Page 1

ISSUE TWO INT | 2012

LET‘S SAVE THE WOLRD IN AN AESTHETIC WAY


2

COVERSHOT CARLOS BLANCHARD RIDER TIMO PRITZEL ILLUSTRATION INSIDE SILKE WERZINGER WWW.SILKEWERZINGER.DE


EDITORIAL

ISSUE 02

Extraordinarily ordinary “Offroad Cycle Culture” – there is nothing more precise to describe what MagFortyone is and what’s behind it. Whatever the reason may be for why we bike – fact is,biking is more than simply riding a bicycle, more than just sports and more than a rush of adrenaline. Biking means living, experiencing and enjoying freedom. It might sound ironic, but physical endeavor and concentration provide perfect conditions for cognitive relaxation and creative minds. While racking ourselves physically, we relax mentally – it’s an extraordinary kind of giving and taking. Simultaneously, “Offroad Cycle Culture” also describes the people of the scene. For this issue, we traveled to Barcelona where we met expressive personalities – everything from a seemingly casual man up to a rock star. This is where we recognized that the ordinary often includes a lot of extraordinary qualities and that there are a lot of ordinary properties in the extraordinary. Enjoy the following pages, which highlight the aspects of the bright side of life: good times, design and creativity! Strangely ordinary - but rather extraordinary. Cheers, Robin Schmitt


4

CONTENT

ISSUE 05

06 HEROES OF WORK THIS IS MAG41 ISSUE 05!

09 WORDPOOL

THE YEARLY SPRING PIT-TALK!

10 GALLERY

SELFMADE: I THINK, THEREFORE I AM.

28 BIKETEST SPECIALIZED

S-WORKS STUMPJUMPER FSR CARBON 29

38 INTERVIEW JEFF STEBER INTENSE: AESTHETIC & DESIGN

44 BIKETEST MONDRAKER ZENITH XR

54 GARDENER‘S WORKOUT

BERGAMONT GREENHOUSE PUMPTRACK

64 INTERVIEW CESAR ROJO RACER, DEVELOPER, GENIUS

76 BCN MAKING OF

A NEW MAGAZINE IN THE MAKING

84 MR. ROCKSHIT

SPANIARD ANDREU LACONDEGUY

94 DINING WITH MOMMY THE FASTEST DISHES

106 TRIP TO ANDORRA

COMMENCAL ABOUT THE FUTURE

116 THIS IS AFRICA

LIFE IS GOOD. BY ROB J HERNAN

126 TIME IS RUNNING BY LET‘S GET READY FOR RACING

130 GLOBAL PARTNERS

INTERNATIONAL MEDIA COOPERATION

132 IMPRESSUM


HEROES OF WORK ROBIN SCHMITT

MAX-P

Brother No. 2 is responsible for the stuff Brother No.1 doesn’t do. Creative realization, racing team, contacts… In order not to get bored, he also works on the new Downtown Magazine, fulltime!

Brother No Brother No organizatio Perfect tea

CHRISTIAN LÄMMLE

INGA B

Chris is a freelance Graphic Designer and currently working on DOWNTOWN and MAG41 for us. That means a lot of work, especially with Robin’s special wishes. WWW.LAEMMLEDESIGN.COM

Inga is a Kong. She Shooting w this issue. Y gazine in th

PHOTOGR@P

TIMO PRITZEL

SILKE

Timo has been in this scene for too long to follow every trend! In the Bergamont Greenhouse Story he is talking about the fun of the sport – without dollars (p.56).

The Berlin of the Edito al man nee bikes, T1, g on the imp ves!  WWW.S

WWW.TIMOPRITZEL.COM


PHILIP SCHMITT

FLORIAN STORCH

o. 1 is responsible for the stuff o. 2 doesn’t do. That’s mainly on, contacts and schedules. amwork!

Storchi is not only a pro on the dance floor, but also as an editor – in terms of the bike scene of course. You can read his stories starting on page 28 & 38.

BECKMANN

SEBAS ROMERO

photographer, living in Hong e accompanied us at the BCN with us and inspired topics in You can find her photos in “Mahe making” (p.78).

There is no one else in the bike scene who is so full of uncontradicted contrasts. A majority of the shots in this issue are from Mr. SELFMADE himself! WWW.SEBASROMERO.TUMBLR.COM

PHYBYINGA.COM

WERZINGER

artist created the illustration orial with everything a casueds to have and to cope with: guitars and always focusing portant. Check out yoursel-

SILKEWERZINGER.DE

ROB J HERAN Rob J belongs to the lucky ones of our society, being able to live his dream. In the Africastory he summed up the beginning of his career (for us). Read it, starting on page 118.


BENJAMIN HAHN During Mag41’s time of incorporation, Benny came over to the Schmitt’s household to take pictures of Dining with Mommy Schmitt (p.96). As you can tell, that was a long time ago. Good old times. WWW.DRAKEIMAGES.DE

© Andre Wygledacz

SAMUEL DECOUT Under Siberian weather conditions in Andorra, Sam didn’t hesitate to roll around in the snow for us! Brrrr. Read more about this story on page 108. WWW.TELEMARKOXICOMANIE.COM

JAVI ECHEVARRIA RUIZ Viva BCN! At the Specialized photo shoot for this issue, Sebas’ and Andreu’s buddy Javi was on top of a 29er for the first time - and it blew his mind! JAVI@BLACKMEDIA.ES


WORDPOOL THE MOST IMPORTANT TOPICS FOR THE YEARLY SPRING PIT-TALK. WORLD | CUP | BIKE World cup bike: Flipping through the current bike magazines, everything and everyone seems to be “World Cup” right now. “This beginner’s bike is unfortunately no good for the stake at the World Cup” is a typical statement. Inevitably, I start asking myself: is my bike suitable for the World Cup? “Well, you would need additional…” – Bullshit. Let’s be honest: Who is actually riding at the World Cup? – Riiiiight, but it still sounds cool.

TWEN | TY | NI | NER Sixfifty, twentynine, twentysix – onetwothree? Hearing about the new trends in the bike scene, they seem to appear faster and shorter-living than Lady Gaga’s fashion trends. Most usually bitch at first: “I don’t need that!”, “Bullshit! They just wanna make some money”, “It rides like shit.” Also quite popular: “Far too soft wheels that make my calf’s energy go phut.” Is that so? Ever actually tried one? – Of course not, but you simply know. Nevertheless, this leads us to our next topic: stiffness.

STIFF | NESS Each year, just in time for the Eurobike, the manufacturers pride themselves with more stiffness, more efficiency, and more speed. It’s easy to gain some new clients with wannabe-saws. Here it’s not only a fact that numbers shift in contrast to the “soft” previous chassis, but also it raises the question: Do we actually need any more stiffness? We let you figure it out – until next issue!

SHRED | DING Apart from tech- and pit-talk, biking plays a big role regarding our hobbies. The ones who want to be extra cool use words like casual Anglicisms - no matter what nationality - or other words describing everything but nothing at the same time. Examples? Shredding, riding, hanging loose, braaaaap, drifting, blasting, moshing, ripping…

BEER If you’re tired of tech-talk, posing and claptrap, there is only one way out: A beer in the evening! Depending on the circumstances, the evening might even begin in the afternoon or even at noon… Furthermore, this is the only word in this word pool with just a single syllable. As simple as that.


10

I THIN THERE I AM

RENÉ DES

A GALLERY OF CREA


I NK, EFORE I M

SCARTES

ATIVITY AND IDEAS


12


VARIETY Flow is an excessively used term in the bike scene. Therefore, the meaning of “flow” is often misjudged – someone who only feels flow on a smooth trail is overlooking something basic. Flow can occur in any kind of activity. Who doesn’t know the feeling? – When everything falls into place, no matter if it’s in an office chair or on a trail under the SouthAfrican sun. This gallery is about the flow of creative creations. The tools are our own ideas, eagerness and goals. Whether it’s a frame builder, finalizing his masterpiece with the finest art of welding; a photographer, translating a picture from his imagination into reality; or a dirt jumper, acquiring a new trick. Without ideas and creativity there will be no goals, no ways, no progress, no flow.


