale, and the largest head of any animal. The sperm whale has the largest brain of any animal, tipping the scales at 20 pounds. On January 17, 2004, a 56-foot bull sperm whale washed up on the beach in Taiwan. The whaling fleet of the United States in the 1850s stood at 735 ships out of a worldwide total of 900.

Two of the three ships involved in the Boston Tea Party, the Dartmouth and Beaver, were used regularly to transport whale oil. The nation’s first and only newspaper devoted to whaling was the weekly Whalemen’s Shipping List and Merchant’s Transcript, first published March 17, 1843 in New Bedford, Massachusetts. Some dolphins have more than 200 teeth. Spinner dolphins can spin as many as seven times before splashdown. A bottlenose dolphin can leap more than 15 feet out of water. Tooth enamel evolved from ancient fish scales. Despite its name, the crabeater seal doesn’t eat crabs, but rather feeds on krill.

Have Plans to Go Cruising? Discover what West Coast Sailors have long known… Outfit your bluewater adventure at Downwind Marine! We provide extensive experience and great value! Use our Online Catalog for all the gear you need Save with every click! We specialize in Special Orders too! ★ Use our Online Cruising Guide to assist in planning your gear and itinerary

THE CRUISER’S CHANDLERY

THREE STORES TO SERVE YOU

★ Call or e-mail us for expert help when you need it ★ If heading south this fall, visit our store and attend our fall cruising events.

2636 Shelter Island Drive San Diego (619) 223-7159 (800) 336-SDMX Mexico 001-800-336-7369

Email: info@downwindmarine.com

VISIT US IN SAN DIEGO … OR VISIT OUR WEBSITE!

22

2804 Canon Street San Diego (619) 225-9411 (800) 532-3831

We are a great family of marine stores with even more products, services and resources to meet all your boating needs.

www.downwindmarine .com www.downwindmarine.com June 2017

www.48North.com


Product News

Wallas is pleased to introduce the 30GB and 22GB forced air diesel heaters. The Wallas GB series is newly designed for greater power, efficiency, fuel tolerance and low environmental impact. At full power, the new GB heaters offer increased heating power and more air volume over the Dt series heaters. More heating power means you can heat up your boat faster, saving power and fuel. New, more powerful brushless blower motors give higher efficiency to the heater and better moisture management, important for wet conditions. Improving on the features of the Dt series, the GB

models move more air, improving ventilation and air flow. With their new laminar flow burners and new software, GB heaters are designed to work with today’s road and boat diesels but also with future renewable and commercially

Outdoor storage wreaks havoc on snaps, zippers and hinges. Even after washing off the slime and salt, they can still be sticky and tough to use. It can get so bad that the fabric will actually tear before they work. Iosso Products’ E-Z Snap frees the most stubborn fastener back to a likenew condition. It's made in the USA.

E-Z Snap lubricates and reduces friction. It's waterproof and won't melt away in hot weather, so it doesn't have to be constantly reapplied throughout the season. Beyond its uses on outdoor

www.48North.com

June 2017

Lowtide available blended biodiesels. This means the 30GB is ready for fuels being developed for the future. The new burner has ultra-low emissions, including very low CO2 and NOx levels. GB heater construction features m o re re n e w a b l e a n d re c y c l e d materials, while improving durability and reliability, featuring stainless steel, high grade aluminum and other corrosion resistant materials. Outside dimensions, controls, and connectivity are the same as the Dt models, so upgrading to the new GB heaters is quick and easy! Check: www.scanmarineusa.com c a n v a s h a rd w a re , s u c h a s sailboat dodgers, EZ-Snap works on drawer slides and other places a little added slip is needed. The formula is non-hazardous and doesn’t contain any solvents, silicone or Teflon. Check: www.iosso.com

23


I

n Seattle, prior For under $100, to our voyaging you can purchase a life, we were avid basic salmon setup: fisherfolk. We loved a trolling rod, reel, the sustainability of flasher, spoon, and growing and catching diver. If you buy most of our food. We nothing else, you enjoyed getting out will be able to catch on weekends and the salmon. Once you occasional weeknight are hooked (pun to throw out our lines intended), invest and see if we might in a downrigger. bring home a salmon, D o w n r i g g e r or to set our pots in placement on sailboats our ‘secret’ crabbing may not be quite as spot near Shilshole. easy as a dedicated We also had a thriving fishing boat, but we garden that supplied found a spot for ours, most of our produce. and you can too! What is better than Salmon is just the freshly caught grilled By Michele and Jon Rogalin Henderson beginning. For under salmon with a freshly $50 you can purchase picked salad from the a basic halibut setup: garden? Handline, circle hook Thus, when we left Seattle last While cruising, fishing plays a leaders, and weights. Just add cut bait! June to cruise our Beneteau Idylle central role in our day-to-day activities, If you like rockfish or lingcod, use the 1350, Ardea, through the PNW, Alaska, as seafood is a staple of our diet. We same rod and reel that you use for and beyond, we knew we would cannot imagine this life without it, salmon, but buy a few jigs or squids. be doing a lot of fishing. We also and have been surprised by how For fish, you will need a net. You may purchased the equipment necessary to many cruisers we meet that don’t fish also wish to have a gaff hook for bigger grow microgreens, because we were – primarily because they don’t know fish. For crab, the easiest thing is to buy accustomed to the freshest possible how, or even where to begin. To that a crab pot kit, which usually comes food and didn’t want to compromise we say, come on in, the water’s fine! with a pot, bridle, and 100ft of line. On that. We used to joke that the Ardea For those cruisers who are keen to occasion, they also come with the bait was a catcher-processor-greenhouse eat the myriad of delicious sea snacks bag, weights, and buoys you will need. sailboat... and it really is! The second step is to buy fishing the Pacific Northwest has to offer, but aren’t sure how to actually catch them, licenses and obtain current sports fishing guides for the areas that you this article is for you! The first step is to procure fishing will be fishing. Be sure to look at catch gear. A relatively small investment can limits and areas that are closed. The bring tasty rewards. If your budget guides clearly show the fishing areas, is anything like ours, the initial costs specific restrictions, and offer the dates might feel a bit daunting. If this is the of the seasons for each species. In British case, choose one species to target, and Columbia, for example, there are certain build your arsenal slowly. One of the gear setups that are okay in some areas, best places to shop is the annual Seattle but not in others. All of these details Boat Show. There are many terrific are well laid out in the free guides. The next step is actually putting a deals to be had. Two of our favorite stores are Outdoor Emporium and line (or a pot) in the water. This is the Lummi Fishing Supply (LFS). Both exciting part! For crab, fill the bait bag have knowledgeable staff that actually with turkey or chicken parts, or if you fish and know what they are talking have been catching fish, put a carcass about. They also know the lingo that in there. Drop the pot in 50-70 feet of may sound unfamiliar in the coming water and leave it. In some areas, your Salmon are tasty, kissable, and catchable pot will be full in an hour; in others, sentences. with an inexpensive setup.

Fishing From Your Sailboat A PNW Starter Guide

24

June 2017

www.48North.com


leave it overnight. There are some areas that are just known for good crabbing. Many avid crabbers have a special spot that they like for its consistently good results. If you observe other crab floats in a certain area, drop your pots there – it could be a great spot! Remember to only keep males and measure them to make certain they are within legal limits. For salmon, one must first know if the salmon are around to be caught. When you are out cruising, take some time to talk to the local commercial fishing people. Most are super nice and will tell you if the salmon are running, what species are in, and where. There can be very good fishing near the mouths of rivers, but check restrictions for these areas. Also, fishing near points outside of these areas are great, especially around the tide change. Salmon like to swim up with the incoming tide, and your chances are better during this time. Chinook (King) salmon seem to prefer a slower trolling speed, in the 2 knot range, and tend to be a little deeper, greater than 60’. Coho (Silver) salmon and pink salmon bite more on a faster trolling speed (around 4 knots) and tend to be a little shallower than the Kings, less than 60’ deep. Achieving these speeds can be tricky under sail, but we think the fish taste better when we catch them with the sails out! Experiment with reefing your sails to achieve the slower speeds. A disclaimer: These are broad sweeping generalizations and those of you that fish are going to have lots of stories that are completely outside of these parameters. These guidelines generally work well. Definitely ask other cruisers and fisherfolk what has been working for them this season. For halibut, the aforementioned handline is a great way to go. Attach a circle hook leader and weight to the handline, with a scrap piece of fish affixed to the hook. Drop it down until you feel it hit the bottom, and pull it back up a couple of feet, so it is floating just above the bottom. Halibut like deeper water, 150-300 feet are not uncommon depths for these fish. A note of caution: These fish can be enormous. My husband, Noj, had an epic wrestling match with a giant halibut he called “Leviathan!” Think very carefully about bringing a large halibut aboard your sailboat. They have been

known to thrash about, breaking boats and bones in the process. If possible, subdue them prior to bringing them on to your boat. One cruiser told us that they pour cheap bourbon directly into a halibut’s mouth to “make it go to sleep.” We have not tried this. A gaff hook is advisable for these fish, due to their wide flat shape. Ling cod and rockfish live near rocky areas. Once you affix your jig or squid to your line, drop it down to the bottom and reel back up part way. Then repeatedly lift the rod so that the bait floats up and let it drift back down. This is called jigging, or yo-yo fishing, and if there are fish around, they will likely bite. Check local tackle shops for what the locals have been using that works in your area. A side note: Go easy on the rockfish. They are endangered and protected in a number of areas in British Columbia. Okay, so you’ve hooked a fish, now what?? First and foremost, shout, “FISH ON!” Keep tension on the line, reeling in slowly. Salmon tend to “run” (and the line will zoom out of the reel). Let them run and continue to reel in to keep tension on the line. Salmon can be quite feisty. Do not be dismayed when you get them close to the boat and they see the net and run again. Patiently keep reeling them back and scoop them up in the net. Ling cod and rockfish can be feisty as well, but they don’t run like the salmon do. They will jerk on the line quite a bit. Once the fish has been netted and brought aboard, you must bonk the fish on the head to kill it. To ensure the tastiest possible fish, bleed and gut them immediately and put them on ice or in your refrigerator. If you have not had very fresh fish, you are in for a treat! Furthermore, you get to share your fishing adventures with other cruisers. The tales (and tails), grow longer with each telling, and this is the second best thing about fishing! For many PNW cruisers, fishing isn’t the first activity that comes to mind when you think about a sailing trip, but adding it to your cruising life is enjoyable, enriching, and nutritous. Give it a try, and share pictures to validate your fishing story! Michele & Noj are in Mexico, heading into Central America. They are catching (and eating) wily tuna and speedy dorado. Follow their journey at CallalooBlue.com www.48North.com

June 2017

Fishing for fun and/or dinner? Come see us for fishing rods reels lures, spoons & flashers bait nets tackle boxes sunglasses raingear charts . . . . and the best local fishing knowledge available!

Open weekdays 8-6 Saturday 8-5 & Sunday 9-4 851 Coho Way, Bellingham WA

800-426-8860 • 360-734-3336

www.lfsmarineoutdoor.com 25


Committing to Cruising By Windpower By Patrick Davin Newcomers to sailing might think that sailors spend the majority of their time covering ground under sail, solely moving by the power of the wind. Experienced coastal cruisers - those who travel from port to port - know this is usually far from reality. Though the Pacific Northwest is a beautiful place to cruise, it is also notorious for light, fickle winds in the summer months. In between major marinas, it’s often more common to see a sailboat motoring than sailing. The time of year is coming when I’ll see sailboats motoring upwind into a perfect sailing breeze of 10 knots or so, and even sailboats motoring downwind with a light following wind. Often, this is because a lot of cruisers are traveling to a schedule. Plus, for many cruisers, sailing in the PNW is a Goldilocks problem - the wind is always too low or too high, never just right. Certainly, there’s nothing wrong with motoring if that’s your choice, but we love cruising the PNW by sailpower. If you’re determined to do so, there can be great rewards to it. 26

Values of Sail-Powered Cruising • Earth-friendly - Sailing uses no fossil fuels while you’re traveling on wind power alone. • Cheap - Sailing is pocket book friendly too - diesel costs money, and sailing costs very little (the wear and tear on the sails, per mile, is minuscule, especially if you run your cruising sails to their last legs). • More wildlife - Sea life doesn’t come around a boat running a noisy diesel engine with a spinning prop that could cut them to tiny bits. By sailing more, you have more occasions when porpoises play in your bow wake, seals approach closer, and bears on shore don’t run away when you’re hundreds of feet away. • Being less reliant on your engine After our transmission died a slow death on our first cruise, I’ve never felt comfortable being completely reliant on having auxiliary power. Sailing more pushes us to increase our sailing skills and occasionally do things like sail onto and off of anchor. Last summer we sailed our June 2017

www.48North.com

C&C Landfall 38 over 1300 nautical miles in three months time, using an average of only five gallons of diesel per week. We sailed from Seattle, through the San Juans and Gulf Islands, the Sunshine Coast, Desolation Sound, the Broughtons, and Queen Charlotte Strait, then to the South Sound and back to Seattle. About 75% of the mileage was covered under sail. With three months, many people choose to go to Alaska, and cover more mileage with a whole lot more motoring. But their sail-to-motor ratio reverses, to as high as 90%, 95% or more in motoring. On the other hand, traveling a high percentage of your miles by sail usually means accepting less audacious distance goals. But we were very happy with our decision to prioritize slow paced sail-based cruising over always pushing to further destinations. There were numerous tips and tricks we learned along the way to make it easier. For starters, a healthy disregard for conventional wisdom helped. We were told people don’t


sail the Inside Passage, that the wind would always be on our nose, and the idea of sailing up narrow straits like Johnstone Strait was considered laughable. None of those things were true, and we sailed both upwind and downwind in Johnstone Strait and many other straits. About 50% of our sailing mileage was downwind. To be a cruising sailor, a few prerequisites make it more likely to work out: • Allow time and develop patience. Modern life doesn’t cultivate this. We get impatient if our YouTube video doesn’t buffer within a couple seconds, or if we have to wait more than a few minutes at a stoplight. Sailing in light and fluky winds for hours on end requires tremendous patience, and this is a skill that gets stronger through practice. • Both of you (if you’re a cruising couple, or otherwise everyone onboard) must be motivated to sail rather than motor. If only one person is into it, the other person will get frustrated and vote for motoring. • Have a boat with good sailing performance, both upwind and downwind. You can do it with a slow, heavy boat, but this is going to make it much harder. 60% of our sailing time last summer was in light wind (4-10 knots). • The boats best suited for maximum sailing in the PNW are performance oriented and sail upwind like they were born for it. You should be able to move over 2 knots in 5 knots true wind on a close haul or beam reach. • Your boat must be set up for easy sailing. It took us over a year before our boat was a well oiled sailing machine. Make sure you have a reefing system that is easy and quick, smooth low friction blocks so raising sails is low effort, and know sail configurations for every wind range. Over the last two years we’ve developed a strategy for maximizing sailing: 1.) Plan short passages. Preferably no more than 20 nautical miles between anchorages. If you have great wind and are making good time, you can shoot for further - plan B. But planning on long days (over 40 miles) is the biggest thing likely to require you to motor. 2.) Route based on the wind. A

big part of our strategy was heavily integrating the wind into our routing. On a daily and weekly basis we planned our route and destinations to improve our chances of finding good wind. If southerlies were coming, which are fairly rare in the PNW summer, we’d go north as far as we could to use that following wind. 3.) Follow the 15 minute rule. If the wind has died and we’re moving less than 2 knots for 15 minutes, we can turn on the engine. We don’t always do so, but the 15 minute rule allows either of us to declare a starting point when we’re getting tired of slowly drifting, and helps ensure we don’t give up too quickly. Sometimes the wind comes back up after only five minutes, but five minutes can feel like a really long time when you’re drifting at 0.4 knots with the sails eager to luff. 4.) If there’s wind, we GO! If you wake up to 10 knots in your anchorage or marina, you go as soon as possible. The wind dictates your schedule, not your social plans or normal routine. 5.) Have flexible schedules and timing. If the wind wants you to reverse direction or stay put, why not revisit a

place you’ve already been, or spend a day at anchor? Having plans to meet up with friends or crew can make this one tricky. That’s why cruisers have the expression “you can pick the time or place, but not both.” 6.) Stay close to sailable corridors, areas of the PNW that are reliably windy. This requires experience with local waters, but if you can, don’t sail (or motor) yourself into a corner. We try to avoid going up long narrow inlets (like Jervis Inlet to Princess Louisa) unless we’re really sure the destination is worth it. The Strait of Georgia and northern Puget Sound are good examples of sailable corridors. Ideal anchorages along a sailable corridor are often an outside anchorage - like Cabbage Island in the Gulf Islands, which allows you to quickly get out to the Strait of Georgia on a light wind day, or duck into the Gulf Islands on a high wind day. This year we’re heading out to the west coast of Vancouver Island, and hope to do something we’ve never done - sail out the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Keep up with Patrick’s cruising at www.svviolethour.com

Mobile Fuel Polishing Serving The Entire Pacific Northwest • 360-808-0505

Fuel Filtering...Tank Cleaning

(Water, Algae, Sludge and Particle Removal Service) Changing filters often? Don’t let bad fuel or dirty tanks ruin your next cruise! Whether you’re cruising the Pacific Northwest, heading for Alaska, Mexico or around the world, now is the time to filter your fuel & tank ... before trouble finds you ... out there!

Seventh Wave Marine

www.seventhwavemarine.com www.48North.com

June 2017

seventhwavemarine@olypen.com 27


LESSONS LEARNED WHILE CRUISING Jamie & Behan Gifford

Dinner with Pirates

The Bumpy Road to Cruising Confidence The candy-striped spine of a paperback, a dowdy history volume, and the aged cloth binding of a retired library book sit stacked on Totem’s main cabin table. This unlikely combination has a singular theme: the Caribbean, from an epic novel to political history. They are not guide books, but signposts to better understand and appreciate where Totem takes us. Travel guides serve a purpose; mainly it’s to avoid missteps by showing the way to enjoyably explore a foreign place. Cruising references were constant companions on the bedside table before we departed, well-thumbed manuals studied to prepare. Their vivid photographs served as reminders and inspiration to get through the obstacles that might keep us from cutting dock lines, while the contents provided comforting knowledge by matter-offactly addressing processes and rules to follow. Looking back on nearly 3,200 days afloat, it’s hard to mark just

when confidence took hold. Rather than a singular moment, it unfolds in experiences along the way. Skills build over time, with repetition. Repetition brings understanding and confidence. Anchoring 491 times (as of today) has fostered confidence in our ability to set the anchor well. Every day, decisions are made that impact our safety. Does a shift in the weather forecast mean we should move to a more protected spot, or is our current location okay? Can we safely go through the shortcut pass to a new anchorage, or is there any question about chart accuracy or tide timing? This scenario played out in April. We felt confident assessing the conditions to transit notorious Current Cut in Eleuthera Island, Bahamas. As a first timers to the cut, we got a lot of wellintended advice, which boiled down to transiting at slack tide and avoiding the Kraken. I’m sure someone mentioned a Kraken! We started reassuring advisors by saying, “dude, we learned this after

Swimming with sharks, having dinner with perceived pirates, or trusting your anchoring skills - good judgment and confidence come from experience and repetition. 28

June 2017

www.48North.com

going through Cattle Pass against the tide!” This seemed to do the trick. Early in our cruising adventures, Totem bobbed at anchor off Santa Cruz Island on the California coast. The rugged island’s interesting history occupied my mind as I cared for our young children below, while Jamie went out for a kayak paddle. A couple hours later, a bedraggled Jamie appeared in the companionway. Paddling to the island, he managed the waves well until a larger set managed him! He was rolled and lost his glasses in the surf. Shaken confidence can be a great teacher. The following month we found ourselves tucked next to an idyllic curve of beach on the Pacific coast of Baja. After a two-day sail, our children needed to run on the beach. Here, too, it’s essential to time wave sets just right for a beach landing. Despite waiting patiently for the “perfect conditions,” like countless greenhorn cruisers in Mexico before us, we flipped the dinghy in the surf—a somewhat traumatic experience for the kids. We learned from cruisers who came to our aid that every other dinghy on the beach that afternoon had flipped as well. In both scenarios, a false sense of confidence resulted in poor judgment calls. Did we need those smacks to jar us from diffidence? Possibly. And possibly it worked, as neither situation has been repeated. A base of experience forges confidence in decision-making. Yet new cruisers get tripped by thinking success in their pre-cruising decision making (in career, business, life) will extend to smart decisions on the water. Not only is there no correlation, the opposite may be true. It’s well known in the aviation community (which closely analyses accidents) that pilots with a moderate amount of experience—about 500 hours—have a much higher accident rate than new or more experienced pilots. In cruising, too, moderate experience lends complacency by leading people to feel they know more than they do. Trouble-free early days can lead to


complacency. We’ve seen in ourselves, and in others, that it’s just when we think we’ve got this cruising gig kinda figured out that poor judgment calls are made. A few months after we flipped the dinghy in Bahia Santa Maria, we watched from the cockpit as a neighboring catamaran started dragging across the anchorage. They’d been cruising Mexico for about a year and felt confident going ashore promptly after dropping the hook, despite this lagoon’s reputation for poor holding. They were lucky that Jamie and another cruiser set a second anchor for them before their boat reached mangroves and mud bank. Cruising confidence anneals over time. Several years later, we anchored between two islands in a remote corner of eastern Indonesia, the world’s largest Muslim country (by population). While Jamie and Niall tidied Totem after our passage, the girls and I went off for our first swim in what is reputed to be among the most biodiverse marine environments in the world. While our heads were underwater, a speed boat roared up to Totem. The crew clustered on board wore camouflage and cloth masks. They came along side Totem and starting boarding uninvited. What would you do? Jamie was alarmed but considered situational context and didn’t panic. Piracy made no sense in this part of Indonesia and in a marine preserve. The kicker was when he noticed a man carrying a clipboard, a weapon wielded mainly by bureaucrats. The visitors turned out to be rangers for the marine park, come to ensure that our paperwork was in order. We became friends, inviting the “pirates” for dinner. This situation could easily have been interpreted differently, with a bad outcome. When teenage circumnavigator Zac Sunderland sailed through Indonesia, he was unnerved when trailed by a mysterious boat. He was advised via satellite phone to load his gun and be ready to shoot. Guess he didn’t know that Indonesian mariners often cover their faces with cloth to block the sun, fisherman often speed closely past boats to shed evil spirits, or pause to check out the strange visitor and ask for water. A daily dose of decisions is not

unique to cruising, but the problems cruisers face lack the familiar patterns of a more conventional lifestyle. Practice, skill building, repetition, patience, unassuming attitude, context, more repetition, observation, and occasional shaken confidence build sailors poised for better decisions. There is no end of opportunities to make poor choices. Here in the Bahamas, our guidebook describes bad holding in one anchorage after another. Reading this guidance is unnerving, and glamorous marina advertisements alongside offer an appealing alternative. Confident

in our anchoring, we choose to test it ourselves, and found conditions different—and better—than described. Instead of thick grass or hard pan, there was nice sand with scattered turtle fodder. But we still didn’t leave Totem on a shore run right after anchoring. There’s no rush, and it’s prudent to see how we set up; besides, a little time spent gaining confidence in our chosen spot is the perfect time to read a book. Follow the Giffords on their blog at sailingtotem.com or check the blog page at www.48north.com/sailing-blogs/

SEAVIEW NAMED LOCAL WARRANTY CENTER

Sundance Yachts recently named Seaview Boatyards their local Warranty Center for Jeanneau and Prestige yachts. Sundance knows that Seaview Boatyard will provide the quality work that their customers expect and deserve. • • • • • • •

Refit & Restorations Electrical Systems Mechanical Systems Electronics Engine Work LP & Topside Painting Hull Extensions

• • • • • • •

Fiberglass Repairs Rigging and Furlers Metal Fabrication Woodworking General Maintenance Insurance Work CAD & 3D Printing

SEAVIEW WEST

SEAVIEW NORTH

SEAVIEW YACHT SERVICE FAIRHAVEN

At Shilshole Bay Marina / 55 Ton

At Squalicum Harbor Marina / 165 Ton

In the Fairhaven District / 35 Ton

206-783-6550

360-676-8282

360-594-4314

west@seaviewboatyard.com

north@seaviewboatyard.com

fairhaven@seaviewboatyard.com

www.seaviewboatyard.com www.48North.com

June 2017

29


Race to Alaska Preview by

Joe Cline

On June 8, Race to Alaska (R2AK) begins in Port Townsend. The no-motorsno-support adventure race to Ketchikan promises to be different than either of the previous years, both in competition and in conditions. The excitement and intigue for 2017 includes the addition of a second $10,000 cash prize (the winner gets the first $10k). This second cash prize is available to any boat that, upon arrival in Ketchikan, is willing to sell their boat to the race organizers for $10,000. I’ve had the good fortune to sail with a few R2AKers on their boats, and this month, I got to sail with a team that’s vying for the second $10,000 prize.

Team Global Diving

Columbia Sabre 32 Katy and Elan Stewart, Emily Silgard, Caroline McKee-Silva Team Global is, in my opinion, one of the purest examples of what Race to Alaska is all about. Two members of this team, sisters Katy and Emily, completed the race last year as Team Onism (which also included their friend Jenny). In that 2016 R2AK, they were racing the family boat, a trimaran their father built. Despite adversity like a severe burn Emily suffered early in the race, they finished the race in 13 days, and I’m not sure anybody who raced in 2016 had more fun. That said, Emily, who downplays her sailing knowledge, remembered thinking in Ketchikan, ‘R2AK 2017? Hell no!’ Yet, after a few months, the conversation re-opened, and this time it involved Emily and Katy’s sister, Caroline, and Katy’s husband, Elan. Katy, who is a professional mariner for the team’s sponsor Global Diving and Salvage, has known a lifetime on the water. She is a legit 30

sailor by every definition of the world, commercial and recreational. She was the captain on Team Onism, and once again assumes that mantle for Team Global in 2017. She’ll likely share some of the responsibility with her husband, Elan, who was Katy’s cruising partner when they sailed their 29’ boat to Mexico, Hawaii, and back. Elan is also a licensed captain and works in the commercial maritime world. Caroline is the wild-card on the team. Like her sisters, she grew up sailing with their dad, but says, “I’ve been upping my sailing chops recently.” She also acknowledged that she is “definitely going to learn a lot on this race.” She is psyched about the wilderness and the wildlife, and was as excited and awestruck when Emily reminded her that the sun never sets when you get far north! While Team Global seem to have no designs on winning outright, they June 2017

www.48North.com

are serious contenders for the second $10,000 prize. Greener, their 50-yearold boat is, to me, kind of fascinating. Columbia is a prolific builder of fiberglass sailboats, but I’m accustomed to Columbia boats that are, shall we say, a bit tubbier. The Columbia Sabre is 32 feet of impossibly narrow pointing machine. It’s beam is just over six feet... six feet! An Etchells is shorter and still wider. As I approached the boat to go sailing with the members of Team Global, I genuinely did a double take. This is narrowest boat I’ve ever sailed, maybe the narrowest I’ve ever seen. The Sigurd Herburn design used a mold built to fit the International 5.5 measurement rule, and thus has a good reputation for sailing well to weather. That’s exactly what Team Global has in mind, Emily’s response to why this boat: “Point higher, go faster!” Their stated goal is to try to get to Ketchikan two days faster than they did on the Onism trimaran, and they chose this boat because of its value and its upwind performance. This platform also allowed them to add a fourth crewmember, and gives them more options for watches, as the boat can easily be sailed by one person. Greener is also well prepared for those no-wind moments, and that was part of what drew Elan to the boat. An advantage of the SUPER narrow boat is that it makes it easier to row with centered stations. Greener is setup with two rowing stations, one in the cockpit and another on the bow. The boat also has a motor well in the cockpit, which will have a pedal drive in it. Two rowers and a pedal drive - that should

Holy narrow boat, Batman.


move a boat with comparatively little wetted surface pretty nicely, even if it does weigh 4500 lbs. So, they want to go fast, and clearly this means sailing round the clock, but as Elan put it, “We plan to sail non-stop, but I want to reserve the right to have a campfire on the beach if I want to.” I liked the approach. It’s kind of a work hard, play hard style. Putting it into context, however, I think Team Global will need to keep the pedal down pretty hard to have a chance at the $10,000. Looking at last year’s results, of the 15 boats that finished in eleven days or fewer (two days faster than their finish in the 2016 R2AK), there were only two boats that, in my estimation, might have considered the $10,000 buyback - pretty good odds! The others would be valued well above that. On the other hand, I would venture that nine of the eleven boats that finished the 2016 R2AK in more than eleven days would have at least discussed the buyback $10K, if it had been offered. So, if Team Global is really angling for the buyback bucks, they won’t want to make many fires on the beach, and will want to reach their 11-day goal.