14


SACRIFICE “Striving for success without hard work is like looking for fruit in places that you didn’t plant seeds.” Everyone who wants to reach a goal has to make an effort and work hard. Without sacrifices and giving 100%, you can’t play at the top of your game. It doesn’t matter if it’s in an office, downhill or slopestyle. Stretching to your limits is part of it. And yes, injuries and setbacks are part of the game. SNAPPER CHRISTOPH LAUE ARTIST ANTTI RISSANEN


16

SICK LINE You have to use your brains to ride fast times. It’s even more crucial in times when milliseconds can determine victory or defeat. You have to be creative with the right choice of racing line – which one is faster, crazier or more risky? SNAPPER CHRISTOPH LAUE ARTIST FERDI BRUNOX


18

WELDING “Wow, nifty welding joints” – an often-mentioned phrase, expressing exactly this: building bikes is a craft and art all at once. The manufacturing process of a frame essentially defines its quality. Bearing that in mind, carbon is more superficial – you can merely rely on carbon as the top layer. SNAPPER DANIEL GEIGER ARTIST UNKNOWN


20

ENGINEERING Developers are the motors of our industry. They make our bikes lighter, faster and better. Without them, we would still be riding Starrbikes. Progress creates competition, and competition boosts development. Ideas and innovations are the basics of a successful product. Sparing and saving development costs means investing money into marketing or being satisfied with the idea of not being able to keep up with the competition. Best example for thorough development: the German bike maker Nicolai. Own ideas, own designs, own realization, and own production – made in Germany. Way to go! SNAPPER HOSHI YOSHIDA ARTIST KALLE NICOLAI


22

TRICKS Dirt jumpers are extremely creative! Not only considering their clothes, but also considering their tricks and constantly checking out new ones. With this much creativity at work, they sometimes lose their style though. Let’s be honest, what does a triple flip have that a nice tabletop or a whip doesn’t? Right! It doesn’t look as smooth. Chapeau. SNAPPER VIKTOR STRASSE ARTIST TIMO PRITZEL


24


PHOTOGRAPHY Cyclepassion, Felt-Cruiser calendar… Top-Snapper Daniel Geiger get’s to photo shoot several models. Even better, as a photographer, you get to combine their sex appeal with bikes. Creativity equals being: new, exceptional, provocative. How so? In terms of light, perspectives, techniques, motives and poses. A fine line between kitsch and art. But in the end it doesn’t really matter. The most important thing is, to do your thing, have fun and find your own style. The result in this case? Impressive! By now, the calendars are high profile, some reached cult status. What can I say? Bikes are sexy, or rather... SNAPPER DANIEL GEIGER ARTIST VENUS


26

LIVIN‘ THE DREAM Sexy girls, the first million or just a simple cool beer. Everyone has a dream of their own. If you have done it the right way, you can make a living from your dream. A special treat of being a pro: centrifugal forces at the sunset ride in the African sun, followed by a Cocktail Safari on the ranch. That’s when your wildest dreams come true. SNAPPER CRAIG KOLESKY ARTIST ROB-J


28

BIG WHEELS

BIG BALLS SPECIALIZED S-WORKS STUMPJUMPER FSR CARBON 29

TEXT FLORIAN STORCH TRANSLATION LISA GRETEMEIER PHOTO SEBAS ROMERO


30

»MORE TIRE, LESS REAR TRAVEL: THE 29ER CONCEPT.«


>>  2012 is definitely the year of the 29er AllMountains. In Europe, skepticism towards large wheels in cross-country has not yet vanished. That’s why we’ve been asking ourselves, does the fancy 29er version of the legendary Stumpjumper FSR have the potential to continue the classic’s story of success? The Stumpjumper. For the last 30 years, the classic’s lugs have successfully managed to maneuver their way through the terrain. The first Specialized model substantially shaped the foundation of bike history. As one of the first mountain bikes in serial production, it also represents an icon of a sport. During its 30 years of development – beginning with Stumpjumper FSR providing one of the first full-suspensiondesigns ever – the bike has traveled a long way to reach its latest development stage. What once began as the Stumpy-master-form with heavy steel frames, massive motorbike-like brake handles and “zero suspension” back in the 1980’s is now aiming to reach the peak of bike development. To be specific: not just any bike – no – the engineers from the Californian Morgan Hill claim to have created “THE most capable bike in the world” with the Stumpjumper FSR S-Works 29. To underline this, the muscular carbon main frame radiates its self-confidence, which is supported by the FSR four-bar rear suspension system, also made of carbon. Outcome? A stunningly light chassis of 2300 g (including rear shock), which is supposed to easily resist the high strains of all-mountain terrain.The main frame is a compound of two monocoquemodules which are supposed to be highly resilient because of the carbon which joins the tube segments. Specialized responds to the widely spread skepticism regarding the frame stiffness of 29ers pragmatically: design details like the lush PressFit 30 crank set, the tapered head tube and the 142mm dropouts with a 12mm thru-axle at the rear wheel should clear out any doubts.


32


The four-bar suspension system works with the Fox RP-23 rear shock, with exclusive lowfriction Kashima coating; using the remote Brain platform the rider can individually adjust the rear shock from extremely active to a very firm platform. The 130 mm rear travel complements the Fox Float Factory F130 fork. In addition to the Brain element, the rear suspension features another highlight: the AUTOSAG option of the Fox/Specialized rear shock allows a simple SAG-alignment via an additional valve. To do this, the rider first fills the rear shock at the main valve (body weight in psi x 3), gets on the bike and adjusts the red valve. Superfluous air streams out via the valve, which then adjusts the air pressure in the positive and negative chambers automatically according to the rider’s weight. It’s almost possible to forget biking over the loads of love for detail. Almost! With a 603 mm top tube and a compact 100 mm head tube in medium size, the seating position is sporty and the rider sits nicely centered on the bike. The first uphill at moderate pitch creates a smile:


34

»RIDIN THE BIKE FIX

thanks to the light 11.5 kg weight, feelgood-geometry and the 1530 g Roval carbon wheels, the Stumpy 29er loves speed! A good pedaling position proves the dedicated geometry on steep climbs: a seating angle of 74.5° is paying off right now. The FSR-rear suspension, with a high amount of traction, totally shows off its skill-set in rough sections uphill. Due to the naturally high traction 29er tires, the bike manages to carry admirable speed. In addition to the higher traction,

another remarkable difference in regards to the 26er is apparent, thanks to the almost unshakable performance uphill. If the rider happens to get off the ideal racing line, the bike will fix it. Even on narrow trails the Stumpy FSR 29 is a pure joy to ride: weight shifts to the front or the back are easy, and the bike has no problem with fast turns. However, the rider has to familiarize himself with the 29er all-mountain’s special characteristics in narrow serpentines:


NG SKILLS? E IS GONNA IT.«

FACTS SPECIALIZED S-WORKS STUMPJUMPER FSR CARBON 29 FRAME FORK REAR SHOCK DRIVETRAIN

FACT 11M CARBON, ISCG ‘05, 130 MM FOX FACTORY F130 RLC, FIT, KASHIMA, 130 MM FOX/SPECIALIZED BRAIN, KASHIMA, AUTOSAG SRAM XX / X.0

HEAD ANGLE SEAT ANGLE TOP TUBE STANDOVER

69° 74,5° 595 MM 741 MM

BRAKES SEATPOST WHEELS TIRES

CUSTOM AVID XX WORLD CUP R 200/180MM SPECI COMMAND POST BLACKLITE,125MM ROVAL CONTROL SL 29 142+ (CARBON) S-WORKS PURGATORY 2.2“, GROUND CONTROL 2.1“

WHEEL BASE WEIGHT PRICE INFO:

1147 MM 11,5 KG (MEDIUM) 7.599 € WWW.SPECIALIZED.COM


36

»SPANIARD JAVI IS GROWING UP. HE’S RIDING 29”«


the longer wheelbase needs to be taken into account,as well as a slight change in timing to turn-ins. This is where the 720 mm wide handlebar comes in handy. Active riders who like to jump often praise the 26”-feeling, which is the only shortcoming of the AM-29er – it is too lush and confident on the trail to achieve this feeling. This is an impression that the Stumpy FSR 29 eventually confirms on pothole trails and high airs: the combination of a sensitive but very forgiving chassis and the lower roll-off-angle of the large wheels keep the bike and its rider firmly and reliably on the ground. (Even on tracks that are typically used for Enduro!) The Stumpy 29er’s features are designed for blasting down gnarly trails - the bashguard protects the chainring, the 30 g light chain guide “Dangler“ securely guides the chain, and the Command adjustable seatpost makes stopping to lower your seat completely needless. Conclusion: To sum it up, the 7599 € worthy Stumpjumper FSR S-Works 29 is a real technical highlight. It is an enormously versatile 29er all-mountain bike. It suits a marathon as well as an Enduro race or a technically sophisticated crossing of the Alps. The well-established 26”-AM has to face some real competition in the upcoming years with wheels of this kind. Their unusually smooth riding characteristics offer serious advantages – and not only for beginners!


38

AESTHETIC I N T E N S E DESIGN & FUNCTION

CARBON

VISION QUESTION OF TIME

UNITED

S TA T E S

JEFF STEBER


AN INTERVIEW ABOUT CARBON, FUTURE, CREATIVITY, DESIGN, AND THE SUBSISTENCE OF A SMALL BIKE COMPANY - WITH JEFF STEBER. TEXT FLORIAN STORCH TRANSLATION LISA GRETEMEIER PIC INTENSE

>>  Not only martial, but at the same time elegant and therefore visually striking in appearance – the aluminum frames created by the Intense founder Jeff Steber (age 53) are legendary. But even Jeff Steber himself had to start from scratch: the former motocross rider and hang-glider welded his first frame on his terrace at home. Ever since a certain Shaun Palmer stirred up the downhill scene on one of the first real downhill bikes, the “M1”, the brand Intense has entailed quite a lot. “Intense” – that used to be the paragon of the smell of hot weld seams, racing authenticity, and a little rebellion, embodied by technically sweeping bikes like the M1. In our brief talk with Steber, the “mastermind” of Intense, he explains why he would not want to go without carbon for frames anymore, and where and how he gets inspired. Mag41: With the “Carbine” all-moun-

tain bike, Intense is presenting their first carbon bike. How do you counter the carbon skeptics, who are especially present in the gravity section? Jeff: Well, I think that there is a general and big misunderstanding when it comes to carbon. Carbon parts can actually be fixed and components are not instantly scrap. I’ve also seen extremely damaged aluminum frames. Of course one has to enlighten people about the particular material characteristics and also take precautions: for example, effective stone chip protection for the down tube. The critical aspect of carbon is located at the level of precise processing. And that’s exactly where we, as a company who does not produce carbon frames in-house, have to take a close inspection. However, if the carbon is processed adequately, the customer can profit from an extremely long-lasting material. As a matter of fact, there are three different carbon qualities on the market. There is a reason why we always, and only, go with top quality. How does a small forge like Intense cooperate with huge manufacturing giants in Asia? Does it actually work? True, that’s tough business, no doubt. I’ve been present during the entire production of the Carbine . I designed everything upfront in our prototype lab, so I was able to demonstrate to our Asian manufacturer exactly what doesn’t work. Kinematics and design are specified by my prototype. Via videoconference, regular meetings at exhibitions, and visits in Taiwan, we achieve an intensive


40

exchange of information on design and our welded aluminum gussets, speciaproducts. The carbon project remains an lized bikes like the M9 and the Slopeambitious one and will not stay limited to style, or many frames’ colors. And a fairly the Carbine… reasonable aluminum frame is usually Since the early days of the company, better suited for a downhill newcomer. Intense has represented high quality, No matter if it’s aluminum or the up-tohandmade aluminum frames, and stayed date carbon, your bikes are shaped in a reserved regarding unique look. Where does carbon for quite a “When I play the gu- it come from? while. Don’t you give I’ve always been a deitar, I end up builup your successful signer, craftsman, and image of aluminum ding one myself.” sportsman at the same frames by switching time, which is extremely to carbon productions? helpful to create new products. And when With the carbon developing, I miss being I do something, I do it the right way or I able to do some things myself. But ne- don’t do it at all. When I play the guitar vertheless, we keep on producing all the for example, I end up building one myshardware parts for the Carbine oursel- elf. The Intense look is probably related ves. Even the assembly takes place here to my motocross experience during the in California. I still have to get used to 1980s. When I gained some experience having carbon in our range of products in the beginning of the 80s with the first but it’s a technical evolution, there’s no zero suspension mountain bikes, I soon doubt about it and that’s why we stick knew, thanks to my motocross experiwith it. For a small company like In- ence, that if I build a bike, it’s going to tense, carbon bikes portray challenges have a full suspension system! This also regarding technological developments. coined the look of the bikes. Apart from But as a high-end producer you need wanting them to look cool, of course, to go with the trend, otherwise the pro- they had to function well, too. In the end, ducts do not evolve as strongly anymore I think this combination is what really deand the brand’s significance diminishes. fines the brand Intense. And I have personally seen many com- And what inspired you throughout the panies experiencing this loss in me- last 20 years? aning, and therefore we reacted towards I draw upon many resources that inspithe carbon trend. re me. I basically benefit from my good Does this mean that Intense is going to memory. I think I have an eye for the nice stop producing aluminum products? and well-created things, which I then No. Aluminum keeps playing an impor- memorize. In addition, I am interested tant role; also because it transports the in many different subjects… books, the Intense-image with characteristics like media, photography, and architecture


42

>> THE NEVERENDING DILEMMA WITH THE CASH â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ESPECIALLY SMALL BIKE COMPANIES HAVE TO FACE THE RISK OF INVESTING HIGH AMOUNTS OF MONEY << magazines, reporting on the newest technological achievements â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all this attracts and motivates me. The aesthetics of your frame designs sometimes remind us of artists. How do you picture yourself? As an engineer or as a designer? Yeah, I definitely consider myself a designer! With our U.S. in-house production, I benefit

from a great advantage: I build all the frames first myself. As soon as I put them together as a prototype, then I take the finished chassis and make a bike out of it the next day. In the beginning, I enjoy doing things myself, trying out new constructions, and going along with a new product from the first day on. This can be done nicely with aluminum. Doing as much


myself and doing it better have always been my main driving forces. No matter if it’s my own house or my bike. I consider this a blessing and a curse (laughing). This much dedication raises the question whether a customer is allowed to fall in love with one of your creations? (Confused facial expression, shrugging) Well… A thrillingly designed frame generates a certain emotional reaction in the viewer, that’s for sure. But I wouldn’t call it love. Mountain biking is not always nice. What’s been your crappiest experience? If you try out things and then they suddenly break. The other day, I tried out a handle bar, it broke, and I harshly fell to the ground. But that was OK, nothing happened. The producer didn’t mention that it was a photography prototype. What I also don’t like is the bad talk about bike companies on the internet, and the reputation that U.S. brands sometimes get on the internet. It gets quite frustrating every now and then, because you are permanently facing tremendous competition and pricing pressure. And it’s also a personal conflict: the critique can hurt occasionally. Especially when you have built the frames yourself. Two years ago, you were one of the first companies putting a downhill bike on 29”wheels. How does the DH-29er project continue? We’ve been experimenting a lot with this bike. But the time is not ripe, especially not for such a small company. The 95129er reminds me of the debut of the YZ400 motocross by Yamaha. They also had to convince all the riders at first. Exactly

the same is happening with the 29er race hard tails at the moment. Only a few years ago, they were hardly known, even though racing teams like Subaru/Fisher have already taken them successfully into action for quite some time. However, this topic gets a lot more interesting now. The riders come to appreciate the advantages, for example in the German Alps. In addition, 29er bikes support the market, for sure. The 29er platform will develop further, totally organically. Where do you picture yourself and Intense in a few years? Jeff: Well, we have a good business plan for the next five to eight years, and we will start presenting some more carbon designs in 2013 already. I could get the M9 assembled in carbon already, but I want the best downhill bike ever and that just takes its time. Therefore I take my time and apply myself to the project 100%. That’s not always easy, because you have to work really efficiently, especially as a U.S. manufacturer. For a company of our size it’s a real challenge to keep track with mountain bike companies like Specialized and Trek. This requires a lot of planning and a well-calculated investment – there is no other way of realizing bikes like the new Carbine. With our CNC milling machine-park, we do have great facilities, but of course it’s worth considering switching to carbon manufacturing to bring the carbon production to California in the long run. But this takes a lot of time and scheduling. Interposing another U.S. firm doesn’t add up – it would only lower our profit margin.


TEXT ROBIN SCHMITT TRANSLATION LISA GRETEMEIER PHOTO SEBAS ROMERO

44

APOLLO II MISSION

ON THE MOON MONDRAKER ZENITH XR


46

>>â&#x20AC;&#x2030; Since Cesar Rojo has taken over the development at Mondraker, the Spanish are basically overflowing with innovation. Their Summum DH bike is not only nailing it because of Fabien Barelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s World Cup win in Maribor, Slovenia - it is also popular due to its light weight and one of the best and most adjustable geometries ever offered among downhill bikes. The Zenith XR is based on the same principle. It offers some nice

and special features for the Enduro segment. However, changes do not always mean progress. But at least there is a possibility for progress. We tested the Zenith on home-like Spanish territory. The centerpiece of the aluminum frame is represented by its Zero suspension system. It features a dual-link system compressing the shock simultaneously on both sides. In comparison to other bikes of the same category but different brands, Mondraker recommends very high amounts of sag. Approximately 35% sag is recommended for the 170 mm rear travel, which matches 22 mm of stroke at the shock. Consequently, this feature not only affects the riding characteristics,


48


but also the way the shock needs to be adjusted. Another specialty is the ability to adjust the head angle with the aid of headset cups (from 68 degrees down to 64 degrees). A 135 x 12 mm rear axle is supposed to offer some extra stiffness. Even the first glimpse at the features lets you know that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a high-profile chassis. The Fox 36 FLOAT RC2 FIT and the DHX Air 5.0, both Kashima editions, offer best for superb suspension performance. The rest of the equipment, like the in-house brand OnOff wheels and other components, are relatively ordinary. As usual, the RockShox Reverb DRIFTING seatpost works beautiTOP, SPEEDfully, and the adjustment ING FLOP: range of the seatpost out THE TIRES of the frame is fine. The compact and centered position on the bike is the first noticeable feature, which is emphasized by the geometry data of a short top tube of 575 mm. The seating and pedaling position is, despite of the shortness of the bike, very good and allows comfortable pedaling. Nevertheless, the suspension system and the chain tend to bob. Even so, this doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really matter because the Zenith is not really designed for uphill, but rather performs great in downhill. Instead, it would be desirable to be able to lower the fork to obtain more handlebar pressure and a steeper


50


FACTS MONDRAKER ZENITH XR FRAME FORK REAR SHOCK DRIVETRAIN BRAKES SEATPOST WHEELS TIRES

ZERO SUSPENSION, 170 MM FOX FLOAT RC2 FIT KASHIMA, 170 MM FOX DHX 5.0 AIR SRAM X.0 / X.9 FORMULA RX 203 / 180 MM SATTELSTÜTZE: ROCK SHOX REVERB REMOTE ONOFF DISC DH 20 / 12 X 135 MM WTB WEIRWOLF 2.30 COMP

head angle for climbing. A little more composure in climbs would really suit the Mondraker, especially if the head angle has been adjusted a little flatter via the headset cups. After the little edgy uphill ride, we are excited to see what the downhill ride has to offer. The compact geometry is like an invitation to enter the game. The low-running top tube manages to convey a subjective feeling of se-

HEAD ANGLE SEAT ANGLE TOP TUBE CHAINSTAY WHEEL BASE WEIGHT PRICE INFO:

66° (+/- 2°) 73,5° 575 MM 440 MM 1147 MM 15 KG 4750 € WWW.MONDRAKER.COM

curity. Thanks to the slack head angle and the relatively long chainstays, the bike remains smooth even at high speed. Only the tires, with their badly supported middle knobs, cause a little vague and imprecise handling. But of course these are easily replaceable. Because of the relatively linear spring rate and the high amount of sag, we completely made use of the bottom-out adjustments of the Fox DHX Air,


52

COMPACT GEOMETRY, LOW TOP TUBE, FRISKY HANDLING

which was quite a hassle because it’s difficult to access via the frame. This is how we obtained a reasonable ending progression with outstanding bump absorption. As a minor deficit, we would mention the missing double chain guide, which should go without saying in this kind of travel option category.