The Columbia Sabre 32 got to show some of what it’s designed to do best when we all went sailing on Commencement Bay in late May. We were short one of the team, since Katy is still out to sea with Global Diving and Salvage. So, Elan, Emily, Caroline, and I set sail in a fluky 5-10 knot southerly. The boat quickly heeled, and Elan noted that the boat has a reputation for being tender. We talked further and agreed that, like the Etchells or other designs with significant overhangs, the heel is a good thing, increasing effective waterline. While many call it tender, what the narrow boat lacks in hull form stability, it makes up for with ballast. The long fin keel boasts 2800 lbs of ballast. For those keeping score, that’s at 62% ballast to displacement ratio! The mighty Greener heeled over and moved ahead with a gentle motion in the flat water. I drove a little, and was impressed with her tracking. The rudder is on the trailing edge of the keel, and it was easy to strike a very nice balance, one where I could let go of the helm for at least 5 seconds before needing to make a slight correction.

One of two rowing stations, and they will have a pedal drive, too! The team has been busy with projects, and they’ve been grateful for the help of the sisters’ boat-builder father. They’ve reinforced some squishy bulkheads, and the deck at the jib tack. They’ve added some R2AKfriendly mods like solar power and a custom gimbaled stove, as well as the human power elements. Team Global are pure R2AK. They live for the adventure, and are most looking forward to parts of R2AK that aren’t very race-oriented. Their ample skills are evident, but not broadcast. Their boat is cool, and a little weird. And they will be seriously fun to follow!

Ocean Passage Making with Instruction

For a unique and dynamic learning experience join expert instructors John and Amanda Neal aboard Mahina Tiare III, their Hallberg-Rassy 46.

www.mahina.com   360.378.6131 www.48North.com

June 2017

31


Galley Essentials with Amanda In preparation for our expedition season, John and I had allowed a few more weeks to ourselves aboard Mahina Tiare to give our new engine a thorough sea trial. To achieve the engine warranty inspection, we had to clock up 50 engine hours. When we discussed the best way to accomplish this, I suggested a round trip from Gothenburg to Oslo. Located on the outskirts of Oslo, in the town of Vollum the Oslofjordmusset, is a modern new interactive maritime museum that not only traces the history of boating in Norway, but also boatbuilding. The museum sits on the small bay of Maudbukta where Roald Amundsen built his polar ship Maud for his 1920’s explorations and where the Anker and Jensen boatyard launched more than 350 prestigious racing yachts from 1905 to 1940. We moored Mahina Tiare nearby and our presentations were well received by Oslo’s keen sailors. The museum’s café was a wonderful place to socialize with our new friends and we soon became addicted to the café’s morning pancakes. Norwegian Pancakes - Lapper 4 eggs ½ cup sugar 4 cups flour ½ teaspoon salt 4 cups plain kefir (or substitute buttermilk) 3 teaspoons baking soda 2 tablespoons of sour cream (optional) butter Dissolve baking soda in the kefir and set aside. In a large bowl combine eggs, sugar, salt, kefir mixture and sour cream (if using). Sift in flour then mix to combine. Grease a large skillet with butter, then heat over medium. Pour ¼ cup of mixture onto skillet. Flip pancake when bubbles begin to burst on the surface flip. Cook for a bit less time on the second side. Serve with jam and sour cream. Serves 6. In Oslo we chose to visit three sea vessel-themed museums that spiked 32

Amanda with fresh caught cod

Exploring Norway’s Cuisine by Amanda Swan Neal our interests; the Viking Ship Museum, The Fram Museum, and Kon Tiki Museum. After a day of fascinating indoor viewing I was ready for the outdoors, so our next day’s tour started high on the hill behind Oslo which provides great views of the city. It’s also home to the Holmenkollen National Arena for Nordic skiing and biathlon events, and its impressive ski jumping hill is so large it can be seen from Oslo’s waterfront. The neighboring Frognersetern Restaurant offers traditional Norwegian home cooking in a historical ornate Dragestil (dragon style) building. We dined on rømmegrøt (sour cream porridge), meat balls and potatoes finishing with slice of divine lemon almond cake. Our tour of Oslo continued downtown into the late evening and we both easily concluded that it’s a charming city. Lemon Almond Cake 1 stick (8 Tbs) unsalted butter - softened ¾ cup granulated sugar - divided 1 tablespoon vanilla extract ½ cup lemon zest June 2017

www.48North.com

4 eggs - separated 2½ cups ground almonds 1¼ cups ricotta cheese, not fat free flaked almonds to decorate Heat oven to 350°F. Grease an 8-inch round cake pan. Beat butter, ½ cup caster sugar, vanilla, and zest with an electric mixer until pale and creamy. Add egg yolks, one at a time, continuing to beat until fully combined. Add almond meal and beat to combine. Fold in ricotta. In a clean bowl beat egg whites, with a hand-held electric mixer, until soft peaks form. Gradually add remaining sugar and beat until stiff peaks form. Fold egg white mixture into the cake mixture. Pour into pan and top with almond flakes. Bake 1 hour. Upon our return to Gothenburg, our new engine was given its check out and certification and we set sail on the first of our season’s expeditions across the North Sea to Orkney. After crew change in Orkney, we sailed back to Norway in blustery winds making landfall at the Krossfjorden south of Bergen. After a quiet motor through the fjord we arrived at Bergen’s downtown quay very late Saturday night to find the city in full swing. Too tired to join in the partying we went to bed and awoke the next morning ready to explore. Sadly, Norwegian cities are shut tight on Sundays but thank goodness the waterfront fish market was buzzing and I was able to sample beet chutney and pick up supplies to create fish soup. Bergen Fish Soup 6 ⅓ cups quality fish stock 1 bay leaf 1 handful flat-leaf parsley, plus additional for garnish 12 whole peppercorns 2 carrots - diced 2 celery stalks - diced 1 leek - cut in half lengthwise and thinly sliced ½ cup dry white wine ¼ cup brandy


1¼ cups heavy cream 3½ ounces salmon fillet - cubed 3½ ounces prawns - shells removed 5 ounces cod fillet – cubed 8 ounces clams - with shells finely-chopped chives for garnish In a large pot add first 7 ingredients and simmer 10 minutes. Add the wine and brandy, simmer 5 minutes. Add cream, bring to simmer, add salmon, cod, and clams and cook for 1 minute. Add prawns and cook 2 minutes. Serve garnished with parsley and chives. Serves 4. Beet Chutney ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil 1¾ cups chopped red onion 1 2-inch-diameter beet peeled, cut into ¼-inch cubes ½ cup water ½ cup red wine vinegar 3 tablespoon raisins 3 tablespoons sugar 2 teaspoons chopped peeled fresh ginger 1 teaspoon yellow mustard seeds pinch of cumin seeds In a heavy saucepan, heat olive oil over medium heat. Add onion and

AM TC

of Alesund, Bodo and Svolvaer for their interesting architecture, exciting atmosphere and a chance to sample local cuisine like the following cod recipe.

Lemon Almond Cake

beet, cook until onion is tender about 8 minutes. Add water and bring to boil, cook 5 minutes. Add remaining ingredients and simmer until beet is tender and chutney is thick, stirring often, about 8 minutes. Season to taste. For the next two weeks, we sailed up the Norwegian coast, ducking and dodging the many fjords and thousands of islands. We enjoyed the seclusion of the offshore islands like Floro, Froya, and Louvund for the hiking, scenery, and a chance to fish for cod; the fjords for their majestic snowcapped peaks and tumbling waterfalls; and the towns

AMERICAN MARINE TRAINING CENTERS, LLC www.americanmarinetc.com

Herb Crusted Roast Cod 4 chunky cod fillets salt and pepper 4 sun-dried tomatoes in oil - chopped 2 tablespoons oil from the jar of sun-dried tomatoes 4oz cheddar cheese -finely grated 4oz fresh white breadcrumbs 4 tablespoons parsley - chopped Preheat the oven to 390°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment. Place cod fillets on parchment and season with salt and pepper. In a small bowl, combine remaining ingredients. Top cod with crumb mixture pressing it down gently. Bake 15 minutes until cod is just flaking and the topping is golden. Serves 4. This month Amanda strikes out from Shetland for the Faroes then Oban. After a crew change, she’ll sail the coast of Ireland to Falmouth. To view her adventures sail to www.mahina.com

Electric Propulsion Systems

Serving the maritime industry by offering the

COMPLETE YOUR following courses and exams: CAPTAIN’S LICENSE ~ Master NMT 100 Tons ~ OUPV - Operator of Uninspected Vessel COURSE ~ Rules of the Road IN ONE WEEK

~ Assistance Towing Endorsement ~ Auxiliary Sail Endorsement ~ First Aid / CPR / AED ~ FCC Exams (MROP, GMDSS, GROL and Radar)

1-855-344-AMTC (2682)

cascadia sailing services New Sails from Doyle • Sail Repair Instruction • Program Management• Consulting

A

where you want to go.

The NEW 3.5 kw DC Generator for your electric propulsion system

Contact us regarding free Sail Pick-ups & Inspections

(206) 849-4259 alex@seattleboatworks.com www.seattleboatworks.com

cascadiasailingservices.com (425) 318-5402 • info@cascadiasailingservices.com

www.48North.com

better way to get to

June 2017

33


ASK THE SURVEYOR by Tom Averna

Hi Tom, I’m enjoying your articles. We recently took our boat out of the water to paint the bottom and noticed a horizontal crack running along the upper portion of the keel. I don’t remember seeing that before. Any ideas? I hope the keel isn’t falling off. Mark Rosen Anacortes, WA. On boats that have a bolt on ballast keel, a crack between the ballast and the keel stub is commonly caused by the seam and fairing compound deteriorating. The age of those compounds, however, is not the only cause of keel joint cracking; it could also be an issue with the keel bolts, which I consider to be one of the weak links in the chain. They are an out-of-sightout-of-mind component that require periodic careful inspection. Keel bolts have a life span: approximately 20 years for stainless bolts, 15 years for iron bolts, and 30 years for bronze. There are always exceptions to the rule. I’ve seen keel bolts that are 40 years old and look new. The bottom line is that your keel boats are not maintenancefree for the life of the boat. On a typical survey of a fiberglass sailboat with a bolt on keel, I do an initial walk around when the boat is on dry dock to look for any obvious defects or damage. The keel joint is part of that initial inspection. If there is a crack at the seam, I’ll open up the crack slightly to probe a little deeper. Often, I discover the fairing compound that was used to smooth the joint was a Bondo (polyester)

Keel joint cracking on display. 34

type fairing compound. That type of compound doesn’t like movement and shouldn’t be used at the keel joint. I can guarantee it will crack eventually. Obvious signs of failing keel bolts are rust streaks and water leaking from the keel joint when the boat is hauled out. Any water penetration in to the joint can compromise the stainless bolts by causing corrosion. Stainless steel is vulnerable to crevice and pitting corrosion when deprived of oxygen. Even though the bolt heads and nuts might look fairly good in the bilge, the bolt could be corroded in the keel where you can’t see. This is called the “carrot effect.” Testing the bolts with a magnet will give you an idea of the quality of the stainless used. High quality stainless steel like Aquamet 22 or Type 316 is non-magnetic and has a less potential for corrosion. In any case, if there is significant corrosion evident, it’s time to think about replacing the keel bolts. How much corrosion is significant? It’s a tough call. The age of the boat, the maintenance history, and the builder can give you facts to base your decision on. Always err on the safe side. The only part of the keel bolts and nuts that a surveyor can see are in the bilge, and even there, bolts could be hidden beneath the engine, fuel or water tanks. Hopefully the bilge is dry and clean enough to see the bolts. The nuts and washers should be clean of corrosion and rust without any apparent signs of leaking. If these parts look good, I’ll feel more confident about the rest of the bolt I can’t see. It’s also important to look at the area around the bolts for any cracking or deformities. If there is a grid type liner in the bilge, look for cracks around the bolts as well. Cracking may also be caused by compressive stresses and June 2017

www.48North.com

groundings. I surveyed a boat in Miami for an owner that was planning on cruising to the Bahamas. When the boat was hauled out, the keel joint crack was oozing rust in big brown drops. It was pretty obvious there was a problem. The keel bolts were corroding. I looked in the bilge, and the steel nuts were practically dissolved into a layer of rust. There was also evidence the bolts were leaking in to the bilge. With rusted nuts and the rust streaks coming from the keel joint, the decision to replace the bolts was easy. I later caught up with the owner who told me the old bolts were totally corroded, especially in the middle of the bolt (the carrot effect). A very poor quality stainless steel had been used for the bolts. The threads were gone on all but two bolts. The boatyard thought only those two bolts were holding the ballast keel in place. A rough Gulf Stream crossing might have spelled disaster. I don’t even like to think about that. As preventative maintenance, I recommend re-torquing the nuts occasionally and keeping the bilge dry and clean. Open up the cabin sole hatches when you’re not aboard, let the bilge ventilate and stay dry. If you have to replace the keel bolts, most boatyards are equipped for such a job. Don’t just replace the worst lookign bolt. Replace them all! Keel bolts are generally designed and (in most cases) overbuilt as well as redundant. Despite some recent highprofile cases of lost keels, it is fairly rare to hear of a keel falling off without warning because the keel bolts failed. Just don’t overlook periodic inspection and keep the bilge dry and clean. Tom Averna is an independent marine surveyor specializing in sailboats.


Sailor Profiles: Rent, Share, or Own?

Sharing, Learning,

and

Experiencing Variety

By Cara Kuhlman

In this ongoing series, we speak to sailors about a decision each of us faces - how to go sailing? Throughout the Pacific Northwest, sailing clubs, charter operations, rental programs, boat share services, informal partnerships, and traditional boat ownership all offer sailors a solution, but how do people choose? In this second installment, members of various sailing clubs or boat share programs in Seattle talk about how, and why, they chose to get on the water by in this way.

Aron Johnson Started sailing in Seattle, WA Favorite crew: Wife Annalise and daughter Daphne Current club/share organization: Seattle Sailing Club (SSC) Cara Kuhlman: Tell me about your sailing background. Aron: I’d been sailing, but I hadn’t grown up sailing. Starting to sail was something we made a conscious decision to do as a family activity. Our daughter is now five, but around two we thought, “Do we want to be sitting on the sidelines at a soccer game or do something all together?” We started taking ASA (American Sailing Association) classes at Seattle Sailing Club in January 2015 and went on our first family sail in April 2015. At SSC, you have to take classes through ASA 103 to take a boat out on your own, so that became our goal. Then we went through ASA 104 Bareboat Cruising. Annalise and I have worked to have parity in our classes and experiences. Why did you decide to start with classes at Seattle Sailing Club?

We knew we weren’t going to buy a boat right away. We wanted to see if we liked it. I knew I wanted to learn on Puget Sound instead of the lakes. Seattle Sailing Club appeared to have the most boats and most reasonable options for monthly membership. With access to 30 different boats including popular one-designs, that’s pretty awesome.

I was single or didn’t have a child, it would be an outstanding way to meet people and make friends. We have a great time talking to the staff in the office and on the dock. Everyone is really friendly and has a wealth of knowledge. It’s not like a yacht club where there is a restaurant with leather chairs, folks smoking cigars and stuff.

How often do you sail? We sail just about every weekend year-round. We want to build up our skills as fast as we can and experience every different kind of weather. Around here, some of the best wind is in the cold and rain.

Have you sailed outside of SSC? We haven’t started chartering outside the club. We don’t have a ton of other friends outside of the club who sail, and those who do don’t want to go out until August. I think it would be different if SSC didn’t have as many boats and it was difficult to get a boat sometimes. Even in the height of summer, we can get a boat; maybe not our first choice, but we can still go sailing. We’ve done overnights through the club and, while it can be a little spendy, I think it is still good value in “boat money” terms.

Would you consider owning a boat? Yes. The decision to join SSC was about learning if we like it, and we’ve checked that off with stars, sparkles, and everything else. We plan to sail these boats for a year or two before we buy. That’ll give us practice docking and anchoring so that when we get our boat, probably a 35-40 foot boat, we’ll have more experience. What do you expect will be different about owning vs. sharing? Sometimes when you tell people you’re part of the club, they dismiss it because you aren’t doing boat maintenance, cleaning the bilge, and such. However, there’s already so much to learn, and it would be hard to do it all at once. When we get our boat, we won’t be both learning to sail and focusing on the systems. It’s a nice way to break up the learning curve. How has SSC’s community impacted your experience? For us it’s a little different because we’re a sailing family, we might not interact as much as others. We participate in some of the regattas and flotillas, which are fun. However, if www.48North.com

June 2017

What’s been the best part of your sailing experience? Well, hopefully that my daughter loves it. It’s always about making her comfortable and having fun. We don’t want the rail in the water and everyone terrified. If it’s windy with 4 foot waves, Daphne isn’t happy so no one is happy. I think it’s important when she’s young that she has a positive, fun experience. She’s the primary starfish and dolphin-hunter onboard. She always holds the stern line when casting off. She tails on the winches (even when they’re self-tailing) and talks your head off about her favorite boat words. Sounds like she’s taken to it! What would you tell someone at a crossroads, deciding to buy, share, or rent a boat? It really depends on your sailing experience. If we had purchased our 35


first boat pick at the very beginning, we’d be lugging around in a full keel Hans Christian and hardly point anywhere. Through the club we’ve learned how important it is to point upwind to get home. I’d probably think of it as a very expensive mistake. I can’t think of a downside to the club except if you were going to do it indefinitely. As a bridge, it’s ideal. A club is a good way to get more experience and learn about different boat types. The variety of boats is a strength of this particular club. What would you tell someone getting started with a boat-sharing program? I wish I would’ve know I needed my Washington Boater ID card. I wish I’d known not to back over your dinghy line, because that’ll get wrapped up in the prop. Having insurance is a good thing – that’s available through the club. Every single boat is rigged differently, even within the same design, like the J/80 fleet. What you’re going to hate is that every boat is rigged differently. What you’re going to love is that you’ll learn a lot of different ways to do the same thing. That’s really useful. Also, the notion that you’re not going to get any practice fixing things that break – that’s not going to happen. You’ll be out sailing and stuff still breaks when you’re underway, whether it’s the engine cutting out or line breaking. You’re not in the bilges upside down, but you’re still fixing stuff and learning about boat maintenance.

Brynn Baker Started sailing in the Caribbean Favorite crew: Husband Paul Current club/share organization: Puget Sound Sailing Institute (PSSI) Tell me about your sailing background. Brynn: I grew up in Olympia and my family had ski boats, but neither 36

Paul nor I grew up sailing. We both love being out on the water, though. It all started when we went sailing on Hobie Waves during our honeymoon in the Caribbean. We loved it. After that, we got a membership at Sail Sand Point and did some small boat sailing. That was great, but ultimately our big goal is to be competent enough to sail to the San Juans or do a weekend trip. Why did you decide to start with classes at the Puget Sound Sailing Institute? Paul and I had been researching for a long time, trying to explore every possible option. PSSI had just added the boat share program in Bell Harbor, and we liked their pricing and policies. They also have boats in Tacoma, Gig Harbor, and Anacortes. We liked that they offered small, 4-person classes on the boats we’d be able to use. Would you consider owning a boat? Yes, definitely. Right now, we couldn’t afford a sailboat, but we would not hesitate to own a boat if we could. I think a house may come first. With the worry of jinxing something, in sailing I think we’ve found “it” - that thing that we will love for the rest of our lives. We plan on being part of a club this year, to confirm that we actually will sail as much as we think we will. Then, we’ll start looking at a 1/4 share, or purchasing a sailboat. What appeals to you about the sailing club/sharing model? We basically found three options: join a sailing club or share program; do a private share with other boat owners; or to charter when we want to go. Chartering was by far the most expensive option and doing a private share would be tough because we didn’t know how to sail yet. So, we settled on the first option. We also get to learn more about what kind of boat we might want to buy by sailing different boats. We’re pretty busy right now, so showing up at the dock and having the boat ready to go is a big one too, as is not having to deal with maintenance or moorage fees. Having grown up around boats, I know the money pit they can be. Taking ASA classes at PSSI, after you complete ASA 101 you can take the boats out for day sails. Then if you take June 2017

www.48North.com

the coastal cruising class, you can take the boats out overnight. They have bareboat chartering certifications and a lot of classes that we’re interested in to increase our knowledge enough so we can justify owning or sharing a boat. How were your first classes at PSSI? Their maximum of 4 students means that everyone gets tons of hands on sailing time, and very individualized attention. We spent two full days out on Elliott Bay in a 22’ Capri, and we were in absolute heaven. We loved it so much we opted in to the highest-level membership which includes unlimited rental sailing. We were pleasantly surprised with our sailing ability and confidence sailing the larger boats. It was more comfortable than sailing FJs (which we’d previously done at Sail Sand Point). We could move around the boat, sit down, and in general had a much more comfortable sailing experience. For us, it also seemed easier than sailing the smaller FJs. Mistakes had less severe consequences (at least in moderate winds we were sailing in) FJs were so easy to flip. What a relief! That being said, I think our base of sailing knowledge from Sail Sand Point was hugely helpful in this course. Knowing wind direction and sail trim is so important in the little boats, and that translated very well onto the keel boat. What would you tell someone at a crossroads, deciding whether to buy, share, or rent a boat? I recommend evaluating each individual situation. Each of the options have different benefits. If we were in a different financial situation or had more knowledge, we might have done something different. In terms of the sailing shares, I was really surprised how many there were around Seattle and how different each one is. There’s huge price, benefit, and fleet differences. We’re excited, and ready to be done with our research and just enjoy things now. What are you most excited for? Getting to be out on the water. One of our favorite date days was to take the ferry to Bremerton because that got us out on the water. I’m excited to be able to do that on our own.


their classes and good charter selection. How often do you sail? Four or five times per year.

Kevin Lisota Started sailing on Elliott Bay, Seattle. Favorite crew: The ones who follow instructions about footwear - last year someone wore 4-inch heels! Current club/share organization: Windworks Sailing & Powerboating Tell me about your sailing background. Kevin: I grew up in Wisconsin, where we spent summers at one of the numerous small lakes in northern Wisconsin. We were more about ski boats and pontoon boats, as the lakes we too small for sailing. Why did you decide to join Windworks? I wanted to learn to sail, and my friend recommended Windworks for

What appeals to you about the sailing club/sharing model? I like the flexibility and cost of being able to pick from the charter fleet. Sometimes I have a big group of ten people; other times, only a couple. Also, I’ve rented a couple of sweet boats that I would never be able to afford as a purchase. Would you consider owning a boat? Probably not. I don’t sail often enough to justify the cost. Besides, I have a hard enough time keeping up on the maintenance of my home. A boat would just add to that task list. Is there anything you feel like is missing from doing a boat share? Around popular holidays, boats may not be available, and I’m not great about planning ahead. It would be nice to have it available at a moment’s notice. How have Windworks’ community or

programs impacted your experience? They have a good selection of classes and if you want to go out sailing, there is a mailing list of people looking for captains or crew. What’s been the best part of your sailing experience? Being out on the water with friends, especially ones who haven’t experienced sailing before. Puget Sound is a great place for cruising. What would you tell someone at a crossroads, deciding whether to buy, share or rent a boat? It’s all about how much you’ll use the boat. Be honest with yourself and stick with renting if your use isn’t very frequent. Buying a boat and putting it into a shared pool is an interesting option. Windworks does this. While the boats get used a lot, their crew does a nice job of maintenance. You can pay that boat loan with the proceeds. Look around at the various options, particularly note the charter selection. Does the program have the size of boats you’re looking for? And how easy or hard is it to reserve a boat?

Sail Seattle! REE Ships F S! UP Ground

INSTALL 5hp – 2000hp

• Skippered Private Sailing Yacht • Up to 32 Guests for 2 to 8 hrs. • Sail by Houseboats and Mansions • Lake Washington & Puget Sound

Business or Pleasure, AquaDrive will make your boat smoother, quieter and vibration free. The AquaDrive system solves a problem nearly a century old; the fact that marine engines are installed on soft engine mounts and attached almost rigidly to the propeller shaft. The very logic of AquaDrive is inescapable. An engine that is vibrating

on soft mounts needs total freedom of movement from its propshaft if noise and vibration are not to be transmitted to the hull. The AquaDrive provides just this freedom of movement. Tests proved that the AquaDrive with its softer engine mountings can reduce vibration by 95% and structure borne noise by 50% or more. For information, call Drivelines NW today.

Call 206-381-6919

info@SailSeattle.com • SailSeattle.com Your charter helps brighten the lives of ill children with sailing trips on the healing sea.

“A‑Northwest Legend for Over 25 Years”

Mention this ad for $50 off!

Visit Our Web Site: www.aquadrive.net

311 S. Brandon St, Seattle, WA 98108 • (206) 622-8760 www.48North.com

June 2017

37


Did your husband grow up sailing? No, interestingly enough. He grew up going to the Jersey shore, so he’d be out near the water, but not boating. But now, as we’re getting on the water he’s really taking to it. We’ve been together for 20 years, and this has been a neat adventure for our relationship. It’s really awesome and exciting to explore together!

Christy LoMauro Started sailing in the Northeast Favorite crew: Her family Current club/share organization: Carefree Boat Club Tell me more about your sailing background. How did you find sailing? Christy: Well, I think the accurate statement is that sailing found me. I grew up on the water. Some of my first memories are being on a sailboat with my family. I lived on two different sailboats during my childhood. My family and I actually built one of those boats, and did some cruising. Sailing and the water is in my blood. For many years I was away from the water. Throughout the years, I looked into buying and became aware of boating clubs. I considered them on more than one occasion, but being married with two kids, and our kids having their own sports, we were just too busy. A lot of people would ask, “Why don’t you just buy your own boat?” They don’t realize that owning a boat is work. You’ve got to put time into it, which isn’t all fun time. It’s maintenance, upkeep, you name it. Since we moved to the Northwest from south Florida three years ago, one of the things we love most about this area is the water: the lakes, the Puget Sound, and the San Juan Islands. I desperately wanted to get us on the water and so did my husband. We came across Carefree Boat Club, and with the variety that they offer, it had everything we were looking for. It had something for teenagers, and something for us. 38

I understand Carefree Boat Club also offers motorboats, do you ever use those? We use both the powerboats and sailboats. We’ve even been out in the little sailing dinghy. We’re using everything and intend to continue to do that. Over the years, whenever we would think about buying a boat, I would think “sailboat” and my husband and kids thought, “Motorboat! Waterskiing!” So for us, when we realized we could have such a variety of location and boats, that really spoke to us. Anything you didn’t expect about your experience? Yes. I think the way that Carefree Boat Club caters to people is unique. They’re a national operation, and they reach out and really try to understand the types of boats that people want access to and where. I think that’s an excellent approach and really helpful. They’re very good at having the members mingle. We met a few people over the holidays that we can reach out to now. We all want to continue building, or re-building, our sailing skills together. What would you tell someone at a crossroads, deciding whether to buy, share,or rent a boat? I would look at the advantages, disadvantages, pros and cons. If I had plenty of time and didn’t mind putting in the labor of love, the maintenance and the vigilance of owning, I’d purchase my own boat. If you get right down to it, it’s either a labor of love you enjoy or it isn’t. If you fall on the side that it isn’t, then I strongly recommend looking at some version of a boating club or share. If we were going to do long, extended cruises, I’d consider owning my own boat. You really have to go in with your eyes wide open, though. June 2017

www.48North.com

The club model is perfect for us. If I had the decision to do over again, I think we’d make the exact same one.