Conclusion: Despite some thoughtful features, the Zenith still troubles us with a few details. The not quite bobbing-neutral riding properties are appropriate for its field of use,

but it will have to face some resentment on German trails, where efficiency is a main focus. Nevertheless the bike is definitely frisky and good fun on downhill trails. Some prototypes of the new Zeniths, Dunes and Summums – which we already had the chance to testride in Spain – show a steady development since Mondraker’s design guru Cesar Rojo entered their business. Check out some more information about Cesar and his work in the Interview on page 70.


54

GARDENER‘S

WORKOUT BERGAMONT GREENHOUSE URBAN MOUNTAINBIKE RACE

>>  Timo Pritzel, in the Swiss greenhouse, talking about dollars, thick thighs, and the fun of it all. “Rider-organized events have always been one of my favorites! After more than 15 years, these kinds of events have always been the ones with the highest fun factor. For example, the Anti Days of Thunder Norway Hafjell, Back in my Yard by Joscha Forstreuer, John Cowan Backyard Jam or the Nine Knights Event in Neukirchen – which were all mounted by riders. There is a significant difference to the big events, where everything is about money rather than the riders, with a lot of agency people not being related to the sport at all. The Greencard – Invitations are required When I got the invitation to the “Greenhouse” in Switzerland, I didn’t have to think about it twice. Plus, I was able to visit my Swiss sponsors TSG and Scott, because in Switzerland everything is pretty close and easy to reach by train. I was even able to make a trip into the mountains – as

a city-boy, I enjoy every time being in the mountains. The Teufelsberg in Berlin is not quite as nice… But back to the event. About the love for detail and a relaxed atmosphere – pumping with style, what can I say? Adrian Kiener & his crew have created a masterpiece with the Bergamont Greenhouse race! With a lot of cool gimmicks and details, the relaxed and family-like atmosphere was especially noticeable – not the dollars. Instead the live-screen broadcast and the time measuring were more than professional, maybe even better than on most events with big budgets. Without live-screens in an extra room, it wouldn’t have worked with this many people on this small space. Because space around the pump track was hard to come by. The track… miniature… but still funny and very technical! The non-locals had a lot of problems getting used to the Swiss curve techniques! The riders with wide handlebars left thick traces on the track. Go figure: the fast locals occupied the top ranks.


TEXT TIMO PRITZEL TRANSLATION MICHAELA JAMMERS PHOTO HOSHI YOSHIDA / ADRIANKIENER.CH


WATER THE PLANTS…OR RATHER DRIVERS: IN THE GREENHOUSE WE GROW GOOD DRIVING TECHNIQUES 56


58

David Graf and the event planner Adrian fought a tough battle. Thanks and respect go out to Adrian â&#x20AC;&#x201C; I know how tough it is to plan an event for weeks and race with the others, all stressed out. Hats off, for even making 2nd place! David Graf won. Even though it was a close call, it was definitely earned! Congrats! Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always nice to see how every rider has their own style, even with a track this small. This is how Sydney Gerber collected a lot of style points on this

very special track. The World Cup riders Guido Tschugg and Roger Rinderknecht were a little more relaxed. They just recovered from injuries and were noticeably relieved not to attend a big UCI-event. Thick thighs: The Gold Sprint Race Another highlight of the event was the Gold Spirit Race! Wow! What a pedal frequency. Anyone who ever tried to give absolutely everything on a bike for a minute knows how hard it is. The


guys are extremely fit. Here it was only 300 m, which had to be ridden a couple of times for the qualification, however. At midnight and with the pump track race already in their legs! But it’s never too late for records. Roger Rinderknecht topped the best time measured. Yet again, you were able to see the love for detail: two bikes, one yellow, the other green, with which the pedaling cadence was measured. On the flat-screens, you could follow which color

was leading. Standing in the front row, seeing how the guys’ heart rate popped up to 220, giving everything their thighs had to offer, was not only impressive, but it also made the crowd go crazy! To be in this kind of shape, but also to have the technique of pedaling this fast… that’s years of training right there… Well, Roger Rinderknecht is the fastest and nicest BMXer and 4xer of Europe for a reason. All in all, it was a great event with a very unique location.


60


Thanks, Gracias & Merci Many thanks to Mr. Kiener, who provided his garden and greenhouse! When he showed off his metallicgreen Peugeot from 1977, looking spick and span, sitting in his garage, I knew it: This is love for detail right here. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why it was no surprise that the event was packed. But everything was taken care of perfectly: the track, atmosphere, crowd and party. Thanks for that! No big bucks, just good times!


62


Results Bergamont Pumptrack Race 1. David Graf 2. Adrian Kiener 3. Manuel Rauch 4. Sidney Gerber 5. Beni Kistner 6. Noel Niederberger 7. Pascal Seydoux 8. Guido Tschugg 9. Timo Pritzel 10. René Wildhaber 11. Werner Muther 12. Lukas Jäger 13. Marcel Beer 14. Basil Weber 15. Roger Rinderknecht 16. Nick Beer 17. Ramon Hunziker 18. Thomas Ryser

19. Rob-J 20. Renato Rufener 21. Adrian Weiss 22. Ludo May 23. Martin Frei 24. Simon Waldburger 25. Freddy Hunziker 26. Balz Weber Results Chris King Gold Sprint 1. Roger Rinderknecht 2. Pascal Seydoux 3. Renato Rufener 4. Lukas Jäger


64

Cesar Rojo. Racer, DEVELOPER, Designer, Genius. FOTO OLGA VIDAL / ALBERT INIESTA /MAXI DICKERHOFF / SVEN MARTIN TEXT ROBIN SCHMITT TRANSLATION MICHAELA JAMMERS


66

>>  There are people that you would absolutely underestimate, if you “casually” met them on the street. Cesar is one of them. Merely the cardigan and horn-rimmed glasses might give you a glimpse of what he is all about: creativity, sense of innovation, design, art of development, intelligence, boss, Top10-World Cup results in downhill. According to all his activities, he is one of the people whose days have more than 24 hours. Mag41: Cesar, back in the days you were one of the top racers in the World Cup. By now, it has gotten quiet around you – only every now and then we get to see you race. What is keeping you occupied right now? Two years ago I founded “Cero Design,” a company specialized in engineering and product design. By now, we also cover graphic design and web programming. I am basically managing the studio and carrying out all of the developmental work for Mondraker. It’s a very broad range of tasks: starting in the morning with tons of mail, processing and supervising anything my 13 employees are working on. Web design, a couple of things for Mondraker every now and then, and later it’s time for graphic design for “Gas Gas”Motorbikes. Just to give you an example. Do you get to ride the bike at all with a tight work schedule like this? Yes, but rather in the summer, when the sun is out longer. Right now, with all this work, it’s really hard during the winter – that’s why I enjoy every single minute on my bike, whether it’s downhill or motocross. Right now I ride a lot of enduro, which simply requires less effort. Not too long ago, I was in New Zealand with Mondraker and the new World Cup team. That was cool!


Cesarâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s Palace. From top-ten World Cup rider to entrepreneur: economic crisis? No chance! There is enough work for Cesar's 13 employees.


68


The former Mondraker-World Cup team lution. It won’t give you a hundred percent, with Fabian Barel was known for its joy because the rider’s position could be puto try out new things, considering geome- shed too far up front or the bike could end try and bike setup. Who was pulling the up being too long. I definitely wanted to strings? stick with my medium frame and approach Yes, Fabien developed pretty extreme ge- the problem from a different perspective. ometries, which worked fantastically on It’s really only a small change, but it signisteep, fast and harder tracks. On leveled ficantly influences position, weight distritracks, not so much. Basically, those pro- bution, subjective feeling of security and duct developments were meant for their steering performance. We start with the own use within the racing programs. Fa- stem, or rather: the steerer clamp. So what bien and Damien’s bikes were far from we do is, we combine a medium with a larbeing mass-produced bikes. It was also ge frame. With the overstand of a medium because of their special frame, the length of a larriding style and prefe- „FOR THE DEVELOP- ge frame, and in combinarences that we were not tion with a short stem (10 MENT OF PRODUCable to implement those mm), we end up with the developments in a serial TION BIKES, FABIEN same reach and the same production. The tests for pedaling position. The BAREL WASN'T those serial developwhole front part is what’s ments, like geometry and really going to change: MUCH HELP” bike setup, were run by weight distribution, feeme. Fabien functioned more like a com- ling of security and the steering performunicator for the brand Mondraker. He mance. The longer top tube goes hand in was able to give feedback about whether hand with a longer wheelbase, which proor not something performed well, but his vides smoother running. The short stem input was not exactly helping the develop- provides a very direct steering and less rolment of the production bikes. It was a dif- lover-like feelings, since the weight, relaferent story with the new team. In New Ze- tive to the front axle, is located farther aland we had production bikes and, with back. Furthermore the suspension fork the team, searched for the right setup. In can absorb hits better, because the direcdoing so, the guys and I tested our new mi- tion of impact and the handle bar are alnimal-reach-stem. most leveled now. The inspiration for this was motorcycles. There it is common, that That would have been the next question. stems have a reach of 5 mm up to 10 mm. Can you tell us more about that? So why shouldn’t we try this with mountain Actually, this was a reaction to the World bikes? We got surprised during our first Cup riders’ wishes. They have always wan- tests. ted smoother running. This is why a lot of Usually, if you try out something new, you riders, who were actually supposed to be need a little bit of time to get used to it. on medium frames, switched to a large or The same applies to the 29er. If you need even XL-frame. Admittedly, they get the a little more time for the adjustment, it job done, but it is not at all an elegant so- usually means that you are not making


70

your wanted progress, since you don’t feel comfortable with it right away. During the series of tests with the short stems, it turned out the exact opposite. I felt comfortable right away. The same happened to downhill pro Markus Pekoll. In New Zealand, he wasn’t too sure about testing the short stem, but I basically made him, even with a frame that was technically too short for him. He wasn’t even supposed to feel good riding it. Well, he had 4 test rides with it anyway. Already on the first one he bombed down the trail like a mad man. After those test rides we switched the stem again, to see how he would handle a stem that he was used to. Halfway down he stopped and said that he felt like an amateur. That was hilarious, considering that he had been riding a 50 mm stem for years. You think he should not have had any problems. This was a shocking but at the same time eye-opening result. With the long stem, he didn’t have the same confidence in curves anymore. The bike simply didn’t feel and ride as easily anymore. This may seem to be a stupid little change, but on steep, rad trails that’s an easy 5-second bonus that I can accomplish with a short stem. I don’t think that this concept (forward geometry) will only be restricted to downhill and enduro. This definitely makes sense for lower rear travel classes. Or even for XC race bikes. But sure, you can talk about it all day, but in the end it’s important to try it yourself.

St

“WHY SH MO


teering it up.

HOULDN'T WE TRY? IT WORKED IN OTOCROSS FOR CENTURIES”


72

The

“OTHER


e total package.

RIWISE THE PERFORMANCE CAN DROP RAPIDLY”

It’s nice to see that you look at the bike as a total unit during the process of development. Are we going to see more of this system integration? Yes, basically we have to perfectly combine all components for a good riding quality. If one part fails, the whole bike is going to be messed up. That’s why it is crucial to always see the bigger picture. You should stick to the presetting, if the bike is primed specially already. When you don’t ride the proper sag or switch the rear shock, without paying attention to the internal settings, the performance can decrease rapidly. We are working at full speed on the geometries for the year 2013 because the “Forward Geometry” changes the sizing of the bikes entirely. Inherently, the riding position doesn’t change because the longer frame levels the shorter stem, but instead the whole front part and the geometry change. Over the course of the year, we are definitely going to experience something special with Summum. So: attention at the World Cup, haha. Is there going to be a Summum made of carbon? Probably next year with our enduros. We have already thought about downhill as well. In road racing, Moto GP etc.,


74

carbon isn’t working for high performance frames. That’s because of the way carbon flexes. Aluminum endorses more feeling. If we do it, we do it the right way. Producing a super stiff carbon bike would be easy. But we don’t want a stiffer bike. Stiffness is not our goal, but more control is. Basically, only vertically the chassis works perfectly. In curves a stiffer bike, which is under lateral impact, rather tends to jump. The result: less grip. A bike that’s less stiff can absorb, or rather level the impact through slight lateral flex, which equals more grip. More grip in curves allows higher speed and more control. In a nutshell: faster

times. An extremely stiff carbon bike feel The influence that the stiffness has on th can feel with the suspension fork as well switch from a Fox 40 to a Marzocchi 888 or Boxxer. The Fox exhausts you faster. Why? Fox 40 is extremely stiff, so you get more from the trail. Especially as an amateur rid exhausted faster. Therefore, it’s crucial to f right fit for the grade of stiffness. It’s defin easy as most marketing managers make y it is. More stiffness equals better quality? N ple as that.


ls horrible. he bike, you l, when you r RockShox ? Because a e feedback der you get find just the nitely not as you believe Not as sim-

Marketing. „CARBON FOR A HIGHPERFORMANCE FRAME DOESN'T WORK.”


76

# A S T O RY A B O U T W R I T I N G S T O R I E S , D E V E L O P I N G A N I D E A , A N D C R E AT I N G A M A G A Z I N E . .

PHOTO INGA BECKMANN / SEBAS ROMERO TEXT ROBIN SCHMITT TRANSLATION MICHAELA JAMMERS


MA # 001 GAZ INE MAK ING >>  Nice pictures, nice graphics and informative texts – simply put: exactly what readers of a magazine are looking for. Particularly pictures of bike tests, alpine cross or other activities are popular. But driving and taking pictures at the same time is even harder than it sounds, especially if you want to meet certain standards of quality and style with those pictures. Instead of going down the mainstream road – mandatory smiles, matching nail polish to your shoelaces – we do our own thing. The photo shoot mainly helps us with the realization of an idea and expressing emotions and a style that match the bikes, text, typography and layout. Many different components add up to a whole. The beginning of everything? An idea. Or in this case even: THE idea. The idea for a new magazine, to be exact. So, at first the thought process. As a main character, so to speak. An idea determines goals. And without goals there is no way. You can follow us on part of our journey by reading the following pages: “The production of a fictional family story – Viva la vida in BCN.” The goal is called Downtown, it’s about the beautiful faces of urban mobility and it’s for free – just like Mag41.


ST ORY IN THE MAK


The first steps of a production are primarily exhausting. A lot of organizing, logistics and planning. Models, photographers, stylists and photo assistants have to be hired. Bikes and outfits need to be shipped. For a smooth process, it’s crucial to check out the locations, especially if the shooting is going to take place in a big city’s hubbub. Attention: traffic, thieves and jaywalkers! The next challenge is not only to organize everything, but also to have everything on time and in place. A single thing can delay the whole production, especially if there are over 10 people at the set. Easy-peasy is not what I would call a photo shoot! Sleeping at night is hard – did I think about everything? During the day, while I am sweating and worrying, the phone bill abroad rises to the infinite. Do we get the administrative approval to shoot in the middle of a tourist magnet “La Boquería”? If not, what are we going to do? Alternatives?


Fre aKIN‘ CRE ATIVE

It’s ideal when you can count on the one clicking the button: the photographer. When he knows exactly what he wants, you should just let him do his thing. No “Look, let’s try it this way.” Because unnecessary backseat driving, being a smartass or Mr. Know-it-all is not going to help at all. A cool idea could get lost and it stops the creativity flow. At the end of the day, the photographer is the pro. Leave him his freedom and he will be what he wants


to be: an artist. The difference in the outcome? Enormous. Without a doubt, you can tell that someone with a lot of creativity, an eye for the extraordinary, and love for detail was at work. Plus, the pictures are one flow, made from one idea. The requirements for that way of working are extremely high: you have to be able to trust him blindly. After all, a “he’ll make it work” kind of attitude could make you go belly-up.


FIE STA EN CASA DE

After the first day a of weight fell off ever and is well attuned light of the day: a pa rived, the vibe was g The girls are there a ses. The guys spiffe about all the worrie is part of the story. It

Visit


and some impressive results, a lot ryone’s shoulders. The team knows, d, to each other. At night, the higharty at a friend’s loft. When we argreat. “Yeaaah! Awesome location!” already, wearing smoking-hot dresed up as well. Relax time, forgotten es? Not at all! Because everything t starts with wild cooking in the kit-

chen, with ingredients that look good but combined, could not at all make for a culinary taste explosion. The music is getting louder; the living room is crowded as fast as the champagne glasses need to be refilled - quickly! People dance and slowly there is room for a smile on my face. It’s on and it works. The idea became reality – despite all artificiality. Well, a fictional family story. Viva la vida in Barcelona! Thanks to everyone!

t: www.downtown-emagazine.com & www.ebike-int.de


84

R

t

ockshi I S

M Y

R E L I G I O N

>> ANDREU LACONDEGUY: There’s probably no other rider out there who is as loud, as unpredictable, and as crazy as the 23-year-old Spaniard. Balls to the wall: parties, cars and bikes. What he considers to be “ordinary”? Well, his stories always begin with alcohol, Red Bull, police, chasing, shit, or crazy.


t

TEXT ROBIN SCHMITT TRANSLATION LISA GRETEMEIER PHOTO SEBAS ROMERO


86


“Gardener’s love: the dirt. Andreu’s arms tell more stories than most novels. Not only scars but also countless tattoos. An eye-catcher: Love Dirt!”

Andreu polarizes – no doubt! Some may think he is simply crazy, but others consider him to be a rock star par excellence! Perfect son-in-law? No way. Until the day he turned 18, he actually used to be quite unsuspicious. Back then, he was hardly known in the bike scene and didn’t have a single tattoo – a strict bar on the part of his parents.