Jennifer Harkness Started sailing in Kansas Favorite crew: Team Puff (The Sirens) Current club/share organization: Seattle Sailing Club (SSC) Tell me about your sailing background. Jennifer: I grew up sailing in Kansas, of all places. We sailed on little Lasers in man-made reservoirs - essentially muddy ditches with high winds. In my twenties, I sailed small boats again, like the Snipe, in Oregon. After that, I took a 15-year hiatus and just got back into sailing last year. What made you decide to join SSC? I had been pining away to get on the water and I found one of SSC’s Groupons, so I decided to take the ASA 101 class and see what it’s like to be on the water here. It started the love affair all over again. I realized I needed to be on the water as much as possible. So I joined the club and now I’ve gone all the way through ASA 106. It’s been an incredible experience. Do you sail outside of your classes? I do. As someone who lives alone and didn’t know anyone in Seattle, the club was ideal. The very first class I took was with another women and we became friends. With my membership I can take boats out whenever I want, so we go out when the wind is good. I try to get out a few times a week if I can. Last summer, I started doing the women’s sailing program for the


Ballard Cup series. So great! I met other women there and got to sail with skipper, Margaret Pommert. It built instant community and was really special because we were all women supporting each other. Some of the team had never even sailed before! We didn’t start out as a team, just individuals wanting to sail. The club put us together and there was a lot of camaraderie and learning. We loved it and we’re doing it again this year! Sometimes I feel women approach things differently, and I felt it was a very supportive environment to learn and have some girl power! I’ve met some great guys I sail with too, but there’s something special about our allwomen team. We’re trying to empower, that’s the biggest word of our team. Beyond this, events like the flotillas to destinations around the Sound introduced me to a bunch of new people. I’ve made a lot of sailing friends that way and we enjoy getting on the water together. Awesome! What boat do you race on? Well, that’s what I love about the club, we get to take out a J/105 for the

races, but I also get to sail so many types of boats there. My goal is to buy a boat at some point, so it’s a good opportunity to try a bunch out, see what I like and don’t like. Well that answers my next question if you’d ever consider owning a boat! Why would you prefer to own a boat eventually? I’d like to live on a boat in the next couple years. For me, SSC was a really great investment to a) really learn more about sailing, cruising and racing, b) to meet community, and c) have access to a lot of different kinds of boats. The variety of boats has been huge, especially learning the rigging and the engines. I talk to the staff a lot and find that really helpful. Everything that I have experienced is pertinent to owning a boat, so I feel like it’s a good step. Was there anything you found challenging when you first joined SSC? I was nervous about getting yelled at because I had some sailing experiences in my youth sailing with people who yelled at me. Thankfully, that has never happened at the club. I was also nervous about meeting

new people. I thought, ‘What if I mess up? What if I wreck the boat?’ Those kind of insecurities are natural. I’ve had my fair share of mess-ups, but everyone is super supportive and inclusive, and it’s a learning experience. I’m starting to feel prepared, ready to go cruising on my own, and do it well. Plus, with the experience I’ve gained at SSC, I’m getting more invites to sail with other boats. What would you tell someone at a crossroads, deciding whether to buy, share or rent? I’m at that crossroads! Sharing time and experience through the club gives me a variety of experiences, from the people to the boats. Sailing is one of those things where you’re always learning, every single time you’re out on the water. So, going out a lot is best. The boats are always ready to go, They’ll come out and get me if the engine dies, which is a safe bet as I gain confidence. I look forward to owning my boat eventually and being able to really learn and master all the systems. Cara Kuhlman is a Seattle-based writer, sailor and craft beer enthusiast.

With a Bristol Channel Cutter

Bristol Channel Cutter was designed by the late Lyle Hess. The vessel is attractive to blue water sailors because of her seaworthiness and outstanding performance. Cape George Marine Works builds the Bristol Channel Cutter and the Falmouth Cutter, along with their other range of vessels. In January 2011, Cape George rolled out their first completed hull using the original Sam L. Morse BCC mold.

Cape GeorGe Marine Works, inC. 1924 Cape George Rd. Port Townsend, WA 98368 360.385.3412 www.capegeorgecutters.com www.48North.com

June 2017

39


o Choose, Install, and Use T -

ow

H

A Roller Furler By Alex and Jack Wilken

Taking the time to hank on or feed a headsail into a groove on a foil can be both time consuming and require additional hands. Changing headsails for heavy weather can also be challenging, especially since this can be the most dangerous time to go forward. A roller furler can make all of this headsail handling easier and safer. There are many kinds of furlers: for mains, headsails, and spinnakers, sometimes utilizing electric or hydraulic aids. In this article, we will cover how to select a manual roller furler for a headsail, how to install it (note that variances in design may change the progression of installation steps) and some of the tips for making the most of it. Many sailors may hire a professional to complete this install, but if you’re the DIY-type, you can do this on your own. Selection: The first consideration is how do you plan to use your furler? Are you racing or cruising? Cruising furlers tend to be heavier and often cheaper, and they usually shorten the sail by raising the tack to accommodate the drum (Figure 1). If you are racing, then you likely care about the luff length of your headsail and may choose a low profile furler, or even an underdeck furler. Some roller furlers

Figure 1: This roller furler has long plates raising it above the anchor, which plus the drum raises the tack by more than a foot. 40

have removable drums that leave a racing foil for a full hoist headsail. Others have continuous furling lines in order to shorten the drum (Figure 2). The size of your boat is the next consideration. Manufacturers carry a range of furling units that specify the intended boat size for each model. In selecting a unit, take into account that there is room for the drum diameter and a reasonable location for the fairlead for the furling line on your boat. Identifying such restrictions and resolving them before you purchase the unit and attempt installation can save you a headache. Purchasing: Once you have selected your roller furler, find a reliable, local dealer, if possible. Having good customer support can be essential going forward. Each manufacturer tries to ensure appropriate fit and components by requiring a list of measurements before purchasing. The measurements include the length of the headstay, its diameter, and the clevis pin diameter. You should download the installation manual for your unit and read it thoroughly, too, so there aren’t unpleasant surprises. The method of connecting the furler to the tack needs to be determined before purchase. This is because the orientation of the clevis pin varies, as does the available space above it. Additionally, you need to know much clearance is needed below the unit for anchors and other gear (Figure 1). Once you have done this and consulted with your local dealer and/or the manufacturer, you can order the roller furler and the additional parts required. Pre-installation: Unless the headstay is nearly brand new, you should probably replace it as part of installing the roller furler. Once the furler is installed, there will be no way to inspect the headstay without taking it down and removing the aluminum extrusion. When measuring the headstay, it is important to measure pin to pin; but before you measure, June 2017

www.48North.com

make sure the rig is properly tuned (reference our article on mast tuning in the June 2013 48° North). Accurate pin-to-pin measurement will require someone to go up the mast and hold the tape measure at the top while their collaborator pulls it tight at the bottom. The saying “measure three times, cut once” is of particular importance here, and three times may not even be enough! You can also remove the headstay to measure it. If you do so, tie one (or more) halyard forward to keep the mast up. If you are going to remove the headstay to measure it, make sure you mark the position of the turnbuckle so you can get it back to its original length. Different furling units will require different attachments at the bottom of the headstay. Some require that all the parts be slid over bare wire before a mechanical fitting is installed as the attachment point. Others can be installed over a marine stud (this is discussed in our article, “Replacing Your Standing Rigging” in the June 2016 issue of 48° North). Whatever the method, it must be included in the plan. Most headsail halyards are rigged so that they are very nearly in line with the headstay, since this is preferable for hoisting a full luff headsail. If the angle is too flat or the distance from the halyard swivel to the halyard block is too long, this will cause the halyard to wrap around the headstay fouling the whole system. To prevent this, you will either need to make sure that the swivel is close enough to the block as to not allow this, or install a halyard preventer to keep it from happening (Figure 3). Reread the installation instructions for your unit so they are clear in your mind. If you are more visual, you can find installation videos for almost all roller furlers. Get all the tools you need together. Figure out where you will assemble the furler, often on the dock

Figure 2: A continuous line furler allows the drum to be shorter “A,” than a standard drum furler “B.”


Figure 3: The halyard retainer does not allow the halyard to wrap around the headstay “A,” by keeping the top of the halyard swivel “B” against the mast. next to the boat. If the dock is cement or another rough, abrasive surface, you will need to have a way of protecting the furler from getting scratched. Also, if the mast is up, you need to consider how you will lift it up to the attachment point. This is normally done with a headsail halyard. Make sure you have enough hands to hoist the assembled unit while protecting it and the boat. You will need someone up the mast to attach it, someone to haul it up, and at least one more depending on size to control the lower end as it is being lifted. Installation: Lay out the headstay and roller furling components in your assembly area. Follow the instructions for calculating the length of the foil. When measuring the length of the turnbuckle, make sure it is in the middle of its adjustment range so that you have the maximum flexibility. Cut the last extrusion piece to length based on your calculations. Make sure that the top extrusion piece is longer than 18 inches, because you do not want the halyard swivel to be riding directly on a joint (Figure 3). If the cut piece is shorter than 18 inches, swap it with a longer piece from lower down. Lay out the extrusion pieces next to the headstay and reconfirm the length with the cut piece. If you are installing a mechanical fitting at the bottom, you can now cut the headstay to the exact length if you left it a little long. Follow the installation instructions for your furler to assemble the unit.

Install the mechanical fitting if needed. Once it is assembled, get ready to hoist the headstay and furler. Slacken the backstay so that it is easier to attach the headstay. Hoist the headstay and furler up the mast and attach it at the top first, then at the bottom. Bend all cotter pins in the clevis pins to secure the headstay, then adjust the turnbuckle to the proper length and secure it with cotter or ring pins. Finish any additional installation steps. To install the furling line, see our article “Controlling the Control Line” in the August 2012 48° North. Uses: A roller furler can be used in a variety of ways beyond the simple setting and striking of sail. If you don’t wish to use your engine to get away or return to the dock or a mooring, or can’t because it is broken down, the roller furler is a great asset. You can unfurl enough sail to catch the wind so as to provide steerage and work the boat away. Conversely, when trying to get the boat to the dock, you can keep enough sail area to maintain steerage until you can work the boat against the dock. Another use is full or partial furling to assist when you are tacking

or jibing with a big headsail or a headsail and staysail. It is difficult to get a full headsail around a forestay when tacking or jibing. One of the most valuable uses of a roller furler is roller reefing. In increasing wind, it is normally best to depower the mainsail first by the normal means: flattening the sail, moving the traveler to leeward, and reefing the main. If the boat is still over-powered, you can roller reef your headsail instead of swapping it out. If you roller reef, it is normally best to roll up almost all of the sail and leave only a small triangle unfurled. Because sails are not flat, if more than a small amount is unfurled, it will have a deeper draft which will increase power for its area. Roller furling has been continually improving since it was first implemented. This improvement is self perpetuating, because roller furling makes it easier to sail, so we go sailing more. As we sail more, we learn how to make sailing and technology more enjoyable and more functional. Jack and Alex Wilken are experienced boat builders, cruisers, and USCG Captains. They own Seattle Boat Works.

Upwind/Downwind Upwind/Downwind Repeat

Tired of the Beating?

then Reach (due west) on over to Eagle Harbor, on Bainbridge Island tie up to Harbour Marina & relive the day at the Pub 21+ Only www.48North.com

June 2017

www.parfittway.com 41


One of the seven bronze statues of strong women. Photo by John Guillote.

I

have been intrigued by this place since Morgan Freeman, pants rolled up and shoes flung casually over his shoulder, strode towards Tim Robbins fixing up his old boat on the beach (if that doesn’t ring a bell, it’s time to rewatch Shawshank Redemption). It’s obvious to me now that this scene was filmed far from Pacific Mexico, but that knowledge does nothing to dampen its allure in my mind. The name itself, Zihuatanejo, leaps out of your mouth in quick, crisp syllables. It’s nearly impossible to frown and say it at the same time. The town has all of the best attributes of Pacific Mexico – long stretches of white sand beaches, delicious and inexpensive food, a protected(ish) bay for anchoring, and a town square that seems nightly to accommodate a parade, basketball game or celebration of some kind. Gaggles of “free range” pre-teens munch on street food and wander the square, laughing and teasing each other. The atmosphere is relaxed, festive and family friendly even late into the evening. Overseeing the activities in town are seven prominently placed statues of women. As we wandered the streets the first day we ventured ashore, already smitten with the bay and the town, we encountered these statues, each one standing bold and confident, and I was in love. These bronze statues represent the seven regions of the state of Guerrero, each one embodying the region’s contributions to the state. That they are all women speaks to the matriarchal society of the area’s native tribes, and to the history of the town’s name. 42

m a t r i a r c h a l foundation, of their tribute to women and acknowledgment of their suffering has augmented my connection with this place. I am inspired by these women, standing confident and proud, presenting the abundance of their home to those that pass below them. This connection is a new one for me. I have spent a good portion of my life ignoring the fact that I am female. When I started climbing at age 14, I saw no reason why I couldn’t climb the same routes as my climbing friends (almost all guys), though I did recognize I would have to tackle the problems differently. I couldn’t simply haul my body weight through a difficult maneuver, but I could reach my heel above my head and use a straight arm to leverage my body through the same maneuver. I learned to use my specific assortment of skills and talents in creative ways to accomplish the goal at hand (which was always to get to the top). When I climbed a route, it looked nothing like the moves my friends made, but that made no difference to the elation of overcoming a difficult problem and the collective celebration at the top. I was still ignoring my female-ness when I started sailing and eventually found myself racing with an otherwise all-men’s team in the Puget Sound. As we approached the start line one cold, wet Saturday, powered up and heeled over, the wind already sending seawater in our faces, I was grinding. We powered over the start line and immediately tacked onto port, certain we could eek out in front of the pack. The jib came across and I hauled on the

The Place of Women By Becca Guillote

The word “Zihuatanejo” can be traced back to “Cihuatlan”, a name that in the local native (Nahuatl) language means “Place of Women.” In this traditional matriarchal culture, the area was a sanctuary dedicated to Cihuatéotl, the goddess of women who died in childbirth and warriors who died in battle (which may seem like an odd pair of responsibilities, but in their culture, childbirth was viewed as a form of battle and its victims were honored as fallen warriors). Here, at this western extremity of the Nahuatl civilization, the women who died in childbirth, under the care of their goddess, act as an honor guard to usher the sun away at the end of each day. (As an interesting aside, the Spanish, when they first reached these beaches around 1522, decided the area was not worth much and with the sanctimonious authority for which these conquerors are well known, tacked “ejo” to the end of the town’s name, which means “of little importance.” Wrong again, Spanish conquerors.) Learning about Zihuatanejo’s June 2017

www.48North.com


winch handle with all the strength and leverage I could find, but within two rotations, the drum stopped, refusing to budge. My measly arms were no match for the load of a number 1 jib in 20 knots upwind. Yelling, hustling, curse words. A huge hand grabbed the winch and a few of my fingers still attempting to push and ground the jib in, my arm following his motions like a child. The whole ordeal must have been less than five seconds, but those were precious seconds lost. We turned down to regain boat speed and as a result of my underpowered arms, had to duck boat after boat, as if bowing in submission, as the fleet flew by on starboard. My fingers throbbed and my confidence crumbled. I wanted to hide in a hole. I blamed my deficiency on my female-ness; if a guy had been sitting there, that jib would have flown in and we would have strode out in front of the fleet. I was not as good as my male counterparts. Of course the despair passed, and I soon found my home on the bow, where being small and nimble is an advantage.

I regained my confidence in my sailing capability. But my habit of ignoring the fact that I am a woman began to falter. I started to accept the idea that I could admit to being a woman and still be a great sailboat racer. That the problem solving and finesse I had to master as a climber because I couldn’t muscle my way up a route were more than coping mechanisms to compensate for being a girl; they were valuable life skills. Sailing humbles even the saltiest sailor. We find ourselves at the mercy of winds, waves, corrosion and broken plastic fittings. There are so many situations that crumble the tenuous foundation of confidence and courage. These challenges are not specific to me, and they are not specific to women. Sailing has taught me that to request help, to acknowledge my limits, to feel overwhelmed, these are not a sign of weakness – they are a show of respect of the sea and confidence in yourself. And that is what these statues remind me. They remind me that my skills and abilities are comprehensive and valuable, and I should depict them with pride and courage. They

Young Becca showing feminine strength and ingenuity to climb difficult routes. remind me that I can be both female and confident. They remind me I am capable. Becca and John are still in Zihuatanejo. Follow their journey at halcyonwandering.com

Your Source for Self-Steering & Emergency Rudder Solutions

• Auto-Helm & Saye’s Rig Windvanes • AnchorRescue System • FoldAway Boarding Ladders 510.215.2010 www.selfsteer.com

scanmar@selfsteer.com

ON A ROLL.

“It was a lifesaver. I’ll never be without it again.”

Schaefer is known worldwide for premium quality jib furling systems that will stand the test of demanding ocean passages. Our drum-bearing unit is machined from a solid block of 6061-T6 aluminum, creating unparalleled strength. Torlon bearings assure smooth operation so you can keep rolling along in the most demanding conditions.

www.AnchorRescue.com

by Scanmar Int’l

508.995.9511 SCHAEFERMARINE.COM

Also available at Marine Servicenter in Anacortes www.48North.com

June 2017

43


Winds

of

Change

R i g g i n g F u n cti o n a l i ty , I n te rch a n g e a b i l i ty , a n d A va i l a b i l i ty C o n s i d e r i n g I n d u s try C l o s u re s B y L isa V izzini

E

arlier this year, the sailboat industry was shaken when Hall Spars and Navtec Rigging Solutions closed their United States operations. Over the years, Navtec and Hall shared many progressive, engineering driven, high profile projects. The loss of these two innovative domestic manufacturers leaves many, especially those with rodrigged boats, asking who will fill the voids; and more specifically, about the future of rod rigging availability. Hall Spars, founded in 1980, fabricated high quality aluminum, and later carbon, spars and rigging components. Their state-of-the-art plant in Rhode Island boasted a 185’ carbon autoclave. When I visited in 2009, Nan Hall proudly showed off the 65’ carbon boom and described the process for building the 179’ mast for the modern J-Class sloop, Lionheart. Over the years, many sailors had the pleasure of directly speaking with Nan Hall about their Hall-rigged project. Nan was always patient and courteous. While Hall Spars closed their US facility, Hall Spars New Zealand and Holland were still operating. At the time of this writing, new developments are still taking place. North Technology Group (the corporation that encompasses North Sails and other businesses) has

Stainless and rod components like these will still be available, but they won’t come from Navtec anymore. 44

purchased Hall Spars Worldwide. It is good to know that the intellectual property at Hall is not going to be lost. In 1970, Navtec was founded by Ken King with the goal to bring better rod rigging technology to the marketplace. Their initial customers were America’s Cup contenders. At Navtec, Beau LeBlanc, Ty Goss, and other brilliant engineers were consistently forthcoming with information about rigging and hydraulics when asked by enthusiasts and professionals alike. Ty thoughtfully explained the intricacies of rod parts to me on more than one occasion. Though Hall’s closure came as a surprise to many, signs that Navtec was on the edge - such as production delays and various delivery issues - have been apparent for at least a decade. The good news is that Navtec’s slow decline gave the industry time to adjust. In other words, these closures do not mean the demise of rod rigging in the United States, though they may cause a price increase for rod rigging. Considering these industry changes, this is a good time to examine some of the similarities and differences in how rod and wire rigging function, what the processes for replacement entail, and some best practices for maintenance and inspection. Many cruising boats were originally designed for wire rigs and there is rarely a reason for those boats to consider going to rod. Wire offers excellent value, longevity and availability the world over. A significant majority of sailboats still have wire rigging. Rod rigging generally offers some better performance characteristics, and can be seen on a variety of boats, like many J/Boats, C&C, Beneteau, Waterline, Sabre, and Valiant Yachts, as well as custom racers and cruisers. Rod is constructed from Nitronic 50 stainless steel, a material different from the 316 or 304 stainless steel usually used for wire standing rigging. June 2017

www.48North.com

Nitronic 50 better resists elongation, corrosion, and fatigue cycling. For a given diameter, rod has a higher tensile strength, and less windage and weight per foot of wire rigging. Because rod is not a woven or twisted construction like wire or other synthetics which are used for standing rigging, it is inherently more stable. The lack of stretch allows for less tension in the rig to support the mast, as well as a more reliable set of the rig under varying pressure and loads. This is especially important for rigs with swept back spreaders and masts that are highly adjustable as a part of sail trim and performance. Considering a switch from rod to wire, or vice versa, should involve careful examination of the rig design, shroud angles, mast components, stiffness of the rig, load characteristics and bending moments. A mast with tangs for marine eyes can be a simple switch from rod to wire. Elements affecting this option would be rod to wire size, chain plate pin size, and elongation concerns. Any replacement of rod with wire must have the same or greater minimum breaking load. The wire size selected must match the current mast tang and chain plate pin size or the tangs and chain plates would need to be changed to fit. The stretch factor and the mechanical tensioning of the stay or shroud need to be analyzed carefully. It is possible that a long run of type 316 wire could elongate enough that the

If you switch from rod to wire, you’ve got to be careful the elongation doesn’t leave you with two-blocked turnbuckles, like this.


turnbuckle becomes two-blocked or runs out of adjustment before the wire is adequately tensioned. A mast with rod stem ball receptacles is likely to be more challenging to convert to wire. This can involve removal of older stem ball tang sets, installation of proper fit compression tubes, bolts, and new tangs for marine eyes or other wire fittings. The sailor will have to weigh the cost of this with the cost of the rod replacement, and think about the different properties of the rigging types. How long rigging lasts is subject to many different factors: age, miles, loads in comparison to break strength, sailing conditions and environmental conditions. Here in the northwest, rigging tends to last longer than warmer climes or those where air pollution is prevalent. The heuristic for wire standing rigging is that it will provide good service for eight to ten years depending on the sailing conditions, environment, and use. It is a good idea to inspect at five year increments or 30,000 miles, which ever comes first. By comparison, rod should be inspected after a maximum of 40,000

to 60,000 sailing miles or six years, whichever comes first. A proper inspection involves un-stepping the mast, scanning the rod inch by inch, and inspection of each cold head. If issues are discovered with the rod heads and there is enough room in the turnbuckles, or longer screws can be used, a new cold head can be formed. It is recommended that the turnbuckles be replaced at least every ten years. Often there will be a stainless or aluminum tube called a “bend” over the rod where it passes through the spreader. The spreader bends are set at a precise angle and this can sometimes mean that the rod in this position will need to be replaced for proper fit of the shroud. Taking care of your rod rig has similarities to caring for a wire standing rig. Like wire or other rigging materials rod wears out from cycling, fatigue, and corrosion. It stands to reason that keeping the stainless clean, allowing it to breathe, and proper tension will prolong its life. Here in the Pacific Northwest, any rigging shop that has previously been able to accommodate rod rigging repair and replacement projects can continue to offer that service, despite

An example of a spreader bend fit over rod rigging. the changes in the industry. Hayn Marine has purchased and taken ownership of the intellectual property (engineering drawings) from Navtec. They will continue, as they have been for several years, to provide quality rod parts. Despite industry changes, rod rigging is still a viable, and sometimes necessary, choice for many sailors. It can hold a value position for sailors seeking predicable rigging performance for whom the cost of composite parallel construction rigging can be impractical. Lisa Vizzini and her husband, Dan Kulin, are the owners and operators of Port Townsend Rigging.

Our Mainsail:

Since 1987

What makes it such a good buy?

SPARKLING FRESH WATER, POWER, AND REFRIGERATION FROM THE SEVEN SEAS

You’ll find features in a LEE SAIL that are specifically included to extend its life: reinforced batten pockets; leech line; tack and clew with leather chafe guards; sail numbers; tell tales; leather encased, hand-sewn aluminum internal headboard and triple stitched with 6-point zigzag seams when required; stainless steel, heavy duty cringles; reinforced stress points.

HYDRAULIC

110 VOLT/BELT DRIVE MODULAR KIT

WA:  Call Toll Free 1-800-533-9567 OR:  10997 NW Supreme Ct., Portland OR 97229 • (503) 641-7170 BC:  PO Box 19567, Vancouver, BC V5T 4E7 • Phone & Fax (604) 685-1234 www.leesails.com • e-mail: vancouver@leesails.com   

UPGRADE MOUNT

316 S/S REMOTE PANEL 12 VOLT DC

AquaGen combines the quality, simplicity & reliability of AquaMarine, Inc. watermakers with the durability of the Kubota 150 amp 12V diesel generators. This compact low fuel consuming AquaGen is a powerhouse, capable of producing up to 150 amps, and 8 up to 62 GPH of fresh potable water from any water source. Make fresh water, refrigeration, and also charge your batteries all at the same time! A hydraulic pump may also be added to run your dive compressure, windlass, bow thruster, or emergency bilge pump. Ideal for longterm cruisers or weekend wanderers. We custom engineer our systems to fit any size vessel or cabin site. Electric, Hydraulic, or Belt Driven Modular Kits are also available. Visit our website for more information: www.aquamarineinc.net.

QUALITY AT AFFORDABLE PRICES. LIFETIME WARRANTY ON PUMP HEAD AND PRESSURE VESSELS. 58 Fawn Lane (P.O. Box 55) (800) or (360) 376-3091 • aqua2133@me.com Deer Harbor, WA 98243

www.aquamarineinc.net www.48North.com

June 2017

45


The Artist’s View – Secrets of the Salish Sea Sketches and story by Larry Eifert

orant. d m r o c r smalle hin neck, an a s i c i g la at ill The Peump patches, to a narrow b White r face leading ese birds. a red define th - but in the ck bla e ar ds bir e es th y sa t You migh rple and yellow. sun they show green., red, pufor a painter. It’s a rainbow of colors

Three cormorant species live in the Salish Sea. A year ago, I wrote about the largest, the Doublecrested Cormorant, and now here’s number two. At first, the Pelagic Cormorant seems jet black, but that’s certainly not true. I like these birds very much because, as the light changes, their iridescent colors change from purple to red and green. The Pelagic is smaller than the Double-crested. It has a thinner neck, much smaller head and very thin bill. Almost snake-like might be a good descriptor. Two white flank patches and, during breeding season, a red beard also help with identification. A third variety, the Brandt’s Cormorant sports a tan cheek patch. I admire these birds for their fishing skills.

Recently, we were on one of the San Juan ferries and I watched a group fishing and occasionally fly to nearby pilings for rest. They were all very chatty with each other and seemed curious about us. Some were below at the base of the pilings and were diving in the turbulent backwash for a disoriented pile perch. Almost every dive produced a fish, and as the birds surfaced, we could see some quickly toss the flapping fish upwards, then swallow it headfirst as it came back down. This way, the fish went down those skinny throats with scales backwards and fins retracted. Stomach juices did the rest. To help all this, cormorants ride low in the water thanks to solid bones that aid in long dives. I say this is a very successful bird!

Larry Eifert paints and blogs about wild places at larryeifert.com. His art can be seen in many national parks across America. 46

June 2017

www.48North.com


S eattle Y acht C lub

P rotection I sland T

his year ’s edition of the Seattle Yacht Club Protection Island Race was my first ever! I’ve done plenty of Puget Sound races, and spent plenty of time around Port Townsend and the Strait of Juan de Fuca, but that particular island and that particular race were totally unfamiliar, until now. Not unlike other races of that length in Puget Sound, there are plenty of stories and many are tales of woe and misadventure, especially in the very dark early morning hours. Tales of drifting, punctuated by moments of sheer terror and scraping the lasagna dinner off the headliner are among my favorites to listen to and not participate in. This year, a good breeze was predicted, and from a good direction, with an epically favorable tide exchange if you were fast enough to turn the corner by 3:00 in the afternoon. Weather briefing and common thinking indicated a finish by 2:00 am, although we had until 3:00 on Sunday afternoon to cross the line. Please let us finish long before that time! At Seattle Yacht Club, the fast boats start first. Our game plan was to hit the west side, and we were curious if the ORC boats would do it. Of course, on a southerly, going west means a port gybe so you either had to win the pin end or take some transoms. You can also do your best to look ominous

or brilliant and spook the herd in that direction. In both of the first starts, that’s how the game was played. Boats who won the pin went west. If you had someone blocking you, it took a while to find a lane across. On Bravo Zulu, we nearly won the pin end at the start, but since it was neither a game of horseshoes nor hand grenades, close wasn’t good enough and we eventually threaded a couple transoms to stick with the plan. The west side was golden. There was good breeze and a river of current. Actually there were many rivers of current, and it was running at a good clip. However, the most consistent river was right along the west shore. The wind built gradually along the run, and as we got to Point No Point, a heavier kite was being

www.48North.com

June 2017

considered. By the time we passed Double Bluff, driving was a two handed job and the sport boats were finally up on step. Bigger puffs hit 20 knots true and with tidal push, we were getting the fun meter up to 13 over the ground. The J/120 Hinzite was hugging Marrowstone Island and putting out a good rooster tail, and it made our brains hurt wondering if it was going to work for them. We kept some separation from shore, and the ORC boats on the horizon were favoring Whidbey Island. Evgeniy Goussev gets the hero award, taking his Lyman Morse 40, Gray Wolf, (think NightRunner, classic above the waterline and all business below) single handed. He kept the kite going down the run and pulled off several gybes, and was still in front of us until a big puff sent him sideways at Point Wilson. After he gathered up his sails slowly, but surely, and secured everything on deck, he was seen motoring toward Port Townsend. Ev reports that the dark and stormies were fantastic, and that Plan B is a-ok. Crossfire, Smoke and Glory seemed to get around the island without too much trouble, and were hauling the mail back uphill as we approached Protection Island. We tried to learn from their sail configuration, but I’m pretty sure they don’t have reef points, and 47


I know for sure they have an army on the rail. A beautiful sight! We were planning to swap down to a small asymmetric on our approach, but swapped instead for a small headsail. As we got to the far end of the island the big breeze and tide rips gave way to a drift. Back up with the big kite, as we ghosted around the shallows. At one point I said, “Denny, it’s only six feet!” He replied, “That’s the wind speed, silly. Look under that…” “Well, it says eight!” “Carry on…” Hinzite took the island wide while we hugged the beach, and eventually the shorter distance of a close rounding paid off. By the time we clawed and drifted back to Point Wilson, the wind machine turned back on. We swapped to the #3 and by the time we could tack, we were putting in a reef! The original plan was to head back up the west shore, however the east side looked better. Whether it was wind or tide or both, the water looked lively toward the east. By the time we passed Point No Point, the wind had swung so far east that you could lay the finish and point the bow straight up the Sound at 10 knots.