By the time he came home on the day of his 18th birthday, his entire arm was covered with tattoos. Starting on his fingers, up to the top of his shoulder. BAAAAM! His parents were horrified; Andreu, on the other hand, pretty happy. This was the beginning of a Spanish story of success with strict rules: “No rules, no limits, just fun.”


88

„I don‘t give a shit!“ The Catalan follows his own rules and sets his own limits. Nowadays he doesn’t seem to participate in contests too often anymore. Actually he is not even a member of the FMB World tour. He doesn’t give a shit on judging and started to ride more motorbikes than mountain bikes. His opinion on being a pro? Where he would consider himself between all the other riders? “Being a pro definitely eases life. Some of the pros are my best buddies, travelling around the world with them is just cool. But in the end, I do what I want!” His credo: “I ride because I feel like it and I am the only one judging how much fun I have – I don’t need judges for that!” There is a reason why Freeride is a discipline without rules, “no dumb shows” where you feel like being in a circus. “I do my own circus!” Andreu may provoke some people with his statements – but the one who can, actually can. Thanks to his status he is in the position of being able to do and say what he feels like, and actually do what ever the heck he feels like doing.


Balls to the wall, all the way & 100 %. Soon on a downhiller as well.


90

YT taking Andreu under contract was a logical consequence. “I have now found a new company that is exactly like I am – they are young, different and they want to go big! I’m stoked about it!” His statement

Love Dirt means for Andreu: of faith is eternalized on his fingers: Dirt “Love Dirt.” Is the name of his new tool “Dirt Love” a coincidence or fate? Only Andreu knows: “I am su- Love per happy with it.”


92

The highest jumps of La Poma Bikepark – like this one – are too pathetic for the young Spaniard. When we visited Andreu, his new dirt yard was just finished, but hadn’t tried the new dirt yet…


Even if he doesn’t quite know yet – this year, the Catalan will take on his downhiller more often, as he is a damn fast rider as well. With only a few special training-sessions, he could be one of the top riders at downhill races. “I’ll try to spend as

much time in the mountains as possible to build and try out some crazy downhill stunts. I am really looking forward to ride some tricky lines!” We – from the downhill-fan-perspective – say: do it! We are excited about what you have in store for us!”


“Mommy – Please prepare some food now!” A wellknown and subtle request at the parents’ home.


Mommy Dining with

Who is the better chef? Of course it’s Mommy! The fastest recipes for racers, amateurs and organic-lovers. Delicious! TEXT ROBIN SCHMITT TRANSLATION LISA GRETEMEIER PHOTO BENJAMIN HAHN

>>   T h e

ones, who want, can! Some of the two-wheelers set a perfect example. In a nutshell: there are many possibilities to tease a better performance out of your system. No matter if it’s power wristbands, energy drinks, doping or simply sex right before the night of the race. Even mental training ranks high in this regard. However, nothing is easier than listening to Mommy’s tips – or even better, to let her cook for you.


96

Back in the days, a dissolute fast food lifestyle used to be the daily routine in the downhill scene. Times have changed. Nowadays, many racers watch out for adequate nutrition as an important component of their training and racing preparations. The healthiest way to improve your performance is probably to customize your nutrition, according to your trai-

ning and sports activities. Sounds difficult and elaborate? Not at all! Relatively easy meals can cause great results. That’s why we asked our mommies, grandmas and a nutritionist for some fast and easy tips. Our little notebook got filled with food suggestions faster than we expected. And yes! In the era of organic food and “Nuclear Power? –No Thanks!”,

M

P


even downhill riders can stock up with wholefood tips without being smiled at. But the right diet requires the understanding of what the food that we eat actually is. Up next, Mommy Schmitt’s pep-talk about wholefood: “First of all, we need to look at the human being in his evolutionary context, just like any scientist or doctor would do. A noteworthy medic would be Dr. Max Otto Brunker – one of the avant-gardists in wholefood nutrition. According to him, most complaints – or rather most diseases of civilization (like diabetes, arteriosclerosis, adiposity, osteoporosis, …) – are diet-related. Well, what do diseases like osteoporosis have to do with downhill? It’s as simple as this: apart from our metabolism, our bone density also suffers extremely from inferior (non-wholefood) meals, which increase the risk of bone fractures. Why is that?

Mommy is explaining! Always listen up when

Piled-up kitchen skills are coming up!

Throughout human evolution, meaning several thousands of years, our bodies grew accustomed to ingesting fresh and natural products and adapted the metabolism accordingly. For about a century now, our metabolism tended to get off rails. Back then humans were born as vegetarians, with the ability to digest meat. Nowadays, only a small fraction of the amounts of natural vital substances and fibers, compared to earlier days, are taken in. The irritation of the metabolism is caused by groceries like refined industrial sugar, white flour, dried vegetables and additives, which the body can hardly digest. In the end, everyone has to decide for themselves if, and if so, how much organic and wholefood they would like to eat. This is just supposed to be a little cause for thought, because especially downhill riding strains the body immensely. Some amateurs should maybe consider thinking about what their joints will and what they are supposed to look like at the age of 50.”


98

Keep the frying pan moving -

says Mommy!

The following dishes only require a few tips and basics but are fairly easy to make. Also, it’s not necessary to rape Mommy’s kitchen to find appropriate kitchenware. A knife, a frying pan, and a chopping board are perfectly sufficient and are easy to take to riders’ camps at races as well. As the right nutrition is only half the rent, Mommy re-

veals some tricks how to drink smart and fast. Drinking lots of water at races is important to guarantee an optimal reduction of lactic acids in the muscles. The ones who like it a little tastier can also drink an oldfashioned apple-juice spritzer, with a pinch of salt to spice it up. A lot of sweating during sports causes an imbalance in the

body’s salt-water-balance. A lack of electrolytes (salt, minerals) diminishes performance and concentration. Therefore, you should add 1-3 gram of salt per liter. Note: use upscale salts because refined salts contain only a fractional part of the body essential mineral nutrients and trace elements. Natural sea salt is ideal.


That`s

what Mommy said! POWER

SNACK

Apart fro m Coke o r is alcohol-f ree whea otonic and t beer, the fashione oldd apple juice spr with a lit itzer tle a al bevera dded salt is an id ege for ho t and ard us days uoof t park. If y raining at the bik ou’re no e t too ner before th v ou e race alr eady, you s still have can a sip of e nergy dr Only if y ink. o u a re p hysically though, because fit accordin the Dep g artment t of Consu o Protectio m er n the com bo of spo energy d r t& rink arrhythm s can cause cardia ia. c

DRINK,

DRINK

LITTLE

...

Gorp (‘go od nuts’) is old raisins and p eaa raisins a n ideal snack. Th nd energy, p peanuts are ric e h in rov carbohyd ide easily digest ible ra of import tes and contain ant ingre lots dients lik gnesium e ma, seleniu m( wound h e a l i n g ) encourages , manga (strong b ne ones), foli c acid, an s e (oxygen d iro su s n a ck ! A p p l y ) . T h e p e r n f lm ect productiv onds are espec ially e to coun te tic acids that arise ract the lacdue to sp orts.

KIDDO!


WALNUTS Very rich in energy and 100 vitamins, exceptional source for omega-3 fatty acids. AMARANTH The grain of the NASA: good for cooking and muscle relaxation. Constant, long-lasting energy supply.

OAT Contains many essential amino and fatty acids, also rich in iron and vitamins. PINE NUTS Encourages metabolism and blood formation. Rich in minerals and trace elements.

MANGO Increases vision, good for immune system. Also boosts the production of sexual hormones.

PINEAPPLE All-rounder: alkaline effect against over-acidification, anticonvulsive; muscle formation; serotonin is a mental strengthener.

GINGER Clears respiratory passages, increases muscle contractility. KIWI Vitamin C shot, stimulates metabolism, increases performance abilities. Kiwis are ripe if they yield on pressure.

BANANA Easily digestible, rich in complex carbohydrates for long-lasting energy. APPLE Rich in easily digestible STRAWBERRY and complex carbohyORANGE Lots of manganese drates, vitamin C, encouLots of vitamins, lots strengthens bones, iron for rages healthy digestion. of dietary fibers. Note: contains acids. blood formation, vitamin C.

Beverages like Coca Cola are great before the start of a race. The high proportion of shortchain carbohydrates last for such short loadings and are transferred quickly into the blood. The caffeine increases

concentration and alertness. However, it is advised to try this out during training beforehand. In general, the beverages should not be too cool. A proper breakfast is essential for downhillers with days full of

training. A substantial and rich muesli provides constant supply of carbohydrates and serves the body with lots of essential nutrients, thanks to healthy ingredients: functional food is our keyword!


Breakfast H

â&#x20AC;Ś S T N E I D E R G ERE THE IN

Basics: aranth, banam a , s e k a fl t a Wholegrain o na, apple h: eMix and matc o, mellow pin g n a m , e g n ra Nuts, kiwi, o s, figs (increie rr e b w a tr s t, apple, aprico xcess n, high base e o ti a tr n e c n o urc ases cidification), c ra ve o e m o rc ilhelps to ove s, ginger, van in is ra , s ie rr e rants, raspb la, lemon

Preparation: The choice of ingredients is relatively variable and should alter depending on the season. Oat flakes, preferably in combination with amaranth, make up the main ingredients. If possible, this should be soaked in water the night before, so the grain doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t swell inside the stomach. Along with this, apples should be grated (with a rasp) and 1-2 bananas should be squashed (works fine with a fork). Additional fruits, nuts and vanilla can be added as desired. Dairy products, like yoghurt or cream or simply freshly squeezed lemon juice mixed with water, are suitable thickening agents. The ones who tend to acquire sinus congestions should go for the latter.


102

RIGHT AFTER ARBO… it’s FAST C of a stomach, aving too full

To avoid h ry now and ve e s k c a n s e om ts and better to eat s is gorp, as nu is th r fo l a e , easily then. Id ly energy-rich e m e tr x e re a ach raisins ng in the stom vi a s e c a p s , le , you digestib us. In addition o rr fe ll a f o t s and mo lkaline effect a e th f o e g ta n can take adva ation. Furtheric if id c ra ve o of almonds on endable due m m o c re re a s promore, banana bility and high ti s e ig d y s a e to their ohydrates. portion of carb

Practice

Right after practice, all the spent nutrients need to be reinstalled and especially the carbohydrate reservoir needs to be refilled. Apart from the intake of fluids, it is advisable to eat something small containing carbohydrates that can be quickly transferred to the glycogen storage of the muscles. Here, groceries that are rich in carbohydrates and with a high level of glycemic load, are recommendable. Our delicious date-marzipan-honey creation provides more power than Popeye’s spinach. The preparation is effortless. Cut the date, take out the pit. Fill in the marzipan, a little honey on top or all around. Done.


DINNER

for One

Preparation: For dinner, a meal rich in carbohydrates is recommendable. But never forget: always within limits! Potatoes, champignons, chives, whole eggs (high value of proteins: 65:35) and salmon are the ingredients. First of all, cut the potatoes in 0.5 cm slices and fry them in oil for about 20 minutes (over a moderate to low heat), flavor with salt and pepper. Add the mushrooms after about 15 minutes and let it simmer until the water evaporates from the mushrooms. Again, flavor with salt and pepper. Work in the parsley & rosemary and arrange together with the potatoes. Afterwards, fry two eggs. Dress them together with the untreated salmon (due to its nutrients) and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all done!

HERE ARE TH INGREDIENT E Sâ&#x20AC;Ś Fresh salmon

4 large potato es, unpeeled, cut in 0.5 cm slices 2 hands full o f wild mushrooms (e .g. yellow bole tuses and red pine mushrooms) Olive oil Parsley Rosemary


The new Downtown magazine â&#x20AC;&#x201C; same vision. Same aesthetic. Same form topic: urban mobility & culture at its finest. And on top of all, for free. S in English and ready to download on: www.downtown-emagazine.com


mat. Different Soon available m

Š www.fabianrapp.com


106

COM

>>  The contrast couldn’t have been more drastic: from sunkissed Barcelona to seemingly Siberian Andorra. By the way: not the smartest idea to go there without suitable equipment & clothes. Visiting the Andorra-based bike maker Commencal was definitely worth it. This is where we tested their Meta AM 29 for the first time, which is known for its symbiosis of two mega trends of 2012: Enduro and 29ers.


MMENCAL ABOUT THE FUTURE, TWENTY-NINERS & RACING

TEXT ROBIN SCHMITT TRANSLATION LISA GRETEMEIER PHOTO SAMUEL DECOUT


108

Prototype: Das Commencal Meta AM 29. Everyone is talking about 29ers – apart from Enduro, this is probably the greatest trend of the biking industry. Many hate it, some love it – but few haters have actually tried riding them. The conquest of the rather downhill-heavy bikes by 29ers cannot be overlooked. Without wanting to philosophize about (unneeded) categories and their distinctions, it soon becomes obvious that for Enduro racing the larger

tires can be rather handy. The advantages are obvious: a gain in grip thanks to enhanced soil contact and a plus in smoothness. This is particularly noticeable in high-speed sections and chunky terrain. The wheels get stuck in potholes less often, they are better at overcoming snags, and take the fear off stairs and terraces – 130 mm of rear travel is totally sufficient for this. Generally, it is a lot easier to stick to your racing line. Especially at Enduro races, where you hardly ever know the trails,

you’r ger w lated top t curit ensu more Rega to me dition but n


re definitely better equipped with the larwheels. Even though there is a design-red change in the seating position, the low tube provides a subjective feeling of sety. Additionally, the enhanced soil contact ures a better braking performance and e grip in turns. ardless of the euphoria, we definitely have ention the drawbacks of the 29ers: the adnal weight of the tires is in fact a problem, not as bad as it is regarding XC bikes. The

often-criticized flex of the wheels actually offers some advantages. Direct contact with the ground ensures great absorption and a balancing of lateral bumps. Therefore additional grip is provided and the wheels are prevented from bouncing and drifting. A definite drawback: a restricted choice of components, especially tires. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find some detailed info about the prototype that we tested in Andorra on the following pages!


110

EVERLASTING CRITICISM: Unfortunately the missing stiffness is being mentioned a little too often. In reality, moderately softer wheels offer more grip & comfort – especially in turns – and also, most riders will never take their wheels to their ultimate limits.

DIFFERENCE: The 29er’s spring rate has ratio at the beginning, with the result tha system is less sensitive but more efficien ger wheels provide more comfort & gr 26’’-wheels, so that it needs less sensitivity


a lower leverage at the suspension nt. Why? The larrip than ordinary y.

FRONT SECTION: The expensive FOX 32 FLOAT 29 with Kashima coating is supposed to offer ideal grip at the front. The frame also offers the possibility of installing an angleset to adjust the geometry according to the trails and riding conditions. Perfect for racers wanting to compete in an Enduro race with large wheels.

LOVE FOR DETAIL: The interiorcable routing, including the rubber shells, offers a clean look. Even the cable for the retractable telescope seatpost disappears in the top tube. The coordination, in terms of decals, gives the bike a consistent & stylish look.


112

IN ANDORRA, WE DID NOT ONLY GET THE CHANCE TO TEST THE NEW COMMENCAL META AM 29 BUT WE ALSO GOT THE CHANCE TO TALK WITH THE MARKETING MANAGER AURÉLIEN AND THE DEVELOPER NICO ABOUT THE ATHERONS, CURRENT TRENDS, AS WELL AS THEIR FUTURE PROSPECTS.

Over the past years Commencal always had a top-level World Cup team. This year, the Athertons moved on to GT, so Commencal’s presence among the top teams in downhill seems diminished. How come? With Myriam Nicole and Thibaut Ruffin (Team Commencal Riding Addiction) we still have some really good World Cup riders. We definitely arrived at a point where we had to decide whether we should invest a lot of money into a single top downhill rider or into Enduro. As you can see, we preferred the latter choice: Enduro. With less presence in the men’s category now we have the opportunity to stand back a little bit next season and to see the downhill World Cup scene from a different point of view. Another factor is that now we have more money for our core business; that means that we are trying to give better support to our dealers and clients. Before putting money into sports marketing you should invest money into the sector where the sales have to be done. In a few words: dealers

are more important than your riders, because this is where you make your sales volume. We are a small brand so we have to think well where to focus on. This time downhill didn’t get the premier position in our planning. What are your future plans for DH? I don’t want to use the term transition, but this year our focus is moving to Enduro racing. And another point is: to find something to replace the Athertons isn’t easy, but for 2013 we want to be back in the downhill World Cup circuit with a team capable of consistent top-3 results. You mentioned more focus on Enduro. What does that mean? I think Commencal has been among the pioneers of Enduro racers in the past. We will be among the first brands to have a top-level Enduro team. For that reason our plans are to build up a bigger Enduro racing team. Right now we do ’only’ have Remy Absalon. He is probably the best enduro racer in the world, so we increased the length of his contract until 2014.


In the past Enduro racers came from other disciplines like downhill or cross country. This way of becoming an Enduro racer is changing right now: there will be racers that will start their career directly with Enduro. We like the idea of a long-term relationship with young riders that grow with us in this discipline. Our new rider for this year is one of this new generation: Nicolas Queré, a French young rider. We think that with Remy’s experience he will make some waves! What do you think about the upcoming Enduro World Cup? It’s definitely great progress for the sport. Most of the bikers are Enduro riders. It is evident that likewise there are a lot more Enduro racers than downhill racers. If you go to the Mega Avalanche, for example, there are like 2000 starters. The World Cup is really good for the discipline’s recognition and will give it a great push. You are about to introduce the Meta Am 29er; will your Enduro team ride this bike at some races?