We finished in time for a spectacular sunset, before dark and well ahead of schedule! The short course boats were all tucked away, and everyone got to wake up in their own warm bed instead of on a wet sail. In the first ORC division, John Buchan’s TP52 Glory got the glory, followed by Lou Bianco’s R/P55 Crossfire and Steve Travis’ TP52 Smoke. Those three boats seem to play well together and its fun for the rest us to watch the battle. In ORC Division 2 as well as Overall ORC, J/125 Hamachi finished on top, followed by John Kerrigan’s Ker 46, New Haven, and John Tenneson’s J/145 Jedi. In PHRF, William Weinstein’s Riptide35, Terremoto, finished on top of their division and overall with a slew of awesome local sailors on board. Charlie Macauley and family on his Farr 39, Absolutely, came next, followed by Shaun Breese’s Farr 39 Tachyon. In PHRF Division 2, Denny Vaughan’s Bravo Zulu finished first, followed by James Hinz’s J/120, Hinzite, and Mark Liffrino’s J/120, With Grace. Only one boat chose the Sport

OVER HALF A MILLION BOATERS CHOOSE US

Boat race - invite some friends next time! Ian Christianson’s Flying Tiger, Izakaya, led the charge to get a division on the water, finishing in first place. On the Short Course to Double Bluff, the first division was won by Alex Simanis’ short handed crew on Evelyn 32, Poke and Destroy, leading the crowd over to the east side of the Sound for the trip uphill. Charles Hill’s Different Drummer and Allen Johnson’s Charlotte also made the podium. In the J/105 fleet, some familiar boats finished on top. Mor Jubilee hit the top spot, followed by Last Tango and Inconceivable! In the little boat division, Reinhard Freywald’s Kiwi Express was first in division and first overall. Second went to Alexia Fisher ’s Santa Cruz 27, Zipper, and Leo Morales’ J/27 Wizard. Cruiser racer divisions are gaining popularity, and the top spot went to Phil Calvert’s Norlin 34, Runaway, followed by Bill Boyeson’s J/42, Jiminy, and Jim Medley’s Bavaria 38, Puffin. by Stephanie Schwenk photos by staff photographer results on pages 52-53

24/7 DISPATCH ASSISTANCE

300 & 600 300 PORTS NATIONWIDE WITH OVER 600 TOWBOATS AND SERVICE IN CANADA

1,200+ TRAVEL, MARINA & BOATING DISCOUNTS

Unlimited* Towing Membership – $149 a year

DOWNLOAD THE NEW BOATU.S. APP FOR ONE-TAP TOWING SERVICE

FORMERLY VESSEL ASSIST

48

BoatUS.com/towing 800-395-2628 June 2017

www.48North.com

WATER TOWING SOFT UNGROUNDINGS JUMP STARTS / FUEL DELIVERY *Towing details can be found online at BoatUS.com/towing or by calling.


S eattle Y acht C lub

V ashon I sland

T

his year ’s iteration of the Seattle Yacht Club’s Vashon Island Race (second race in the Tri-Island Series) exposed the collection of close to 50 yachts to all that this chilly, wet Northwest spring can offer, including a bit of sun. The race started just north of West Point in a solid 10 to 15 knots, sometimes shifty, southerly and building ebb tide. The forecast of thundershowers and a pronounced Southwesterly shift later in the day proved to be accurate, depending on when you started and where you were on the course. The fleet generally worked their way across the Sound, working the west side of the track down Blake Island and the eastern shore of Vashon. Small, sometimes intense (and cold!) shower cells rolled over the fleet, interspersed with welcome blue skies and sunshine, and, of course, wind squalls, shifts then massive shifts. Headed on both tacks?! Check! 18 knots to nothing

in three minutes?! Check! Must be spring in the Northwest! The bottom of Vashon was predictably calm for the big boat fleet, but eventually a 13 knot carpet of southwesterly filled across the bay and down Colvos Passage. The unusual (and sad) sight of the Gray Whale carcass on Vashon Island met long course competitors as they jibed down the Passage, each seeking their own private lane in the 2 to 3 knot The TP 52 “Smoke” passes the ferry “Wenatchee” on their way around Vashon Island.

“Madame Pele” and “Izakaya” cross tacks in Elliott Bay.

www.48North.com

northbound tidal runway. Once past the north end of Vashon, the race turned into a boat speed and handling exercise, with crews working the jibing angles, building flood tide and commercial traffic avoidance challenges with varying degrees of success. Most boats in all courses tended to stay right both upwind (heading south) and downwind (heading home northbound) to avoid current and keep the best angle to the finish. Few brave souls found benefit in taking fliers, and the race became something of a parade towards the finish. The fleet was done by supper time on Saturday, and boats were home and snug early on what ultimately turned out to be a fun, fast and interesting spring Saturday. Full credit to the SYC organizers, and PRO Charley Rathkopf for staging a safe and well run event. by Matthew Wood photos by Jan Anderson results on pages 52-53 The Sierra 26,“Uno” passing Decatur Reef off of Restoration Point.

June 2017

49


Sloop Tavern Yacht Club

R ace

full fleet of 125 boats was greeted A with an amazing weekend for sailing during this year ’s Race to the

Straits. Once again, the Sloop Tavern Yacht Club did a fantastic job getting all the ducks in a row to get this race off smoothly and when the fleet hit the water Saturday morning, sunny skies and a steady southerly wind brought smiles to our crew onboard the J/24, Flyer. With winds that were predicted to be southerly then northerly later, the boats that left the gate early in the day were rewarded with an easy trip up to Double Bluff buoy before the wind switched. While we spent only a few minutes waiting for the new breeze to fill in, a large portion of the fleet was left to drift with the flood tide while the wind made up its mind. We kept pace with the Wylie 31, Velella, between Kingston and Double Bluff

50

to the

S traits

Top: The Moore 24, “La LuchaMoore,” sailed by Michael Barton & Colin Dunphy heading to Port Townsend. Center: “Freedom,” a J/22, passing Point Wilson Lighthouse. Bottom: left: The parade of J/105 spinnakers leaving Port Townsend on Sunday morning.

June 2017

www.48North.com

before finding a new boat to chase around in Mutiny Bay. The fleet kept near shore to avoid the afternoon flood, and as we putted along, a pack of J/105s passed by on their way north in the increasing breeze. Most of the boats were double handed and a few were singlehanded, so the wind power was quite evident without extra weight on the rail to balance it out. I talked my crew through a headsail change before entering the more open waters of Admiralty Inlet and as the fleet made its way across to Marrowstone Island and into Port Townsend Bay, the tide switched to an ebb. This pushed up against a 20 knot northerly, kicking up waves and making for quite the ride to the finish. The decision to leave docking as first come first serve in Point Hudson marina caused a few pile ups near


Duke Phan’s Q-class, “Grayling,” takes 1st in Class 3 Double Handed Non-Flying Sails.

the entrance as shorthanded crews worked hard to handle larger boats in the strong crosswind. By the race cut-off at 7:00pm, the entire fleet was safely docked for the evening. The NW Maritime Center graciously opened their doors to the rowdy bunch of Seattle sailors and we were served a tasty chicken and ribs dinner paired with beers donated by Northwest Rigging and wine provided by Beta Marine. We ate heartily, happily chatting away with other crews about the exciting day on the water. Darwin says: If you want to go cruising with a gal you're a wooing, Dirty sails will take the romance out of sailing

Sailing is all about romance

Let Clean Clean Sails Sails Let work on on that that canvas canvas work until it's as neat & pristine as a new bride in June.

SAIL & CANVAS CLEANING SAIL & CANVAS CLEANING

206-842-4445 206-842-4445 Seattle - Schattauer Sails & North Sails

Sunday morning started off calm, but a solid northerly quickly built. That, combined with warm temps and clear skies indicated another beautiful day on the water. We squeezed out of an eight boat raft up and into the bay just in time for our 8:30am start. Under way, we kept looking backwards, distracted by the hundred or so spinnakers spread out across the water. It was a spectacular sight. We spent the entire day switching positions with the other J/24, Roshambo, before finally getting squeezed out in the light winds near Kingston. The northerly winds persisted in varying strength throughout the day, allowing us to fly the spinnaker all the way home while dodging current lines, sticks, and the occasional porpoise and seal. Compared to the tough currents and conditions we saw last year, this edition of the race was quite pleasant, featuring enjoyable winds, close competition, and plenty of sunshine to burn away pale winter skin. While our finish against the Thunderbirds and the other J/24s could be improved

Arkadiy Tseytlin’s Catalina Capri 25 “Taxi” before a beautiful shot of Port Townsend.

on, we still had a great time onboard Flyer. I am happy to have completed both legs of the race and to finally be able to say I’ve sailed fully to Port Townsend and back. Thanks to the committee boats Beltane, Blue Lullaby, and Strange Attractor for their time bobbing around waiting for us to finish. I can’t wait to get out again next year for another fun sail up to Port Townsend. by Scott Galbraith photos by Jan Anderson results on pages 52-53

Think you have what it takes, to win it all? Come To The Premier Racing Spot In All of North America and Find Out! San Juan 24 North American Championship June 23- 25 A Champion will be crowned! http://bit.ly/SJ24NAChampionship Whidbey Island Race Week 2017 July 10- 14 5 days of world class sailing 6 nights of live music and parties whidbeyislandraceweek.com

POINTS Anacortes -DROP-OFF Ullman Sails

Bellingham - SkookumPort SailsTownsend Sails Schattauer Sails PORTLANDsails - Banks SailsSeaward canvas Quantum SF BAYSails AREA - Hood Sailmakers & Doyle Sails Banks Sails North SAN DIEGO Ullman Sails UK Halsey North Sails,- Oregon

www.cleansails.com www.cleansails.com

Call Oak Harbor Marina for your slip reservations (360) 279-4575 • www.ohmarina.org www.48North.com

June 2017

51


Puget Sound Race Results 4 Such Fast David Garman ID35 Corinthian YC Seattle PSSR Large Boat Class 3 - Double Handed Non-Flying Sails Div North Course 7 Kinetics Nordic 44 Brad Greene 1 Grayling Duke H. Phan Q-class Class 1 8 Overtime Ross 930T Julie Renick 2 Charlotte Al & Jane Johnson Quest 30 PL Boat Type Skipper Class 7 3 re-Quest Alex Wetmore Express 37 1 Shrek 1D35 Paul Carter 1 More Jubilee J/105 Erik Kristen 4 Priorities Wayne Foley Cal 31 2 Absolutely Farr 39 ML Charlie Macaulay 2 Last Tango J/105 James Geros 5 Boadicea Simon ffitch Ericson 32-3 3 Ballistic Melges 32 Brad Cole 3 Inconceivable! J/105 L Rummel/D Cohen 6 Beatrice Jennifer harkness C&C 27 4 Bat Out of Hell Farr 30 Lance Staughton 4 Jaded J/105 Chris Phoenix 7 Cloud Nine Bob Rowe Catalina 5 Nefarious Farr 30 Dan Randolph 5 Panic J/105 Chuck Stephens 8 Inara Mathison/Slepski Catalina 30 6 Bravo Zulu Bene 40.7 Denny Vaughan Class 8 Class 4 - Double Handed Flying Sails Division Class 2 1 Kiwi Express Farr 1020 Reinhard Freywald 1 Bingo Northfield Perry 24-1 1 Uno Sierra 26 Brad Butler 2 Zipper Santa Cruz 27 Alexia Fischer 2 Hula D & B Stange Westsail 32 2 Dos Sierra 26 Molly Jackson 3 Wizard J/27 Leo Morales 3 Lady Eileen Barret Crabtree Baba 30 3 Different Drummer Wauquiez C40s Charles Hill 4 Nor’wester C&C 38-2 John Neesz 4 Miss Mayhem Melissa Davies San Juan 24 4 Shada J/109 Jerry Woodfield 5 Jolly Green J-80 Mike Poole 5 Holdfast Kristin Pederson Santana 20 5 Tantivy J/109 Stuart Burnell 6 OxoMoxo Swan 391 Doug Frazer 6 Ruby Louise Cranston Riely Santana 22 Class 3 Class 9 Class 5 - Double Handed Flying Sails Division 1 More Jubilee J/105 Erik Kristen 1 Runaway Norlin 34 Phil Calvert 1 Moonshine Kirk Fraser Yankee 30 2 Inconceivable! J/105 D Cohen / L Rummel 2 Jiminy J/42 Bill Boyeson 2 Rock Lobster Trent Piepho San Juan 7.7 3 Last Tango J/105 Jim Geros 3 Puffin Bavaria 38 Jim Medley 3 Wavelength Eric Dunkel Ranger 29 4 Delirium J/105 Jerry Diercks 4 White Squall XCal 40 Roger Deitz 4 Necessary Evil Kirt Hegerberg Catalina 30 5 Jaded J/105 Chris Phoenix 5 Mata Hari Catalina 36 Mk ll Jeff Blyth 5 Isaura 6 Moose Unknown J/105 John Aitchison Brenda Van Fossen San Juan 28 6 Izarra Bene 411-2 Andrew Harvilla 7 Avalanche J/105 Ed Wilder 6 Quest John Wilkerson Pearson 323 7 Al-Hiin Dehler 34 Dan Rees 8 Puff J/105 Tom Muir 7 Dolphin Quest Paul Benson Shannon PH 38 8 Nooka Ranger 33 Douglas Bourlier Class 4 Class 6 - Double Handed Flying Sails Division 1 Distraction Melges 24 Tom Greetham 1 Cuatro Vientos Mike Tunney Thunderbird Seattle YC Vashon Island Race 2 Good Enough Melges 24 Matt McGregor 2 Selchie Kwadwo Copeland Thunderbird PL Boat Type Skipper 3 Trophy Wife Melges 24 Glenn Klute 3 Roshambo Mark Daniel J/24 Class 1 4 Comfort Monkey Melges 24 Evan Walker 4 Lil White Rabbit Bill Wood Merit 25 1 Smoke TP 52 Steve Travis 5 Rogue Melges 24 Alex Krawarik 5 Flyer Scott Galbraith J/24 2 Glory TP-52 John Buchan 6 Pickled Beets 6 Freedom Melges 24 John Rahn Egor Klevak J/22 Reichel/Pugh 55 Lou Bianco 3 Crossfire 7 Cougar Hunter Melges 24 Tseytlin Capri 25 Jeff Vernon 7 Taxi Arkadiy Cata 4 Neptune’s Car Santa Cruz 70 Paul LaMarche South Course 8 Intrepid Peter Beidler Thunderbird Class 2 Class 5 Class 7 - Double Handed Flying Sails Division 1 Eye Candy Farr 395 Jim Marta 1 Here & Now J/29 Pat Denney 1 Space Toaster David Gee Moore 24 Ker 46 John Kerrigan 2 New Haven 2 Gaucho 2 Wild Rumpus Stephanie Schwenk Ross 930 John Cahill SC 27 Riptide 44 Jonathan McKee 3 Dark Star 3 Kowloon Olson 911 Ken Chin 3 Thumper Erik Hauge Express 27 Class 3 4 Kiwi Express 4 La LuchaMoore Michael Barton Farr 1020 Reinhard Freywald Moore 24 1 Terremoto Riptide 35 William Weinstein 5 Banana Stand Adam Yuret 5 Slick J/29 Christine Nelson Santa Cruz 27 Farr 39ML Charlie Macaulay 2 Absolutely 6 6 Vela Volta Bav 35 Steve Kirsch Alternate Reality D & M Jensen Express 27 Custom 40 Carl Buchan 3 Madrona Class 6 7 Off Constantly Jeff Hulme Santa Cruz 27 Ron Holbrook 4 Constellation J-133 1 Taj Mahal J/80 David Schutte 8 Amorillo Clint Tseng Moore 24 Class 4 2 Jolly Green J/80 Mike Poole Class 8 - Double Handed Flying Sails Division 1 Bravo Zulu Beneteau 40.7 Denny Vaughan 3 Crazy Ivan J/80 Bryan Rhodes 1 Nimbus Mark Harang Evelyn 26 J-120 James Hinz 2 Hinzite 4 Lek Dimarucot J/80 Lek Dmarucot 2 Teaser Kirk Utter Cal 33 J-109 Jerry Woodfiel 3 Shada 5 Stellar J J/80 Alan Ross 3 Whistling Swan William Pirrie Islander 36 J-120 Mark Liffring 4 with Grace 6 Namaste J/80 Kevin Callahan 4 Velella R & A Helling Wylie 31 C&C 115 David DeLanoy 5 Fortuna Class 7 5 Kamon Mike Taft Jean SO J-35 Tyson Varosyan 6 Solution 1 Zipper Santa Cruz 27 Alexia Fischer Class 9 - Double Handed Flying Sails Division Class 5 2 Shazam Santa Cruz 27 Bob Tollenaar 1 Elixir Megan Aphrodite Flying Tiger 10M I ain Christenson 1 Izakaya 3 Cherokee Cal 33 Peter Stewart 2 Tir Na nOg Bill Fraser Tartan 37 Class 6 4 Selchie Thunderbird Kwadwo Copeland 3 Mata Hari Jeff Blyth Catalina 36 Mk II 1 Uno Sierra 26X Brad Butler 5 Mata Hari Cal 36 Jeffrey Blyth 4 De Novo Dave O’Hern CS 36T 2 Charlotte Quest 30 Allen Johnson Class 8 5 Dessert First Don Rees Ericson 34-2 3 Different Drum Wau Cent 40s Charles Hill 1 Return San Juan 24 Mark Bradner 6 Otava Jerry Nuernberger Jean 38 4 Helios Beneteau 36.7 David James 2 Grauer Geist San Juan 24 Ken Johnson 7 Tangent Charlie O’Hern Hunter 34 5 Karma Dash 34 Ken Orlob 3 Fancy San Juan 24 Jeff Kendall Class 10 - Double Handed Flying Sails Division 6 Tourist J-100 William Daniel 4 Manhattan Transfer San Juan 24 Mike Irish 1 LXIII (63) Dennis J/27 7 Kinetics Nordic 44 Brad Greene 5 Sweet Jesus San Juan 24 Sean Busby 2 Jolly Green Zuzana Culakova J/80 8 Overtime Ross 930T Julie Renick 6 Snappy Tom San Juan 24 Gil Lund 3 Underdog Lek Dimarucot J/80 Class 7 7 Miss Mayhem! San Juan 24 Melissa Davies 4 Conrad J Wolf J/30 1 More Jubilee J-105 Erik Kristen 5 Taku Theo J/30 2 Inconceivable! J-105 Rummel / Cohen Seattle YC Protection Island 6 Impulsive Ulf Georg Gwildis J/30 3 Jaded J-105 Chris Phoenix PL Boat Type Skipper Class 11 Double Handed Flying Sails Division 4 Last Tango J-105 James Geros 1 Muffin Christopher Butler S/C 33 Class 1 J-105 Chuck Stephens 5 Panic TP-52 John Buchan 2 Wildflower Tom Mitchell J/35C 1 Glory J-105 Dave Pengelly 6 Avalanche Reichel/Pugh 55 Lou Bianco 3 Plan R Paul Hanson J/29 2 Crossfire Class 8 3 Smoke TP 52 Steve Travis 4 Shadowfax David & Kathleen Jade J/35C 1 Kiwi Express Farr 1020-2 Reinhard Freywald SC 70 Paul LaMarche 5 SKANA II Philippe Lindheimer Sabre 386 4 Neptune’s Car Santa Cruz 33 Garry Greth 2 Muffin Hugh MacMenamin Tartan 3700 Class 1 6 Tir Na Nog Tom Andrewes 3 Madame Pele Davidson 29 1 Hamachi J/125 Dougherty/Andrews Class 12 - Double Handed Flying Sails Division C&C 38-2 John Neesz 4 Nor’wester Ker 46 John Kerrigan 1 Selah Tad Fairbank J/100 2 New Haven Santa Cruz 27 Alexia Fischer 5 Zipper J/145 John Tenneson Gary Seibert Hanse 411 3 Jedi 2 Corsair J-27 Leo Morales 6 Wizard Doug Frazer Swan Class 3 3 Oxomoxo Class 9 1 Terremoto Riptide 35 William Weinstein Duncan Smith Choate 40 4 Slow Loris 1 Jiminy J-42 Bill Boyeson Farr 39ML Charlie Macaulay Robert Morton Islander 40 2 Absolutely 5 Innamorata Bavaria 38 Jim Medley 2 Puffin Farr 39 Shaun Breese 6 Sir Isaac John Bailey Custom Schooner 3 Tachyon Norlin 34 Phil Calvert 3 Runaway Cookson 12m Stevan Johnson 4 White Cloud Class 13 - Double Handed Flying Sails Division Roger Deitz 4 White Squall XCal 40 Class 4 1 Cheeto Benito Brent Campbell Melges 24 Catalina 36 Mk ll Jeff Blyth 5 Mata Hari 1 Bravo Zulu Bene 40.7 Denny Vaughan 2 Poke & Destroy Alex Simanis Evelyn 32-2 Ranger 33 Douglas Bourlier 6 Nooka 2 Hinzite J/120 James Hinz Davidson 30 3 Dang When Wet Bryan Agnetta Dehler 34 Dan Rees 7 Al-Hiin 3 with Grace J-120 Mark Liffring Piotr Zin Seascape 27 4 Persistence Beneteau 411-2 A ndrew Harvilla 8 Izarra 4 First Light Bene 47.7 Dorr Anderson 5 Payara Kurt Ritter Hobie 33 5 Sadie Mae Grand Soleil 40 Justin Beals Class 14 - Double Handed Flying Sails Division Sloop Tavern YC Race to the Straits 6 Serenite Beneteau 46 V Mushkatin 1 Dulcinea M & T Gardner-Brown J/105 Name Type PL Boat Class 5 J/105 2 More Jubilee Erik Kristen Class 1 - Single Handed Flying Sails Division 1 Izakaya Flying Tiger 10M Iain Christenson J/105 3 Inconceivable David Cohen 1 Wings Evan Walker J/29 Class 6 Delirium P Henderson J/105 4 & R Barber 2 Kittiwake Mike Mcguane Is Bahama 30 1 Poke & Destroy Evelyn 32-2 Alex Simanis Tom Kerr & Serhad J/105 5 Corvo 105 3 Namaste Kevin Callahan J/80 2 Different Drummer Wauq Cent 40s Charles Hill Madeline John J/105 6 Reboot 4 Gypsy Daniel Islander Freeport 3 Charlotte Quest 30 Allen Johnson J/105 7 Moose Unknown John Aitchison Class 2 - Single Handed Flying Sails Division 4 Uno Sierra 26X Brad Butler 8 Avalanche Ed Wilder/Jim Breazeale J/105 1 Great White Dan Wierman J/35 5 Helios Beneteau 36.7 David James Class 15 - Double Handed Flying Sails Division 2 Mer Scott Durham Hanse 415 6 Karma Dash 34 Ken Orlob 1 Tantivy Burnell Stuart M J/109 Justin Beals Grand Soleil 40 3 Sadie Mae 52

June 2017

www.48North.com


2 Different Drum Charles Hill Wauq Cent 40s 3 Mountain Reed bernhard J/109 4 Shearwater Karl Haflinger J/35 5 Lodos Mehmet Tolga Cezik J/109 6 Solution Tyson Varosyan J/35 7 Fortuna D & M De Lanoy C&C 115 Class 16 - Double Handed Flying Sails Division 1 Warcanoe Michael Farr 30 2 Nefarious Dan Randolph Farr 30 3 Square one Matt Pistay Farr 30 4 Bat Out Of Hell Lance Staughton Farr 30 5 Anarchy Tom Ward FT 10 6 First Edition Alexander & Henderson Hum Bay 30 Class 17 - Double Handed Flying Sails Division 1 Wicked Wahine D Towe & D Kaseler Melges 32 2 Terremoto William Weinstein Riptide 35 3 Kahuna Strum-Palerm/Pritchard Aero 38 4 Grace Andy & Jaime Mack J/122 5 Javelin R Blaylock & M Laky 1D35 Turbo 6 Gray Wolf Evgeniy Goussev Custom 40 7 Tabu Jim & Michele Leonard Farr 44 8 Monte Solaro David Dumont Bene First 44.7 8 Asylum Kyle Caldwell J/44 Class 18 - Double Handed Flying Sails Division 1 Hamachi S Dougherty/J Andrews J/125 2 Ocelot Ben Glass Fox 44 3 Kyrnos F & J Laffitte Custom 56 4 White Cloud Steve Johnson Cookson 12MT 5 Artemis Tom Muir Andrews 53 6 Tachyon Shaun Breese Farr 39 Class 19 - Double Handed FS Multihull Division 1 Green Flash James Miller Catamaran 2 Escape Yury Palatnik Corsair F-27 3 Moon & Stars Maurice Prather Catamaran

R2AK June 8

West Sound Sailing Association Races

Begins in Port Townsend, WA and finishes 750 miles later in Ketchikan, AK.Contact anika@nwmaritime.org

June 10: Bremerton YC Blake Island June 24: West Sound Corinthian YC Brownsville Race Check www.wscyc.net

Leukemia Cup Regatta June 10 The Leukemia Cup Regatta is an annual sailing event that takes place in Elliott Bay. As the kickoff event of Elliott Bay Marina’s Downtown Sailing Series, the Leukemia Cup Regatta is a casual race meant to bring sailors together over their love of boating and their commitment to fighting blood cancer. Check: www.leukemiacup.org/wa

CYC Seattle P.O.D. Regatta June 24-25

CYC Portland Oregon Offshore PL Boat Sail# Skipper A Fleet 1 Rage 69830 Steve & Nancy Rander 2 Riva 46980 Scott Campbell 3 Anam Cara 79093 Tom Kelly B Fleet Corinthian Yacht Club of Seattle’s 1 Peregrine 42726 Steve Smolinski 2 Velocity 28642 Tom Keffer P.O.D. Regatta (PNW One Design) is 3 Passepartout 47724 Pete Shainin 4 Siren 134 Carl & Nicole Sirois a two-day sailing event open to One C Fleet Design, PHRF, and IRC Fleets of all 1 California Girl 6853 Timm & Victoria Lessley 2 Kaizen 26 Robert W. Rinker, Jr. experience levels. Round the buoys 3 Thirsty 34498 Alan Bergen races start off Shilshole Bay at 11:00 4 Rya 79109 Andrew J. McCann D Fleet am each day. Call (206) 789-1919 or 1 Bums Rush 111 Mark & Mike McCuddy 2 Wy “East 141 Frank Colistro go to www.cycseattle.org 3 Cool Change 23723 Frank Noragon 4 Kokopelli 57138 Tom Collins 5 Shamrock 37 Gary Brunner 6 Sol Pacifico 79141 Randall Barnes J/24 Nationals Rank Boat Sail # Skipper 1 Tundra Rose 5399 Keith Whittemore 2 5208 Will Welles 3 Siesta 5185 Nobuyuki Imai 4 Pearl 5477 Michael Johnson 5 Tremendous Slouch 5471 Scott Milne 6 Baba Louie 2365 Mark Laura 7 Spark 1238 Steve Travis 8 Self Abuse 2845 Harry Dursch 9 Atom Ant 1980 Bob Kinsman 10 Hair of the Dog 5354 Jakob Lichtenberg 11 Suspence 3421 Carl Sheath 12 Alternate Facts 5253 Alex Simanis 13 Joyride 1890 Wayne Pignolet 14 R.Y.L.A.H. 4339 John Mason 15 ....little dog too! 5358 Derek DeCouteau 16 Big Tuna 617 Lucas Laffitte 17 Jailbreak 2171 Lydia Volberding 18 Dancer 2625 Greg Gale 19 Challenger 4272 Stuart Archer 20 Flyer 2854 Scott Galbraith 21 Irrational 3839 Vlases/Dukelow 22 2395 Matt Pistay 23 MouseTrap 4000 Mark Prentice 24 Garage Sail 674 Tim Sauer 25 Rhumba Girl 1826 Robert Hyslop 26 Roshambo 3747 Mark Daniel 27 Amuse Bouche 5352 Pete Sauer 28 Ghost 5322 Phil Brzytwa 29 Habanero 3746 Richard Bustamante 30 Super G 296 Matt Gibbs 31 Djinn 3732 Nojan Moshiri 32 Jester 2505 Al Reuter dns, dnf, dnc not shown

Windermere Regatta June 24-25

Anacortes Yacht Club is proud to present the 30th edition of Windermere Regatta. Come join us for two days of PHRF and One Design buoy racing. The schedule of events is jam packed with fun both on and off the water. Windermere regatta is a Seattle Yacht Club Grand Prix qualifying event. Check: www.anacortesyachtclub.org

Santa Cruz 27 Nationals June 29-July 2 The 2017 SC27 Nationals will be held at Anacortes Yacht Club. Please check out the Notice of Race for details at www.anacortesyachtclub.org www.48North.com

June 2017

Seattle Yacht Club Events June 3: Blake Island Race June 10: Leukemia Cup Check: www.seattleyachtclub.org

35th America’s Cup June 20-21: Red Bull Youth America’s Cup Finals. June 17-18 & 24-27: America’s Cup Match presented by Louis Vuitton. Check: www.americascup.com

Emerald Cup Regatta June 24-25 Join Triton Yacht Club and the sailors of the beautiful Fern Ridge Reservoir for the 31st Annual Emerald Cup Regatta! Sailors from across the region will aim to win their classes as they vie for the coveted Emerald Cup, given to the Overall Winner. Full NOR and Registration available via www.tritonyachtclub.org

Whidbey Island Race Week July 9-14 Adult Summer Camp is nearly here! Whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned pro, you’ll have fun and become a better sailor at Whidbey Island Race Week. Five days of sailing, six nights of live music, and festive parties - including Toga Night, Reggae Night and Gilligan’s Island Night - make for the best summer sailing destination event. There are plenty of accommodations in Oak Harbor and Coupeville or camp on the Navy base across the street from the Oak Harbor Marina. Race, party and play at Whidbey Island Race Week! Visit www.whidbeyislandraceweek.com 53


C orinthian Y acht C lub S eat tle

P uget S ound S ailing R egat ta L arge B oats

N

othing ushers in spring sailing like CYC’s buoy racing opener, PSSR. The little boats get their own weekend in early April, and later in the month the big boats come out to dust off the winter rust and burn around the cans. CYC’s professional race committee set north and south courses to accommodate eight classes, including many of the familiar one-designs, J/105s, Melges 24s, and San Juan 24s. Joining the expected one-design crowd is the burgeoning J/80 fleet. The Pacific Northwest J/80 Fleet kicked off their 2017 Season Series during PSSR with six boats on the line. The fleet shook off the winter cobwebs on the south course in variable conditions that rewarded c o r re c t l y re a d i n g t h e wind shifts and current influenced by the outflow from the Ballard Locks. The boats and crews appear evenly matched again this season with five 54

Top: The Thunderbird, “Selchie” (right, bow on), “Shazam,” a Santa Cruz 27 (center) and the Cal 33, “Cherokee.” Below: In the J/105 class, “More Jubilee” lead “Jaded” around the weather mark. different J/80s scoring a bullet over the course of ten races. D a v i d S c h u t t e ’ s Ta j M a h a l showed excellent boat speed in the challenging conditions and by one

June 2017

www.48North.com

point over Bryan Rhodes’ Crazy Ivan after five races on Saturday. The top five boats were separated by just six points heading into Sunday. Mike Poole, on Jolly Green, jumped off to a fast start on Sunday with bullets in the first two races. The podium places were all up for grabs heading into the last race. In the end, it was Taj Mahal holding off Jolly Green for a one point win. Contributing to the J/80 enthusiasm is that October ’s CYC Puget Sound Sailing Championship will serve as the West Coast Championship for the North American J/80 Class. This is the first time this championship event will be sailed on Puget Sound and shows the growth of the local fleet. Check: http:// j80northwest.com Over the course of the weekend, the wind and weather cooperated, offering a taste of nearly all conditions. North course classes completed


Left: “Bravo Zulu,” “Shrek,” “Absolutely,” and “Bat Out Of Hell” battle it out in a tight division. Right: “Inconceivable!”....

eight races, while the south course ran 10 races. Most all of the classes were won decisively, but in Class 1, the One Design 35, Shrek, skippered by Paul Carter, barely squeeked out a first place finish by just half of a point ahead of the Charlie Macaulay’s Farr 39ML, Absolutely, with Brad Cole’s Melges 32, Ballistic, in third. In Class 2, both of Brad Butler ’s Sierra 26s took top honors, with Uno in first and Dos, driven by Molly Jackson, in second (of course) and Charles Hill’s Wauquiez Centurion

40, Different Dummer, in third place. In the ever-growing J/105 fleet, More Jubilee ran away with first place while Inconceivable! and Last Tango closely took second and third place. In the Melges division, it was the Gig Harborites on Distraction commanding first place over Seattle boats, Good Enough and Trophy Wife. On the south course, in Class 5, the J/29 Here & Now took first place, with Gaucho, a Ross 930 and Kowloon, an Olson 911 following. Two Santa Cruz 27s battled it out with Zipper,

claiming first and Shazam second, followed by Cherokee, the Cal 33, taking third. Finally in the San Juan 24 class, Return took top spot with Grauer Geist close behind and Fancy taking third. The San Juan 24 North Americans will be held in Oak Harbor on June 23-25. Check: https://sites. google.com/site/sj24northwest by Brian Rhodes and 48°N photos by Jan Anderson results on pages 52-53

Ballard Sails and Yacht Services

Sail Repairs, New Custom Sails Racing & Cruising Running & Standing Rigging 6303 Seaview Ave. NW  • (206) 706-5500 www.ballardsails.com • info@ballardsails.com

www.48North.com

June 2017

55


J/24 Nationals

C

orinthian Yacht Club of Seattle pulpits. “Rubbing is racing” seemed was abuzz playing host to the to be the theme of the day, and resulted J/24 National Championships from in a lot of red protest flags flying off May 18th to the 21st. The event backstays. The judges were busy well included three days of racing and into the evening at the yacht club and one day of dock talks and seminars. after the dust settled, Whittemore’s There was a strong showing from Tundra Rose maintained first place Seattle’s local J/24 Fleet, accounting position by two points with another for the majority of registered boats. Seattle boat, Scott Milne’s Tremendous Additional entries included boats Slouch, moving into second place, from Japan, Idaho, Montana and just one point ahead of Michael Rhode Island. All boats hoped to do Johnson’s Pearl and Japanese boat, well, but only one would win the berth Siesta, skippered by Nobuyuki Imai. to the 2018 J/24 World Championship Post race clubhouse festivities, in Fraglia Vela Rive del Garda, Italy held nightly, featured debriefs from and the title of 2017 US National the boat with that day’s standout Champion. performance discussing what they Thursday’s schedule included a did to go fast. After Johnson’s Pearl dock talk presented by North Sails with won the day on Saturday, his tactician, experts Will Welles (2016 National and local pro Dan Kaseler, had this to offer North American Champion) and his in the debrief: “It’s hard to imagine fellow crewmember for the weekend, better conditions for the boat, with Andrew Kerr (winner of several sun, great breeze, and a strong fleet. past J/24 National events), sharing We had a super interesting playing knowledge about rig tuning, boat field, with winds shifting between handling, and the racing venue. 300 and 360 degrees, and large tides It was an anticlimactic start on keeping it extra challenging. I spent Friday, with no breeze and a lengthy a lot of time managing our risk-topostponement. The winds finally reward ratios. With very tricky wind built and the race committee was able to pull off two Seattle Skipper, Keith Whittemore and crew, sailed races before the sun went “Tundra Rose” to a win and secure their berth at down. Seattle skipper, Keith the World Championships in Italy. Whittemore, on Tundra Rose, set the precedent for the weekend by taking the bullet in the first race. On Saturday, anxious participants were greeted by conditions similar to the previous day and a twohour postponement. The day was riddled with scoring penalties, DSQs, DNFs, DNSs and a couple bent 56

June 2017

www.48North.com

and current scenarios, we focused on making small winnable bets, rather than putting all our chips on a side. Most of the passing, at least for us, happened on the beats where we worked the compass pretty hard, while keeping an eye on the tidal situation.” On Sunday morning, there was a thick fog layer hovering over the water and a steady breeze to accompany it. By the first horn, the sun was out and the fight was on to establish the winner for the weekend. Whittemore came out swinging and after winning two out of the first three races, and taking a second in the other, he headed to shore knowing their victory was secured. Congratulations to Whittemore and his crew of Kevin Downey, Shelby Milne, Mark Rodgers and Brian Thomas, who claim the National Championship and the berth to the Garda Worlds. Still up for grabs were the other top positions. Will Welles and crew took the other two bullets for the day, which narrowly put them into second place, with a tiebreaker over Imai’s Siesta. Pearl wound up fourth. At the end of the weekend, Kaseler said, “It’s always tough to miss the podium by a point after three days of sailing, but we had a great time, and we were super stoked to see the guys from Tundra Rose crush it for the home town fleet.” by Jen Forsyth photos by Jan Anderson results on pages 52-53


Classic Mariners’ Regatta June 3-4 The Classic Mariners’ Regatta is for wooden sailboats of all shapes and sizes. If you are interested in viewing some of the most beautiful wooden yachts in the Pacific Northwest, join us at this year ’s CMR. Contact: http://nwmaritime.org

Milltown Sailing Assoc. Saratoga Sprint June 10

The Saratoga Sprint is the middistance feature race sponsored by MSA. The Race begins in Port Gardner with long and short courses. Tides, currents, and shallow bays are challenges racers will face as they head north from Everett into Saratoga Passage to Camano Head and Langley, or to the Baby Island buoy in Holmes Harbor. For more information and to register: www.milltownsailing.org

Sloop Tavern YC Three Buoy Fiasco June 17

Duck Dodge Races The course will be posted on the committee boat. For information, check: www.duckdodge.org June 6: Duck Dodgesty June 13: Western Night June 20: Hippies & Hipsters June 27: Prom Night July 4: No Duck Dodge July 11: Mardi Gras July 18: Pirate Night July 25: Christmas in July August 1: Toga Night August 8: Tropical Night presented by 48° North/ Marine Servicenter/ Fremont Brewing & Ullman Sails August 15: Pajama Night (Snuggies & Huggies) August 22: Skippers Choice August 29: Pink Boat Committee Sept. 5: ReAppreciation Night September 30: Rum Run

This is a pursuit race (each boat will be assigned a GPS start time based on rating) starting in Shilshole Bay, after which a series of three race marks can be rounded in any order, in any direction! There will be an awards party following the race. Sign up for this summer’s Fiasco at www.styc.org

San Juan 24 North Americans June 23-25 The San Juan 24 North American Class Association will hold its 2017 Championships at Oak Harbor, WA. Sailing will be in Penn Cove and/ or Saratoga Passage. The Notice of Race and information can be found at: https://sites.google.com/site/ sj24northwest. Or contact David Steckman, regatta organizer, at: DSteckman@idexcorp.com

Ballard Sails and Rigging

G

et ready for sailing season with a rig inspection and tune-up from Ballard Sails & Rigging. Your One-Stop-Shop for all your rigging solutions. • Standing and Running Rigging • Furlers • Lifelines • Spars • Custom Fabrication • Rigging Tune • Rigging Inspection • Fast Personal Service

6303 Seaview Ave. NW • Seattle, WA 98107 206-706-5500 • rigging@ballard sails.com www.ballardsails.com www.48North.com

June 2017

57


L

ast week, I told a mostly non-sailing friend about the upcoming Oregon Offshore International Yacht Race, that annual 193 mile run from buoy 2 outside the Columbia River to the Inner Harbour in Victoria, B.C. “Oh, I’d love to go sailing,” she said. “Take me! Please!” Yeah. Be careful what you wish for, my friend. The 2017 edition of the Oregon Offshore will certainly go down in the memory banks of everyone who participated as one of the most physically (and probably emotionally) challenging versions of that race ever. NOAA had been predicting winds to 25 with gusts to 35, and while NOAA reports have been known to be wrong from time to time, on this occasion the Feds got it pretty much dead on, as the fleet was pounded by southerlies ranging from 20 to 40 knots (most often hanging around 25-35), accompanied by the associated sea state that comes with delightful little breezes like those. Of the 24 boats registered for the race, 22 made it to the start line, in and of itself an accomplishment, given that the conditions on the Columbia River Bar resulted in a restriction to vessels under 30 feet. If you weren’t ready for what the Pacific was about to dole out, the Bar certainly got your attention. On board Desperado, Jerry Barnes’ New York 36, we decided that a doublereefed main for the start seemed like a good idea, and it was. We crossed the line, settled in, and then hoisted the smallest, heaviest chute we had, and held on. The winds held pretty consistent, with occasional squalls that dumped rain on us but also brought increased winds (up to 40 knots constant at one point) and we tried to use every one of them to our advantage. Like most Offshores, the fleet dispersed fairly quickly, some boats hugging the rhumbline, others going out. On Desperadao, we’d catch an occasional glimpse of a sail in the distance (usually when we were on the top of a wave), but more often we

2017 Oregon Offshore International Yacht Race

How Pacific Northwest Sailors Have Fun

58

were too busy keeping the boat on her feet and ourselves from launching into the lifelines. We were mostly successful with the former. Not always so with the latter. Ocean racing. Mostly awesome. I can’t speak for every crew member on every boat in the fleet, but as day wore on into night, it got more and more interesting to scream up and over wave after wave with our second chute up (having determined that the first one simply wasn’t large enough) while trying to keep the slimy side of the hull in the water where it belonged. Still, it was one of those great sails that, at the time, you marvel that you actually PAID real MONEY out of your own pocket to do this to yourself; all the while knowing that after that first cold beer at the finish line in Victoria, you are going to remember the whole trip fondly while planning to do it again next year. What we on Desperado called the “Offshore Paradox.” And then Friday morning dawned. Around 0600, on our approach to Cape Flattery, it all became worthwhile. The sun rose in the east, warming our windblown faces. The wind speeds June 2017

www.48North.com

remained the same, as did the sea state, but what had seemed miserable a few hours earlier now inspired smiles on our faces as we flew on to one of my favorite landfalls. We made Tatoosh Island around 0730 and headed into the Strait of Juan de Fuca, all the while counting our eggs before they were in the pudding. In other words, we started discussing how cool it was going to be to arrive at the finish Friday afternoon. What is it about Juan de Fuca that makes her such a fickle mistress? In the space of a few minutes, we went from winds consistently in the 20s to…well… nothing at times. Thankfully, on Desperado we managed to get far enough in to avoid the ebb flush, but some of our fellow competitors weren’t so lucky. And then we spent the rest of Friday milking everything from 15 knot breezes to what I’ll politely call lulls. Meanwhile, in the PHRF Class A1, long-time Offshore veteran, Rage, was in a heated battle with Kinetic, the TP52 out of Vancouver, B.C. After shadowing each other for the entire course (essentially a repeat of the 2016 Offshore) Kinetic managed to beat Rage across the finish line by all of 15 seconds. That’s racing, folks. Back on board Desperado, we finally got a break after passing Race Rocks, picked up some nice breezes for the last few miles, and crossed the line at the Victoria Harbour breakwater. A few minutes later, we were hoisting champagne and those wonderful hot towels, courtesy of the Offshore welcoming committee. I haven’t decided which is more appreciated, the bubbly or the towels. Congratulations to the crew of Free Bowl of Soup for taking the overall win, and congratulations to everyone who got out there in those delightful conditions and made another run through the “Graveyard of the Pacific.” What were we thinking when we VOLUNTEERED for this stuff? story and photo by Eric Rouzee results on pages 52-53


Classifieds ad! Plan Aheue s s July I is deadlineth 2 1 June

Get the exposure you need. Get the results you want.

1980 CAL ‘39 Great Bill Lapworth design. Recently spent $8,000 on upgrades, including new cushions, Force 10 stove, 125 amp alternator. Also has fridge, autopilot, Harken Furler, Spin. Geneker, 163, 110. A lot of boat for $65,000. Email pete@clippershipinc.com or call (206) 459-0596.

1992 BENETEAU OCEANIS 50 3 cabin layout, sinks, showers, and Raritan heads. Beautiful classic teak salon. Forepeak washer and dryer, workshop, new teak decks, dodger, and bimini. Located Mediterranean. Will deliver. surgiamo@hotmail.com 6152

6146

WILLIAM GARDEN SEABIRD II Based on the 1911 Seabird that sailed the Atlantic to the Azores with the looks of the original but more freeboard and headroom. Function/design combined with performance/durability. 2007, 26’ yawl, 7 hp Sabb diesel engine. Variable pitch prop, LOA 34’6”, LOD 25’11”, LWL 22’. Beam 8’10”, Draft 3’5”, S ai l 3 9 0 sq . f t . D i sp l acement 7,500 lb. Ballast 2500 lb. internal iron. Teak/epoxy/glass/ plywood. 2016 copper-free hull paint. Solar vent, sleeps 5, Headroom 5’10”. Head, stainless stove/ sink, windlass, covers. 6327anchor, Seaview Ave$7,500 NW obo. On trailer in Kirkland, WA. Contact Jan Hanson at Seattle, WA 98107 jan.evw.hanson@gmail.com or (360) 431-0850. 6160

2000 KRISTEN YACHTS 47’ STEEL MOTORSAILER S/V RAVEN SONG $350,000. Great go-anywhere cruising boat. Great liveaboard boat. Vancouver, BC. For details and pictures see www.sv-ravensong.com or call (604) 876-6478. 6142

1992 CATALINA 36 Well maintained. Great condition. Dependable Universal M-35 diesel, cruises at 7 knots. Speed, depth, wind, GPS, radar, autopilot, windlass, battery monitor, and refrigeration. Diesel and electric heat. Dinghy and motor. Well set up for cruising. $55,000. Contact George at lgmeredith@comcast.net

1978 CAL 39 TALL MAST Phone (206) 789-7350 Race. Cruise. Liveaboard. Perkins 4108. Vacuum flush (206) head. Force Fax 10 stove with 789-6392 oven. Electric Windlass. Autohelm. sails, 3 spinnakers, 5 head sails, Email2 main savannah@48north.com Harken roller furling. $55,000. (206) 375-0350. 5402

6167

1976 Westsail 32

56’ JOHN ALDEN PILOTHOUSE CUTTER Built by Camper & Nicholson to Lloyd’s Specs, Solid GRP Hull. 2011 completed 18 year circumnavigation. Includes air compressor, bow thruster and lots more. Moored at USSC Marina, Bowen Island. Email: westbynorth@gmail.com 5952

1960 KETTENBERG 40 Owned by current owner for 38+ years. For $25,000, enjoy DREAM vacations in the Pacific Northwest on a west coast classic. For additional information contact Russell at russell.keller1@gmail.com 6135 www.48North.com

Cutter rig, repowered with 50 HP Yanmar diesel, cockpit enclosure, Monitor Windvane, autopilot, watermaker, and mast steps. Pre-surveyed. $31,000. San Juan Sailing - Bellingham Wa. brokerage@sanjuansailing.com 360-671-0829

June 2017

2.5” = $100.00

59


Phone (206) 789-7350 Fax (206) 789-6392 Email savannah@48north.com

Boats For Sale

Baba 35 “Aurora”

New Beta 39, Bow thruster, Electrical, Flexiteak decks, Nav. package, dodger, canvas and upholstery. Absolutely stunning, a true gem! $119,000

Boats For Sale

Boats For Sale

30-FOOT CRUISING CUTTER We have owned Phalarope for over 37 years but must now reluctantly sell her. Heavy GRP lay-up, Sabb diesel, Dickinson heat, Wagner steering, Hydrovane, DBC life raft, Achilles dinghy, good sails and ground tackle, GPS plotter, EPIRB, charts and navigation gear, tools and spares. Canadian registered, lying at Victoria, BC. $19,000 US. murdochandcompany@shaw.ca or call Alex at (250) 413-7729.

CORSAIR SPRINT TRIMARAN Corsair Sprint 750 is compact, easily trailerable. It is lightweight, sporty, exceptionally fast, responsive and safe. With its huge cockpit and spacious decks and nets, the Corsair Sprint 750 is a highly mobile day cruiser; but it’s the amazing performance, with 20-knots plus speed capability that sets the Corsair Sprint 750 apart. Stored undercover, sailed in fresh water 4 months per year. New North mainsail and jib, screecher and asymmetrical. Custom kickup rudder from Morrelli & Melvin, TackTick wireless instrument racing package. Fiberglass camera and instrument mount at the transom. Contact John at jon.texter@gmail.com

6190

6186

2008 Beneteau 423 “Summertime”

BRISTOL CONDITION! 2 cabin, 2 head layout, 1 owner vessel, Hull buffed and sails cleaned annually. Detailed maintenance log, full nav. package, solar and dinghy. $164,900. 2005 JEANNEAU SUN ODYSSEY 49 $280,000 Excellent condition, maintenance log, located in Bellingham, WA. For details and pictures go to http://bit.ly/forsaleodyssey0417 or contact Jed Miller, (206) 533-8733 6138

48 ft. Nautor Swan “Harlekin”

Refit completed in 2004 included new mast, boom, standing and running rigging, Nav. package, dodger, canvas, plus teak deck removed. A serious bluewater cruiser. $172,900.

Contact sandyb@seamarineco.com 360-385-4000

6.4” = $256.00 + 3” color = $286.00

BLUEWATER CUSTOM GARY MULL DESIGN ALUMINUM 47’ Great sailing beautiful boat. Professionally built hull. With a lot of ocean miles, she is ready to go again. Recently upgraded electronics, new interior. See her at http://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/51161

CLASSIC BURMESE TEAK SLOOP Built in Ah King Boat Yard, Hong Kong 1938. Designer unknown but likely Phil Rhodes. Heavy standing rig, ocean veteran. Ported in San Francisco Bay in 1950’s. LOA 35.6’. New deck, mast rebuilt 2010. Yanmar 2GM20 rebuilt 2012. Laminated teak frames on 6” centers, fastened with copper rivets & roves. Blue Sea breaker panel. Solid fuel stove, kerosene range. VHF, depth sounder, radar, autopilot, Lifesling, SL555 windlass, 200’ 5/16” chain, Avon inflatable. Recent survey. Sweet sailer. $35,000. Located Bellingham, WA. Contact pwilling64(at)gmail(dot)com. 5563

5862

PEARSON ALBERG 35 A well-maintained 60s heavily built beauty. Universal M4-30 diesel w/ 770 hrs, Pedestal steering w/ autopilot, propane cabin heat & stove, Maxwell 800 anchor winch w/ remote, GPS, AIS, VHF/DSC, knotmeter & sounder. New Gennaker. Recent survey & potential moorage available. An affordable, comfortable, seaworthy boat. $33,500. Contact Chuck at cjcannon@seanet.com 6137

60

1976 MORGAN 38’ SLOOP Center cockpit, Perkins diesel, two jibs, one main. Moored in Lake Washington. (206) 362-7854. $15,000. OBO. 6173

June 2017

www.48North.com

1975 MILLER 28 $10,000 Sailed for 9 summers from Olympia to Glacier Bay. 1/2 cabin is galley, set up for single hand, autopilot and plotter. 150 furled Genoa plus asymmetric spinnaker with sock, 2 cylinder Yanmar diesel, 16 gallon fuel, 40 gallon water, Lectra/san waste. Many spares. Selling to upgrade to trailerable trimaran. Rick H. (801) 486-1770. Salt Lake City cell (425) 232-0595. Hauled out at Dagmar’s in Everett, will be there mid May. 6162


Boats For Sale

Boats For Sale

Boats For Sale

1982 CAPE DORY 25D Good condition. Renovated interior. Many other updates. Located in Olympia. $19,000. jalittooij@comcast.net (360) 352-0366.

KELLY PETERSON 44 Currently located in Marina Palmira, La Paz, Baja California Sur. $95,000. Great cruising/liveaboard, ready for you to explore the Sea of Cortez and beyond. High gloss varnish interior, nonskid deck, sails like a dream. See photos and specs at www.ahoyswab.com Contact Laura at ahoylola@yahoo.com

TRACKER 7.7 SLOOP Built 1984. Cold molded cyprus hull, New Zealand design. Volvo inboard, new full batten mainsail, new light air genoa, sleeps 3, very clean. $14,500. Contact Dwight at dwightandjoannicholson@olympus.net

6177

Place your ad by

6181

6183

21’ BAYLINER SLOOP Care about quality. One of the best designed and built 21’ trailerable sailboats. BOAT & TRAILER REBUILT - Learning - Safe - Functional - Simple, yet prepared for cruising and someone experienced. Comes with everything! See it to believe it. (360) 417-1544. $7,599.

June 12th

to be featured in our July issue

5704

87 CATALINA 34 TM FRESH WATER Located in Bayview ID. Fresh water for the last decade. Above average condition. New sails, dodger, bimini, rigging, AGM Batteries. 10’ dinghy, davits, Rocna anchor. $44,000. I will pay up to $2,000 for move. (208) 610-2197. 6189

1981 PASSPORT 42 Recently returned from Australia, Passages is a purpose-built offshore vessel. Ready to take you adventuring. Email for equipment list. Located Sidney, BC. (250) 732-0778. sv.passages@gmail.com $139,000 US. 6132

KIRBY 25 For sale to a loving sailor. 1980 Kirby 25 Sailboat, #127, the “Canadian J-24”, 1995 Marine Cradle Trailer, 9.9 Johnson, all electronics, etc. Moored at Delin Docks, across from the Glass Museum in Tacoma and moorage rights with reasonable rates transferable to new owner. $5,000 OBO. Call Ben at (253) 576-7760. 5959

2007 FLYING TIGER 10M $42,000. Boat is in excellent condition. Details and photos at www.flyingtiger10m.blogspot.com Sandpoint, Idaho. (208) 290-6426.

READY FOR TRANSPAC. SANTA CRUZ 50 #1 Tons of GoFast gear, miles of expensive safety gear & 6327 Seaview Ave NW a pedigree that spans nearly 4 decades. Join the Santa Seattle, WA 98107 Cruz class in the classiest and still lethal Hull #1. Given Phone (206)she 789-7350 the right crew & conditions can be the top dog in what is shaping be a Bill Lee landslide to Hawaii Faxup to(206) 789-6392 this year. ULDBs rule! $160,000 and worth every bit Emailshesavannah@48north.com of attention gets. Lying Kaneohe, SoCal. Delivery possible. Contact Wanda Azzario at (808) 367-8185 or wazzario1@icloud.com 5796

6170

45’ CAPRICORN CAT, 1995 KURT-HUGHES CRUISING CAT, $270,000 Beautiful, fast, agile, and a blast to sail. High bridgedeck clearance + daggerboards = great windward work. Big upper galley, fridge, and freezer. 4 cabins, 2 heads. Continually sailed, cruised, and upgraded with the best money can buy. Fresh survey shows she’s in excellent condition, and is ready to go NOW . . . Did I mention FAST? We often cruise in the mid teens, with 19.4 our top so far, but that’s PLENTY for me. This is not your typical Tupperware tub. Fully equipped. We’ve loved sailing and cruising her and you will too. Do you hear Mexico calling? You could be there in 2 weeks. What are you waiting for? Call Wayne (831) 332-8448. 6148

1981 FORMOSA 51 80 hp Ford Lehman (2,200 hrs), new Isotherm reefer/ freezer, new three burner Force 10 stove/oven propane, new airhead, Electrosan, new VHF radio, Torrid 17 gal water heater, GPSMap4212, chart plotter, Fathometer, 150 gallon water/250 gallon diesel, Dickenson Antarctic diesel heater, Lewmar anchor windlass, wood masts just varnished 2016, microwave, two cannons, new 110 v. wiring most 12 v. wiring new, 3,000 w inverter, gas generator, located Bremerton Yacht Club. $132,900. Contact cjrc2p@aol.com 6175 www.48North.com

June 2017

33’ Wauquiez 1981

Clean, freshly bottom painted, Pre-surveyed. Radar, GPS/Plotter, Autopilot, VHF, Roller Furling, Windlass, Propane Galley, Propane Cabin Heat, Vacuflush Head, Avon Dinghy, Volvo FWC 30 HP Diesel 2001, 650 hours, Sail Drive, Tiller. $39,000. San Juan Sailing - Bellingham Wa. brokerage@sanjuansailing.com 360-671-0829

2.8” = $112 + 1.2” color = $124

61


Boats For Sale

Boats For Sale

Boats For Sale

1977 FISHER 30 PILOTHOUSE Refit and ready to go. Bow thruster, rebuilt Isuzu 54 hp, new shaft, prop, digital electronics (including radar). All new wiring, hoses, thru-hulls, pumps, tanks, upholstery. Beautiful Awlgrip masts. Fantastic anchor setup and custom cockpit enclosure. Warm, dry, no mildew. Recent epoxy bottom and survey. Price slashed to $32,000. micgoose@aol.com

1977 RANGER 33’ Winner Round-the-(San Juan)-County Div II (‘90s). Exceptional maintenance. 2nd owner. Family adventurer, lots of light in cabin, sleeps 6. 3-burner propane stove with oven, ice box, diesel bulkhead heater, new head. Kitchen & flatware included. Coast Guard documented. 2 spins, 3 genoas, 1 main. New navy Sunbrella upholstery. Atomic 4 FWC. Electronic ignition & fuel pump. 30 gallon water, 20 gallon fuel, 10 gallon diesel; 20 gallon holding. 2-blade Max-prop. New standing rig & roller furling. Aluminum spreaders. Spin pole & reaching strut. $19,700. Photos. Orcas Island. Able to meet at the ferry landing if serious. vaparker@hotmail.com

C&C 41 $36,500 1981 hull produced by Capital yachts in California as a Newport 41, after purchasing the redline mold from C&C, same boat. A comfortable and fast Northwest family cruiser in sail away condition. Comfortable and warm cabin, teak and holly sole. Full electronics array Garmin, Raymarine. Dodger, bimini, lying Semiahmoo. Nick (360) 969-6338 ndiemel@gmail.com

5765

6327 Seaview Ave NW Seattle, WA 98107

5515

6128

Phone (206) 789-7350 Fax (206) 789-6392 Email savannah@48north.com

FUJI KETCH 35 ALDEN DESIGNED A true bluewater vessel, this beauty has a fiberglass hull with wood interior offering the best of both worlds. Yanmar 3HM35F, Prosine Inverter, Matrix tank monitor, newer sails, mechanically sound, ready to sail. See her at http://tinyurl.com/fuji35 6201

1984 OLSON 25 RACER/CRUISER WITH WINNING RACE HISTORY Great condition. Continuously updated. Complete complement of North sails, most in near new condition. Yamaha 4 hp 4 stroke outboard, Standard Horizon VHF, speed & depth, Furuno GPS, solar battery charger, stereo system, porta-potti, cabin sleeps 4, and cushions in good condition. $13,000 with trailer. Contact Henry at henrybrooks@comcast.net or (360) 867-0164 for full details.

60’ Custom Motorsailer

Beautiful 60’ motorsailer conversion by Dutch shipyard DeHaas. Originally designed for offshore fishing in the rugged North Sea, this Corten steel yacht was luxuriously converted in Holland in the mid-nineties to a ketch rigged motorsailer. Former owners sailed her to the Northwest from the Canary Islands. Strong, low hour Iveco 6 cyl. diesel, 16kw genset, Euro 230v/50hz. systems, rewired in 2008. Bow thruster and hyd. stabilizers. Extensive electronics and nav. setup. Sleeps six in three staterooms. All of the original and conversion plans onboard. Finally planning that lifelong dream cruise to Tahiti?…call us! See one hundred photos and the full specs at pacificmarine.org. (206)225-3360. 62

CATALINA 36 - $48,900 Well maintained popular all-weather family cruiser 1989. Complete cockpit coverage with dodger and bimini. NavPod at helm with Garmin chartplotter, GPS and radar. Autopilot, roller furler, cockpit cushions, diesel heat, inverter, 8’ dinghy with engine and more. See at www.facebook.com/sailingpugetsound, email mogade58@gmail.com or call Mike (206) 953-6926. 6172

6199

1989 PACIFIC SEACRAFT 34 Cutter US Documented. Rigging replaced 2000-06. Monitor self-steering vane, Yanmar Diesel 35 hp, 100 Amp alternator. Very little use. $78,500. See her at http://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/61198 5997

HUNTER 280 1999 Hunter 280 $29,900 OBO. Well maintained. Yanmar diesel, propane cabin heater, stove, head. Sleeps 4. All boat systems in good working order. Spinnaker included. Comfortable and fun boat to sail. Moored on the Columbia in Portland. Email kel.snydely@gmail.com 6198

SEAWIND 31 SAILBOAT BY TRUMBLY BOATWORKS Furling headsails, hot/cold pressure water, anchor winch, two speed winches, dodger, radar, charger, Garmin plotter, sounder, BBQ, all sails, new Yanmar engine. $21,000. Call John at (360) 866-7390. 6141

June 2017

www.48North.com

1989 CAPE GEORGE 31 Excellent condition. Max-Prop. Tall rig. Bulwarks rebuilt: cedar core replaced with corecell foam and solid glass. $99,000 CAD. Call Kevin at (604) 290-3676. 5824


Boats For Sale

Boats For Sale

Boats For Sale

SOLID TEAK HULL - 35.5’ CHEOY LEE 10’ beam. Built in 1963. Tiller. Full keel/ draws 4’ 11”. 120 hours on new Universal 35B diesel engine. Good condition. Sails great in light or heavy winds. $34,000! Moored in Portland, OR. Call Gregory at (503) 804-6366. Email to GDunlap@DiamondGroupPro.com

33’ GAFF RIGGED CUTTER Moondawgie Mini Pirate Ship. Custom built in Lahaina, Hawaii 1997. YouTube: Moondawgie Mini Pirate Ship (Spell Dawgie). Glass hull. Small deck leak, needs work topside, pristine below decks. Autohelm, solar, Yanmar inboard low hrs. VHF, Tri data, etc. One of a kind. $20,000 OBO trades considered. dick93@icloud.com

CATALINA 27 ‘81, excellent condition, sleeps 4, cruise equipped, diesel, autopilot, 150 genoa, furling, and many more. New bottom and engine service 2016. $12,900. (360) 215-0335.

4997

6090

Dinghies

6192

GIG HARBOR BOAT WORKS TENDER 8.5’ Ultralite Rowboat designed for towing behind sailboats. It tracks well, stays dry, and easily rowed with spruce oars by Barkley Sound Oar. $675. Pictures and more info at compton.dk@gmail.com 6184

38’ SKOOKUM SLOOP Loaded with windlass, chart plotter, radar, depth, diesel, Yamaha 9.9, solar, new roller furler and sail, inverter/ charger, autopilot. Needs deck work. Best Offer. (206) 240-8079. 4894

2001 J/32 $88,000 New North sails, main with 3 reefs, 135 Genoa on roller, dk. blue gennaker, new stack pack, new dodger, new interior foam and fabric at interior, new running rigging, new batteries, new B&G Zeus 9” chart plotter, new refrigeration, new dinghy and 4 hp. outboard, new bottom job. I am the second owner. This boat is in awesome shape due to its seasonal use (3 months per year) in fresh water for the first 14 years. For more info & specs on this amazing boat go to this website. www.cruisingworld.com/sailboats/j-32 Email seacooper@gmail.com for more info & pics. (360) 298-0545.

1960 36’ LAPWORTH L-36, strip planked mahogany. One owner 40 years. Cruised to Hawaii and raced San Francisco Bay. Extensive restoration, continuously and conscientiously maintained. Twice winner of SF Wooden Boat Show Stone Cup – “Best in Show.” $40,000. John Hamilton and Carol Leonard (415) 821-4731. HamiltonSFO@gmail.com. Located Sausalito, CA. 6191

MONTGOMERY DINGHY, EXCELLENT CONDITION This fiberglass dinghy is in excellent condition. Length is 6’ 7”, width is 3’ 9. Excellent yacht tender or cottage front rowboat. Comes with 2 “like new” oars. $1,195. Contact Gary at (360) 588-8595 or (206) 713-0902. 6180

5978

1980 US 25 POLARIS Cruise? DD. Cruise crafted interior. 25 hr 8 hp electric start ouboard. Self tailing winches. Roller furling head sail. Asym & balloon spins, radio, depthfinder $5,500 butcharts2@aol.com (206) 242-9524. 6188

Gig Harbor Boat Works

Over 2000 boats built and shipped worldwide since 1987. 8 different sizes of boats from 8’ to 17’

1972 ISLANDER 40 MOTORSAILeR Ideal liveaboard Center cockpit. Beamy carried well forward. 6’3” of headroom. Airy large ports. Tons of storage. Walk in closet. 75 hp Chrysler/Nissan diesel. $24,500. Blaine (360) 296-1904.

(253) 851-2126 www.ghboats.com

6194

1982 S2 7.9 W/TRAILER $12,500 Lifting keel, OB model, carbon main and genoa, Kevlar 110, Poly .5 oz spinnaker located in eastern Washington. Email for full features list and pictures krtimoney@gmail.com 6197

1981 J 24 SAILBOAT 1981 J/24 Sailboat, four sails, Honda outboard, moored in Lake Washington. Good shape. $5,500 OBO. (206) 362-7854. 6173 www.48North.com

June 2017

63


Seattle, WA 98107

Partnerships

Instruction

Phone (206) 789-7350 Fax (206) 789-6392 email jen@48north.com

Professional Services

CATALINA 310 PARTNERSHIP 2005 Catalina 310 in excellent shape. 1/3 or 1/2 share available in long-standing LLC partnership. Very well appointed and maintained. Moored in Gig Harbor. Contact Tony at (253) 448-7761. 3258

CATALINA 1/3 PARTNERSHIP 1988 34’ Catalina. $15,000 Well-maintained. Will be hauled for biannual bottom paint early May. Good opportunity for survey. Moored in Tacoma. Call Larry (253) 312-0228. 6159

• Basic through Advanced Sailing Lessons • Week-long Cruise & Learn lessons • Spinnaker, Intro and Advance Racing Classes Gill foulweather gear & Dubarry footwear

206-782-5100 www.seattlesailing.com info@seattlesailing.com

Clubs

7001 Seaview Ave NW Suite 130 (Shilshole Bay Marina in Port of Seattle Building)

6327 Seaview Ave NW Seattle,Nancy WAAnderson 98107 - Seattle

206/669-0329 • sureritesigns@gmail.com www.sureritesigns.com

Phone (206) 789-7350 Fax (206) 789-6392 1.5 =$60/month Emailinch jen@48north.com Business Classified ad 2016 March issue PROOF

• 25+ years of experience • Business Classified, 1.5” BW, $60 Month

Sloop tavern Yacht club www.taylorsails.com erictaylorsails@gmail.com

2442 NW Market St. #94, Seattle, WA 98107 “Established in Ballard since 1976” $75 Annual Dues - Reciprocal Moorages High quality sailing at the lowest cost Info (206) 473-1905 Ashley

1945

Mac’s CUSTOM CANVAS & MARINE UPHOLSTERY

Boat Cushions & Canvas CLEANING & REPAIR

2017

Resew • Zippers • Clear Plastic Foam • Water Proofing • New

The Best Racing in the Northwest • On the Lake or Sound • Active Cruising • Reciprocal Rights Corinthian Yacht Club of Seattle 7755 Seaview Ave. NW, Seattle, WA 98117 Phone (206) 789-1919 for information www.cycseattle.org

Free Estimates • Fast Quality Work

5015 15th Ave. NW, Seattle, WA 98107

(206) 783-1696 - www.MacTops.com

Tethys

FREE unlimited day sailing on the club boats.

• Sail on Puget Sound out of Shilshole Bay Marina • Full Service Sailing Club/Pro Shop/Brokerage • All the advantages of ownership without the hassles

Offshore Sailing for Women Nancy Erley, Instructor 206.789.5118

nancy@tethysoffshore.com www.tethysoffshore.com

Cliff Valentine

cliff@nwmarineair.com

(206) 548-1306

206-782-5100

www.seattlesailing.com info@seattlesailing.com

Check Us Out at

www.nwmarineair.com

We specialize in marine heat pumps, A/C systems, refrigeration, and watermakers. We also carry an assortment of portable freezers and wine coolers for your entertainment needs on the go!

7001 Seaview Ave NW Suite 130 (Shilshole Bay Marina in Port of Seattle Building)

Place your ad by June 12th to be featured in our July issue. 64

Specializing in Marine Heating, Air Conditioning & Refrigeration

June 2017

www.48North.com

Adler Barbour


Email jen@48north.com Fax (206) 789-6392 Email savannah@48north.com

Pared Down Professional Services

Professional Services

JUST WINCHES LLC. .B R I O N T O S S . CO W • Complete yacht refits

M W • Long & short term projects W • Winch servicing- installations & repairs • Plumbing, mechanical, and general re-fit since 1978 system upgrades & repairs Rigging ✴ Consultation ✴ Tools ✴ Education www.justwinches.net 6327 Seaview Ave(206) NW747-9203 • service@justwinches.net 360.385.1080 2442 NW Market St. Seattle WA.rigging@briontoss.com 98107 Seattle, WA 98107

VESSEL MOVING Phone (206) 789-7350 1.5” ad ($60) + 1” of color ($10) = $70/ insertion No ocean too big, no trip too small, no ship too large, 1.35” bw= $54/insertion Fax (206) 789-6392 no mast too tall, sail or power, we move them all! When Email you are ready, givejen@48north.com us a call. Professional service 6327 Seaview Ave(206) NW390-1596. since 1967. CappyTom@aol.com,

Seattle, WA 98107

Phone (206) 789-7350

TomFax Averna, ACMS (206) 789-6392 Marine Surveyor Email savannah@48north.com

• Rotary Swaging • Roller Furlings • Life Lines • Mast Repair • Standing Rigging

Professional Services

Extra Pared Down

Business Classified, 1” BW, $40/Month 2016 April issue JUST WINCHES LLC. • Yacht refits • Winch servicing • Plumbing, mechanical, general re-fit system upgrades & repairs www.justwinches.net (206) 747-9203 • service@justwinches.net 2442 NW Market St. Seattle WA. 98107

1” ad ($40) + 1” of color ($10) = $50/ insertion Anacortes, La Conner, Oak Harbor, North Sound

MOBILE MARINE SERVICES

Electronics & Electrical Systems, Woodworking & Varnishing, Outboard Engines, and more! (360) 320-2325

www.knrmarineservice.com

(360) 293-1154 www.northwestrigging.com

Specializing in sailboats since 1990 Office: (360) 376-2770 Mobile: (360) 472-1801 thomasaverna@gmail.com Serving the San Juan Islands

January 2016 issue Draft #3, 12/11/15 1” full color, $60 per insertion ($40 per inch + $20 color) Business Ad for

(206) 354-9039 tim@ballardyachtrigging.com www.ballardyachtrigging.com

Marilyn Johnson 12-7196 Mauka Nui S Pahoa, Hawaii 9677

March Issue Color 1.25” at $40/inch= $50/insertion + 1.25” color at $10/inch= $12.50 = $62.50/ insertion

See us for a Better way to Heat Your Boat

(808) 646 0767

ketchmarilyn@gmail.c

Books Sailing to Alaska? Get local knowledge of winds and currents from Seattle to Glacier Bay

Espar by Parts • Sales • Service (206) 548-1306 Eberspächer www.nwmarineair.com

Taken By the Wind: The Northwest Coast

On Amazon at www.tinyurl.com/tbtw48n www.48North.com

June 2017

65


Phone (206) 789-7350 Fax (206) 789-6392 email jen@48north.com

Charter

Charter

MOORAGE

San Juan Sailboat Charters

SAIL ALASKA WITH THE EXPERTS

liberty bay Marina 40’ - 48’ - 60’ open slips. Great location. Restrooms, Showers.

Best Priced Bareboat Sail Charters in the NW

• Catalina 30’ • Catalina 34’ • Hunter 38’ • Jeanneau DS 40’ Gets You Sailing Located in Bellingham & Anacortes, WA

1-800-599-0489 - sanjuansailboatcharters.com

Glacier Bay, Sitka, Petersburg, Juneau Now Booking for 2017 & 2018 S/V BOB

7-10 day trips, 4 staterooms w/ private heads and showers. Licensed Captain and crew. Fully permitted and insured. Capt.blain@soundsailing.com (907) 887-9446 www.soundsailing.com SAIL

Sail and Learn Voyages Sail..and and Learn Voyages Sail Learn Voyages Sail Learn Voyages Leg 1 and North Atlantic crossing Leg2 ..Canadian North Atlantic Atlantic crossing Leg East coast Leg North Atlantic crossing Leg 1 1..1..North crossing Leg 2 .. Canadian East coast Leg Canadian East East coast coast Leg 2 2....Canadian

www.sailtodiscover.com www.sailtodiscover.com www.sailtodiscover.com www.sailtodiscover.com

1.1” bw= $44/insertion April- June= $132 April - June with 5% prepay discount= $125.4

Poulsbo, WA

360-779-7762 or 360-509-0178

HIKE

FISH

WHALES

BEARS

34’ - 50’ slips for lease/purchase Free Wifi, Pumpouts & Showers, Fuel, Store /Café (360) 371-0440 semiahmoomarina.com

Sail and Learn Voyages Leg 1 .. North Atlantic crossing Leg 2 .. Canadian East coast

www.sailtodiscover.com 1.6” bw= $64/insertion April- June= $192

NORSK April - June VIND with 5% CHARTERS prepay discount= $182.4 6327 Seaview Ave NW Seattle, WA 98107 Reserve Now! Phone (206) 789-7350 Fax (206) 789-6392 Curious??? EmailCat jen@48north.com

Gato Verde Adventure Sailing Come have fun learning basic to advanced sailing and seamanship skills combined with environmental education aboard our comfortable & efficient catamaran. Also available for carefree skippered charters. More information at www.gatoverde.com or 360-220-3215

Come Sail With Us!

Day Sails, Sunset Sails, Dinner Sails, Multi-day cruises from Bainbridge Island DreamboatAdventureSailing.com (541) 953-3936

Dreams are contagious. Infect someone you love.

Sailboat Bareboat Charters

Draft #1, 3/15/16 1.25” BWwww.SailAnacortes.com = $50 info@SailAnacortes.com April 2016 66

Gateway to the San Juans

1” Class Ad: $40/Month 3 months prepay (5%) discount: $114 Classified ad Proof 2017 April issue

Flotilla Charter

SAIL The GREEK ISLANDS- 15 DAYS 6327 Seaview Ave NW

May 9th to the 23rd - $2,450 plus airfare Seattle, WA 98107 Sept 5th to the 19th - $2,650 plus airfare

7 nights yachts, 1 night Phone (206) 789-7350 hotel Athens, 2 nights hotel Fax (206) 789-6392 Poros, 3 nights Santorini. Email jen@48north.com All transfers, domestic air to Santorini, and hotels included.

Sunset, 1, 2, or 3 Day Puget Sound Charters Available with USCG Licensed Master Shilshole Marina departure Jim Knutson, Capt. 206-617-4264 jdonaldknutson@yahoo.com NorskVind.com

MOORAGE ANACORTES MARINA

Annual moorage available now: 32’ to 80’ Open and 32’ to 60’ Covered slips. In town rental slips w/security gates, mini storage, full service boat yard, fuel dock & pump out on site. Anacortesmarina.com or (360) 293-4543

Blaine Harbor

Keep your boat close to the San Juan and Canadian Gulf Islands this summer. Year-round moorage. Open slips, 26’-60’. 30 and 50-amp power.

New playground & trails. Easy access to I-5 & Bellingham Airport.

Beautiful Blaine Harbor (360) 647-6176 www.portofbellingham.com June 2017

www.48North.com

For more details call 949-683-7727 or email travel2@adventures4u.net

January Issue Draft 1.75” x $40/inch= $70 + 1.75” x $10/inch of color= $17.5 Total: $ 87.5

Real Estate

Blaine H

3 month prepay option Original total= $262.5 Total with 5% discount= $249

6 month prepay option (I can update your ad in May to only highlight September) Original total= $525 Total with 7% discount= $488.25 UNIQUE BUDD INLET OFFER 1992, 3,500 square feet, mid-bankhome, 3 bay garage, kitchen, living, dining, lower. 3 bedrooms down to beach. Westside Budd Inlet w/city services. Bulkheaded beach with oyster/clam beds. Parceled tidelands, deep water moorage/dock. Spectacular view of Mt. Rainier, St. Helens, Olympic Mt. Range and Tacoma Narrows Bridge lights.View of Olympia. lkharrison@hotmail.com 6161


Marine Equipment

Marine Equipment

Marine Equipment

RETIRED BOAT BUILDER SELLING MOLDS FOR ROWING/SAILING DINGHIES Three lapstrake style - 8’9”, 10’, and 12’3”. One El Toro mold. Excellent shape. Always kept indoors & covered. Have molds for rudders & daggerboards for each as well as front & rear seat molds. Also a mold for Shearwater 19 racing rowboat (reverse transom) former cross-sound rowing race winner. $9,000 for these five molds. Pictures available for the boats that came out of the molds. Contact Jim Llewellyn. North Pacific Marine. Bainbridge Island. jim.llewellyn47@gmail.com or (206) 842-4552. 6039

MASTERVOLT WHISPER GENERATOR Mastervolt Whisper 8 Generator - $1,999 (or make me an offer) If you’re handy with diesel engines, this is for you! One cylinder has low compression. Needs new piston ring. Year 2005, very low hours (~150 hours). Includes: Advanced digital diesel control, sound shield and spare parts, filter, belt. (425) 591-7111. davebrennan@gmail.com 4797

NEW LEE SAILS GENOA Luff 33’, Foot 14’6”, Leech 31’, 7 oz. Dacron. Cost $800 US, Sell for $450. dabarrybest@frontier.com

www.hydrovane.com

LEWMAR WINCHES, NEW Two-speed #40 Chrome: $495. Self-tailing #16 Chrome: $899/pr only. Single speed #16 Chrome: $350. Single speed #7 Aluminum: $125. Purchase all, free shipping included. Contact Bruce at thepenguin1949@gmail.com

4831

FEEL THE FREEDOM Of sailing with a Hydrovane

6185

Independent Self-Steering Windvane AND ‘Ready to Go’ Emergency Rudder...

MARINE EQUIPMENT Spin pole - 15’, 3’ 1/2” diameter piston type: $300. Dinghy - 8’ 12” Avon inflatable RIB: $750. 1974 Johnson Outboard - 1 + 3/4 hp: $250. Contact Jim at jimandsue@hewitson@frontier.com or (206) 375-0350.

• • • •

ELECTRIC WINCHES LEWMAR EVO Electric winches NEW in box, 2 each, size 55, includes everything, winch, motor gearbox, circuit breaker, deck switch, built in manual override. $7,900. For both, call Charlie (503) 789-7599. 6193

No problem to install off center No lines running through the cockpit No worries in case of steering failure Your best crew member - will steer 24/7 and won’t eat, sleep or talk back!

5402

Also makes engine panel shields

Rain shields for opening ports

Stay dry and get a breeze RAIN or SHINE

CARBON MAST Carbon mast for sale. Made by Offshore Spars, built for Tartan 3700. Suitable for 35-40’ boat, up to 16,000 lbs displacement, 2 sets swept back spreaders, No rigging. Email for details. $10,000 jackanaka@gmail.com

STEERING THE DREAM Fuel Cell Battery Charger

Hydrogenerator

6113 www.48North.com

June 2017

67


Classified Submission www.48north.com

PHONE: (206) 789-7350 FAX: (206) 789-6392 EMAIL: classads48@48north.com MAIL: Classifieds, 6327 Seaview Ave. NW, Seattle, WA 98107

For business classified ads, please contact the office directly.

Crossword 1

M O U

10

S

E

N

O

Individual/Private ads: 00 $21. /month for 30 words or less, each additional 10 words $7.00 To include photo: $18.00/month for 1.25” space Add an additional $10.00 /month for COLOR

BUSINESS ADS: $40.00/column inch, $10/each additional 1/4 inch Full color is an additional $10 per column inch PLEASE CALL FOR MORE INFO!

ALL ads placed in the print version of the magazine will appear in the online version! ALL email addresses and web addresses will be hyperlinked! For more info, email: classads48@48north.com or call (206) 789-7350 for Classified Info/Rates! For SCAM ALERT information, go to: http://www.48north.com/classads/adinfo_online.htm

“Water and boats through the trees” by Joe Cartwright www.paintingwithwatercolors.com 68

June 2017

www.48North.com

H

33

E

K

F

S

U C

R

E T

B

O 24

28

4

S

A

13

N T

25

A W

S

H

T

I

S

H

O

C 34

T

A

B

S

D 19

22

S

W

6 8

T O

T E M

14

O W N 20

I N

E

N

D

S

A

T N

E

R

N

S

U

I

26

7 9

O W S

E D

L E

I M

E U

5

11

S

Y I

F

O G

L

R

31

Y

R

F O

E

C

12

D

18

3

L L

N

A

27

16

A

21 23

A P

T R

N E

E

E

15

2

R

L A

29

S

32

S

17

W

C

H I

T 30

S T

O

L

E

E

R

Help Wanted Boatyard/Fiberglass Work Pacific Fiberglass Pacific Fiberglass is looking to fill several positions at our shop in Ballard. We have a great work environment, competitive pay and we enjoy doing the highest quality work and making our customers happy. We are currently looking for general labor, a detailer and painter. Call (206) 789-4690 or email robert@pacificfiberglass.com


WaterLine

krogen express | bracewell yachts |

boats

Helmsman

®

t r a w l e r s

helmsman trawlers®

31 Sedan

new & available! Arriving June To Our Seattle Docks waterline boats brokerage powered by boatshed

boatshedusa.com boatshedseattle.com | boatshedtacoma.com | boatshedeverett.com trawlers~ *reduced Steel Bushey 100’ Tug $179,000 Converted Tug 78 $184,000 Custom Classic 76 $119,000 DeFever 60 Flush Deck $499,000 Nordlund 52 Pilothouse *$99,500 Albin 43 Trawler $117,500 Helmsman 43 Pilothouse *474,900 Ponderosa 42 Sundeck $98,900 Vantare 42 Aft Cabin $99,500

Hi-Star 42 Aft Cabin *$99,000 Lien Hwa 42 Sundeck *$89,900 Californian 42 Aft Cabin *$74,000 Camano 41 Trawler *$309,900 Classic BC Forest Service $49,500 Mariner 38 Seville DC *$249,000 Barry Farrell 38 Trawler *$119,000 Trojan 38 Sea Voyager *$49,500 Nova 36 Sunquest $78,000 Grand Banks 36 Classic $52,000

Grand Banks 32 Helmsman 31 Sedan

*$39,500 *$265,000

sailboats~ *reduced Herreshoff 56 $215,000 Amel Maramu 48 Ketch $138,900 Garden Porpoise 46 *$62,500 Bruce Roberts 44 *$69,000 Schucker 430 Motorsailer $62,500 Cheoy Lee 41 Ketch *$89,500

Cal 392 Marcos 39 Cutter Alajuela 38 Solaris Sunrise 36 Sport Island Packet 35 Cat J-35 Sloop Racer Gemini 105 MC Cat Legendary Yachts 33

$65,000 *$62,500 *$55,000 *$89,950 134,900 *$28,900 $119,000 $180,000

entire inven t o r y a t waterlinebo a t s . c o m

waterlineboatS.com ~ 206.282.0110 ~ 2400 weStlake avenue north ~ Seattle

Sailboat & Trawler Listings

Bellhaven Bellhaven Yacht Sales Cape George Cape George Marine Works, Inc ElliottBYS Elliott Bay Yacht Sales JK3 Yachts JK3 Yachts Mar Servic Marine Servicenter NW Yachtnet.com NWYachtnet Pacific Cruising Yachts Pacific Cruising Passion Yachts Passion Yachts

Sail NW Seacraft Seattle Yachts Signature Swiftsure Waterline West Yachts Yacht Finders

Sail Northwest Seacraft Yacht Sales Seattle Yachts Signature Yacht Sales Swiftsure Yachts Waterline Boats West Yachts YachtFinders/WindSeakers

Key N = No Auxillary Power G = Inboard Gas 0 = Outboard D = Inboard Diesel E = Electric

Brokerage Sail Listings

Boat Type 18' i550 w/Trailer

Yr Aux Price 14 O 14,999

Broker Passion Yachts

20' Beneteau First

Contact Page www.passion-yachts.com 75

Boat Type 24' Dana

Yr Aux Price 87 D 56,000

Broker Seacraft Yacht Sales

17 OB

54,500

Signature Yachts

www.signature-yachts.com

81

24' Dana

87 D

68,000

Seacraft Yacht Sales

20' Com-Pac w/trailer O9 D

28,000

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

24' Eastward Ho

76 D

19,000

Passion Yachts

20' Laser SB3

08

24,500

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

24' Martin 241 w/Trl 80 O

21' Hunter 216 w/trlr O7 O

19,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

25' Beneteau First

22' Beneteau First

17 OB

39,900

Sail Northwest

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

22' Beneteau First w/trl 16 O

~

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

22' Beneteau First w/Trlr 16 O

~

Signature Yachts

www.signature-yachts.com www.capegeorgecutters.com

49,500

Cape George

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

Signature Yachts

www.signature-yachts.com

81

25' Beneteau First 25 15 D

69,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

75

25' Catalina 250

O1 O

22,500

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

81

25' Hunter w/Trailer O8 O

25,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

39

25' Seaward 25 w/Trl O1 O

26,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

3

26' Devlin Sharpie

99 ~

49,500

Seacraft Yacht Sales

(206) 547-2755

76

2

26' Niagara

81 O

12,500

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

www.passion-yachts.com

75

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

84 G

22' J/70

13 ~

22' J/70

13 O 47,900 JK3Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

27' Cascade 27 Hull#1 78 D

15,000

Passion Yachts

22' J/70

14 E 43,900 JK3Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

27' Catalina

22,995

NW Yachtnet

www.jk3yachts.com www.sailnorthwest.com

75

6,900

22' J/22

Sail Northwest

76

79,900

80 D

9,000 JK3Yachts

(206) 547-2755 www.passion-yachts.com

15 D

22' Falmouth Cutter

45,000

Contact Page (206) 547-2755 76

www.48North.com

June 2017

93 D

69


1992 Alden 54 $475,000 Custom Hard Dodger, Roller Furling Headsail, Staysail & Mainsail. Timeless Design.

don.kohlmann@nordhavn.com• (206) 223-3624 • www.Nordhavn.com

Leave Your Disability at the Dock! Footloose introduces the recreation and sport of sailing to people of all ages with various disabilities. Based out of Leschi Marina, WA. It’s good, clean, safe family fun! Come join us! “Leave Your Disability at the Dock.” www.FootlooseDisabledSailing.org

Brokerage Sail Listings

Boat Type 27' Catalina 27

Yr Aux Price 82 D 13,500

Broker Marine Srvicenter

Contact Page www.marinesc.com 82

27' Hunter 27

06 D

39,900

Signature Yachts

27' Orion

82 D

52,000

Seacraft Yacht Sales

28' Bristol Channel Ctr 81 D

60,000

Cape George

28' Newport mkII

84 D

14,900

Passion Yachts

29' C&C 29

77 D

12,000

Passion Yachts

29' J/88

17 D

~

Sail Northwest

30' Admiralty

06 D

35,000

Swiftsure Yachts

30' Brewer Nimble

07 D

39,900

Yachtfinders/Wind

30' Bystedt

74 D

14,900

Passion Yachts

30' Cape Dory MK II 87 D

49,900

Bellhaven Yacht Sales

Boat Type 32' Gulf 32 PH

Yr Aux Price 80 D 24,500

Broker Marine Srvicenter Passion Yachts

www.signature-yachts.com

81

32' Gulf Pilothouse

83 D

(206) 547-2755

76

32' Pacific Seacraft

95 D 115,000

39,900

Seacraft Yacht Sales

www.capegeorgecutters.com

39

32' Westsail

75 D

Seacraft Yacht Sales

www.passion-yachts.com

75

33' Alerion

09 D 209,000 JK3Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

33' Dragonfly 1000

95 D 120,000

Pacific Cruising

45,000

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

33' Gemini 105 Cat

08 D 119,000

Waterline Boats

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

33' Hans Christian

85 D 109,500

NW Yachtnet

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

33' Hunter 33

O8 D

69,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

33' Hunter 333

98 D

39,500

Marine Srvicenter

www.bellhaven.net

75

33' J/100

05 D

69,900

Swiftsure Yachts

Contact Page www.marinesc.com 82 www.passion-yachts.com

75

(206) 547-2755

76

(206) 547-2755

76

www.jk3yachts.com

3

www.pacific-cruising.com

75

(206) 282-0110

69

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

www.passion-yachts.com

75

www.marinesc.com

82

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

30' Catalina

83 D 19,900 Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

33' Legendary Yachts 00 D 180,000

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

69

30' Catalina

83 D 19,900 Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

33' Nauticat 33 PH

84 D

65,000

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

30' Catalina

78 D

12,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

33' Nauticat PH

85 D 119,000

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

30' Catalina 30

80 D

14,900

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

33' Pearson

86 D 19,900 Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

30' Catalina MkI

79 D

17,900

Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

33' Tartan 101

16 D 195,000

Pacific Cruising

www.pacific-cruising.com

75

www.bellhaven.net

75

33' Yamaha

78 D

32,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

30' Etchells 22

71 ~

5,950

Bellhaven Yacht Sales

30' Fisher PH

75 D

74,900

NW Yachtnet

30' Henderson

97 G

42,000

Sail Northwest

30' Nonsuch Ultra 30 90 D

64,000

30' S2 9.1

86 D

21,500

30' S2/Becker w/trl 77/08 D

39,900

Passion Yachts

30' Yankee

72 D

29,900

31' Beneteau First 310 91 D

35,000

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

34' Beneteau 343/352 08 D

89,900

Signature Yachts

www.signature-yachts.com

81

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

34' C&C 34

79 D

27,500

Sail Northwest

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

34' C&C 34

79 D

24,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

34' Cal

76 D

16,000

West Yachts

www.west-yachts.com

74

www.passion-yachts.com

75

34' Cal MkIII

78 D

~

Anacortes www.anacortesyachtsandships.com

76

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

34' Crown

76 D 21,400 Yachtfinders/Wind

Signature Yachts

www.signature-yachts.com

81

34' Dehler

16 D 76 D

www.yachtfinders.biz

~ JK3Yachts

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

Signature Yachts

www.signature-yachts.com

81

34' Islander

85 D 39,900 JK3Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

31' Cal

79 G

18,000

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

34' Jeanneau 349

17 D 179,885

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

31' Cape George

12 D

72

Seacraft Yacht Sales

67,500

Cape George

www.capegeorgecutters.com

39

34' Pacific Seacraft

90 D

(206) 547-2755

76

~

~

Cape George

www.capegeorgecutters.com

39

34' Red Wing

08 D 130,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

31' Hanse 315

16 ~

~

JK3Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

34' Sweden

84 D

59,500

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

31' Hunter

O6 D

71,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

34' TartanT34-C

78 D

34,900

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

31' Jeanneau SO

02 D

58,000

JK3Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

34' X-Yachts

89 D

44,700

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

71 D

53,000

Pacific Cruising

www.pacific-cruising.com

75

49,500

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

31' Cape George hull ~

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

35' Allied Seabreeze

www.signature-yachts.com

81

35' Baba

80 D

(206) 285-9563

71

www.jk3yachts.com

3

35' Beneteau First

11 D 165,000

Signature Yachts

www.signature-yachts.com

81

88 D 39,500 Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

35' Beneteau O 35.1

17 D 195,500

Signature Yachts

www.signature-yachts.com

81

72 D 24,500 Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

35' Beneteau Oceanis 16 D

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

31' Pacific Seacraft

89 D

49,000

Yachtfinders/Wind

32' Beneteau 32.2

07 D

78,000

Signature Yachts

32' Beneteau First

89 D

38,500

JK3Yachts

32' Ericson 32' Ericson

70

69,000

(844) 692-2487

3

31' Beneteau Platinum 16 D 139,900

~

Seattle Yachts

77

34' Hans Christian

31' Beneteau Oceanis 16 D

77,990

www.jk3yachts.com

June 2017

www.48North.com

~


E l l i ot t B ay y ac h t S a l E S

68’ Nelson Marek “Drumbeat”

48’ Custom Schooner “Grail”

Sai l l i S t i n g S 68’ Nelson Marek ’84 ............$229,000 50’ Custom Sloop ‘74.............. $149,000 48’ Custom Schooner ‘86 .........$99,500 50’ Custom Sloop “Checkmate”

47’ Beneteau 47.7 ‘05 ............$210,000 46’ Beneteau 463 ‘97 ............$144,900 46’ J Boat ‘00 ...........................$327,500 40’ Catalina MK II ‘05 ............ $179,000 40’ Hinckley B-40 ‘70 ............. $139,500 40’ Kalik ‘80 ...............................$45,000

47’ Beneteau “First Light”

40’ S & S Loki Yawl ‘53............. $49,500 38’ Bavaria ‘03 ........................$125,000 35’ Baba Cutter ‘80 .................. $49,500 32’ Northwest ‘96 ........... NEW LISTING

Broker age team 46’ Beneteau “Adventure”

40’ S&S Loki “Irolita”

40’ Hinckley B-40 “Freya”

Paul Jenkins

Bill O’Brien

Debbie Yeend

206.793.3529

206.849.8497

253.732.9988

40’ Kalik “Paramour”

Elliott Bay Marina 2601 West Marina Place, Suite D Seattle, Washington 98199

40’ Catalina “Legacy”

Phone: Fax: Email: Web:

38’ Bavaria www.48North.com

June 2017

206.285.9563 206.676.3704 info@elliottbayyachtsales.com www.elliottbayyachtsales.com

71


Quality Listings Wanted!

"Start your adventure with us…"

844.692.2487

Shilshole Bay Marina • Anacortes Marina

www.SeattleYachts.com DEFEVER

Motor Yachts

2017 Elan E4 starting at $204,759

2017 Elan Impression 40 starting at $225,957

2016 Catalina 355 for $239,000 SPECIAL DISCOUNT

Price valid through 6/30/17

2012 Catalina 385 $199,000

1976 Hans Christian 34' $77,990

1989 Catalina 36' $48,900

EL d L!

to Pric S e

Re M du ajo cti r on

Re M du ajo cti r on

Brokerage Offerings

2013 Tayana Pilot House 46'

Anacortes Office Seattle Office 2415 T Ave. Suite 112, Anacortes, WA 98221 7001 Seaview Ave. NW, Suite 150, Seattle, WA 98117 Phone: 844.692.2487 Dial 1 for Seattle & Dial 2 for Anacortes Email: info@seattleyachts.com 72

June 2017

www.48North.com


swiftsure yachts The logbook for June 2017 When I find myself 1000 miles from the next human being, far out in the ocean, I can’t help but feel really small. The boat that I’m on takes on a whole new significance in life when she becomes your whole world. It’s a great feeling and those of you fortunate enough to have this experience know what I mean. There are some boats that are well designed and outfitted to become your world and Twist gives you the feeling that she’s that kind of boat. Her designer, Bill Dixon, has the experience and Moody builds terrific boats. When you look at the massive chainplates on Twist you get a real understanding of what “Category A Ocean” means. She feels great underway, very comfortable and safe. Just the sense you want when your existence depends on it. – bob schoonmaker

Twist 1998 • Moody 46 $285,000

q ua l i t y ya c h t s f r o m s w i f t s u r e ya c h t s . d e ta i l s o n l i n e at s w i f t s u r e ya c h t s . c o m

48 J/Boats J/145 • 2003 • $297,500 two hallberg-rassy 43 models

Malo 45 Classic • 2005 • $489,900

46 Beneteau 461 • 1999 • $155,000

Hallberg-Rassy 53 • 2003 • $469,000

Bristol 38.8 • 1983 • $114,500

price reduced

2003•$390,000 (shown); 2005 • $375,000

Shearwater 39 • 1990 • $175,000

Shannon PH 60 • 2014 • $1,095,000 price reduced

Outremer 49 • 2010 • $595,000

Lavranos 50 • 1990 • $184,775

40 Caliber LRC • 1996 • $179,500

Passport 456CC • 2003 • $349,000

NEW SAILING YACHTS

for world cruising from Swiftsure Yachts 73 72 70 60 50 48 47 47 46 46 46 46 44 43 42

Manuel Campos Ketch 1941 $475,000 Ted Geary Schooner 1920 $119,000 Jensen Expedition 2004 $2,850,000 Farr PH 1997CAD$775,000 Dubbel & Jesse 1989 $269,000 C&C 1973 $230,000 Stevens 1984 $175,000 Valiant 1984 $199,900 Garcia Passoa 1993 $275,000 Grand Soleil 1998 $169,000 Swan 1984 $225,000 Hylas 2000 $298,000 Morris 1995 $459,000 Perry 2001 $199,950 Roberts PH 1994 $109,500

42 42 40 40 40 38 37 34 35 34 33 30 25 25

Hallberg-Rassy Hallberg Rassy Valiant Caliber 40 LRC Jonmeri C&C 115 Pacific Seacraft Sweden Nexus Red Wing J/100 Admiralty Ranger Tug Ranger Tug

1983 1986 1977 1996 1986 2006 1999 1984 2003 2008 2005 2006 2014 2012

$174,000 $225,000 $79,000 $179,500 $119,000 $139,000 $170,000 $59,500 $299,000 $130,000 $69,900 $35,000 $118,500 $112,000

two offices to serve northwest yachtsmen

2500 Westlake Ave. N. on Lake Union The Chandlery, 133 Parfitt Way SW on Bainbridge Island

www.48North.com

June 2017

SwiftsureYachts

206.378.1110 | info@swiftsureyachts.com www.swiftsureyachts.com www.facebook.com/swiftsureyachts

73


info@west-yachts.com 1019 Q Ave. Suite D Anacortes, WA

360-299-2526

www.west-yachts.com

le at t

Se

Se

at t

le

d

Re Pr

i u ce ce d

Bavaria Ocean 42 1999 • $159 ,900

36' Herreshoff Diddikai '46....... $27,500

36' C&C 34+ '91........................ $89,900

at t

Se

Sistership 38' Morgan '85............................Inquire

38' C&C Landfall Cruiser '79..... $44,500

at t

40' Hunter 40.5 '93................... $98,000

42' Bavaria '99......................... $159,900

at t

le

40' Panda by Ta Shing '85......... $149,000 Se

Se

at t

le

40' Ta Shing Tashiba '88........... $174,900

38' Islander Freeport '83............ $69,900

Se

Se

at t

le

37' Bruce Roberts steel '91........ $49,950

le

Se

at t

le

35' O'Day '86.............................$39,500

le

34' CAL '76.........REDUCED TO $16,000

42’ Colvin Gazelle '10 .............. $29,900

44' Peterson Cust Alum '77........ $49,000

53' Spencer Ketch '73.............. $150,000

46' Nielson Trawler '81............ $299,000

44' DeFever Motor Yacht '83... $139,900

42' Grand Banks Classic '87..... $199,000

32' Maple Bay Trawler '01........ $109,000

30' Maple Bay '98...................... $59,900

30' Bertram Flybridge '84.......... $39,000

28' Cutwater '15...................... $165,000

25' Bayliner Discovery 246 '09.. $42,000

25' Devlin Surf Scoter '00.......... $98,000

74

(360) 299-2526 • www.west-yachts.com June 2017 www.48North.com (Lee Youngblood in Seattle 425-444-9109)


www.bellhaven.net (360) 733-6636

Toll Free (877) 310-9471 700 Coho Way, Bellingham, WA 98225

1989 Tartan Thomas 35 $46,500

1973 Cal 2-46 $119,000

Tiller rigged, rare combination of a good club racer with a comfortable interior.

Completely restored by current owners.

Open House - June 3rd and 4th 12-4PM

SALES + S A I L I N G L E S S O N S

PASSION-YACHTS.COM 503.289.6306 INFO@PASSION-YACHTS.COM

Hunter 42 1999 $119,000

Catalina 355 2014 $189,900

Meeting your boating needs in the Pacific Northwest

Po r t l a n d

Sailing Ma

gazine May 201 6

, by Sailors

For Sailors , by Sa Since 198 ilors 2

• Sign up for our free online mag. • Explore the new www.48north. com

www.PacificCruisingYachts.com • 425-998-8731 TARTAN SAILBOATS - LEGACY POWER - DRAGONFLY TRIMARANS Brokerage - Sail - Power - Charter - Club Re Pr du ic ce e d

• Subscribe to the print magazine.

For Sailors

FORMERLY SHEARWATER YACHT SALES - ANACORTES

Re Pr du ic ce e d

Three ways to enjoy 48° North, the monthly sailing magazine:

www.48north.com • (206) 789-7350

Li Ne st w in g Li Ne st w in g

• Gray & Navy hat • Olive Green & White hat

1920 Harris Fantail 34 - $25,000

2008 TARTAN 3400 - $180,000

Pe Sa nd le in g

Tartan 345 Promo Sail Away

Ball Caps!

$209,950

• Red cotton hat • Khaki hat • Navy Blue hat

1961 Rawson 30 - $7,500

Li Ne st w in g

1971 Newport 30 - $34,000

Trucker Hats!

Boat Beanies!

1995 DRAGONFLY 1000 - $109,500

Re Pr du ic ce e d

1989 SCEPTRE 41 - $160,000

2006 JEANNEAU 45 - $240,000

FOB Anacortes

• Gray knit with Black edge • Black Fleece or Olive Green Fleece

$15.00 each + s/h

2016 TARTAN 101 $195,000

(206) 789-7350 www.48north.com

www.Tartan345Promo.com

www.PacificCruisingYachts.com

2415 “T” AVE., SUITE 203 - ANACORTES, WA

We pay the sales tax!

www.48North.com

June 2017

75


2201 Skyline Way • Anacortes • 360-853-6402

New 2017 Pacific Seacraft 40 49’ DeFever Raised PH - 1988 Ocean Ready - A true icon of pilothouse trawlers. Lehman 135 diesels..$270,000

40’ Cruise a-Home 1980 A bullet proof hull with a restored house and re-set windows.......... $54,000

42’ Tayana Vancouver 2001 A genuine center cockpit, cutter rigged bluewater beauty..........................$260,000

40’ Catalina 400 MkII - 2007 Like New - Private suites fore and aft, twin wheel cockpit.......................$198,500

“The worst thing in the world is a well-built ugly boat, because it will last forever.” - W.I.B. Crealock

Check out our website for new boat pricing and information on brokerage boats 34’ Cal Mk III 1978 Recent genoa, 3 blade Max prop, and rig replacement. Very comfortable...$26,000

64’ Grand Alaskan 2001 Ready to cruise to Alaska or Mexico. Twin Caterpillar diesels.............$629,000

REPRESENTING BUYERS AND SELLERS FOR OVER 32 YEARS

206.547.2755

SEACRAFT.COM

david@anacortesyachts.com

www.anacortesyachtsandships.com

Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

35' Carroll Marine

99 D

79,900

Yachtfinders/Wind

35' Carroll Marine

99 D

59,900

JK3Yachts

35' Catalina 355

14 D 189,900

Passion Yachts

35' Cheoy Lee

80 D

Yachtfinders/Wind

35' Elan E4

17 D 268,090

Seattle Yachts

35' Ericson 35-2

71 G

12,000

Passion Yachts

35' Ericson MkII

69 ~

15,000

35' Hinterhoeller

81 D

58,500

35' Island Packet

01 D 157,500

Marine Srvicenter

39,000

Broker

Brokerage Sail Listings Contact

Page

Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

36' Catalina

85 D 39,900 Yachtfinders/Wind

3

36' Catalina 355

16 D 239,000

Seattle Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

36' Catalina MK II

02 D

94,500

NW Yachtnet

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

36' Catalina MkI

89 D

48,900

(844) 692-2487

72

36' Gozzard

86 D 129,000

www.passion-yachts.com

75

36' Herreshoff Diddikai 46 D

Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

36' Islander

79 D 33,000 Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

36' Islander

79 D 19,500 Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

77 3

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

www.jk3yachts.com

27,500

Broker

72

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

Seattle Yachts

(844) 692-2487

72

Seacraft Yacht Sales

(206) 547-2755

76

www.west-yachts.com

74

West Yachts

82

36' Morgan

83 D 34,900 JK3Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

81

36' Sabre

08 D 239,000 JK3Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

(206) 282-0110

69

36' Solaris Sunrise

93 2D

89,500

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

69

www.passion-yachts.com

75

35' Island Packet Cat 93 2D 134,900

Waterline Boats

35' J/35

84 D

28,900

Waterline Boats

35' Nauticat PH

96 D

Inquire

Marine Srvicenter

35' O'Day

86 D

39,500

West Yachts

35' Tartan Thomas

89 D

47,500

Bellhaven Yacht Sales

36' C&C 34+

91 D

89,900

West Yachts

36' Cape George

89 D 150,000

Bellhaven Yacht Sales

36' Cape George

75 D

89,000

Seacraft Yacht Sales

36' Cape George 36

77 D

67,000

Marine Srvicenter

(206) 282-0110

69

36' Union Cutter

80 D

29,500

Passion Yachts

www.marinesc.com

82

37' Beneteau First

85 D

64,900

JK3Yachts

www.west-yachts.com

74

37' Beneteau O

17 D 227,500

www.bellhaven.net

75

37' Beneteau O 37

17 D

www.west-yachts.com

74

37' C&C 115

06 D 130,000

www.bellhaven.net

75

37' Chance

74 D 34,900 Yachtfinders/Wind

(206) 547-2755

76

37' Dehler

16 D

www.marinesc.com

82

37' Endeavour

78 D

27,900

NW Yachtnet

89 D

49,900

Passion Yachts

~

3

Signature Yachts

www.signature-yachts.com

81

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

JK3Yachts

~ JK3Yachts

~

~

www.capegeorgecutters.com

39

37' Hunter 37

80 D

35,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

37' Island Packet 370 08 D 275,000

Marine Srvicenter

36' Cascade

79 D

39,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

37' Pacific Seacraft

99 D 170,000

Swiftsure Yachts

36' Cascade 36

80 D

18,500

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

37' Pacific Seacraft

92 D 129,000

Seacraft Yacht Sales

June 2017

www.48North.com

3

www.jk3yachts.com

36' Cascade

76

77

(844) 692-2487

www.marinesc.com

Signature Yachts

Cape George

Page

www.signature-yachts.com

35' Island Packet 350 01 D 153,000

36' Cape George hull ~

Contact

www.yachtfinders.biz

www.jk3yachts.com

3

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

www.jk3yachts.com

3

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

www.passion-yachts.com

75

www.marinesc.com

82

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

(206) 547-2755

76


Professionally staffed! Open EVERY day!

(619) 224-2349 • Fax (619) 224-4692 • 2330 Shelter Island Dr. #207 San Diego, CA 92106 www.yachtfinders.biz • Toll-Free (866) 341-6189 • info@yachtfinders.biz

A Leader in Brokerage Sales on the West Coast

w Ne ting s i L

32’ ERICSON MK 2 ’88 .............$39,500 “WAYPOINT II” a very well cared for and updated vessel. Rigged for ease of sailing shorthanded, and quite a performer.

36’ CATALINA ’85 ....................$39,900 “HAPPY TIME” An outstanding coastal cruiser with abundant storage. This is a clean boat with many upgrades.

w Ne ting s i L

d

ce

u ed

R

40’ NEWPORTER ’57............... $64,900 “GRATEFUL DAD” Very nicely appointed and maintained. Some modern upgrades to the electrical systems and rebuilt engine.

41’ ISLAND TRADER ’77 ...........$54,900 “KATRINA LIANA” Extremely well maintained classic sailing vessel. Large comfortable cockpit area, perfect for entertaining.

45’ HUNTER 450 PASSAGE....... $139,500 “APPALOOSA” Very well equipped and upgraded by her previous owners to the extent that they felt confident to sail her anywhere.

Yr Aux Price

40’ OLSON ’84 .......................$69,000 “POHONO” Easily driven in light air and capable of planing down wind. Comfortable interior make these boats excellent cruisers.

w Ne ting s i L

Broker

36’ ISLANDER YACHTS ’79........ $19,500 “ISLANDIA” One of the features of the Islander is a very gradual companionway step set up which makes it dog friendly.

w Ne ting s i L

36’ ISLANDER YACHTS ‘79 ........$33,000 “SIMPLE PLEASURE” 6-new Lewmar opening ports, new salon hatch, and new interior lights. A nice sailing, comfortable boat. w Ne ting s i L

Boat Type

35’ ERICSON MK 2 ’69 .............$15,000 “AQUARIUS” Hull and deck appear to be in excellent condition, tabernacle mast and canvas companionway cover.

w Ne ting s i L

35’ CHEOY LEE ’80 ..................$39,000 “SANTE” The most loved & cared for Cheoy Lee 35 to have graced our shores. Her condition and maintenance are impeccable.

Brokerage Sail Listings Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

74

38' Shannon Ketch

81 D

86,000

NW Yachtnet

www.marinesc.com

82

39' Beneteau 390

90 D

59,000

77 D 111,000 Anacortes www.anacortesyachtsandships.com

76

39' Beneteau 393

38' Alajuela 38

77 D

69

38' Alerion

06 D 249,000 JK3Yachts

38' Baltic 38 DP

85 D 109,500

NW Yachtnet

49,950

West Yachts

37' Tartan 37

78 D

49,500

Marine Srvicenter

38' Alajuela

55,000

Waterline Boats

Page

30’ CATALINA ’83................... $19,900 “FIRST WISH” A very clean version of one of the most successful production boats ever. Brand new standing and running rigging.

www.west-yachts.com

37' Roberts Steel Ctr 91 D

Contact

41’ COLUMBIA ’72 ..................$29,500 “SPIRIT” This rare deck/salon configuration will make an excellent coastal cruiser and/ or liveaboard for the new owner.

Broker

Contact

7

Signature Yachts

www.signature-yachts.com

81

O2 D 139,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

39' C&C

73 D

28,500

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

3

39' Cal 392

80 D

65,000

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

69

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

39' Catalina 385

12 D 199,000

Seattle Yachts

(844) 692-2487

72

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

(206) 547-2755

76

(206) 282-0110 www.jk3yachts.com

38' Bavaria

03 D 125,000

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

(206) 285-9563

71

39' Farr 39 C/R

96 D 109,000

Sail Northwest

38' Beneteau O

17 D 232,500

Signature Yachts

www.signature-yachts.com

81

39' Fast Passsage

78 D

Seacraft Yacht Sales

38' Bristol 38.8

83 D 114,500

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

39' Gulfstar

81 D 87,000 Yachtfinders/Wind

38' C&C 115

06 D 139,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

39' Jeanneau 39i

08 D 178,900

Marine Srvicenter

38' Cape George

91 D 157,500

Cape George

www.capegeorgecutters.com

39

39' Marcos Cutter

81 D

Waterline Boats

38' Catalina 38

89,000

62,500

85 D

61,500

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

39' Nauticat PH

96 D 184,500

Marine Srvicenter

38' Coronet Elvstrom 79 D

49,500

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

39' Shearwater

90 D 175,000

Swiftsure Yachts

38' Hans Christian

69,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

40' Bali 4.0 Catamaran 17 D 277,000

Bellhaven Yacht Sales

78 D

38' Hanse 385

14 D 246,500

JK3Yachts

38' Hunter

O7 D 120,000

Passion Yachts

38' Irwin MkII

89 D

49,900

Yachtfinders/Wind

38' Islander Freeport 83 D

69,900

West Yachts

3

40' Beneteau 400

94 D

98,500

Signature Yachts

75

40' Beneteau O 40

93 D

94,500

Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

40' Beneteau Oceanis 11 D 164,900

Signature Yachts

82

(206) 282-0110

69

www.marinesc.com

82

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

www.bellhaven.net

75

www.signature-yachts.com

81

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

www.signature-yachts.com

81

74

40' Bill Garden Cust

92 D

Bellhaven Yacht Sales

www.bellhaven.net

75

81

40' C&C

02 D 169,500

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

www.west-yachts.com

74

40' Caliber 40 LRC

96 D 179,500

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

www.marinesc.com

82

40' Catalina

05 D 179,000

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

40' Catalina 400

95 D 124,500

Passion Yachts

JK3Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

Signature Yachts

38' Morgan

85 D

West Yachts

38' Nauticat PH

85 D 139,000

Marine Srvicenter

38' Nauticat PH

76 D

38' Sabre 386

06 D 210,000

39,900

77

www.marinesc.com

www.west-yachts.com

01 D 139,900

35,000

www.jk3yachts.com www.passion-yachts.com

www.yachtfinders.biz

www.signature-yachts.com

38' Moody CC

~

Page

www.nwyachtnet.com

40' Catalina 400MkII 08 D 187,000

www.48North.com

June 2017

(206) 285-9563

71

www.passion-yachts.com

75

Anacortes www.anacortesyachtsandships.com

76

77


Please Support the Advertisers Who Bring You 48° North 48° North Subscribe to digital mag...... 75 48° North Hats..................................... 75 American Marine Training Center..... 33 Anacortes Yachts and Ships................ 76 Artist Ad - Joe Cartwright................... 68 Aqua Marine........................................ 45 Ballard Rigging..................................... 57 Ballard Sails......................................... 55 Bellhaven Yacht Sales and Charters.... 75 Beta Marine Engines.............................. 8 Boat US.......................................... 13, 48 Cape George........................................ 39 Cascadia Sailing Services.................... 33 City of Vancouver................................ 17 Clean Sails........................................... 51 CSR Marine......................................... 55 Defender Industries.............................. 11 Downwind Marine............................... 22 Dr. LED................................................ 39 Drivelines Northwest........................... 37 Elliott Bay Yacht Sales......................... 71

Broker

Fisheries Supply................................... 15 Flagship Maritime................................ 21 Footloose Sailing Assoc....................... 70 Forespar................................................ 31 Iverson’s Design Dodgers..................... 45 JK3 Yachts.............................................. 3 Lee Sails............................................... 45 LFS....................................................... 25 Mahina Offshore Expeditions.............. 31 Marine Servicenter.............................. 80 Nordhavn............................................. 70 NW Yachtnet.com................................. 7 Oak Harbor Marina............................. 51 Pacific Cruising Yachts & Charters..... 75 Parfitt Way........................................... 41 Passion Yachts...................................... 75 Port Ludlow Marina............................. 12 Port of Friday Harbor........................... 18 Port Townsend Rigging........................ 27 Rosario Resort...................................... 23 Sail Northwest....................................... 2

Sail Sand Point.................................... 68 Scan Marine......................................... 17 Scanmar International, Inc................. 43 Schaefer Marine................................... 43 Schooner Mallory Todd....................... 37 Seacraft Yacht Sales............................. 76 Seattle Boat Works.............................. 33 Seattle Sailing Club............................. 16 Seattle Yachts....................................... 72 Seaview Boatyard................................. 28 Seventh Wave Marine......................... 27 Signature Yachts.................................. 79 Swiftsure Yachts................................... 73 Ullman Sails........................................ 20 Washington Sea Grant.................. 20, 57 Waterline Boats................................... 69 West Marine........................................... 9 West Yachts.......................................... 74 Wichard............................................... 10 Yachtfinders/Windseakers.................... 77 Yager Sails & Canvas........................... 18

Brokerage Sail Listings

Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

40' Cruise A Home

80 G

44,900

Passion Yachts

Contact

40' CS Yacht

88 D

69,800

Marine Srvicenter

40' Elan Impression

17 D 269,973

Seattle Yachts

40' Hinckley

70 D 139,500

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

40' Hunter 40.5

93 D

West Yachts

40' J/120

94 D 119,000

40' J/120

01 D 159,900 JK3Yachts

40' J/122

07 D 315,000 JK3Yachts

40' Jeanneau 409

14 D 268,500

Marine Srvicenter

40' Jeanneau DS 40' Jonmeri

Page

Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

Broker

www.passion-yachts.com

75

41' Cheoy Lee Offshore 77 D

www.marinesc.com

82

41' Columbia

72 D 29,500 Yachtfinders/Wind

(844) 692-2487

72

41' Formosa Ketch

76 D

49,900

(206) 285-9563

71

41' Hanse 415

16 D

~

www.west-yachts.com

74

41' Island Trader

77 D

54,900

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

41' Kettenburg K41

67 D

39,500

www.jk3yachts.com

3

41' Newport

83 D

38,900

www.jk3yachts.com

3

41' Sceptre

89 D 180,000

www.marinesc.com

82

41' Sweden

85 D 114,900

NW Yachtnet

98 D 149,000

Anacortes www.anacortesyachtsandships.com

76

41' Sydney

96 D 119,000 JK3Yachts

86 D 119,000

Swiftsure Yachts

73

42' Bavaria

99 D 159,900

West Yachts

40' Kalik

80 D

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

71

42' Beneteau 423

O5 D 159,500

Passion Yachts

40' Newporter

57 ~ 64,900 Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

42' Catalina

04 D 159,000

Seacraft Yacht Sales

40' Olson

83 D 55,000 Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

42' Cheoy Lee

82 D

99,900

Marine Srvicenter

40' Olson

84 ~ 69,000 Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

29,900

West Yachts

98,000

55,000

Sail Northwest

www.swiftsureyachts.com

40' Panda by Ta Shing 85 D 149,000

West Yachts

40' S&S Loki

53 D

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

40' Steel Pilothouse

99 D 129,000

Seacraft Yacht Sales

40' Tashiba Cutter

88 D 174,900

West Yachts

40' Valiant

77 D

79,000

40' Valiant

77 D

40' Valiant 40

77 D

41' Beneteau 41.1

17 D 319,900

41' Beneteau 41.1

17 D 299,900

41' Beneteau 411

99 D

41' Beneteau 411 41' Beneteau O 41

49,500

(206) 285-9563

89,500

Contact

Waterline Boats

Page

(206) 282-0110 www.yachtfinders.biz

Passion Yachts

69 77

www.passion-yachts.com

75

www.jk3yachts.com

3

Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

Pacific Cruising

www.pacific-cruising.com

75

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

JK3Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

www.west-yachts.com

74

www.passion-yachts.com

75

(206) 547-2755

76

www.marinesc.com

82

77

42' Colvin Gazelle

10 D

www.west-yachts.com

74

www.west-yachts.com

74

42' Hallberg Rassy

83 D 174,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

(206) 285-9563

71

42' Hallberg Rassy

86 D 225,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73 77

(206) 547-2755

76

42' Hunter 420 Passage 03 D 134,500

Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

www.west-yachts.com

74

42' Hunter Passage

93 D 107,000

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

42' Maple Leaf

76 D

59,500

Seacraft Yacht Sales

(206) 547-2755

76

49,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

42' MaxCat Shell

OO ~

44,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

82,000

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

42' Nauticat PH

04 D 349,500

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

Signature Yachts

www.signature-yachts.com

81

42' Roberts PH

94 D 109,500

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

Signature Yachts

www.signature-yachts.com

81

42' Tayana

01 D 260,000 Anacortes www.anacortesyachtsandships.com

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

42' Wauquiez Cent

85 D 139,999

NW Yachtnet

01 D 119,900

Signature Yachts

www.signature-yachts.com

81

43' Alaska Brewer

94 D 130,000

Marine Srvicenter

98 D 109,900

Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

43' Atkins

02 D 165,000

Seacraft Yacht Sales

41' Beneteau O 41

12 D 215,000

Signature Yachts

www.signature-yachts.com

81

43' Bali 4.3 Catamaran 17 D 357,000

41' C-T PH Ketch

76 D

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

78

94,900

29,900

June 2017

43' Beneteau

www.48North.com

Bellhaven Yacht Sales

86 D 62,500 Yachtfinders/Wind

76

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

www.marinesc.com

82

(206) 547-2755

76

www.bellhaven.net

75

www.yachtfinders.biz

77


Brokerage Sail Listings

Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

Broker

43' Beneteau O

09 D 194,900

Signature Yachts

43' Beneteau Sense

12 D 315,000

NW Yachtnet

43' Hallberg Rassy

03 D 390,000

43' Hallberg Rassy 43' Hans Christian

Contact

Page

Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

47' Beneteau 473

05 D 169,500

JK3Yachts

47' Beneteau O 473

05 D 219,900

Signature Yachts

3 81

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

17 D 409,838

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

78 D 199,000

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

47' Stevens

84 D 175,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

73

47' Valiant

84 D 199,900

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

75

48' Amel Maramu

84 D 138,900

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

69

48' Beneteau O 48

17 D 477,500

Signature Yachts

www.signature-yachts.com

81

48' C&C

73 D 230,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

7

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

47' Formosa

81 D 119,900

05 D 375,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

47' Jeanneau 479

78 D

69,000

Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

47' Southerly 145

43' Jeanneau DS

03 D 184,900

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

43' Perry

01 D 199,950

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

43' Polaris Cutter

78 D

84,500

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

43' Schucker 430 PH 79 D

62,500

Waterline Boats NW Yachtnet

44' Bruce Rbts Offshore 81 D

69,000

Waterline Boats

44' Bruce Rbts Offshore 93 D

(206) 282-0110

69

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

(206) 282-0110

69

48' Cust. Schooner

86 D

99,500

49,500

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

48' J/145

02 D 389,000

Sail Northwest

44' Jeanneau 44DS

17 D 319,983

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

48' J/145

03 D 297,500

Swiftsure Yachts

44' Jeanneau SO44

90 D 114,800

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

49' 8 Meter

37 ~ 187,500

JK3Yachts

44' Morris

95 D 459,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

49' Goetz/Tatlor

97 D 179,950 Yachtfinders/Wind

44' Peterson Alum.

77 D

West Yachts

www.west-yachts.com

74

49' Jeanneau SO 49P 07 D 349,500

Marine Srvicenter Swiftsure Yachts

49,000

71

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

www.jk3yachts.com

3

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

www.marinesc.com

82

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

www.bellhaven.net

75

49' Outremer

10 D 595,000

81

50' Beneteau

97 D 178,900 Anacortes www.anacortesyachtsandships.com

76

(206) 547-2755

76

50' Dubbel & Jesse

89 D 269,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

50' Kettenburg K50

62 D 174,000

Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

www.jk3yachts.com

3

50' Lavranos

90 D 184,775

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

50' Peterson Cust.

78 D 149,000

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

www.yachtfinders.biz

Bellhaven Yacht Sales

45' Beneteau O

17 D 395,500

Signature Yachts

45' Besteaver ST

11 D 625,000

Seacraft Yacht Sales

45' Brewer ketch

78 D

79,000

Yachtfinders/Wind

45' Hanse 455

15 D

~

45' Herreshoff

82 D 224,500 Yachtfinders/Wind

45' Hunter

97 D 139,500 Yachtfinders/Wind

45' Hunter CC

06 D 214,000

Signature Yachts

45' Jeanneau 45DS

10 D 294,500

Marine Srvicenter

45' Jeanneau SO

06 D 240,000

Pacific Cruising

45' Jeanneau SO45

06 D 240,000

Marine Srvicenter

45' Malo 45 Classic

JK3Yachts

77

51' Alden Skye Ketch 80 D 178,500

www.signature-yachts.com

81

51' Bakewell-White 02 D 350,000 JK3Yachts

Marine Srvicenter

(206) 285-9563

71

www.marinesc.com

82

www.jk3yachts.com

3

www.marinesc.com

82

51' Beneteau Oceanis 93 D 155,000

Anacortes www.anacortesyachtsandships.com

76

www.pacific-cruising.com

75

52' Santa Cruz

99 D 495,000

Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

www.marinesc.com

82

53' Hallberg Rassy

03 D 469,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

West Yachts

www.west-yachts.com

74

05 D 489,900

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

53' Spencer Ketch

73 D 150,000

45' Passport 456 CC 04 D 349,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

54' Hunter

82 D 89,000 Yachtfinders/Wind

46' Beneteau

97 D 144,900

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

(206) 285-9563

71

55' Nelson / Marek

09 D 349,000

46' Beneteau 461

99 D

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

56' Bob Perry

95 D 495,000

46' Cal 2-46

73 D 119,000

Bellhaven Yacht Sales

www.bellhaven.net

75

56' Herreshoff Schner 56 D 215,000

Waterline Boats

46' Cecil Lange

76 D

Seacraft Yacht Sales

Swiftsure Yachts

46' Garcia Passoa

93 D 298,000

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

JK3Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

JK3Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

(206) 282-0110

69

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

(206) 547-2755

76

60' Farr PH

97 D 775,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

60' Mariner

78 D 800,000 Yachtfinders/Wind

62,500

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

69

60' Shannon

14 D 1,095,000

46' Grand Soleil

98 D 169,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

62' Deerfoot

82 D 349,500 Yachtfinders/Wind

46' Hunter

00 D 135,000 Yachtfinders/Wind

77

64' Roberts PH 64

88 D 298,000

Marine Srvicenter

46' Hylas

00 D 298,000

Swiftsure Yachts

73

65' MacGreagor

84 D

Sail Northwest

46' J/40

00 D 327,500

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

66' Gorbon

97 D 845,000 Yachtfinders/Wind

46' J/46

00 D 315,000 JK3Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

68' Nelson Marek

84 D 229,000

46' Garden Porpoise 71 D

(206) 285-9563

www.signature-yachts.com

45' Bali 4.5 Catamaran 17 D 412,000

49,000

Page

www.jk3yachts.com

81

www.nwyachtnet.com

84 D 169,000

Contact www.signature-yachts.com

www.signature-yachts.com

43' Slocum Cutter

Broker

www.yachtfinders.biz www.swiftsureyachts.com (206) 285-9563

71

99,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.yachtfinders.biz www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

www.marinesc.com

82

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

www.yachtfinders.biz

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

77

77

(206) 285-9563

71

46' Jeanneau 45.2

00 D 189,000

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

70' Jensen Expedition 04 D 2,850,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

46' Jeanneau 469

15 D 389,500

Marine Srvicenter

www.marinesc.com

82

72' Ted Geary Schner 20 D 119,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

46' Kanter Atlantic

88 D

Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

77

73' Manuel Campos

41 D 475,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

46' Moody

98 D 285,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

78' Cheoy Lee

88 D 449,000

Seacraft Yacht Sales

(206) 547-2755

76

46' Spindrift CC

84 D 149,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

75

46' Swan

84 d 225,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

73

46' Tartan 4600

04 D 340,000

JK3Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

46' Tartan 4600

97 D 240,000

JK3Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

46' Tayana PH

13 D 419,000

Seattle Yachts

(844) 692-2487

72

47' Beneteau 47.7

05 D 210,000

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

(206) 285-9563

71

99,900

www.48North.com

June 2017

79


Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

100' Steel Navy Tug 44 D 21' Chaparral 99 G 15 G 21' Wellcraft 220 22' Wellcraft 232 15 G 22' Wellcraft 232 15 G 24' Marauder FlyBridg 72 TG 25' Devlin Surf Scoter 01 D 14 D 25' Ranger Tug 25' Ranger Tug 12 D 26' Aquasport 275 04 O 26' Maxim 2500 w/Tlr 03 G 26' Steiger 07 D 93 G 27' SeaSport Nav 28' Bayliner 2859 94 ~ 28' Bayliner Discovery 09 ~ 28' Cutwater 15 ~ 28' Tiara 2900 04 ~ 84 D 30' Bertram FB 30' Grand Banks 73 D 30' Maple Bay 98 ~ 08 O 30' Robalo 31' Bertram 82 ~ 31' Helmsman Trawler 15 D 31' Tiara Flybridge 89 G 32' Grand Banks 32 74 D 32' Maple Bay 01 D 90 D 32' Nordic Tug 32' TransPac 87 D 32' Trojan Sport Fisher 77 D 32' Coastal Craft 320 02 D 33' Chris Craft Classic 48 D 33' Wellcraft 330 00 D 34' CHB Trawler 77 D 34' Glacier Bay 3470 05 D 34' Harris Fantail 20 ~ 34' Mainship 84 G 34' Sea Ray 340 86 ~ 34' Tollycraft 72 D 35' Monk 57 G 35' Nexus 03 D 36' Carver 356 04 ~ 77 D 36' CHB/Eagle 36' Grand Banks 73 D 36' Nova Sunquest SD 96 D 36' Seahorse Marine 11 D 36' Tiara 3600 90 ~ 36' Vicem Windsor 09 D 36' Willard Vega 63 D 14 ~ 37' Back Cove 91 D 37' Bertram 37' Fountaine Pajot 05 D 37' Fountaine Pajot 17 TD 37' Lord Nelson Tug 88 D 07 D 37' Nordic Tug 06 D 37' Nordic Tug 37' Sea Ray Sundancer 12 D 37' Trojan 86 ~ 38' Barry Farrell 74 D 38' Mariner Seville 09 D 38' Nimbus 365 Coupe 16 D 38' Trojan Sea Voyager 68 G 39' Californian Nav 01 D 39' Kadey Krogen 00 D 39' Tiara 3900 09 ~ 40' Bavaria 17 ~ 40' BC Forest Svc. 32 1D 40' Custom Trawler 83 D 40' Fountaine Pajot 17 TD 40' Puget Trawler 78 D 41' Back Cove 15 ~

80

179,000 12,900 64,900 79,900 69,900 25,900 98,000 118,500 112,000 50,000 34,950 84,000 79,500 18,500 42,000 165,000 60,000 39,000 24,000 39,900 125,000 125,000 265,000 48,000 39,500 109,000 125,000 69,900 38,000 159,900 62,900 99,000 35,000 139,900 25,000 49,500 28,900 9,900 39,000 299,000 135,000 49,500 52,000 78,000 258,000 99,500 249,000 88,500 445,000 130,000 239,500 ~ 120,000 375,000 359,000 269,000 49,900 119,000 249,000 489,000 49,500 179,900 357,000 398,000 ~ 49,500 199,999 ~ 65,000 685,000

Brokerage Trawler Listings

Broker

Contact

Page

Waterline Boats https://waterlineboats.com/ Marine Servicenter www.marinesc.com Marine Servicenter www.marinesc.com Marine Servicenter www.marinesc.com Marine Servicenter www.marinesc.com Marine Servicenter www.marinesc.com West Yachts www.west-yachts.com Swiftsure Yachts www.swiftsureyachts.com Swiftsure Yachts www.swiftsureyachts.com JK3 Yachts www.jk3yachts.com Marine Servicenter www.marinesc.com Anacortes www.anacortesyachtsandships.com Marine Servicenter www.marinesc.com Yachtfinders/Wind www.yachtfinders.biz West Yachts www.west-yachts.com West Yachts www.west-yachts.com JK3 Yachts www.jk3yachts.com West Yachts www.west-yachts.com Anacortes www.anacortesyachtsandships.com West Yachts www.west-yachts.com JK3 Yachts www.jk3yachts.com JK3 Yachts www.jk3yachts.com Waterline Boats https://waterlineboats.com/ NW Yachtnet www.nwyachtnet.com Waterline Boats https://waterlineboats.com/ West Yachts www.west-yachts.com West Yachts www.west-yachts.com Bellhaven www.bellhaven.net Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com Marine Servicenter www.marinesc.com Marine Servicenter www.marinesc.com Sail Northwest www.sailnorthwest.com Yachtfinders/Wind www.yachtfinders.biz Marine Servicenter www.marinesc.com Pacific Cruising Yachts www.pacific-cruising.com Marine Servicenter www.marinesc.com Yachtfinders/Wind www.yachtfinders.biz Marine Servicenter www.marinesc.com Anacortes www.anacortesyachtsandships.com Swiftsure Yachts www.swiftsureyachts.com JK3 Yachts www.jk3yachts.com Bellhaven www.bellhaven.net Waterline Boats https://waterlineboats.com/ Waterline Boats https://waterlineboats.com/ Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com Yachtfinders/Wind www.yachtfinders.biz Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com Bellhaven www.bellhaven.net JK3 Yachts www.jk3yachts.com West Yachts www.west-yachts.com NW Yachtnet www.nwyachtnet.com Signature Yachts www.signature-yachts.com Marine Servicenter www.marinesc.com Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com Marine Servicenter www.marinesc.com Yachtfinders/Wind www.yachtfinders.biz Waterline Boats https://waterlineboats.com/ Waterline Boats https://waterlineboats.com/ Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com Waterline Boats https://waterlineboats.com/ Marine Servicenter www.marinesc.com Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com JK3 Yachts www.jk3yachts.com JK3 Yachts www.jk3yachts.com Waterline Boats https://waterlineboats.com/ NW Yachtnet www.nwyachtnet.com Signature Yachts www.signature-yachts.com Anacortes www.anacortesyachtsandships.com JK3 Yachts www.jk3yachts.com

June 2017

69 82 82 82 82 82 74 73 73 3 82 76 82 77 74 74 3 74 76 74 3 3 69 7 69 74 74 75 72 82 82 2 77 82 75 82 77 82 76 73 3 75 69 69 72 77 72 75 3 74 7 81 82 72 72 82 77 69 69 72 69 82 72 3 3 69 7 81 76 3

Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

41' Camano Trawler 06 1D 309,900 42' Bracewell SportFish 10 D 349,900 42' Californian Trawler 77 2D 74,000 42' Carver 4207 86 ~ 89,900 42' Devlin Sockeye 00 D 420,000 42' Grand Banks 70 D 79,000 42' Grand Banks 74 D 99,950 42' Grand Banks 87 D 199,000 42' Hi-Star Aft Cabin 87 2D 99,000 42' Lien Hwa Sundeck 86 2D 89,900 42' Ponderosa Trawler 84 2D 98,900 42' Vantare AC Trawler 42 2D 99,500 43' Albin 43 Trawler 89 2D 117,500 43' Fathom Element 11 D 385,000 CALL 43' Fathom Element 17 D 43' Helmsman Trawler 17 1D 474,900 43' Viking Yachts 06 D 249,000 44' DeFever 83 D 139,900 99 ~ 225,000 44' DeFever AC 44' Gulfstar 79 D 117,000 44' Nimbus 405 Coupe 17 D 776,679 44' Ocean Alexander 82 D 64,900 44' Puget Trawler 78 D 94,550 44' Tollycraft 88 ~ 149,000 45' CHB 84 D 99,500 45' Monk McQueen 64 D 109,000 45' Northwind 81 D 118,950 46' Nielson Trawler 81 D 299,000 47' Bayliner 01 D 246,000 47' Bayliner 4788 94 D 179,500 47' Diesel Duck 06 D 599,000 48' Californian CPMY 88 D 169,200 48' Nova PH 90 D 139,000 49' DeFever 88 D 270,000 04 D 499,000 49' DeFever PH 49' Elling E4 08 D 399,000 49' Integrity PH 05 D 495,000 50' Carver 98 D 264,000 50' CTF Trawler 13 D 669,500 50' Northwest 09 D 895,000 51' Wm.Garden 64 D 59,000 52' DeFever Euro 16 D 1,240,000 92 D 249,000 52' DeFever PH 52' Matthews FD 63 2D 89,000 70 D 99,500 52' Nordlund PH 53' Navigator 05 D 444,000 53' Southern Cross 89 D 350,000 55' Ocean Alexander 83 D 299,500 55' Symbol Pilothouse 94 2D 329,500 56' Carver Voyager 04 D 499,500 57' Carver 570 02 D 447,500 59' Compass Yachts 01 D 450,000 59' Selene 08 D 1,295,000 60' Sather Brothers 78 D 395,000 60" DeFever Trawler 84 2D 499,000 63' Johnson 90 D 750,000 64' Grand Alaskan 01 D 629 98 D 659,000 65' Realships 66' Cheoy Lee LRC 91 D 250,000 70' Jensen Expedition 04 D 2,850,000 76' President Legend 04 D 1,795,000 78' Tug Historic 1890 D 184,000 92' Broward 84 D 450,000 93' Palmer 89 D 695,000

www.48North.com

Broker

Contact

Page

Waterline Boats https://waterlineboats.com/ Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com Waterline Boats https://waterlineboats.com/ Yachtfinders/Wind www.yachtfinders.biz Marine Servicenter www.marinesc.com NW Yachtnet www.nwyachtnet.com Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com West Yachts www.west-yachts.com Waterline Boats https://waterlineboats.com/ Waterline Boats https://waterlineboats.com/ Waterline Boats https://waterlineboats.com/ Waterline Boats https://waterlineboats.com/ Waterline Boats https://waterlineboats.com/ NW Yachtnet www.nwyachtnet.com NW Yachtnet www.nwyachtnet.com Waterline Boats https://waterlineboats.com/ Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com West Yachts www.west-yachts.com Yachtfinders/Wind www.yachtfinders.biz Bellhaven www.bellhaven.net Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com NW Yachtnet www.nwyachtnet.com Anacortes www.anacortesyachtsandships.com West Yachts www.west-yachts.com Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com Anacortes www.anacortesyachtsandships.com West Yachts www.west-yachts.com Anacortes www.anacortesyachtsandships.com Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com Anacortes www.anacortesyachtsandships.com NW Yachtnet www.nwyachtnet.com Anacortes www.anacortesyachtsandships.com Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com Anacortes www.anacortesyachtsandships.com Bellhaven www.bellhaven.net Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com Seacraft Yacht Sales (206) 547-2755 Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com Waterline Boats https://waterlineboats.com/ Waterline Boats https://waterlineboats.com/ Anacortes www.anacortesyachtsandships.com Anacortes www.anacortesyachtsandships.com NW Yachtnet www.nwyachtnet.com Waterline Boats https://waterlineboats.com/ Yachtfinders/Wind www.yachtfinders.biz Anacortes www.anacortesyachtsandships.com JK3 Yachts www.jk3yachts.com Elliott Bay Yacht Sales (206) 285-9563 Bellhaven www.bellhaven.net Waterline Boats https://waterlineboats.com/ Anacortes www.anacortesyachtsandships.com Anacortes www.anacortesyachtsandships.com Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com Swiftsure Yachts www.swiftsureyachts.com Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com Waterline Boats https://waterlineboats.com/ NW Yachtnet www.nwyachtnet.com Seattle Yachts www.seattleyachts.com

69 72 69 77 82 7 72 74 69 69 69 69 69 7 7 69 72 74 77 75 72 7 76 74 72 72 76 74 76 72 72 76 7 76 72 72 72 76 75 72 76 72 72 69 69 76 76 7 69 77 76 3 71 75 69 76 76 72 72 73 72 69 7 72


k oc Ou rD

Platinum Service Dealer

SEATTLE (206) 284-9004

www.signature-yachts.com

St oc k In

St oc k In

Ou rD

oc k

20' Beneteau First '17........ Just Arrived

Ou rD

oc k

22' Beneteau First '17.............. $39,900

B eneteau O ceanis 35.1

Fountaine Pajot LUCIA 40

ve d

k

Ju st Ar ri

St oc In

Ou

rD

oc

k

25' Beneteau First '15.............. $69,900

Ou

rD

oc

k

27' Hunter '06.......................... $39,900

B eneteau O ceanis 41.1

B eneteau O ceanis 38

oc oc Ou

rD

oc

40' Beneteau 400 '94............... $94,500

41' Beneteau Oceanis 41 '12.. $215,000

43' Beneteau '09.................... $194,900 What's Happening 20' Harbor/Trlr '04............. Sale Pending 20' Harbor '12............................... SOLD 35' Benetau First '11.......... Sale Pending 36' Beneteau 361 '04......... Sale Pending 36' Sabre 362.................... Sale Pending 38' Beneteau 38.1... 2 in Commissioning 41' Beneteau 41.1.....Two More Arriving 45' Beneteau '17........Two More Arriving

k oc Ou

rD

CE RE

DU

Coo mmm miiss ssiion onin -g

Ou

rD

oc

40' Moody Center Ckpt '98.... $159,000

D

Ou

rD

k

Ou

rD

rD

40' Beneteau Oceanis '11....... $164,900

k

Ou 38' Moody CC 01................... $139,900

k

37' Fountaine Pajot MY37

Ou

rD oc k

35' Beneteau Moorings '06...... $88,500

k

k oc

ck Sto In

Ar

riv

ing

35' Island Packet 350 '01....... $149,000

45' Hunter CC '06.................. $185,000

47' Beneteau 473 '05............. $219,900

48' Beneteau Oceanis

Showcase Marina Open Mon. - Sat. 10-5, Sun. by Appt. • 2476 Westlake Ave N. #101, Seattle, WA 98109 www.48North.com

June 2017

81


Seattle (Lk. Union) - Sales  2442 Westlake Ave. N.

Anacortes - Sales, Dry Storage & Yard 700 28th St & 2417 “T” Ave.

(206) 323-2405 (360) 293-9521

1977

CPYB Dan Krier

CPYB Tim Jorgeson

CPYB Jeff Carson

Kirk Peterson

Jim Rard

CPYB Patrick Harrigan

Anacortes

40 See & Follow Us

years

2017

L A G O O N

2017 Jeanneau 479 #72673: $409,838 In Stock - SAVE $53,460

2017 Jeanneau 44DS #72379: $319,983 In Stock - SAVE $43,460

2018 Jeanneau 419 #72924: $279,878 Arriving - SAVE $12,750

2018 Lagoon 42 #205: $578,484 Arriving - SAVE $28,925

2018 Island Packet Northstar 44 Order Yours & SAVE

2018 Nauticat 37 Pilothouse Strong US$=BIG SAVINGS

Gilles MARTIN-RAGET

2017 Jeanneau 349 #72751: $179,885 In Stock - SAVE $11,000

2018 Jeanneau Yacht 51 #72985 Arriving - SAVE $37,500

w

L i Ne

d d

st

u

in

ce

Re

d

d

46' Jeanneau 469 '15.. $389,500 u d

u

Re

d

st

ce

ce

w

g

in

Li Ne

47' Formosa '81..........$119,900

42' Cheoy Lee '82......... $99,900

42' Nauticat PH '04..... $349,500

40' C&C 121 '02......... $169,500

39' Jeanneau 39i 08.... $178,900

38' Nauticat MS '85.... $139,000

37' Island Packet 370 '08..$275,000

36' Cape George '77..... $67,000

35' Island Packet 350 '01.. $157,500

WE NEED LISTINGS! 2 MOS MOORAGE for Qualified Listings! Prime Lake Union SALES DOCK!

54' Jeanneau Yacht 54 '16........ SOLD 49' Jeanneau 49p '07..........$349,500 45' Jeanneau SO '06..................SOLD 44' Bruce Roberts PH '93......$49,500 43' Jeanneau DS '01.......Sale Pending 41' Jeanneau 419 '17............... SOLD 42' Jeanneau DS '07..................SOLD 39' Nauticat PH '96.................. SOLD 38' Nauticat MS '76................. SOLD 37' Tartan 37 '78............Sale Pending 36' Cascade '80.....................$18,500 33' Hunter 33.3 '98.................. SOLD 32' Gulf PH '80.....................$24,500 30' Catalina '80..............Sale Pending 20' Laser SB3.... CLOSE OUT $24,500

L i Ne

in

ce

st

u d

Re

40' Valiant '77............... $82,000 Re

d

u

ce

d

40' Jeanneau 409 '14.. $248,500

43' Brewer Alaska '94. $130,000 w

44' Jeanneau SO '90..... $114,800

d

46' Jeanneau 45.2 '00. $189,000

47' Southerly 145 '86.. $199,000

g

w

st

in

L i Ne

g

51' Alden Skye '80...... $178,500

Re

d ce u d

Re

64' Roberts PH '88...... $298,000

g

www.marinesc.com • Serving Northwest Sailors Since 1977  •  info@marinesc.com

38' Coronet-Elvstrom '79...$49,500

L i Ne

st w in g

38' Catalina 38 '85........ $61,500

30' Nonsuch Ultra '90... $64,000

82

30' S2 9.1 '86................ $24,500

L i Ne

st w in g

st w in g

33' Nauticat MS '85.... $119,000 L i Ne

st w in g

35' Niagara '81............. $58,500 L i Ne

L i Ne

st w in g

35' Nauticat PH '87.........$129,000

30' Catalina 30 '81........ $24,950 June 2017

www.48North.com

27' Catalina 27 '82........ $13,500

Profile for 48° North

June 2017 48 North  

June 2017 48 North  

Profile for 48north