Yes! They will have the full range of Metas (SL & AM 29er will be new for 2012), so depending on the profile of the racetrack they can choose the best-suited one. In XC there are a lot of people racing with 29ers. What are the benefits of the big wheels for Enduro riders in your eyes? Well, the benefits are especially the gain of grip and the feel of security and stability that the big wheels will provide. It is much easier to keep your line. The big wheels almost erase many obstacles and get less stuck in holes or big steps. On several tracks they will be faster. But for sure there are still some weaknesses. The weight of the wheels & tires is a problem, but not that big like in XC. The smaller range of parts makes it difficult to get the perfect components for the given conditions of a race track. Beside the development of the 29ers there is a new trend: 650B. What about Commencal? To be honest, it is too early to make a concrete statement. Most Europeans have realized


114

that 29ers have some great advantages. 650B is a good compromise of the advantages and disadvantages of both the big wheels and the normal 26 inch wheels. Having less inertia on the wheels with the 650B could work really well. On the other hand, it can confuse some customers because they would have to choose between three different wheel sizes and different ranges of products & components. Will we see 29ers with even more travel? In America we’ve seen some DH bike prototypes with 29 inch wheels. If you consider the steep and gnarly World Cup downhill tracks with lots of high speed sections, the big wheels could be interesting for the downhill sector. Is that an option for Commencal? Right now, no. The problem is that there are hardly specific components for the downhill segment. The problem is the weight. To give you an example: we received prototypes of 29 inch downhill tires that weigh around 1.5kg. That’s pretty heavy. Due to the technical weaknesses,

we don’t see it as the future of downhill World Cup bikes. Roughly said, we see the 29ers for XC. The 650B can have a great future and may be used even up to DH bikes. But that’s something we have to test extensively. Soon we will receive some specific parts for testing. The previous Meta was also available in carbon – are you working on that for the new Meta models? Right now it is not in our top priorities. Why? It’s quite complicated to manage the carbon bike production in Taiwan. It is a technology we need to spend more time on to achieve a highlevel performance. Instead of having a product range being widely spread out in many different technologies, our aim is to have a smaller range with a reliable technology that works 100%. Furthermore from our experience we are not really comfortable with the working conditions in carbon manufacturers.


» For 2013 we want to be back in the downhill World Cup circuit with a team capable of consistent top-3 results «

» This year our focus is Enduro racing « » The problem is the weight we don’t see it as the future « » Carbon is no option for us right now. Our aim is to have a smaller range with a reliable technology that works 100%. «


116

Usually I am not the type of traveler who likes to come back to the same place over and over again. I love diversity and new inspiration. But when I came to Cape Town for the first time nine years ago, I knew I would have to come back again. It was my first big journey back then in 2003. I did not know what to expect - I just wanted to escape the winter and find some riding in South Africa. I had a friend in Cape Town who

invited me to spend my winter in the South African summer from December to March. Besides the world class surf spots, ice cold water with massive white sharks, and the famous Table Mountain, I did not know much about this place. But Cape Town is a hot spot for all kind of athletes. From road cyclists to climbers, surfers, kite- and windsurfers, runners, freestyle jet-skiers and MTB Racers - itâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s the top location for all those sports.


TEXT ROB J HERNAN OTO CRAIG KOLESKY


118

So my mind was wide open, and luckily that made me run into some great people I can call friends even after all these years. One of them is Craig Kolesky. I met him on my first trip and he was an upcoming surf- and actionsports-photographer with very basic equipment but massive motivation to shoot. We took some great shots, even though he had never shot MTB before. But his pictures of me helped me to get my first real sponsorship nine years ago. Since then I have been able to make a living riding bicycles, and Craig

progressed fast forward as a professiona well. When I returned back last year, I h not much had changed over the years. I back,â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatssup bru!â&#x20AC;&#x153; lifestyle and youn from all over the world. Good parties, g forward-pushing drive that people have of now. You can see this, for example, b biking evolved in the last few years here. good and strong riders now that this cou a problem with young upcoming athletes


al photographer as had the feeling that It still has this laid ng fashion-models great food and this e to make the most by how mountainThere are so many untry does not have s in the World Cup.

If you think they ride old shitty bikes in Africa, you are wrong. The scene is obsessed by the best-performing products on the market. In terms of trail bikes and 29ers they are even a few steps ahead of the Europeans. When they buy a new bike today, it‘s without a doubt a 29er fully while here the people are still a bit shy. The world famous Cape Epic has of course a massive influence on the South African MTB scene. So many people are riding bikes today – it‘s amazing. A lot of them were only doing watersports before, but now they find riding bikes is a perfect alternative to no wind or no wave days.


120

Places like Tokai forest with super fun XC trails and DH sections are packed on weekends and late afternoons. No lifts, just your legs and your desire take you back on top of the mountain for the next run. The DH guys meet for shuttledays in Paarl or on a private farm in Yonkershoek. Paarl offers a DH race track and some easy flow freeride style single tracks. The Cape region offers also many spots for dirt jumping. Even the Cape Town university has its own dirt line on their campus. The last time I went for a week trip down the garden route. It‘s the classic tourist trip, so the road is always busy. On the way you find some smaller game parks with the „Big 5“ animals (it‘s definitelly worth a stop!) and some

other activities. The city of George is o mountainbike destinations as well. Kny a „must see“ – a lovely little green city a stunning landscape. A few hours north from Cape Town are mountains,the only spot where they get a ng their winter. In summer it‘s normaly 1 than in the city. Temperatures up to 50+ d so unusual. Riding under these condition everyone‘s style. It may be a little too ho it‘s still worth a trip. I found some great l gle jumps and rides in a cave. There are loops worth a ride in this rough, dry terra


one of the main ysna is definitely at the sea with a

e the Cederburg a bit of snow duri10 degrees hotter degrees C are not ns is of course not ot for me too, but locations for sinsome great MTB ain.

» If you think they ride old shitty bikes in Africa, you are wrong. The scene is obsessed by the best-performing products on the market. «


122

Back around Cape Town, one of the most beautiful places to ride is Stellenbosh. It has some really good XC trails and an amazing playground called G-Spot with perfectly built berms and nice

jumps. Be there for sunset and you can see in deep orange-red light how the sun sets behind Table Mountain. Drink a cool bottle of Savanna Cider and enjoy the good life you are living.


124

And yes, it is Africa and you do see the big difference between the poor and rich people at every corner. Life is rough for the people who must live in the massive townships while we are so lucky that we can afford such luxury toys like bikes. Maybe this is also a reason why I need to come back over and over again. Sometimes I feel I need to spend some time in Africa again when life

is going upside down here in Europe. All I need is climb Table Mountain or spend a few hours on my surfboard and South Africa reminds me how good our life is and that we have really no reason to complain about anything. It takes me back on the right path and makes me focus on the things that are really important. Reason enough to come back year after year.


» It takes me back on the right path and makes me focus on the things that are really important. Reason enough to come back year after year. «


126

,

Let s rea to r

Mag41 becomes


s get ady race

s team germany


128

Our downhill racing team is getting ready to race - the of the new stuff have arrived already! See a full team pre issue! Till then: Watch out on the race tracks! Team Germ


new bikes and some esentation in the next many is coming!

BENNY STRASSER The reigning German champion has only one goal this year guess what? Yup. But nevertheless he enjoys every second on his new Demo!

NOAH GROSSMAN Some could call him a hard competitor, but we call him a team mate: Noah is German viceChampion! FERDINAND BRUNOLD „Look at the tiiiiime!“ is probably one of the most used sentences in downhill. But for that young gun it‘s true: German vice-juniorchampion. ROBIN SCHMITT While last year he was racing EDC & WC this season he might only have time for a few races. Why? Managing the team and doing 2 magazines is a lot of work!


COOPERATION PARTNERS MAG41 130

02

SPECIAL THANKS TO: BASTIAN DIETZ

03

04

05

06

07

08


08

WANT TO BECOME A COOPERATION PARTNER? MAIL US: COOPERATION@MAG41.COM

09

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21


IMPRESSUM ISSUE #002

DONATE

MAG41 IS FOR FREE, BUT IF YOU LIKE THE ISSUE FEEL FREE TO SUPPORT US.

SIGN UP

AND NEVER MISS THE LATEST ISSUE.

JOIN US

ON FACEBOOK.


Editorial Department Mag 41 www.mag41.com E-Mail: Info@mag41.com

Advertising: Max-Philip Schmitt mpschmitt@mag41.de

Publisher: 41 Publishing & Marketing UG Hummelbergweg 12 71229 Leonberg

Social Media: Maurice von Kahlden, Manfred Schmitt

Directors: Max-Philip Schmitt, Robin Schmitt Editors: Robin Schmitt, Florian Storch, ROB J Hernan, Timo Pritzel, Patrick Sauter, Daniel Häberle Design: Christian Lämmle (AD), Johannes Decker Photo: Sebas Romero, Daniel Geiger, Carlos Blanchard, Sven Martin, Christoph Laue, Hoshi Yoshida, Viktor Strasse, Craig Kolesky, Maxi Dickerhoff, drakeimages.de, Inga Beckmann, Samuel Decout, Albert Iniesta, Olga Vidal

Revision: John Morse Website: Daniel Adams ( bowstreet.de ) Special thanks to: Johann Flickinger, Sebas Romero, Daniel Geiger, Javi Echevarria Ruiz, Basti Dietz & alle anderen Supporter © 2012 by Mag41 Publishing & Marketing UG. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. No part of this document or the related files may be reproduced or transmitted in any form, by any means (electronic, photocopying, recording, or otherwise) without the prior written permission of the publisher.

Profile for 41 Publishing & Marketing UG

Mag41 Issue #2 International  

Mag41 is a free digital mountainbike magazine, published in English and German. Download the issues at: www.mag41.com/issues

Mag41 Issue #2 International  

Mag41 is a free digital mountainbike magazine, published in English and German. Download the issues at: www.mag41.com/issues

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded